T2.

21 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

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Assessing the potential for geological carbon sequestration in the UK
The United Kingdom could significantly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions while continuing to use fossil fuels by removing carbon dioxide from power plants and storing the carbon in geological structures, including disused oil and gas fields, deep below the ground or sea floor. This form of carbon sequestration could act as a bridging strategy while longer-term solutions are further developed, such as renewable energy technologies. However, questions remain about the costs, safety, legality, environmental impacts, long-term effectiveness and public acceptability of such an approach. Dr Simon Shackley and Clair Gough, from Tyndall Centre North at UMIST, are working with geologists, lawyers, engineers and environmental scientists to explore these uncertainties from a range of perspectives. The research team will focus on two case studies investigating: 1) the capture of carbon dioxide from point sources across the midlands and eastern England with subsequent storage at sites below the Southern North Sea; and 2) from sources in NW England to storage in reservoirs at sites below the east Irish Sea. For each case study they will identify potential storage sites, taking account of storage capacity and safety. They will use a model combining economic and engineering aspects to calculate costs and sensitivity to changes in characteristics of the power plant, pipelines and other infrastructure. They will also examine the implications of environmental regulations and review the impacts on the marine environment. A series of citizen panels in different parts of the UK will assess public perceptions and planning issues. The team will then extrapolate the results of the case-studies up to the national scale and examine decision-making processes to understand the key barriers and opportunities associated with carbon capture and storage. The results will provide a comprehensive evaluation of carbon storage options in the UK and contribute to decisions on the potential for geological carbon sequestration within the UK response to climate change over the next five to 10 years.

Carbon dioxide has been removed as gas is produced from a field off the Norwegian coast since 1996, storing a million tonnes of carbon dioxide each year in a saline aquifer. A Tyndall project is evaluating options for using the process in the UK to store carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Credit: © Øyvind Hagen, Statoil More information Contact the lead investigator of Project T2.21 (An integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration in the UK): Ms Clair Gough Manchester School of Management UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Phone: +44 (0) 161 200 3447; Fax: +44 (0) 161 200 3505 Email: clair.gough@manchester.ac.uk Other researchers involved in this project are: Dr Simon Shackley, Dr Jiri Klemes and Dr Bo Li, UMIST Professor Robert Harrison and Mr Tim Cockerill, School of Sciences, University of Sunderland Dr Sam Holloway, British Geological Survey Dr Martin Angel, Southampton Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton Professor Richard Macrory and Mr Ray Purdy, Faculty of Laws, University College London Project duration: September 2002 to August 2005 Useful web sites: The Tyndall Centre: www.tyndall.ac.uk UMIST's Manchester School of Management: www.manchester.ac.uk/management/research/researchtechman.htm International Energy Agency report Putting Carbon Back in the Ground: www.ieagreen.org.uk/capstorg.htm US Department of Energy carbon sequestration: cdiac.esd.ornl.gov CO2 Capture Project: www.co2captureproject.org

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T2.21 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

MIT Carbon Sequestration Initiative: sequestration.mit.edu Tyndall online discussion on geological carbon sequestration: www.tyndall.ac.uk/forum/messages/archive/sequestration.html

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