T2.

24 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

About Us : People : Research : Publications : Events : News : Opportunities : Contact : Intranet : Search

Ensuring new and renewable energy can meet electricity demand
Mitigation of climate change will require new and renewable energy technologies to supply a greater proportion of the UK's energy than current targets. However, many of these energy technologies, such as wind, wave or photovoltaics, are intermittent. Meeting variable energy demand with uncertain supply will be a major challenge for sustainable electricity systems. New energy supply technologies will therefore need to be accompanied by flexibility or by demand management and increases in energy storage. Professor Goran Strbac, from UMIST's Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, and colleagues are analysing the reliability of supply from various mixes of technologies including wind and wave energy, combined heat and power systems, distributed generation, fossil fuel systems incorporating carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. They will calculate costs of maintaining reliability of supply using computer models of the UK electricity system under different development scenarios. They will investigate the use of energy storage and conventional power plants as a backup to balance supply and demand from season to season. They will also investigate ways of managing electricity loads to match supply on a daily and even minute-by-minute basis. For example, appliances may need to be more flexible by incorporating in-built storage systems or timers that switch on and off to neutralise the variability in supply. They will also investigate different regulatory and financial incentives that encourage innovation in sustainable energy systems to maintain reliability of supply from sustainable systems. The results will enable regulators and policy-makers to consider cost, capacity and sustainability in planning decarbonised electricity systems that minimise environmental impacts and carbon emissions. They will also provide operators and manufacturers in the energy industry with tools that incorporate renewables when seeking to balance supply and demand.

A new Tyndall project is looking into different mixes of energy generators, energy storage and flexibility of demand to ensure a reliable supply of energy from a sustainable electricity system. More information Contact the lead investigator of Project T2.24 (Security of decarbonised electricity systems): Professor Goran Strbac Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD, UK Phone: +44 (0) 161 200 4803; Fax: +44 (0) 161 200 4820 Email: g.strbac@manchester.ac.uk Other researchers involved in this project are: Dr Catherine Mitchell, Warwick Business School, University of Warwick Dr Jim Watson, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex Project duration: October 2002 to September 2004 Useful web sites: The Tyndall Centre: www.tyndall.ac.uk UMIST's Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics: www.ee.manchester.ac.uk The value of intermittent renewable sources in NETA: www.tyndall.ac.uk/publications/briefing_notes/note02.shtml

1 of 2

15/9/05 9:49 am

T2.24 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

Renewable energy and CHP resources in the UK: www.tyndall.ac.uk/publications/working_papers/wp22.pdf The Renewables Obligation: can it deliver? www.tyndall.ac.uk/publications/briefing_notes/note04.shtml

2 of 2

15/9/05 9:49 am