SMOKY MOUNTAI N

Free Press
NOV • DEC 2010 VOLUME 8
F
P
FORMERLY THE TRI STATE SHOPPERS GUI DE
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W
hen you picked up this magazine, you
might have said to yourself “Oh Great!
Another free publication littering the
counters of restaurants and convenience
stores, and decorating the streets with those horrendous
plastic boxes.” Nonetheless, you did in fact pick it up, and
we’re glad you did. Te Free Press is an editorial publica-
tion reincarnated from the Tri State Shoppers Guide. Te
diference in this magazine however, is that it aims to be
the frst truly regional magazine for the Smoky Mountains.
Right now the Free Press is distributed in Western North
Carolina, East Tennessee, and North Georgia, and we are
expanding further every day.
Tis magazine was created with one goal in mind - to
provide the latest in news, art, music, and culture to the
people of the Smoky Mountains. While some magazines
have attempted to create a regional connection they fail to
do just that - connect. Te Smoky Mountain Free Press
connects with the region in a diferent way. Between our
printed publication, website, various social networks, and
podcasts we want to foster an environment for businesses
to connect with their customers, and most of all for people
to connect with each other. As a region the Smoky Moun-
tains are comprised of a lot of small towns, and for the
most part - those small towns fail to be represented in regional
newspapers and magazines. As the Free Press continues to grow
you will see an expansion of pages with content dedicated to
each county we serve. In this way - people from all across the
region will be able to make a connection with one another. We
all experience the same things from day to day and through this
magazine we might be able to learn something new from the
other towns and people in our region.
We are excited to watch this magazine evolve into the very
frst regional public media outlet. Tis magazine will always be
free and it will always provide the content that you want to read,
but we can’t do it alone. We need your help - we need to know
what you want to read and we need to hear what’s on your mind.
Te only way for this magazine to connect with humans is if we
publish what they want to see. So if you’re reading this and you
feel compelled to sound of - give us a call, write us a letter, send
a carrier pigeon if you have to - we just want to know what’s on
the mind of our readers. We want to see your art, hear your mu-
sic, and get to know your unique talents, because if it’s interest-
ing to you - then I can guarantee it will be of interest to us.
Sincerely,
Bryan Hughes, and the Free Press Staf
[Introductions]
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4 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 CONTENTS
Publisher / Editor: Bryan Hughes
bryan@mountainfreepress.com
STAFF WRITERS
Ronda Birtha - ronda@mountainfreepress.com
Ellen Schofeld - keschofeld@gmail.com
F
P
STAFF
W H O W E A R E
PHOTOGRAPHY
Ronda Birtha - ronda@mountainfreepress.com
COLUMNISTS
Paul Schofeld - ION The Sky
Mike Miracle - Words on Notes
Lenora Hughes - Healthwise
ADVERTISING
Advertising Manager - Josh Hughes
josh@mountainfreepress.com
EDITORIAL
Sales Reps
Faith Snipes
Lenora Hughes
Robin Graves
CONTRIBUTORS
Michael Elrod - Movie Reviews
[Contents]
The Smoky Mountain Free Press is distributed on the
frst Wednesday of each month in Western NC, North
GA, and East TN. The Smoky Mountain Free Press is
available for free and is limited to one copy per reader.
Additional copies may be purchased at 50 cents per
copy. Under North Carolina law it is unlawful to insert
anything into this publication without permission from
the publisher.
The opinions expressed herein are those of each
individual author/advertiser and do not necessarily
refect the opinions or views of the Smoky Mountain
Free Press.
All content in this publication is published under the
Creative Commons Attribution. Reproduction of content
is permissable as long as it remains in tact, and gives
full credit to the original author.
The advertisements contained herein are published
as designed and submitted by the advertisers, or as
designed by the publishing company with the authoriza-
tion of the advertiser.
The Smoky Mountain Free Press is a publication of 446
Media. Copyright 2010. Some Rights Reserved.
MountainFreePress.com
Smoky Mountain Free Press
37 N. Church Street.
Murphy, NC 28906
Phone: 828.407.0931
info@mountainfreepress.com
Letters, News Tips, Articles, Photos,
Essays and all other inquiries should be
emailed to:
L E G A L
C O N T A C T
Please Recycle This Magazine After Reading
I N T H I S I S S U E
N o v e m b e r - D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0
A Burgeoning Art Scene
The Great Smoky Mountains have become
a staple for Arts in the Southeast. See what
Cherokee County is doing to promote the
arts within the community.
Page 15
ON THE COVER
INSIDE
6 Mountain Work: -- Documentary flm production is under way.
8 All in a Day’s Outing -- Te Unicoi Turnpike Trail.
10 Recreation -- Have you hugged an Alpaca Lately?
14 Writing a book? -- Learn how to self edit your work.
16 Opinion -- A look at Rurban Development Teories.
12 Healthwise -- Is diabetes medicine more dangerous than the disease?
20 ION the Sky -- See two galaxies with the unaided eye.
22 Words on Notes -- Te Kings of Leon’s Album:
Come Around Sundown is reviewed by Mike Miracle of WACF 95.1.
COLUMNS
FEATURES
19 PUZZLED? - Tis months crossword and Sudoku
23 CONCERT CALENDAR
24 - 25 THE AGENDA
26 - 29 DINING GUIDE
30 THE MARKET - Te Classifeds
31 MOUNTAIN HOME SERVICES
What’s for Dinner?
Be sure and check out our extensive Dining Guide
What do you think of the Smoky Mountain Free Press?
Although we’ve been in print for 8 years as the Tri State Shoppers Guide, We’d love
to hear your thoughts on the new format. Send all correspondence to
info@mountainfreepress.com.
12 Healthwise -- Is diabetes medicine more dangerous than the disease?
20 ION the Sky -- See two galaxies with the unaided eye.
22 Words on Notes -- Te Kings of Leon’s Album:
Come Around Sundown is reviewed by Mike Miracle of WACF 95.1.
6 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 FILMMAKING
W
as it the very nature of traditional mountain work that ingrained people with strong work ethics and a sense of responsibil-
ity to family and community? Is there a connection between the type of work that is currently disappearing from the local
landscape and the disappearing of the values that were once so highly esteemed? Has the nature of the new economies re-
shaped and redefned what people consider valuable? Te North Carolina Humanities Council awarded Tri-County Com-
munity College, in Murphy, NC, with a $7000 grant to produce the documentary, Mountain Work: A Social Commentary that will address
these questions.
TCCC receives $7,000 humanities grant to produce flm
The Newly Planted Vineyard at Eagle Fork
Mountain Work: A Social Commentary
Billy Ray Palmer, instructor of social sciences, and
Terrie Kelly, author of the grant, invited me to assist
with the project development because of my techni-
cal background and interest in the humanities and
folklife. After a few meetings, we developed the theme
and hammered out an initial storyboard. Before long,
the social relevance of this
project became apparent
– as well as its potential to
become epic. We agreed to
manage our expectations,
knowing that this docu-
mentary would not be a
comprehensive cataloguing
of every aspect of work, nor
an exhaustive tribute to the lives of all of the meaning-
ful people in Cherokee, Graham and Clay counties. In
fact, we even acknowledged that obtaining the answers
to the above questions, though signifcant and engag-
ing, may not be the all-important outcome of this
project. Why is that? Let’s consider the broad strokes
of how this documentary is getting done.
Mr. Palmer enlists his archaeology students to
research how the fve main types of work (namely,
subsistence farming, timber and logging industry, the
railroad industry, manufacturing, and tourism) have
impacted and afected the social and economic struc-
ture of this part of Appalachia.
Te students’ research leads them to interview
people associated with the type of work, or who have
been afected by the growth and decline of diferent
industries.
An Advisory Council, organized by Mr. Palmer
and Mrs. Kelly with the expressed intent to involve
the community in the project’s development, works
with the students to identify additional resources and
people to interview.
Te interaction between students, the advisory
council, and the people in the communities, fosters
conversations among the diferent ethnic groups and
between estranged generations that may be dependent
on each other’s collective eforts to restore social values
that were once so highly esteemed.
In keeping with the North Carolina Humanities
Council’s vision, the Mountain Work project, “envi-
sions people who explore their personal and collective
stories asking fundamental questions about identity,
work, and culture; learning to value others’ stories and
perspectives; and transforming their lives and commu-
nities through new refections and new visions.”
Te Mountain Work project, a project about this
area, by people from this area, can ultimately be seen
as a community efort. Te success of it will not be
defned by arriving at academic answers to complex
social issues. Te success of this project will be experi-
enced in the process of creating it.
[Filmmaking]
Purel Miller is interviewed at old Tannery location in Andrews North Carolina
Harold Jenkins talks about the rise and fall
of tobacco farming
Jill Parrish, left, interviews Mayor Bill
Hughes
“... learning to
value others’
stories and
perspectives...”
Words and Photos by:
Ronda Birtha
TCCC receives $7,000 humanities grant to produce flm
Mountain Work: A Social Commentary
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Over millennia of time, Native Americans, soldiers,
militiamen, colonists, drovers, prospectors, bushwhackers,
guerrillas all passed over it. An ancient trading path that
predates history, it has been known as the Unicoi Path, the
Tellico Path, the Overhill Trading Path, and fnally, the
Unicoi Turnpike Trail.
Today, it is a part of the Millennium Trails program’s
American Discovery Trail, the nation’s frst coast to coast
non-motorized recreation trail. Tanks to the Tennessee
Overhill Heritage Association’s website and trail guide, the
trail is easily explored by car and foot and makes for a very
interesting day trip.
Starting from Murphy, NC, take the Joe Brown Highway
towards the Hanging Dog Recreational Area. Stay on the
highway as it winds around Lake Hiwassee. Take a right turn
at the stop sign at the intersection with the Hiwassee Dam
Access Road, where the pavement ends, and the road begins
the ascent up and over the Unicoi Gap,the lowest gap in the
Southern Appalachian Mountains.
As the trail climbs over the gap, it provides exceptional
views of the surrounding mountains. On the Tennessee
side of the gap is a parking lot and trailheads for the hiking
portion of the Unicoi Trail, and the Benton McKaye Trail, a
nearly 300 mile footpath through the southeastern Appala-
chians.
Note: because it follows large power lines, the road is well
maintained. However, it can be hazardous in adverse weather,
or just after a storm, due to falling tree branches. In that
case, another option is to take US 74 West from Murphy to
Ducktown, Tennessee, and turn right onto TN 68, picking
up the trail at Coker Creek.
Historical Coker Creek is the site of one of the earliest
gold rushes in the United States. You can still pan for gold
here in the streams of the Cherokee National Forest. Gold
pans, supplies and maps are available at the Welcome Center.
Te trail continues along TN 68 to Tellico Plains, TN,
which is the western terminus of the Cherohala Skyway. Te
Skyway Visitor Center provides restrooms, visitor informa-
tion, and interpretive exhibits about the Cherohala Skyway
and Cherokee National Forest.
Tellico Plains occupies a large natural plains, which is an
unusual feature in the rolling Smoky Mountains. It’s also
the probable site of Talliquah, or the Great Tellico, one of
the principal Cherokee towns. An important crossroads for
centuries, the Overhill Trading Path and Warriors’ Path di-
verged at Tellico Plains. Te Overhill Trading Path climbed
over the mountains into North Carolina while the Warriors’
Path ran southwestward to join the Cherokee settlements
along the Hiwassee River. A side trip here on FS210 leads
to the awesome Bald River Falls, which can be enjoyed right
from the road.
Continuing on TN 360 from Tellico Plains, the trail
continues on to the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum. Se-
quoyah, inventor of the Cherokee syllabary, was born nearby
in what was then the Overhill town of Tuskeegee. He found
a way to reduce the thousands of Cherokee thoughts to
85 symbols representing sounds. In 1821, after 12 years of
working on the new language, the syllabary was introduced
to the Cherokee people. Within a few months thousands of
Cherokees became literate, and within a few years the Bible
and numerous hymns were translated into the Cherokee
written language.
Te trail ends at nearby Fort Loudon, which was con-
structed during the winter of 1756-57 at the request of pro-
British Cherokee to deter French settlements and raiding by
pro-French Indians. Weapons and supplies were transported
over the Unico Turnpike all the way from South Carolina.
Te reconstructed fort sits on a hill overlooking Lake Tellico,
and living history demonstrations take place throughout the
year. Te visitor center displays artifacts and information on
the fort’s history.
See also: “Footsteps of the Cherokees, A Guide to the
Eastern Homelands of the Cherokee Nation”, by Vicki
Rozema and “Daytrips from Coker Creek”
8 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 TRAVEL
[ALL IN A DAY’S OUTING ]
The Unicoi Turnpike Trail
A scenic drive taking you
all the way from Unicoi
Gap to Fort Loudon.
Words and Photos by:
Ellen Schofeld
Bald River Falls
Travel & Leisure
On Display at Coker Creek
Fort Loudon
US-76 E
Lake
Blue Ridge
Lake
Nottely
Lake
Chatuge
North Carolina
Hiawassee
Ellijay
• East Ellijay
Georgia
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Blairsville
Blue Ridge
Ducktown
Andrews
Brasstown
Murphy
Joe Brown Hwy
Deckers & Fosters
Flea Markets
Warne
CourtHouse
Anex
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rive
Hayesville
Young
Harris
McCaysville
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Have you hugged an
ALPACA lately?
10 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 RECREATION
I
n ancient times, alpacas roamed the lush
pastures and mountainous foothills of the
South American Andes mountains and
were prized by the Incas. In fact, Peru,
Bolivia, and Chile are still home to the largest
percentage of these beautiful animals.
Because alpacas are inexpensive to obtain,
friendly, trainable, and can easily be raised on
a small acreage, alpaca farms have become very
popular in the United States. Indeed, it’s easy to
fnd an alpaca to hug at a farm near you, right
here in western North Carolina.
Unlike other “live-
stock”, alpacas don’t
have horns, hooves,
claws or incisors, so
they don’t butt, bite
or scratch. However,
they have been known
to spit just like their
close relative the camel!
Personality wise, they’re
alert, intelligent, curi-
ous, and predictable.
Tey’re even small and
gentle enough to travel
short distances in the
family minivan. Social
animals that seek com-
panionship, they com-
municate most commonly by softly humming.
Tere are two diferent alpacas types, the suri
and the huacaya. A suri has fber that grows quite
long and forms silky, pencil-like locks. A huacaya
has a shorter, dense, crimpy feece, giving it a very
woolly appearance. Naturally hypoallergenic due
to its lack of lanolin, alpaca fber comes in 22
colors recognized by the textile industry. Because
it’s smooth, it can be worn without any itching
or irritation. And, it’s stretchy, water repellent
and wrinkle-resistant, suitable for very luxurious
garments.
Obviously, alpacas are versatile and interesting
animals. But, don’t take my word for it...go ahead
and visit an alpaca farm yourself. I guarantee that
you’ll be enchanted by these little charmers.
By: Ellen Schofeld
[Recreation]
Go online For More Info: http://www.alpacainfo.com | Above - Two Friendly Alpaca’s
Below Left - Alpaca’s Together in a Stable. Below Right - Yarn made from Alpaca fber. Alpaca’s yield 22 different
colors recognized by the textile industry.
A Garment made from
Alpaca Fiber. Photo
Courtesy of the Alpaca
Owners & Breeders
Association.
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When our doctors prescribe a medication for us we
don’t question its safety. Tis is because there is an
unspoken trust that the drug has been properly studied
and tested before it goes on the market. In recent
years that trust has been broken as we see more and
more drugs pushed to market that are not safe. When
these drugs are not properly studied and tested many
lives are in jeopardy! Te latest tragedy is the diabetes
drug Avandia. According to several reports in 2007,
including one reported by the New England Journal
of Medicine, Avandia has been the best selling oral
diabetes treatment in the
world. It is estimated that
1 million people in the
US have taken Avandia
and it has generated bil-
lions of dollars in sales for
GlaxoSmithKline PLC.
Te FDA approved Avandia
in 1999 for treatment of
type 2 Diabetes. Since then,
the FDA has updated the
product’s labeling to refect
new data showing patients taking Avandia may sufer
side efects such as fuid retention, edema and conges-
tive heart failure. Te most recent label change was in
2006 when the FDA ordered a black box warning be
placed on the product concerning potential increase in
heart attacks and heart related chest pain. In February
of this year, a report by the Senate Finance Committee
concluded that GlaxoSmithKline had full knowledge
of the heart risks of Avandia in late 2004. In Septem-
ber of this year, European health regulators ordered
Avandia of the market while doctors in the US are
only being required to have patients sign a consent
form before taking the drug! Tis begs the question,
“why does the US continue to leave a dangerous drug
on the market?” Here are some interesting facts about
Avandia so you can draw your own conclusion about
this drug and why it is still on the market here in the
US.
*** Avandia came to Market in 1999 and it rapidly
became a blockbuster. By 2006 it was bringing in
$3.2 Billion a year.
***In 2009, two years
after a study was pub-
lished in the New England
Journal Of Medicine linking
Avandia to a 43 percent
increased risk of heart
attack and a 64 percent
higher risk of cardiovas-
cular death compared to
other treatment methods,
sales of Avandia dropped
down to $1.2 billion.
***According to a two-
year long senate investiga-
tion released in early 2010,
Avandia was found to cause about 500 more heart
attacks and 300 more more cases of heart failure
than Actos (a similar diabetes drug with a less than
perfect tract record of its own).
***In 2004,GlaxoSmithKline began a review of
its drug as evidence of the cardiovascular risk
became clearer; in 2005 and 2006, the company
12
Smoky Mountain Free Press • November / December 2010
HEALTH
[Healthwise]
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13 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 HEALTH
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*You must continue to pay your monthly Part B premiums.
The benef t information provided herein is a brief summary, not a comprehensive description of i
benef ts. For more information contact the plan. i
SecureHorizons
®
MedicareDirect
TM
, a Medicare Advantage Private Fee-For-Service plan, is offered by
UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract.
Limitations, copayments and coinsurance may apply. Benef ts may vary by county and plan. i
If you prefer, you can contact SecureHorizons directly for more information or to enroll at 1-800-559-
9095, TTY 711 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week. Or visit our Web site at
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produced an internal analysis showing 29%
and 31% increase in heart problems. In
2006 the company gave the results to the
FDA. Seven years had passed and the
dangers of Avandia continues to be hidden
from the public.
It is unfortunate that the FDA has known
about the dangers of Avandia for years and has
chosen to ignore the facts even from their own
experts! It is also unfortunate that the medical
profession has led people to believe that dia-
betes is a blood sugar disease. Tis is not the
underlying cause of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes
is a disease caused by insulin resistance and
faulty Leptin signals between the liver and the
brain. Te drugs that are prescribed for diabe-
tes do not cure the disease, nor do they address
the underlying problem. Te drugs only focus
on regulating the symptom of elevated blood
sugar.
Independent research shows the best treat-
ment and cure for type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle
change. Te following is a list of things to
change in order to get diabetes under control:
***Severely limit or eliminate sugar and
grains in your diet. Stay away from all white
products including breads, pasta, and rice.
Fructose and corn syrup are the most dan-
gerous to a diabetic.
***Get regular exercise. This is very im-
portant. You should work up to an hour or
two every day.
***Avoid trans fats.
***Get plenty of good quality omega-3
fats.
***Get enough high quality sleep every
night.
***Make sure to get enough vitamin D.
***Normalize any emotional issues and
stress. Find ways that work for you to bal-
ance your stress levels.
***Monitor your fasting insulin levels. It
should be between 2 to 4.
Yes, this takes much efort but the result is
worth it in the long run. If you work with your
doctor, and change your lifestyle, you may be
free of these dangerous drugs. Take responsi-
bility for your health!
“...patients taking
Avandia may suffer side
effects such as fuid
retention, edema &
congestive heart failure.”
[Literature]
14 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 LITERATURE
Y
ou probably know someone
who is writing a book … or has
written one but keeps it tucked
away in the nightstand … or has
an idea for one but doesn’t know where to
start. According to Diane Gedymin, founder
of Te Publisher’s Desk, 83% of Americans
dream of writing a book. Odds are you may
be one of them.
As a writer and writing consultant, I do
not believe that writing is a profession that
belongs only to those who demonstrate un-
canny, raw ability to stir a pot of words and
cook a multi-course meal of exquisite, evoca-
tive sentences. And I certainly do not believe
that there is anybody for whom “everything
comes fnished from [his, or] her pen.” (See,
“Are We Forgetting that to Err is Human?”)
Fact is, there exists writers, famous and
those yet to be discovered, who excel at char-
acter development, dialogue, clever narration,
stretching tension. True, some writers simply
have a knack for storytelling. Tey have what
we often call a “gift.” At the opposite end
of the spectrum, lives writers who can form
technically sound sentences but can’t tell a
story; or those who can tell a story, but can’t
write a coherent sentence.
Sadly, I fnd it common practice to assign
writers to one end of the spectrum (either,
“gifted” at one end, or “give it a break, why
don’t you” at the other) without the beneft of
applying the adage: practice makes perfect.
Okay, not perfection, because, let’s face it –
no one is. But the idea that you either have
it or you don’t misleads the writer (as well as
many editors and readers) into believing that
no amount of efort or practice, or applying
and perfecting the basic principles of sound
storytelling, will make a diference. I used to
buy into this idea. I even used to sell it.
Tis article is not about writers perched at
either ends of the talent extreme. It’s about
the vast middle ground of average writers
who are swimming up and down a fuid
continuum of talent potential; average writers
– who, despite their best eforts, push against
the negative momentum of declarations
convincing them that they will never be suc-
cessful. And why? Because they don’t “have
it.” So where, you might ask, can you “get it”?
First, let me say nothing will improve ones
writing except writing … regularly, consis-
tently ... defantly. Secondly, I recommend
the following three books:
• Plot and Structure by James Scott Bell;
Writer’s Digest Books; 234 pp; $16.99
• Characters, Emotion and Viewpoint by
Nancy Kress; Writer’s Digest Books; 234 pp;
$16.99
• Self-Editing for Fiction Writers (Second
Edition) by Renni Brown and Dave King;
Harper Collins Publishers; 279 pp; 13.99
James Bell introduces Plot and Structure
with “Putting the Big Lie to Sleep”. Te
lie that “writing can’t be taught.” Over the
course of 14 chapters he demystifes the
writing process by uncovering the essential
elements found in successful (that is, well-
written and marketable) stories.
Nancy Kress’ Characters, Emotion and
Viewpoint helps writers develop meaning-
ful characters by examining the complexity
within ourselves, within people we know,
or think we know. Characters is full of ex-
amples, both good and bad, and remedies.
In both Kress’ and Bell’s books, there are
redundant sections, sections that are way
too granular, many sections that are intro-
duced with corny subtitles (e.g., Appearance:
What’s Tat You’re Wearing, How Rich Is
She? Appearance in the Social Context).
Still, both books are worth weeding through.
Finally, I found Brown and King’s
Self-Editing for Fiction Writers to be an
exceptional book. It discusses Point of
View, Proportion, and Dialogue Mechanics
in a straightforward manner. What I like
best about this book is how it often, and
unapologetically, reveals the root causes of
poor writing. Consider the excerpt below
regarding speaker attributions (e.g. “he said,
cunningly”):
Perhaps it’s a
lack of confdence
on the writer’s part,
perhaps it’s simple
laziness, or perhaps
it’s a misguided
attempt to break up
the monotony of us-
ing the unadorned
said all the time …
but all too many
fction writers tend
to pepper their
dialogue with –ly’s.
Which is a good
reason to cut virtu-
ally every one you
writ. Ly adverbs almost always catch the writer
in the act of explaining dialogue – smuggling
emotions into speaker attributions that belong
in the dialogue itself. -Self-Editing for Fiction
Writers, p. 87
Woo.
Although designed for writers at the fnal
stages of a draft, it could still beneft writers
at any stage of the creative process. Keep in
mind, however, that you should not be writ-
ing and editing your work at the same time.
A draft is to pour your heart into. Introduce
your head in your revisions.
Aspiring writers who struggle to convey
their stories need the same things that any
other group of professionals in any other feld
of endeavor need: honest and objective evalu-
ation, direction, practice, and humility. Please,
do not misunderstand OR MISQUOTE
what I am saying. I am not saying that with
these few ingredients, any writer can become
a successfully published author. Te reality
is, some – perhaps many – will still swing to
the “give it a break” end of the spectrum. Te
reality is that some wildly talented authors
may never get published or recognized by
mainstream readers. Some wildly popular, yet
insanely average authors will make money
hand over fst because of either a fuke or
clever marketing. Don’t be discouraged:
clever marketing does not sustain an author.
Clever storytelling does.
So, with that said, writing is nice work if
you can get it … and you can get it, if you try.
On the Square in Hayesville
828-389-1492
www.phillipsandlloyd.com
Hours: Tues - Fri 10:00 - 5:30
Sat 10:00 - 3:00
Curiosity Shop Bookstore
Your Full-Service Bookstore!
ANDREWS, NC
1060 Main Street
828-321-2242
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46 Valley River Ave
828-835-7433
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Local Arts/Crafts • Disc Golf Supplies
www.csbookstore.com
Are you writing a book? Read this.
By: Ronda L. Birtha
Reviewed by Lindsay Wright
If you think you know your dog, think
again! Our local trainers at Cold Nose Col-
lege have said that if you read only one
dog training book, make it The Other End
of the Leash. Curiosity got the best of me,
so I decided to give it a try.
Patricia McConnell, PhD, animal
behaviorist and dog trainer has written
a fascinating book about dogs and their
humans. She allows us to see ourselves as
our dogs possibly see and experience us.
We get a whole, fresh look at the “whys” of
animal behavior and how to deal efec-
tively with problems without using force. I
found myself highlighting and underlining
several topics, knowing that I will go back
and re-read this many times.
Enrich your relationships with your
furry friends. Pick up a copy at your local
bookstore.
Self-editing requires honest objectivity.
Book Spotlight
The Other End of
the Leash
The Other End of the Leash
Author: Patricia McConnell,
PhD
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Page Count : 246
List Price: $16.00
15 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 ART
By: Bryan M. Hughes
R
ight now we’re sitting on the cusp of a surging infux of Arts in the mountains of North Carolina and North Georgia - an Appalachian renaissance as it were. The Smoky
Mountains have always been a haven for folk artists, artisans, craftspeople, and musicians. However, until now it has always been pegged into one stereo type - that being
Bluegrass Musicians, Folk Artists, old timey artisans, and what some have afectionately titled - Hillbilly Arts.
But now we are seeing a large increase of new art styles in our region. Over the past decade Asheville has blossomed forth into a Cultural Mecca for the arts, and that
movement is starting to spill into our area. There are a lot of artists, musicians, and crafters that have been afraid to put themselves in the public eye, either because they lack conf-
dence in their work, or they feel that they wouldn’t be able to make a living at it...
[The Arts]
Art Surges Forth
Cherokee County plays host to a burgeoning art scene
In the past few years those notions have started to change
-artists are banding together to create groups and organizations
for the betterment of the arts. The Valley River Arts guild has been
hard at work trying to improve the overall aesthetic of the Town of
Andrews through various art projects. The Andrews Valley Initia-
tive has a master plan that places a heavy emphasis on the Arts,
and the Valleytown Cultural Arts and Historical Society has an
amazing collection of regional works that
rival the exhibits of larger metropolitan
museums.
One group of particular interest though,
is the Cherokee County Arts Council
(CCAC). The CCAC is a non proft organiza-
tion based out of Cherokee County with
the sole intent of creating an environ-
ment within Cherokee County for the arts
to fourish. Their mission is to promote
awareness for and access to the arts in
Cherokee County, North Carolina. “The
Arts” in this instance, is a broad term en-
compassing a wide variety of creative and
artistic outlets. From painters, sculptors,
and sketch artists right down to poets,
dancers, and musicians - there is a place
for everyone within the arts council.
“Art is a release for some people, an escape from their daily life,”
said Kathleen Nolte - the Director of the CCAC. She continued “The
Arts Council is here to increase access for the whole community
to the arts, and I think it’s very important for children to have ad-
ditional exposure to the arts.”
The CCAC was formed to fll a void, it’s the frst arts council in
Cherokee County for over ten years and with a new board and
new mission, they have wasted no time in implementing a new
artistic direction to the county. The long term goal for the arts
council is to develop a performing arts center which will hold
workshops, classes, and a craft market, and will be suitable for
large scale theatrical and musical performances.
Even right now, in their young existence the CCAC has already
accomplished a lot in the way of expanding the arts in Cherokee
County. “The council has taken on a very grassroots type of devel-
opment. People have been very excited about what we’re doing
and business owners have even ofered up their businesses as
places for arts to be displayed within the community,” said Nolte.
Two artist displays can be seen right now in Cherokee County -
one in the Valley River Merchants building in Downtown Murphy
and another in the window of the Old Bradley Inn in Downtown
Andrews. The work displayed is exquisite and if you are in the area
you should defnitely check them
out.
The CCAC has also been instru-
mental in starting art programs
for young people in schools.
Sadly, art classes have taken a
back seat in schools due to lack of
funding. In some curriculum, art
is only taught one day a week. It
has been proven that a lack of art
exposure in school yields negative
results on the overall benchmarks
of the students. Being the proac-
tive group they are, the CCAC has
begun laying the groundwork for
the Arts in Schools program to
increase art exposure for students.
Furthermore, the arts council is
making the efort to expand creative programs already available
in Cherokee County. On Saturday, November 20th, the CCAC
has arranged for an additional day of festivities following the
Tree Lighting on Friday night, with strolling musicians walking
the streets, and the Brasstown dancers performing. The Farmers
Market starts at 10am, with holiday music provided by Anjelica
Wilkerson and Elizabeth Adamovich from Murphy High School
at 11am. The Brasstown Dancers include the Dames Rocket and
Garland Dancers with performances starting at noon. Also, plans
are underway for a spring time art and music festival, studio strolls
and various musical performances, all in Cherokee County.
Recently the CCAC has started their membership drive, and
with such a noble cause it would be advantageous for everyone
to join. There are memberships available for everyone. For more
information on how you can join the CCAC email Kathleen Nolte
at kathleen.nolte@gmail.com, or check out the website at www.
CherokeeArtsCouncil.org
This art movement isn’t just limited to Cherokee County
- Young Harris College sponsors a monthly Campus Gate Gallery,
Wolf Creek broadcasting started a much needed FM station
(WACF 95.1 - they actually play GOOD music) which has helped
tremendously in helping our regions subculture come to the fore-
front, and small artist communities are popping up everywhere.
If you get the chance to make a trip to Bakersville, NC you will not
be dissapointed in the caliber of art on display in the town.
Yes, it seems that in the past few years we’ve been reawakened
to the arts, which is exciting because prior to this time, arts and
music were somewhat stale and static. I know there are those of
you out there that have been working to kindle the art fre in our
area for decades, but now we are fnally seeing Artists networking
together to pool resources and fnally make a larger impact.
Almost every weekend there is a new exhibition, a new concert,
a new play, or some sort of art focused gathering. Within all of
this we are seeing new artists - young and old - with real talent,
and what’s more - the art scene is becoming more and more dy-
namic. There will always be the traditional Appalachian art & mu-
sic - it’s part of our heritage and it’s alive and well here. However,
there are now a lot of artists who are using diferent mediums and
styles and it makes for a very eclectic mix of work that we’ve never
seen before. Soon our region will become a staple for arts, music,
and culture alike. It’s an exciting time for the arts in the Smoky
Mountains.
In light of this, the Free Press will always strive to highlight the
Arts. The burgeoning art scene of Appalachia needs a place to be
recognized, but we need your help. If you or someone you know
is a highly skilled artist, send them our way. With this magazine
we want to profle as many artists, musicians, and craftspeople as
possible. We want to put the various art groups in the spotlight,
and we want to see the arts fourish. All art forms are valid and no
matter what type of craft you perform - people from our region
can appreciate it. So don’t be shy - send us your art. Call us at
828.407.0931 or email bryan@mountainfreepress.com.
The Dames Rocket will be Performing at the
Murphy Farmer’s Market on Saturday November 20th
;OL)LHY
PAINTS & INKS ART
Ben O. Willingham
(828) 837-6255
(828) 557-7364
Commissioned Pen & Ink
160 Old Hwy. 64
Murphy, NC 28906
thebearbow@webworkz. com
Thurs. - Fri. 11am - 5pm • Sat. 10 am - 5pm
Amazing Flowers and Gifts
Family Owned and Operated
13926 Hwy 19
Box 9
Andrews, NC 28901
Located in Whites Plaza
828.321.3601
828.321.9852
amazingowersandgifts@frontier.com
Soon our region will
become a staple for
arts, music, and culture
alike. It’s an exciting
time for the arts in the
Smoky Mountains.
16 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 OPINION
Somewhere between
Urban
and
Rural
[Opinon]
L
et me frst start of by saying this article is pure conjecture. I am no bona fde urban or small town development guru, and further more I simply just live in a small
town and have a lot of opinions concerning the subject. If you are someone who believes that small towns should always stay the same, then I’d advise you to turn the
page, because the thrust of this article is not to make people angry. However, if you are like me, and feel like we could be doing a much better job in developing our
small town infrastructure and economy, then read on.
For some reason, small towns are often left behind in terms of progress. Some claim that it’s because of elected ofcials, some claim it has to do with poor business practices, and
others just simply like to use the economy as the scapegoat. However for the sake of this article, we’re not going to broach those topics. What we are more concerned with is creat-
ing a way for small towns to progress and fourish without losing the qualities that are most appealing.
Urban development takes place at a rate
50 times faster than typical rural develop-
ment, but that fgure could be drastically
reduced if the right plan were implement-
ed. We live in the 21st century, and we’re
no longer hindered by the limitations of
geography - so there is no reason we can’t
take Urban Development schemes, scale
them down, and apply the same principals
to small town development. Tis type of
planning has been coined “Rurban Devel-
opment.”
While we could fll the contents of
2000 pages with diferent planning
methods, I’d like to consider just three
main topics which may open your eyes to
the wonderful resources that are already
available to us.
Te frst thing that needs to take place
for growth to happen in rural areas is
to energize local entrepreneurs. Busi-
ness owners in small towns often have a
pragmatic or even pessimistic view point
when it comes to the survival of their
business, and why shouldn’t they. Each
year they have watched their profts fall.
Creative entrepreneurs are often stifed
by the fact that they receive no support
in their business, or they may feel that
the community just doesn’t care. Every
business has a place in a small town, and
in order for them to fourish they need to
know that they are backed by the commu-
nity. Still, too often I see business owners
detached from one another and they are
often forced to distance themselves from
their businesses and chase other avenues
of income. New organizations need to
be formed for the sole purpose of joining
together business owners in each town.
Once in place, you will have created a
think tank of local business owners who
can pioneer new and innovative ideas on
increasing business for one another. A
great place to start would be to evaluate
and audit what your local chamber of
commerce actually ofers for each busi-
ness, and perhaps make adjustments. By
engaging businesses, you create a more
positive morale among business own-
ers, you stimulate your local economy by
promoting the purchase of local goods,
and you have created an environment
that is appealing to new businesses and
entrepreneurs.
Te second key in promoting rurban
development is to reach out to the youth
of your small town, after all - they are
the future. Unfortunately though, schools
ingrain in their brightest students the
notion of going to a university getting a
degree and landing a high paying job in
a city. As for the rest of the students -
they are placed in vocational studies to
fnd jobs doing blue collar work for an
average pay. Now my aim is not to attack
the school system and there’s absolutely
nothing wrong with either scenario, but
many schools never really encourage their
students to think of careers that can con-
tribute to their own community. Tere are
many young people who have a lot to ofer
their town and can contribute in a large
way, but don’t bring their careers home
because they are given the idea that they
can succeed better elsewhere. Truthfully
- it is easier to succeed in urban areas, but
if children are given the idea that they
could one day pioneer new businesses
then you might be pleasantly surprised at
the amount of kids willing to start their
careers in their hometown. A recent
poll at a local high school showed that if
given the opportunity to succeed in their
career, 83% of the kids would stay in their
hometown. Young adults are never devoid
of creativity, imagination, or optimism and
those are the qualities that small towns
need to harness in order to see positive
changes.
Te fnal thing I’d like to discuss
concerning rurban development is to plan
and implement just like cities do. When
exploring options for small towns and
how to allocate money, small town plan-
ners do well to consider a few things. How
will their actions afect the local economy?
Will it create jobs or destroy jobs. Does
their decision contribute to the overall ap-
peal of the town? i.e. aesthetics, prosper-
ity, and happiness. Most importantly a
small town planner will consider if where
is the biggest need. So often money is
spent and decisions are made that never
address any of the underlying problems
in the town. It takes a lot of research, a
lot of honest evaluation, and a lot of time.
However, it is time well spent, and when
a plan is put on paper it is easier to stick
to. Also, it doesn’t hurt to reach out to
other counties and fnd out what they’re
doing. Asheville is a prime example of
how a town can incorporate local small
business owners into their master plan and
fourish. In efect the downtown center
of Asheville is comprised primarily of
local businesses and entrepreneurs - and
what’s more - they prosper! So it would
make sense to check with the people of
successful towns and fnd out what they
have done to get to their current status.
I’m sure you will fnd that people are
more than willing to tell you about their
ideas. It’s a constant learning experience
and with the support of everybody in
your community then you will start seeing
positive results.
Tere is an abundance of resources
available to help small towns put together
plans of action and conduct research. Te
center for Rural Entrepreneurship is a
great place to start, and there is also a
blog entitled Te Rurban Fringe which
provides a wealth of articles and resources
to consider. After talking with the people
of many Appalachian small towns I know
that the great majority want to see re-
gional growth take place. So I encourage
you to reach out and do the same - talk
with local people and business owners,
revive that entrepreneurial spirit, reach out
to young ones, and fnd out for yourself
what your role can be in bringing about
positive change in your town.
To get started in your research check
out these websites. TeRurbanFringe.com
and Ruraleship.org
By: Bryan M. Hughes
17 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 OPINION
T
he morning that I was to
teach the seminar, Revising
Your Manuscript, I listened
to NPR’s Mary Louise
Kelly interview Kathryn Sutherland, the
Oxford Uni-
versity profes-
sor who found
spelling,
grammar and
punctuation
errors riddled
in thousands
of Jane Aus-
ten’s original
handwritten
manuscripts.
According
to Suther-
land, Aus-
ten’s papers
show “blots,
crossings out,
messiness”
and a writer
who “broke
most of the
rules for writing good English.” At one
point in the interview, Ms. Sutherland
says, “we as critics should stop polishing
her halo.”
First of all, who put the halo on
Austen? Second of all, ‘boo’ on everyone
who believed that “everything came
fnished from her pen.” Everything?
Unfnished? Really? Seriously? Henry
Austen, Jane’s
brother reportedly
professed this a year
after her death.
Please. Who does
not hyperbolically
eulogize loved ones?
Jane Austen was
human, right? I
mean, really.
F7* and editors
– does the fact that
we need them dilute
the strength of a
writer’s creativity?
Let me state for
the record: I am
not, nor have I ever
been a fan of Jane
Austen’s writings. For
me, this issue is not
about Austen’s writing, writing style,
misspellings, and dangling participles
– all things found in DRAFTS that
imperfect humans develops. Part of the
issue seems to be about the unrealistic
expectations put upon an individual and
the consequential gall to be fabber-
gasted when that person’s “human” is
showing.
Here’s what I’m more disturbed by:
according to Sutherland, Austen’s docu-
ments reveal an experimental writer
who was “even better at writing dialogue
and conversation than the edited style
of her published novels suggest.” While
people mooned over Austen’s “pol-
ished” works, I can’t help but wonder if
her editor, William Giford, deprived
generations of readers of a richer, more
creatively intuitive writer, sensitive to
nuances of clever and engaging dia-
logue? I wonder if, rather than improv-
ing Austen’s writing, Mr. Giford
sterilized and reconstituted it. I can’t
help but wonder if I might have been a
fan of Austen if her “experimental” style
was nurtured, not neutered.
I can only wonder. For the curious
among us, Austen’s original manuscripts
are now available for scrutiny.
*F7 is a Microsoft Word shortcut that
launches the Spelling/Grammar correc-
tion tool.
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[Opinon]
Give Jane Austen a Break.
To Err is Still Human.
By: Ronda L. Birtha
Jane Austen by szlea
(Creative Commons)
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19 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 PUZZLE
CrossWords
1. Not fresh
6. Inspiration
10. Boast
14. Respect
15. Frolic
16. Doozy
17. Ancient Greek marketplace
18. Hold on to
19. Seaweed
20. Hoodlum
22. Along a line
24. Require
25. Similar in character
26. Light weapons?
29. Avid
30. Injure
31. Booming
37. Give a speech
39. Strange
40. Renegade
41. Impervious to water
44. Bog
45. Boosts
46. Invented the lightbulb
48. Domain
52. Bearing
53. Egg dish
54. Surpass
58. Memo
59. Assistant
61. Stop
62. Auditory
63. Colored part of an eye
64. Parental brother
65. Repose
66. Focusing glass
67. Precipitous
ACROSS
DOWN
1. Type of carpet
2. Roman robe
3. Any minute
4. Eyeglasses with a long handle
5. Found at the end of a pencil
6. Annoyed
7. One who accomplishes
8. An uncle
9. Put into service
10. Flavorless
11. King
12. Seaweed
13. Watchman
21. Exam
23. Not outer
25. Japanese stick fghting
26. Program
27. Distinctive atmosphere
28. A very troublesome child
29. Praise
32. Mob
33. Abating at intervals
34. Nile bird
35. A Roman emperor
36. Secluded valley
38. Delete
42. Long-necked river duck
43. Accomplishment
47. A disk used in throwing competi-
tions
48. One who gives
49. Overact
50. Mixed-blood
51. Choose
52. Conjecture
54. Chief Norse god
55. Competition involving speed
56. Part of an archipelago
57. Look furtively
60. Outrage
Need a hint?
You can fnd the
solutions to these
puzzles on page 25.
[Puzzled?]
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20 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 ASTRONOMY
A Lesson in ASTRONOMY
Looking for a Fantastic Sci-Fi Novel? For info on “Trophy” the Novel go to www.Paulmschofeld.com
[ION THE SKY]
High in the northeast around 9:00 pm look for the constel-
lation Cassiopeia. It resembles a large squashed capital “M”
tipped sideways. Tis circumpolar constellation, like the Big
Dipper, rotates around the North Star. As the Big Dipper is
sinking in the northwest Cassiopeia is rising. Using Cassiopeia
as a guide let’s look for our frst galaxy, the great Androm-
eda Galaxy, also referred to as M31. Te top three stars of
Cassiopeia form an equilateral triangle. Picture these as an
arrowhead with its point at the upper right. Now follow the
direction it’s pointing for three arrowheads to an area nearly
straight overhead. Search for the misty patch in the sky that
the ancients called the “little cloud”, the Andromeda Galaxy.
Binoculars show this quite well as a
tenuous glow with a brighter center
stretching across the feld of view. In
a small telescope at low power (20x-
40x) you can even glimpse two small
satellite galaxies around this great island
universe. While you are observing check
out the “Double Cluster” of stars to the
right of Cassiopeia’s bottom two stars.
Beautiful in a telescope these clusters
also appear as a fuzzy patch to the
unaided eye.
Many observing M31 for the frst
time are not impressed. “Tat’s it?” they
say. “Tat little smudge?” It won’t “blow
your mind” or “knock your socks of”
like the frst telescopic view of the moon
or Saturn. It’s more subtle … you have
to think and meditate on what you are
actually viewing. Seen in the right per-
spective it is quite impressive. For one
thing, it is the most distant object that can be seen with the
unaided eye ... 2.5 million light years away. Holy cow! You’re
talking deep space! And here’s some more: Andromeda is our
sister-galaxy, a large spiral with about a trillion stars. Did you
say trillion? Yes. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, pales in compari-
son with “only” 200-400 billion stars. However, astronomers
tell us the mass of each galaxy is about the same when you
fgure in “dark matter”. (Don’t ask, I don’t understand either.)
Te Milky Way, Andromeda, the Triangulum Galaxy, and
about thirty smaller ones form the “local group”, our local
neighborhood of galaxies. When you try to contemplate all of
this you can see why it’s necessary to meditate on it, fxing it
in your mind’s eye. Tis exercise helps us to see how small we
really are in the grand scheme of things.
So what’s the second galaxy we can see with the unaided
eye? Tat’s easy, the Milky Way. But to really appreciate it you
need to see it on a moonless night from a dark location away
from city lights. As your eyes grow used to the darkness the
Milky Way will become more obvious as a shimmering stream
of faint stars overhead. It is more prominent at certain times
of the year, too. During the summer months we are looking
toward the center of our galaxy and the Milky Way is more
condensed. During the winter we are looking toward the outer
rim and the star felds are not as thick. But the brilliant winter
stars more than make up for the diminished celestial river
above. So during the cold clear nights of winter bundle up and
check out the night sky. Make it your goal to contemplate and
enjoy the wondrous beauty of the galaxy we call home.
Credits: Te beautiful image of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy,
was imaged and shared by Boris Stromar.
Te writer is an amateur astronomer and author of the new
science fction action-adventure novel, TROPHY. For additional
information, please go to: www.paulmschofeld.com
By: Paul M. Schofeld
See two galaxies with the unaided eye
M31
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A Lesson in ASTRONOMY
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High in the northeast around 9:00 pm look for the constel-
lation Cassiopeia. It resembles a large squashed capital “M”
tipped sideways. Tis circumpolar constellation, like the Big
Dipper, rotates around the North Star. As the Big Dipper is
sinking in the northwest Cassiopeia is rising. Using Cassiopeia
as a guide let’s look for our frst galaxy, the great Androm-
eda Galaxy, also referred to as M31. Te top three stars of
Cassiopeia form an equilateral triangle. Picture these as an
arrowhead with its point at the upper right. Now follow the
direction it’s pointing for three arrowheads to an area nearly
straight overhead. Search for the misty patch in the sky that
the ancients called the “little cloud”, the Andromeda Galaxy.
Binoculars show this quite well as a
tenuous glow with a brighter center
stretching across the feld of view. In
a small telescope at low power (20x-
40x) you can even glimpse two small
satellite galaxies around this great island
universe. While you are observing check
out the “Double Cluster” of stars to the
right of Cassiopeia’s bottom two stars.
Beautiful in a telescope these clusters
also appear as a fuzzy patch to the
unaided eye.
Many observing M31 for the frst
time are not impressed. “Tat’s it?” they
say. “Tat little smudge?” It won’t “blow
your mind” or “knock your socks of”
like the frst telescopic view of the moon
or Saturn. It’s more subtle … you have
to think and meditate on what you are
actually viewing. Seen in the right per-
spective it is quite impressive. For one
thing, it is the most distant object that can be seen with the
unaided eye ... 2.5 million light years away. Holy cow! You’re
talking deep space! And here’s some more: Andromeda is our
sister-galaxy, a large spiral with about a trillion stars. Did you
say trillion? Yes. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, pales in compari-
son with “only” 200-400 billion stars. However, astronomers
tell us the mass of each galaxy is about the same when you
fgure in “dark matter”. (Don’t ask, I don’t understand either.)
Te Milky Way, Andromeda, the Triangulum Galaxy, and
about thirty smaller ones form the “local group”, our local
neighborhood of galaxies. When you try to contemplate all of
this you can see why it’s necessary to meditate on it, fxing it
in your mind’s eye. Tis exercise helps us to see how small we
really are in the grand scheme of things.
So what’s the second galaxy we can see with the unaided
eye? Tat’s easy, the Milky Way. But to really appreciate it you
need to see it on a moonless night from a dark location away
from city lights. As your eyes grow used to the darkness the
Milky Way will become more obvious as a shimmering stream
of faint stars overhead. It is more prominent at certain times
of the year, too. During the summer months we are looking
toward the center of our galaxy and the Milky Way is more
condensed. During the winter we are looking toward the outer
rim and the star felds are not as thick. But the brilliant winter
stars more than make up for the diminished celestial river
above. So during the cold clear nights of winter bundle up and
check out the night sky. Make it your goal to contemplate and
enjoy the wondrous beauty of the galaxy we call home.
Credits: Te beautiful image of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy,
was imaged and shared by Boris Stromar.
Te writer is an amateur astronomer and author of the new
science fction action-adventure novel, TROPHY. For additional
information, please go to: www.paulmschofeld.com
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Do you Write?
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Send samples of your work to info@mountainfreepress.com
Submit your work directly at www.mountainfreepress.com
Music in Review
I knew I was gonna buy this record after hearing the frst
single – Radioactive – and I’m not afraid to admit that I was
afraid to admit that I liked the frst single. Like really really
liked the frst single, which is okay for unpretentious radio
listeners (i.e. me; usu.) but not so much for those parsing
indie wheat from chaf and/or self-professsed holier than
thou indie music critics (i.e. also me; usu.) and those of this
second ilk surely wouldn’t muddy their
ear holes with this new stuf from this
old-ish band because “We liked KOL
when they frst started man, and their
new stuf is like so oh my gawd not
even close to their older stuf, because
back then they got it man they just
got it and now they sold out brah and
they’ve lost their edge dude and fell of
and their old stuf is soo much better
than their new material dude I’m telling you…”
Clif Notes would tell you that the KOL were hot when
they entered the fray as their unrefned sound, gritty
vocals, pure indie rock and roll vibe and general awesome
indie aura took them, and listeners, to places both have
never been; but know that they’ve made it and millions,
they are has beens in the indie sense and have essentially
forgotten about the art and become a part of the machine;
so goes the logic. As such, The KOL are who you disdain
if you’re an indie music connoisseur because of their per-
ceived distancing: “They’ve moved on and so should we” is
the mantra taken with bands start with scrapped pennies
at dive bars then transitioning to sold out stadiums. It’s
a thoughtless and really jealous and empty mantra, on
the whole, and that’s why we still listen; sometimes in
the comfort and supreme privacy of bunkers and bomb
shelters because forget about ever being caught with
their new record: red faces held aghast as pointed fngers
tremble over your area; eyes can’t believe their sight be-
cause you actually own that record?? OMG! /banished.
Even so – we still listened, and I did and I couldn’t get
enough of it; the single. I’d play it every time I had a
chance. It’s infectious. And full of emotion. It wastes not
a note in its portrayal. Nice and tight and radio-ready. The
only qualm I had with later and later listens
was that it didn’t develop. It just starts at an
epic level and remains. There’s no buildup.
It’s all BOOM in your face from the jump and
levels maybe barely but stays at most at this
high emotional level, which is
nice because the emotion’s nice
and high and good and sound
but the journey was…nonexis-
tent. And there’s a lot to be said
about a nice buildup to emotion;
conversely, there is a lot to be said
for a song that nails the emotion
from the get go and carries said
emotion adequately. This song
hangs itself on the latter and after repeated
listens I was curious as to what this record
would have to ofer. Would they try for just
radio-ready pieces and nail an emotion quickly?
Efectively making a record of songs mostly ready for radio
airplay? An airplay that soaks up short ordered sweetness?
Or would they work out their creativity and create stuf
that demanded work from the listener? Or maybe play
somewhere in the middle? Had I not enjoyed the singe,
we’d be talking about a free EP I got from a band called Yel-
low Ostrich (ed. note YO is worth the price [yellowostrich.
bandcamp.com] it’s like an exercise in yodeling beat box
electronica and seemingly innocuous wordplay…try it on
for size and hit us up with refections – Michael@951.fm)
But I enjoyed the frst single and wanted more.
So I bit and bought.
And I mean I guess it’s okay to start an album with a
track that’s titled – The End- and it’s surely less thought
provoking and maybe worse to close an
album with a track titled -The End- but
what does its entry at the start of the record
say? Does is beg for some sort of artistic
validation through not-so-subtle irony? Or
is it trying to reshape your thinking about
how this record will be? Maybe I’m thinking
to much about the title of the frst song…
and does it really matter in the frst place?
Umm…no not really and stop thinking
about it so minutely thankyouverymuch.
What is important is if it’s good. And it is;
this -The End- song, it’s good and opens
the record in a musically agreeable fashion.
Symphonic almost and open in a way that
brings to mind beginning movie credits
with slow moving panoramas and lightly
faded names of people you’ve never heard of foating near
translucent across the screen as you wait for the action to
please hurry up and get going. It’s a nice start that opens
the door for -Radioactive- a song whose description has
weighted the word count. What happens next is…inter-
esting. The songs that follow are varied and nicely spaced
and overall unique from both the record
and the bands body of work, on the
whole as least concerning the latter for
sure. You get country-ish jams not heard a
whole lot on any of the bands past works;
you’ll hear tinges and nuances from
their last album; nostalgia starts to creep
when hints of Youth and Young Manhood
and even the Novocain EP seep through
separate songs on this record. And the
songs here are progressions from their
previous records, too, so this thing as a
whole is evolved and nicely well rounded;
seemingly. My difculty in labeling this
record was grappling with whether this
was a Caricature v Evolution. I think there
are slices of both. Some tracks here feel
heartfelt and labored over and creative;
proving to be overall works of art and natural
progressive from their past work(s). Others, though, seem
all together almost mindlessly tossed together, though not
in a holy-wow-this-song-is-worthless-and-even-I-could-
have-made-it way, but in a way that a band whose proven
pop song mastery has come near naturally. So the songs
that fall in that Caricature category are so because they
feel almost thrown together; in only a way that talented
musicians can throw together a song-meaning that these
songs are still, you now, not bad; just not noteworthy.
But is it a waste of time? Naw. It’s worth a listen. But
nothing here is going to jump of the disc and alter lives
just as much as nothing here will cause a diehard KOL fan
to jump ship. It might even convert some nonbelievers.
The band was good when they started. They still are. Their
next will prove where they truly want to be. As it is now,
they’ve reached a point where trying just hard enough is
good enough. Luckily, for the talented KOL, good enough
is well enough to not be written of…yet.
22 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 MUSIC
DISCOUNT PARTY SUPPLIES & MORE
828-837-2700
1178 Andrews Road. Murphy, NC 28906
The place to go for
holiday party supplies & decor
My indie is WAY more INDIE
than your Indie
Come Around Sundown
Band: Kings of Leon
Label: RCA
Release Date : October 2010
Listen to an album sampling
at mountainfreepress.com
[ Concert Calendar ]
[Words on Notes]
By: Mike Miracle
WACF 95.1
I guess it’s okay
to start an album
with a track that’s
titled – The End
23 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 MUSIC
DISCOUNT PARTY SUPPLIES & MORE
828-837-2700
1178 Andrews Road. Murphy, NC 28906
The place to go for
holiday party supplies & decor
Music in Person
[ Concert Calendar ]
November 20
nCrossroads at Chev-
elle 66 in Murphy, NC.
nCeltic Thunder at Fox
Teatre in Atlanta
nCowboy Mouth at
Georgia World Congress
Center.
n The Infamous
String Dusters at Te
Variety Playhouse Atlanta.
November 21
n Jonathan Byrd at
Purple Onion in Asheville
n Ben Folds at the
Tabernacle in Atlanta.
November 23
nEric Gant at Chevelle
66 in Murphy, NC.
nDonovan Franken-
reiter at Te Orange Peel in
Asheville.
n The Ataris at Te
EARL in Atlanta.
November 26
nEric Gant at Chevelle
66 in Murphy, NC.
nDavid Wilcox at Te
Grey Eagle in Asheville.
n Minus the Bear at
the Masquerade.
n The Whigs at Te
Variety Playhouse Atlanta.
November 27
n Revenge at Chevelle
66 in Murphy, NC
nAcoustic Syndi-
cate at Te Orange Peel in
Asheville. .
November 28
n Tim Kasher at Te
EARL in Atlanta.
nCindy Lauper at Te
Orange Peel in Asheville.
November 29
n Minus the Bear at
Te Orange Peel Asheville,
NC.
November 29
n The Sword at Te
Orange Peel Asheville, NC.
December 1
n Misfts at Te Orange
Peel Asheville, NC.
December 2
n Delta Spirit at Te
Grey Eagle Asheville, NC.
December 4
n Liz Melendez at Ch-
evelle 66 in Murphy, NC.
n Coldwar Kids at Te
Orange Peel Asheville, NC.
n Carolina Chocolate
Drops at Te Variety Play-
house Atlanta.
December 9
n Granville Automatic
at Te Lexington Avenue
Brewery Asheville, NC.
December 10
n The Bill Murray
Experience at Larue’s
Backdoor - Asheville, NC.
n Drive-By Truckers at
Te Orange Peel Asheville,
NC.
n Trans Siberian
Orchestra at Te Arena at
Gwinett - Atlanta GA.
n Indigo Girls at Te
Tabernacle - Atlanta GA.
December 11
n Milele Roots at Ch-
evelle 66 in Murphy, NC.
n Madball at Te Mas-
querade Atlanta.
n Nonpoint at Te Mas-
querade Atlanta.
n Sister Hazel at Cen-
ter Stage Atlanta
December 17
n Ben Chapman at
Chevelle 66 in Murphy, NC.
n Blind Guardian at
the Orange Peel in Asheville,
NC.
December 18
n High Noon at Chev-
elle 66 in Murphy, NC.
December 19
n Janis Ian at Eddie’s
Attic in Decatur, GA
December 20
n Amy Grant at Te Fox
Teatre in Atlanta.
n Greeley Estates at
Te Seven Venue in Doug-
lasville, Ga.
December 22
n MillionYoung at Te
Masquerade Atlanta.
December 30
n The Avett Brothers
at Asheville Civic Center
December 31
n Joel Grant Huggins
and The Suns at Chevelle
66 in Murphy, NC.
n The Avett Brothers
at Asheville Civic Center
n Clutch at the Orange
Peel in Asheville
n Soul Asylum at Te
Hyatt Regency in Atlanta,
GA.
n Coolio at Te Hyatt
Regency in Atlanta, GA.
n Perpetual Groove
at Te Variety Playhouse
Atlanta.
[ On Deck ]
Ben Folds. Coldwar Kids. The Avett Brothers. Milele Roots. Coolio.
Do you want to be included?
Help us keep our concert calendar thorough.
Send your music events to:
Email - info@mountainfreepress.com.
Mail - to 37 N. Church Street. Murphy, NC 28906.
If you would like your band to
be reviewed call 828.407.0931
Minus the Bear is an indie rock group
which formed in Seattle, Washington,
United States in 2001 and have released
four albums and four EPs. The band consists
of Jake Snider (vocals, guitar), Dave Knud-
son (guitar), Cory Murchy (bass), Alex Rose
(synths, vocals) and Erin Tate (drums). Origi-
nal keyboardist Matt Bayles left the band in
2006, but has remained on good terms with
the band and produced their 2007 album
Planet of Ice. The band is known for their
amusing song titles such as “Hey, Wanna
Throw Up?” and “Monkey!!! Knife!!! Fight!!!”.
Despite this light humor, the band’s music is
quite technical.
You have two chances to catch Minus the
Bear in November. First they will be gracing
the Masquerade in Atlanta on November
26th, and then they will be at the Orange
Peel in Asheville on the 29th.
Friday, October 29 - Sunday, October 31
4077 Hwy 339
Young Harris, GA 30582
Call Toll Free: 1.877.590.3368
Phone: 706.896.0000
Email: info@dentparamedicsinc.com
www.dentparamedicsinc. com
We Specialize in:
Paintless Dent Removal
and Windsheild Repair
Minus The Bear
T
a
n
t
o
p
i
a
There is a ne line between
getting a tan and looking like
you spent the day rolling in
cheese pus. Be careful that
you do not cross it.
3090 Hwy 64 West, Suite 107
Murphy, NC 28906
828-837-8796
tantopia_llc@yahoo.com
the Agenda
[ What you could be doing in November ]
Email your calendar listings to: info@mountainfreepress.com
24 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 AGENDA
Beginning in the late 1930s, Dalí went through a radical
change in which he embraced Catholicism, developed the
concept of nuclear mysticism and, in efect, reinvented him-
self as an artist. Comprising more than 100 works including
40 paintings and a related group of drawings, prints and
other Dalí ephemera, “Salvador Dalí: Te Late Work” will
also explore the artist’s enduring fascination with science, op-
tical efects and illusionism as well as his connections to such
artists of the 1960s and 1970s as Andy Warhol,
Roy Lichtenstein and Willem de Kooning.
Among the highlights of the exhibition will be
several works that have not been seen in the U.S.
in 50 years, including the monumental “Christ of
St. John of the Cross,” which was voted Scot-
land’s favorite painting in 2007, and “Santiago
El Grande,” which has not left New Brunswick,
Canada, since 1959. Designed as an altarpiece,
this painting includes Dalí’s vision of the Cruci-
fxion, an homage to Saint James (the patron saint
of Spain) and an atomic explosion. Te exhibition
will also feature “Assumpta Corpuscularia Lapisla-
zulina,” from a private collection in Spain, which
has not been seen publicly since 1959.
“Salvador Dalí: Te Late Work” is organized
by the High Museum of Art in collaboration
with the Salvador Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg,
Florida, and the Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí,
Figueres, Spain.
Te High will be the sole venue for the exhibi-
tion, and it will be on view through January 9,
2011.
Te High Museum of Art, founded in 1905
as the Atlanta Art Association, is the leading art
museum in the southeastern United States. With
more than 12,000 works of art in its permanent
collection, the High Museum of Art has an extensive anthol-
ogy of 19th- and 20th-century American and decorative
art; signifcant holdings of European paintings; a growing
collection of African American art; and burgeoning collec-
tions of modern and contemporary art, photography and
African art. Te High is also dedicated to supporting and
collecting works by Southern artists and is distinguished as
the only major museum in North America to have a curato-
rial department specifcally devoted to the feld of folk and
self-taught art.
The High’s media arts department produces acclaimed
annual flm series and festivals of foreign, independent and
classic cinema. In November 2005, the High opened three
new buildings by architect Renzo Piano that more than
doubled the Museum’s size, creating a vibrant “village for the
arts” at the Woodruf Arts Center in midtown Atlanta. For
more information about the High, please visit www.High.
org.
Get to know the man behind the Mustache.
The late work of Salvador Dali at High Museum
Now - January 9, 2011
D E A L E R
222 NC Hwy 69
Hayesville NC 28904
Business: (828) 389-1958
Fax: (828) 389-0789
J a c k y J o n e s C h r y s l e r D o d g e J e e p . c o m
j ackyj ones @br memc. net
Blairsville Cinema
Open 7 Days a Week
Take $1 o concessions with this ad
Expires 1/1/11
Call for Showtimes- 706.745.1000
Or visit www.blairsvillecinema.com
Located on Hwy. 515 in Blairsville, GA
Custom & Classic Auto Services For Your
Pre-1973 Classic & Special Interest
Cars and Trucks
(828) 644-9134 7878 US Hwy 64 W, Murphy NC
Photo’s provided courtesy of High Museum of Art
You can fnd out more at
www.high.org
December 1
Blairsville
•Misty Mountain Railroad
America’s largest, privately-
owned O-guage Train Display
with 14 Lionel trains traveling
over a mile of track through
a 4,000 square foot fantasy
layout of Southern Appalachia.
America’s largest, privately-
owned O-guage Train Display
with 14 Lionel trains traveling
over a mile of track through a
4,000 square foot fantasy lay-
out of Southern Appalachia.
December 4
Hiawassee
Wine Tasting
Wine Cottage is located in
Young Harris of Union County,
where is part of North Georgia
Blue Ridge Mountain and
border with Hayesville, NC and
Clemson, SC. We focused on
providing international gour-
met afordable, high-quality
fne wine, cheese, cofee and
chocolate, more and customer
satisfaction - we will do ev-
erything we can to meet your
expectations.
December 5
Brasstown
•Fireside Sale.
Fireside Sale at John C.
Campbell Folk School 10-5 pm.
Stroll through the beautifully
decorated Keith House. Cozy
up to the fre in the Com-
munity Room and shop for
holiday gifts made by local
and regional artists. For more
information call: 828-837-
2775/800-365-5724 or visit
www.folkschool.org.
December 31
Brasstown
•Possum Drop
16th Annual New Year’s Eve
Possum Drop At Clay’s Corner
in Brasstown, NC. Ring in the
New Year with a Miss Possum
Contest, bluegrass music, Little
Brasstown Church Choir, the
Blessing, cider and good clean
fun. For more information call:
828-837-3797.
Submit your
events to our
Calendar at info@
mountainfreepress.
com
25 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 AGENDA
[ Calendar ]
Month of December
Sycamore Crossing
Antiques and Collectibles
for a One-of-a-Kind Home
At Sycamore Crossing
in Blue Ridge you will
find art from local
artists, antiques from
all over the world & a
smile to greet you.
Come say hello.
Over 5000 square
feet of gorgeous
antiques, collectibles,
vintage linens &
primitive furniture
from around the
world. Located on
Main Street in
Downtown
Blue Ridge.
Jane Whaley
Owner
531 East Main Street
Blue Ridge, GA 30513
706-632-3366
www.sycamore crossing.com
Reclaimed
Cypress
Artists Jessi
& Dee Vance
-
Wine Cottage
Fine Wine, Cheese, Coee & More...
1615 Hwy 17 Unit #18
Young Harris, GA 30582
706-896-9238
winecottageinc@aol.com
www.winecottageinc.com
Mountain Cuisine
[Dining Directory]
CHEROKEE
COUNTY, NC
Chevelle 66
66 Hiawassee Street
Murphy, NC
(828) 835-7001
Fare: American / Steaks
ShoeBooties Cafe
25 Peachtree Street
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-4589
Fare: American / Multi Cultural
Doyle’s Cedar Hill
Restaurant
925 Andrews Rd, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-3400
Fare: American Fine Dining
Murphy’s Chophouse
130 Valley River Avenue,
Murphy, NC
(828) 835-3287
Fare: Steaks/Seafood - Fine
Dining
Wings N Things
269 Valley River Avenue,
Murphy, NC
(828) 835-3232
Fare: Wings/Barbecue
Subway
451 W US Highway 64, Mur-
phy, NC
(828) 837-9999
Fare: Sandwiches
Brothers Restaurant
(828) 835-9100
Fare: American - Steaks/Sea-
food
No Name Deli
16 Old Ranger Road
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-9138
Fare: Sandwiches, Deli.
Murphy’s Pub
29 Tennessee Street
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-0303
Fare: Bar / Sandwiches
New Happy Garden Buffet
628-1064 U.S. 74,
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-0711
Fare: Asian / Chinese
Pizza Hut
680 W US Highway 64, Mur-
phy, NC
(828) 837-7314
Fare: Pizza
Main Street
85 Hiwassee St, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-7648
Fare: American / Burgers
Main Street
52 Hiwassee St, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-0500
Fare: Pizza
Papa’s Pizza To-Go
530 W US Highway 64
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-3335
Fare: Pizza
Rib Country Murphy
2121 U.S. 64, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-4444
Fare: Barbecue
China Town Restaurant
1504 Andrews Road
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-9898
Fare: Chinese
Herbs Pit Bar-B-Que
15735 U.S. 64
Murphy, NC
(828) 494-5367
Category: Barbecue
Royal Waffe King
780 U.S. 64, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-3242
Fare: Breakfast Food / Diner
Blue Mountain Coffee &
Grill
30 Nc Highway 141
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-1362
Fare: American / Steak /
Burgers
Monte Alban Restaurant
Mexicano
865 W US Highway 64, Mur-
phy, NC
(828) 835-9767
Fare: Mexican
Cook’s Diner
647 Andrews Rd, Murphy, NC
(828) 837-6862
Fare: Diner Style / Burgers
Mountainside Diner
7460 Nc Highway 141, Marble
(828) 837 -3100
Downtown Bakery At
Murphy
29 Tennessee Street,
Murphy, NC
(828) 835-8986
Fare: Bakery Goods
Waffe House
968 W US Highway 64, Mur-
phy, NC
(828) 837-0600
Fare: Breakfast / Diner
Italian Cafe & Deli
4195 W US Highway 64
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-1301
Fare: Italian
El Manzanillo Mexican
Restaurant
1370 W US Highway 64
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-9624
Fare: Mexican
Wildfowers Treat Shop
33 Peachtree Street
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-1415
Fare: Desserts
Quiznos Sub Sandwiches
3090 U.S. 64, Murphy, NC
(828) 835-3300
Fare: Sandwiches
Grizzly Bear Restaurant
5560 W US Highway 64,
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-0707
Fare: American / Diner
Blimpie Subs & Salads
2330 Us 19, Murphy, NC
(828) 835-9150
Fare: Sandwiches / Salads
Antica Roma Caffe
19 Tennessee Street,
Murphy, NC
(828) 837-5300
Fare: Italian / Sandwich /
Bakery
Elsie’s Steak & Seafood
358 Main Street
Andrews, NC
(828) 321-4915
Fare: Steak/ Seafood
Monte Alban Restaurant
Mexicano
498 Main Street, Andrews, NC
(828) 321-1802
Fare: Mexican
Huddle House
148 Main Street,
Andrews, NC
(828) 321-8100
Fare: Diner / Breakfast
Chestnuts Cafe
493 Main Street
Andrews,NC
(828) 321-4566
Fare: American / Multicultural
Burger Basket
1679 Main Street,
Andrews, NC
(828) 321-3785
Fare: Hamburger
China One
14048 Us 19
Where will
you eat tonight?
The Smokies’ most Complete Dining Directory
26 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 DINING GUIDE
[Dining Directory]
Join us every Wednesday night
From 5-9 pm for
SUSHI NI GHT
Offering assorted rolls, nigiri and Hand rolled varieties
Also
Join us nightly from 5-6 pm for our
EARLY BI RD MENU
Choice of soup or salad, 5 entrees, Vegetable and one side dish.
Br i n g i n t h i s a d a n d r ecei v e a
Com p lem en t a r y d es s er t .
We look forward to welcoming you!
For reservations &
More information. please call (828) 488-2826
9400 US Hwy 19 W • Bryson City, NC 28713
www.nvnc.com
Owned and Operated by
Chef James Reaux of
Murphy’s Chophouse
Mountain Cuisine
[Dining Directory]
Andrews, NC
(828) 321-3366
Fare: Chinese
The Daily Grind
46 Valley River Ave.
Murphy, NC
(828) 835-7322
1060 Main Street.
Andrews, NC
(828) 321-2252
Fare: Sandwich/ Cofee
GRAHAM
COUNTY, NC
Subway
272 Rodney Orr Bypass
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-1530
Fare: Sandwiches
Lynn’s Place
237 East Main Street,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-9777
Fare: American
Phillips Restaurant
248 North Main Street
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-3332
Fare: American
Pacefeco Mexican Res-
taurant
429 Rodney Orr Bypass,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-8448
Fare: Mexican
Black Knight Drive-In
810 Tallulah Road,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-4609
Fare: Diner Style
Timeout
457 Rodney Orr Bypass,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-3777
Fare: American
Stecoah Diner
258 Johnson Dr,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-8430
Fare: Diner Style
Ebbs Drive Inn
448 Rodney Orr Bypass,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-3980
Fare: Diner Style
Crisp & Crisp Inc
120 School House Road,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-4892
Fare: American
Blue Waters Mountain
Lodge
292 Pine Ridge Road,
Robbinsville, NC
(828) 479-8888
Fare: American Fine Dining
CLAY
COUNTY, NC
The Copper Door
2 Sullivan Street,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 237-4030
Fare: American Restaurant
Rib Country Hayesville
580 North Carolina 69,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-9597
Fare: Barbecue Restaurant
Pizza Divas
18 Creekside Circle,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-3888
Fare: Pizza Restaurant
Angelo’s Downtown Pizza
45 Main Street,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-2500
Fare: Pizza
Alazan Mexican Restau-
rant
964 Nc 69,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-2727
Fare: Mexican
Cottage Salad Station
Market & Deli
955 Nc 69,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-8473
Category: Restaurants
Monte Alban Mexican
Restaurant
18 Creekside Circle,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-1631
Fare: Mexican
Mika’s Pizza
165 Highway 64 W
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-6366
Fare: Pizza Restaurant
Sequoyah Fine Dining
1750 Mountain Harbour Drive,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-6200
Fare: Restaurant
Burger Boy
4 Nc 69,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-3636
Fare: Burgers
Ridges Country Club
1665 Mountain Harbour Dr,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-6200
Fare: American
Chevelle’s 69
983 Nc 69,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-6069
Fare: Steaks/Burgers
Cafe Touche
82 Main Street,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 361-9475
Fare: Sandwiches
Maryann’s Country
Kitchen
495 Hwy 64 Business,
Hayesville, NC
(828) 389-4888
Fare: Southern


SWAIN
COUNTY, NC
Mountain Perks Espresso
Bar & Cafe
9 Depot Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-9561
Fare: Cofee & Sandwiches
Pasqualino’s Italian Res-
taurant
25 Everett Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-9555
Fare: Italian
The Filling Station Deli
Sub Shop
145 Everett Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-1919
Fare: Sandwich Restaurant
Anthony’s Restaurante &
Pizzeria
103 Depot Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-8898
Fare: Pizza Restaurant
Everett Street Diner
126 Everett Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-0123
Fare: Casual Dining
Fremont Inn
245 Fryemont Rd,
Bryson City, NC
(800) 845-4879
Fare: American
Naber’s Drive In
Restaurant
1245 Main Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-2877
Fare: American Diner
Guayabitos Mexican
Restaurant
236 Highway 19 S,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-1336
Fare: Mexican
Yummi Yummi
33 Rector Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-1240
Fare: Chinese Restaurant
Blue Ridge Grill
80 Songbird Forest Red,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-8881
Category: Restaurant
Iron Skillet
165 Everett Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-4766
Fare: American
Riverside Grille
1341 Main Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-2824
Fare: American
Tammy’s Cafe
27 Fry Street,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-6284
Fare: Sandwiches
Burger Basket
12351 Highway 19 W,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-2662
Fare: Hamburgers
13 Moons
9400 Highway 19,
Bryson City, NC
(828) 488-2826
Fare: Fine Dining
TOWNS
COUNTY, GA
Asiano Restaurant
1382 U.S. 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-0508
Fare: Asian/ Sushi
Daniels Steak House
273 Big Sky Drive,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-8008
Fare: Steak
China Grill
217 South Main Street,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-8088
Fare: Chinese
Monte Alban Restaurant
581 North Main Street
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-6698
Fare: Mexican
Old Hiawassee Grille
3499 U.S. 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-4141
Fare: American / Steak
Michaelee’s Chocolate
Caffe
142 North Main Street,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-2752
Fare: Italian / American
El Cancun Mexican
Restaurant
3360 US Highway 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-7677
Fare: Mexican
Big Al’s Pizza Co.
757 Bell Creek Road,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-1970
Fare: Pizza Restaurant
Mossy Bottoms Cafe
1620 Highway 76 # 13,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-0553
Fare: Sandwiches
Hawg Heaven
1586 U.S. 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-1807
Fare: BBQ
Bear Meadows Grill
715 N Main St,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-0520
Fare: Casual American
Cafe Portofno
3295 Dogwood Lane,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 435-0502
Fare: Italian / American
The Pitz
1088 Georgia 75,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-6232
Fare: BBQ
Grandma’s Lap
715 N Main St,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-3434
Fare: Southern
Bledsoe’s Corner Cafe
101 South Main Street
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-1941
Fare: Breakfast Casual
Mamasu’s Brick Oven
Pizza
1620 U.S. 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-7492
Fare: Pizza
10% OFF
ENTIRE
CHECK
Murphy, NC
865 US Hwy 64
Murphy, NC
828-835-9767
OPEN 7 DAYS
FROM 11AM
With this ad - expires 11/1/2010
Not valid with any other oers.
Sundays from 12 Noon
Join us every Wednesday night
From 5-9 pm for
SUSHI NI GHT
Offering assorted rolls, nigiri and Hand rolled varieties
Also
Join us nightly from 5-6 pm for our
EARLY BI RD MENU
Choice of soup or salad, 5 entrees, Vegetable and one side dish.
Br i n g i n t h i s a d a n d r ecei v e a
Com p lem en t a r y d es s er t .
We look forward to welcoming you!
For reservations &
More information. please call (828) 488-2826
9400 US Hwy 19 W • Bryson City, NC 28713
www.nvnc.com
Owned and Operated by
Chef James Reaux of
Murphy’s Chophouse
27 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 DINING GUIDE
Did we miss your restaurant? Call 828.407.0931
Chevelle
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The Fun Starts Now
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Live Entertainment
Bring this ad in for $1 o an Entree
Chevelle 66
Murphy
(828) 835-7001
Chevelle 69
Hayesville
(828) 389-6069
www.chevellerestaurants.com
01/01/11
Shake Healthy Llc
67 Gander Gap Road,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-7425
Fare: Healthy
Oaks Restaurant
3499 U.S. 76,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-4141
Fare: Fine Dining
Imperial Palace Chinese
Restaurant
Ste 115NW, 1700 Georgia 17,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-0925
Fare: Chinese
Deer Lodge Dining Room
7466 Highway 17
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-2726
Fare: Steak
Enrico’s Italian
Restaurant
687 Main st., suite 5,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-1950
Fare: Italian
Crossroads Restaurant
3915 US Highway 76 West,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 896-1786
Fare: Steaks
Brother’s at Willow Ranch
6223 US Hwy 76,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-1272
Fare: Seafood Restaurant
Moschetto Continental
Cafe
1155 Main Street,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-1420
Fare: Italian American
Chophouse of Hiawassee
625 Highway 76 W,
Hiawassee, GA
(706) 896-3200
Fare: Fine Dining
Brasstown Valley Dining
6321 U S Highway 76
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-4617
Fare: Fine Dining
Mary Ellen’s Southern
Grill
1615 Georgia 17
Young Harris, GA
(706) 896-1048
Fare: Southern
Taste of Chicago
3921 Highway 76 E,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 896-8922
Fare: Pizza
Mary Ann’s Country
Kitchen
871 US Highway 76,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-2136
Fare: Southern
Young Harris Family
Restaurant
7184 U S Highway 76,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-3258
Fare: Southern
State Line Diner
2631 Georgia 66,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-0696
Fare: Southern
La Dolce Vita
3921 Hwy. 76 east,
young harris, GA
(706) 896-7560
Fare: Italian Restaurant
Bread of Life Family
Restaurant
871 Main Street,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-2136
Fare: American
Little Italy Sandwich
Shoppe
1615 Georgia 17,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 435-0511
Fare: Italian / Sandwiches
Roosters
1147 Main Street,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-6661
Fare: American
Old Willow Restaurant
6223 U.S. 76,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 379-1272
Fare: Southern
Mima’s Cantina
Ste K, 3921 U.S. 76,
Young Harris, GA
(706) 896-6870
Fare: Mexican
UNION
COUNTY, GA
Rib Country Blairsvillle
373 Kousins Drive,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-3530
Category: Barbecue Restaurant
Hole In the Wall
12 Town Square,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-5888
Category: Restaurant
The Plantation House
110 School Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 835-2554
Category: restaurant
Comfort Cafe
28 Town Square,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-8825
Category: Restaurant
Golden Gate
19 Merchants Walk,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-4834
Category: Chinese Restaurant
Antonietta’s Grill
130 Plott Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-5305
Category: Italian Restaurant
Cook’s Country Kitchen
105 Pat Haralson Memorial
Drive,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-1332
Fatz Cafe
42 Highway 515,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-1643
Category: Restaurant
No 1 Chinese Restaurant
342 Blue Ridge Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-1933
Big Cheese
761 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-8686
Category: Restaurant
Blairsville Restaurant
229 Earnest Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-6921
Griddle Cafe & Deli
190 Young Harris Street, Blairs-
ville, GA
(706) 781-1330
Category: Restaurants
Cookie Jar Restaurant
223 Wellborn St,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-3600
Mike’s Seafood Market
& Grill
513 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-9519
Category: Seafood Res-
taurant
Hilltop Cafe
583 Blue Ridge Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-3115
Category: Restaurant
Saw Mill Place
1150 Pat Haralson Memorial
Drive,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-1250
Muffy’s Mountain Burgers
519 Blue Ridge Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 835-2992
Category: Hamburger Res-
taurant
Saw Mill Place
845 Pat Haralson Memorial
Drive,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-1250
Category: Restaurant
Dan’s Grill Inc
305 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-0013
Category: Restaurant
Nancy’s Pizza & Subs
100 Town Square,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-5636
Category: Pizza Restaurant
JNJ Cafe
380 Bracketts Way,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 835-1504
Category: American Restaurant
Chef David’s Home
Cookin’
Ste 5, 28 Town Square,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 835-1556
Category: Restaurant
Aviator Cafe
342 Blue Ridge Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-1043
Category: Restaurant
J D Roosters Winghouse
117 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-6654
Category: Restaurant
Fatz Cafe
206 Highway 515 E,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 781-1643
Category: Restaurants
Mike’s Seafood Market
& Grill
121 Murphy Hwy,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-9519
Category: Restaurants
Blue Moon Research Inc
100 Summit Way,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-1072
Category: Restaurant
Grinds & Glazes
233 Highway 515,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-0748
Category: Restaurant
Ficilys Pizza & Subs
305 Murphy Hwy,
Blairsville, Georgia
(706) 745-0232
Category: Pizza Restaurant
Ils Wayport
19 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-2445
Category: Restaurant
Downtown Pizza Co
417 Blue Ridge Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 835-1211
Category: Pizza Restaurant
Gallucci’s Italian Bistro
190 Young Harris Street,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-7151
Category: French Restaurant
Monte Alban Restaurante
566 Murphy Hwy # 104
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-5998
Category: Mexican Restaurant
Dan’s Grill Inc
65 Murphy Highway,
Blairsville, GA
(706) 745-0013
Category: Restaurant
FANNIN
COUNTY, GA
Victorian House Restau-
rant
224 West Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 258-2275
Southern Highlands
Seafood
2414 East 1st Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3615
Category: Seafood Restaurant


[Dining Directory] [Dining Directory]
28 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 DINING GUIDE
Submit your restaurant to info@mountainfreepress.com
F
P
ELSIE’S STEAK & SEAFOOD
358 Maln Street - Andrews, NC 2890l
(828) 321-4915
Open 7 Days A Week
Monday - Thursday ll a.m. tlll 8 p.m.
Prlday and Saturday ll a.m. tlll 9 p.m.
Sunday ll a.m. tlll 3 p.m.
Not valid with any other offer
451 US Hwy 64 W.
Murphy NC 28906
828-837-9999
One Coupon
Per Customer
20% Of f
Br eak f ast
Sandw i c h

Chinese / American
Buffet and Grill
1164 West US Hwy 64
Murphy, NC 28906
www.HGBUFFETandGRILL.com
Toccoa Riverside Res-
taurant
8055 Aska Road,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-7891
Serenity Garden Cafe
657 East Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 258-4949
Category: Restaurant
Great Eats Deli & Bakery
611 East Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3094
Category: Restaurants
Blue Ridge Mountain
Bar-B-Q
3870 East 1st Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6996
Category:
Barbecue Restaurant
Angelina’s Gourmet
Italian Market
3640 East 1st Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3354
Category: Italian Restaurant
Blue Jeans Pizza & Pasta
11 Mountain St # C,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6502
Category: Pizza Restaurant
Blue Ridge Brewery
187 Depot Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6611
Category: Restaurants
Village Restaurant
4131 East 1st Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-2277
Christy Lee’s Courtyard
Grille
588 East Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 946-5100
Category: Seafood Restaurant
A Tin Loong Chinese Res-
taurant
5771 Appalachian Highway,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6090
Circle J Family Steak
House
4004 East 1st Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-5955
Category: Restaurants
Cabin Grill
5771 Appalachian Highway,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3999
Category: Restaurant
Yellow Jacket Restaurant
2755 Blue Ridge Dr,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 492-3475
Golden Star
5705 Appalachian Highway,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6090
Category: Chinese Restaurant
Goodfellas Restaurant
2098 Blue Ridge Drive,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 964-4663
El Sol Mexican
Restaurant
39 Lance Ln Ste 1,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 258-3300
Blackberry Ridge Eatery
5140 Appalachian Hwy,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-5678
Category: Restaurant
China 1
4295 Old Highway 76,
Blue Ridge, GA
706) 258-3658
Category: Chinese Restaurant
Indigo Hills Restaurant
3365 East 1st Street
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3663
Someplace In Time
631 East Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-8533
Category: Restaurant
L & L Beanery
260 West Main Street,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-3242
Category: Cafe & Restaurant
Powerhouse Grill
2985 Old Highway 5,
Blue Ridge, GA
(706) 632-6754
Category: Restaurant
[Dining Directory]
29 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 DINING
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Starting January, 2010 the Smoky Mountain Free
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30 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 MARKET
the Market
FOR ADVERTISING INFO PLEASE CALL 828.407.0931
Outdoor/Casual Clothing, Footwear,
Accessories, Cabin Decor & Gis
706-896-0028
130 N. Main St. - Hiawassee, GA 30546
Mountain Lifestyles Emporium
Auto ~ Home ~ Life ~ Health ~ Business
Farley Insurance Services
P.O. Box 640
1004 HWY 64 West
Murphy, NC
Rodney L. Brown
Murphy (828) 8377447
Fax (828) 837-9105
Cell (828) 361-1556
email: brown@farleyagency.com
Call for Free Consultation
!LÞÞ¬× EZE.EGE.ZGOO
Specializing in Service & Repair for X-Box 360 Consoles
WE CAN GUARANTE NO MORE
OVERHEATING
Ring Of Death Repairs · Memory & GPU Errors · Upgrades
Ask about our 'Pre-Furb¨ and 'X-Clamp¨ Solutions!
Classifed Advertising: Classifeds are a fat $9 per Month. Maximum of 30
words. Any classifed exceeding 30 words will be charged a fee of $.10 per
word. You can submit classifeds through our website at mountainfreepress.com
or you can email your classifed ad to - classifeds@mountainfreepress.com.
Current Classifed Deadline: January 1 at 5:00 pm
Display Advertising: For information on placing a display ad please call
828.407.0931 and a sales representative will be happy to assist you with pricing.
Current Display Ad Deadline: December 31 at 5:00 pm
F
P
828.407.0931 | mountainfreepress.com
Classifeds
Motorcycles
---------------------
1978 BMW R100S Restored.
52K original Miles64 Han-
nigan Ferring, Corbin Saddle,
BMW Bags, Lufmeister Trunk,
and Many Many Extras Letting
it go at $4,000. 828.557.3004
Campers / RV’s
---------------------
Jayco Quest 294 J Camper.
29 Foot, sleeps 8. Queen Size
bed. Full Kitchen with oven
and 3 burner stove. Fridge and
Separate freezer. Full bath, lots
of storage, A/C unit AM/FM
CD player, TV, ALL NEW TIRES
Including the Spare. Includes
weight distributing Hitch. Ex-
cellent Condition. Very Clean
Used very little. $8,900 or best
ofer. Call 828-837-4186.
Real Estate
-------------------
For Sale 28.69 acres, some
owner Financing 29,900 per
acre, can subdivide No Ristric-
tions, 1 ½ miles on left Side of
Hwy 64 East & Downings creek
Great location, City Sewer avail-
able, Creek & more, Call 828-
361-0948
For Sale by owner 1.70 acres,
Commercial, city sewer& water
1274 hwy 64 west, Hayesville
near Ford dealership. Reduced
$169,900.00 Call 828-361-0948
For Sale Two commercial
buildings on Hwy 64 east City
sewer, well, over 35,000 sq. ft.
fnished,
In each building, On 5 acres,
parking lots, excellent condi-
tion, multiple uses. Asking price
reduced $2,900,000.00, Call
828-389-8752
Comm. Rentals
---------------------
Commercial Unit available
beside 95.1 FM in Young Harris.
Includes 95.1 advertising pack-
age for your business. Call for
details. 706-379-9770.
Place your classifed online at
mountainfreepress.com
For a LIMITED
time only -
Classifeds only $5
for 30 words when
placed online at
www.mountainfreepress.com
Offer Valid Until December 31, 2010
Mountain Screens, Inc.
Olde World Quality Workmanship
Specializing in Decks, Porches,
Doors, Screen Repair, &
Custom Made Screens & Shutters
Casper and Jackie Jentzsch
mountainscreens@gmail.com
828-557-1275
FREE ESTIMATES
The Club Shoppe
Custom Fitted and Custom Made Golf Clubs
t Repairs
t Golf Simulator
t We carry most major Brands
3090 US Hwy 64 W. #105
Murphy, NC 28906
828.837.0505
Your ad could go here -
call 828.407.0931
31 Smoky Mountain Free Press • November - December 2010 MARKET
the Market
!LÞÞ¬× EZE.EGE.ZGOO
Specializing in Service & Repair for X-Box 360 Consoles
WE CAN GUARANTE NO MORE
OVERHEATING
Ring Of Death Repairs · Memory & GPU Errors · Upgrades
Ask about our 'Pre-Furb¨ and 'X-Clamp¨ Solutions!
828.407.0931 | mountainfreepress.com
Classifeds
Motorcycles
---------------------
1978 BMW R100S Restored.
52K original Miles64 Han-
nigan Ferring, Corbin Saddle,
BMW Bags, Lufmeister Trunk,
and Many Many Extras Letting
it go at $4,000. 828.557.3004
Campers / RV’s
---------------------
Jayco Quest 294 J Camper.
29 Foot, sleeps 8. Queen Size
bed. Full Kitchen with oven
and 3 burner stove. Fridge and
Separate freezer. Full bath, lots
of storage, A/C unit AM/FM
CD player, TV, ALL NEW TIRES
Including the Spare. Includes
weight distributing Hitch. Ex-
cellent Condition. Very Clean
Used very little. $8,900 or best
ofer. Call 828-837-4186.
Real Estate
-------------------
For Sale 28.69 acres, some
owner Financing 29,900 per
acre, can subdivide No Ristric-
tions, 1 ½ miles on left Side of
Hwy 64 East & Downings creek
Great location, City Sewer avail-
able, Creek & more, Call 828-
361-0948
For Sale by owner 1.70 acres,
Commercial, city sewer& water
1274 hwy 64 west, Hayesville
near Ford dealership. Reduced
$169,900.00 Call 828-361-0948
For Sale Two commercial
buildings on Hwy 64 east City
sewer, well, over 35,000 sq. ft.
fnished,
In each building, On 5 acres,
parking lots, excellent condi-
tion, multiple uses. Asking price
reduced $2,900,000.00, Call
828-389-8752
Comm. Rentals
---------------------
Commercial Unit available
beside 95.1 FM in Young Harris.
Includes 95.1 advertising pack-
age for your business. Call for
details. 706-379-9770.
mountain Home Services
[ They can FIX it ]
New Homes
Log or Stick Built
LANDRITH
CONSTRUCTION
828-644-5931
ON YOUR PROPERTY OR
IN ONE OF OUR DEVELOPMENTS
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974
John Boy
E XT E RMI NAT I NG
CUSTOM PEST CONTROL SERVICE
5FSNJUF$POUSPMt)PNF*OTQFDUJPOT
'MFB$POUSPMt.PJTUVSF$POUSPM
Ventilation
/FX$POTUSVDUJPO
Soil Treatment
4FOJPS$JUJ[FO%JTDPVOU
828-837-3566
Gary Thompson
Owner
NC LIC # 981PW
We Make Mouse Calls!
SILVER SKID-STEER SERVICE
Grading
Driveways
Homesites
Hole Auger
Trenching
Underbrushing & Clearing
NC Certified Septic Installer
DAN SILVER
828-837-5226
828-361-7160
Free Estimates
Your Listen and Win Station
Toll Free Request Line: 1-866-500-9511
LISTEN LIVE at www.951.fm
Office: 706-379-9770

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