AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

................................................................................................................................................

Chapter 9

1896 ­ 1903 Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

The Four Wars • Economic Dislocation and Population Loss •  The Political Economy of the Filipino Republic
Four   wars   broke   out   in   the   archipelago   over   1896­1899.   The  Christian Filipino revolution against Spain began in August 1896.  President Emilio Aguinaldo formally declared victory in September  1898; the Filipino Republic, the first in Asia, was inaugurated in  January 1899. The   Spanish­American   war   was   featured   by   an   American   naval  victory over the antiquated Spanish fleet on May 1, 1898 in Manila  Bay.   On   this   basis,   the   American   President   William   McKinley  issued   instructions   on   May   19,   1898   directing   the   military  occupation of the archipelago. The United States began the hostilities in the Christian Filipino­ American War on February 4, 1899. The war dragged on until June  1906. The   fourth   war   was   fought   by   the   United   States   against   the  Muslims of Mindanao and Sulu from July 1899 to June 1912. We can summarize the economic and population loss from 1896 to  1903  only for  Luzon  and the  Visayas.  The   setback to  agriculture  was concentrated and prolonged in the rice sector, with rice imports  of  P129,215,500 over  1901­1910.  A survey  of  the approach  of  the  Filipino Republic to political economy concludes the chapter.      

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

1

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

The Four Wars
The principal action that began the revolution at the end of August 1896  was an attack on Manila by urban irregulars who were routed by the regime's  forces.   The   immediate   shift   of   hostilities   to   the   nearby   Tagalog   provinces  gave   the   revolution   its   essential   nature.   The   fighting   men   were  overwhelmingly   rural   workers,   small   farmers   and   hacienda   tenants   who  fought under the pueblo upper class, their natural leaders. During its initial phase (1896­1897) the revolution was most active in the  provinces around Manila. Cavite won its liberation as early as October 1896.  The fighting was also hard in Batangas, Laguna, Morong, Bulacan, Nueva  Ecija,   Tayabas,   and   Bataan,   with   the  rebels   organizing   in   Pampanga   and  Tarlac. To   the  pueblo  elites,  many   of  whom   were  educated   in  Manila,  political  aspirations   were   clear.   To   the   fighting   men,   the   immediate   issue   was  economic and  agrarian,  revolving  around   the issue  of land. The  haciendas  held by the Augustinians, Dominicans, and Recollects totalled some 165,000  hectares. In Cavite alone almost 50,000 hectares of the best farm lands and  pueblo   sites   were   in   the   friar   haciendas.   The   Cavite   pueblos   of   Naic   and  Santa   Cruz   de   Malabon   (the   modern   Tanza)   were   embraced   within   the  Dominican   haciendas;   San   Francisco   de   Malabon   (present­day   Gen.   Trias)  was in the Augustinian hacienda of the same name; and the Recollects' San  Juan   de   Imus   hacienda   encompassed   the   entire   towns   of   Bacoor,   Imus,  Cavite Viejo, and Dasmarinas. Because many of the families who had lost  their  lands  left   the  pueblos   and   became  outlaws,   the province   came  to  be  known as the “cradle of the tulisan.” The rebels expelled the friars and took  over the haciendas. During this phase of the revolution there was little fighting in the Visayas  and none in the Muslim south. In Luzon, Manila was swollen with refugee  Spaniards and friars from the provinces, but it was besieged by the rebels.  The  delivery of provincial  produce and the businesses servicing  the export  and import trade ground to a halt, and the port was closed. Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 2

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

The   fighting   in   the   provinces   disrupted   the   local   economies.   Food  shortages were not acute in areas where the planting of the new rice crop had  been done by August, but this was shortlived. Farm labor was dislocated and  the fields idled because most of the rebels were farm workers, but this was  remedied by the women and some men from the surplus pueblo residents.  But trade between the pueblos and Manila was paralyzed. In Cavite, where  the fighting was most extensive and furious, the economy was in ruins. In  Batangas and Laguna, where the Cavitenos crossed and attacked the enemy  garrisons, and which were staging areas for enemy counter­offensives against  Cavite, the losses were only slightly lighter, as was the case in Bulacan and  Nueva Ecija. In scores of provinces the cedula and other taxes could not be collected.  The   friar   haciendas   and   the   lands   and   livestock   of   Spaniards   were   taken  over.   Leading   the   seizures   were   the   dispossessed   landless   families,   the  kasamá and tulisan. The latter went back to the towns, some of their leaders  becoming   officers   in   the   rebel   forces.   Lastly,   the   war   produced   numerous  evacuee   families,   among   whom   were   rich   inquilinos   and   traders   who   had  homes in the capital. These flocked to Cavite and other provinces where the  revolution was strong. The inquilinos were cut off from their landholdings  and the traders from their businesses, and the trade in provisions gave way  to confiscation and requisitioning by the belligerent forces. The   second   phase   of   the   revolution   just   after   mid­May   in   1898   was  marked   by   unbroken   successes.   The   nation   was   finally   united   when   the  revolutionary leaders in the Visayas acknowledged unity with Luzon under  the overall leadership of General Aguinaldo. It was the beginning of the new  planting season, and the dislocation of agriculture and farm labor broadened  and deepened. Civilian movement of goods in normal trade remained  at a  standstill.   But   exultation   and   resolve   supported   the   proclamation   of  independence   on   June   12,   followed   by   organic   laws   organizing   local  governments and the revolutionary government. The men of the pueblos, who  had   been   irregular   rebel   forces,   were   either   absorbed   into   local   militia  commands   or   mustered   into   a   regular   revolutionary   army.   The   pueblo  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 3

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

governments had to support the local militia, the army, and the revolutionary  government. Since 1896 the rebels had been supported by their leaders from  the   local   elite.   Now   the   latter's   resources   were   being   exhausted   by   the  breakdown of commercial agriculture and trade. Aguinaldo observed in late  July   1898   that   “the   pueblos   are   retrogressing   with   giant   strides   towards  impoverishment.” Nevertheless, the victorious conclusion of the revolution was announced  by   Aguinaldo   in   mid­September   during   the   opening   of   the   revolutionary  congress in Malolos, Bulacan. A republican constitution was promulgated and  the first democratic republic in Asia was inaugurated in January 1899. The short fighting in Manila Bay between the US navy and the wooden  Spanish   warships   had   no   immediate   effects   on   the   economy.   Manila   was  spared; it was delivered to the Americans in August after a negotiated mock  assault. The Americans held only Manila and a few points allowed them by  the besieging Filipinos, pending the peace negotiations in Paris. In the peace  treaty of December 1898 Spain ceded the entire archipelago to the United  States.   The   port   of   Manila   had   been   reopened   in   mid­August,   but   the  environs  were occupied  by the Filipino forces, and exports until December  were below a third of the 1895 level. The Christian Filipino­American War covered all of Luzon; in the Visayas  the main fighting was in Samar and Leyte, Cebu, and Panay and Negros.  This was the most costly of the wars. The   major   engagements   during   the   first   phase   of   the   war   were   fought  from the suburbs north of Manila through northern Luzon. Pitched battles  were   fought   at   battalion­   and   regiment­strength   from   February   until  November, ravaging the rich corridor along the railroad from north of Manila  to Pangasinan. The strength of the Filipino army was concentrated in this theater and  suffered crippling losses in this type of war. At this point the Filipinos shifted  to guerrilla warfare, with the rest of the war moving to the south of Manila,  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 4

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

the Bicol, and the Visayas. The guerrilla phase evolved into a people's war; the guerrilla units were  sustained and supported by the folk of the pueblos, including those under  enemy occupation; the people paid taxes to the local governments organized  by   the   occupying   enemy   forces,   as   well   as   to   the   guerrilla   “shadow  governments.” The   United   States   president   McKinley   had   assured   the   Congress   in  December   1899   that   the   US   army   was   merely   quelling   a   small   “Tagalog  rebellion” in the islands. After he was assassinated in 1901 the three­year old  affair was an embarrassment to the new president; the American troops in  the islands exceeded the normal peace­time strength of the US Army. The  tactic that the US Army adopted in order to stop the guerrilla war in Luzon  was marked by incredible atrocities. It began with the herding of the entire  population of Laguna and Batangas, about 300,000 non­combatant men and  women   and   children,   in   concentration   camps   in   each   pueblo   of   the   two  provinces starting on Christmas Day, 1901. The people from the barrios had  to haul their food and provisions, poultry, and anything else they could carry,  to   a   designated   cramped   area   in   the   pueblo.   The   US   Army   burned   or  destroyed houses, crops and backyard plants, animals, plows, fishing boats,  etc., left behind in the barrios; any Filipino crossing the lines was to be shot.  The purpose of the camps, referred to in the American documents as “zones of  protection,” was to cut off the guerrillas from the services and supplies they  received from the pueblo folk. As the planting season drew near, Gen. Miguel  Malvar,   commanding   in   the   military   zone   south   of   Manila,   foresaw   the  imminent starvation of his people; he surrendered in April 1902. In July, the  Americans declared that the “Tagalog rebellion” was suppressed. But the war was not over, and the US Army had to wage a “pacification  campaign.”   In   1903,   to   deal   with   the   guerrillas   in   Albay   in   the   Bicol,   it  herded   the   entire   population   of   the   province   into   concentration   camps.   In  1905, it was the turn of the people of Batangas and Cavite to go into the  camps. The US Army war against non­combatants ended the people's support  of   the   guerrilla   forces   in   Luzon.   In   the   Visayas   in   1906   five   US   Army  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 5

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

battalions occupied Leyte; this finally brought the long war to a dose. The Moro Wars began in 1899 when the US Army occupied Mindanao and  Sulu on the strength of the Treaty of Paris. (The Americans tried to impose  the   cedula   on   the   Muslims.)   The   Muslim   mode   of   fighting   began   with   an  ambush   or   raid   on   an   isolated   enemy   troop   or   patrol,   after   which   the  Muslims, under their datus or sultan, would retire to a stronghold or  cotta.   The warriors and their women and children, numbering many hundreds or  more than a thousand, would await the enemy and make a last stand. They  would be pounded by hours or days of artillery fire before the hand­to­hand  fighting. The principal engagements in this kind of war were in Kudarangan and  Laksamana in Cotabato (1904 and 1905), and in Bud Dajo and Bud Bagsak  (1906 and 1912) in Sulu. The fall of Bud Bagsak marked the end of the Moro  Wars. There was no significant cultivation sector in Mindanao and Sulu, and  the main effect of the war on the economy of the region was the paralyzation  of the Jolo trade. Economic Dislocation and Population Loss The   money   costs   to   the   US   Army   of   its   wars   in   the   archipelago   are  officially   reported   at   $169,853,512   from   mid­1898   until   July   1902   and  $114,515,643 thereafter until June 1907. These figures do not include costs to  the US Navy. An independent civilian estimate of the “cost of the Islands” to  the United States during approximately the same period is $308,369,155 and  confirms the official report. It is not possible to make a similar reckoning of the cost of the wars to the  Filipinos. The dislocations and losses since 1896 produced crises that endured  into the next decades. The severest dislocations were in pueblo agriculture,  the base of the predominantly agrarian society and economy. On hectarage  under cultivation, the Census of 1903 report adopted the Spanish estimate of  2,827,000 hectares of farm lands in 1896. A more careful estimate by James  A. Le Roy, a former staff member of the early US occupation government, has  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 6

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

the   area   under   cultivation   in   1896   at   just   over   4,000,000   acres   or   about  1,660,000 hectares, with the actual area cultivated in 1903 at 3,250,000 acres  or about 1,315,000 hectares. These numbers point to a 20 per cent loss, some  345,000 hectares of cultivated farms idled between 1896 and 1903. The carabao, the Filipino draft animal, virtually disappeared, harnessed  for years in the army supply trains or slaughtered for food, with the survivors  vulnerable to rinderpest and surra due to prolonged and strenuous overwork.  The surviving carabao stock in 1902 was officially estimated at only 10­15 per  cent of the 1896 population. The depleted stock made the rise in the price per  carabao, from the prewar P20 to P200 in 1902, academic. The   rice   harvests   were   now   only   25   per   cent   of   pre­war   output.  Misfortunes   aggravated   the   crises   as   locust   plagues   ravaged   the   Visayas  crops in 1901 and the Luzon harvests in 1902. Drought in 1903 brought the  locusts to almost all the provinces. Food shortages led to malnutrition and  lowered  resistance to epidemic diseases such as cholera. The 1903 tally of  102,109 deaths due to cholera was believed to have accounted for only two­ thirds   of   actual   deaths.   The   Census   of   1903   report   suggested   without  corroborating   evidence   that   the   epidemics   were   the   major   cause   of   the  population losses since 1896. The occupation regime coped with the crises with emergency measures.  Part of an emergency relief fund of $3,000,000 voted by the US Congress in  1903   was   used   for   the   import   of   carabaos   from   China   for   the   partial  replenishment of the carabao stock. “Locust boards” were organized in the  provinces and towns. Bounties were paid out to distribute cash to the people,  and thousands of tons of the pest were killed. The plagues lasted throughout  the decade after 1900. The long history of rice price controls by Philippine governments began  during this era of food shortages. But price controls do not increase supply. In  1900, when the occupation government's effective jurisdiction over territory  and population was still limited owing to the guerrilla war, rice imports cost  $3,113,403. Imports steadily rose as more provinces were occupied and more  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 7

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

people had to be fed. In 1903 the rice import bill was in excess of $10,000,000.  Make­work schemes were devised to enable the people to pay the discounted  prices of the imported rice. The   population   loss   due   to   the   wars   and   war­related   factors   can   be  approximately   established.   The   Census   of   1903   report   estimated   that   the  1903 population level of the archipelago had already been reached during the  mid­1890s. The Spanish population estimate for 1894 was 7,782,759; that for  1898   was   7,928,384;   and   the   1903   census   figure   was   7,635,426.   Despite  defects in the pre­1903 estimates, it is safe to conclude that the equivalent of  the normal population growth during the intervening years, a period when  the average annual growth rate was about 1.5 per cent, had been lost. There were differential regional­ and provincial­level losses related to the  wars. As expected, Luzon suffered more losses than the Visayas. Among the  provinces the loss was highest in Batangas because it was the only province  whose population was herded into the concentration camps twice. Most of the  towns around and east of Manila were guerrilla bases during the war with  the Americans; they were organized as the new province of Rizal in 1901 and  the   provincial   population   data   for   1903   indicate   that   they   incurred   losses  next only to Batangas. In the Visayas, Iloilo suffered more losses than the  others because it was the main target of the US invasion of the Visayas in  1899 and its resistance was the most stubborn. Losses in the other provinces  were high in Zambales, Nueva Ecija, Laguna, and Bulacan. The   above   assessments   are   based   on   a   comparison   of   the   provincial  population   data   in   the   1887   census   (see   US   War   Department,   Bureau   of  Insular  Affairs,  Pronouncing  Gazetteer   and Geographical  Dictionary  of the   Philippine   Islands,  1902)   and   those   in   the   1903   census.   The   1903   data  moderate the losses in many Luzon provinces because of the inter­provincial  migration  during   the  close  of  the   war  with   the  United   States.   Indeed  the  census data indicate that Cavite, the heart of the Revolution and a leading  guerrilla base, suffered only a net loss of 274 persons by 1903 ­ if this were  true,   the   pre­revolution   Spanish   estimates   understated   the   population  because they almost certainly did not include the tulisan. The 1903 census  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 8

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

analysis also avoids, delicately, explicit reference to the wars as contributory  to the population losses. It cites epidemics as the primary cause of the losses  in   population;   in   the   cases   of   Batangas,   Rizal,   Bataan,   and   Bulacan   it  remarks that there was probable out­migration from these provinces to the  capital because of their proximity to Manila.

The Political Economy of the Filipino Republic The Filipinos had had no formal national and provincial administrative  experience   during   the   Spanish   era.   Their   organizational   skills   were   most  conspicuous in the conduct of the annual fiestas of saints at the pueblo level.  There  were  no  guilds  of artisans,  traders,  schoolteachers,  or  professionals;  there were no farmer associations or labor unions. As with the fiestas, the  practice   of   management   skills   in   the   public   sector   was   limited   to   pueblo  affairs. The eve of the revolution saw the organization of the secret society  Katipunan; it evolved as a grouping of pueblo or barangay chapters loosely  united at the provincial level with tenuous administrative ties at the national  level; the organizing element was the common aspiration for independence. Thus, the revolution started without a national political organization. The  military organization evolved first. The fighting forces emerged at the pueblo  level as spontaneous units of small farmers and tenants. As in most popular  revolutions in other nations and historical eras, the populist fighting forces  elected their respective leaders from the local upper class, in this case, the  landed   elite,   inquilinos,   planters,   and   traders.   Those   who   led   the   largest  units   or  achieved   marked   success   in  the  field   became  provincial   and   zone  commanders   and   officers   in   the   central   command   as   the   revolution  progressed. When the revolutionary army was formally created in July 1898  it   remained   a   popular   army;   the   men   continued   to   elect   their   corporals,  sergeants,   lieutenants,   and   captains.   Majors   and   officers   of   higher   ranks  were appointed by the central command. As with the military, the institutional form and operations of the civilian  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 9

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

government   were   locally   based.   The   June   12,   1898   independence  proclamation   was   followed   by   the   June   20   decree   prescribing   detailed  procedures  for the operation of pueblo and provincial  governments. It was  only after the local government foundations were established that the formal  organization   of   the   national   revolutionary   government   was   defined   in   the  decree of June 23. The   decree   of   June   20   vested   the   management   of   pueblo   assets   and  revenues, including properties left or abandoned by the Spaniards, in each  pueblo head, assisted by an official directly charged with records of taxes and  property.  The regulations  also provided  that  all the taxes  collected  by the  past regime at the local level were to continue, except that gambling licenses  and taxes on cockfighting were abolished, “because they cause nothing but  ruin to the pueblos.” A head tax of one  peseta  per quarter (P0.80 per year)  was imposed on all males above eighteen years of age, but the men in the  army, militia, and police were exempted. This was similar to the terms of the  old cedula personal. However, those of the “well­to­do class” were to be levied  additional imposts to be determined by the central government. Each pueblo  was to have an annual budget. The local treasuries were to remit funds in  excess   of   local   budgetary   needs   to   the   provincial   governments.   The   latter  were   directed   to   have   their   own   budgets   and   were   required   to   send   any  surplus funds “by the safest and quickest way” to the central government. The essentially  local experience  of the leaders was manifested in the  philosophy that the primary administration of civil life was to be exercised at  the popular level of government, while the central government would exercise  basically policy and unifying functions. In practice, the  national political  aspirations  of   the   leaders   was   manifested   in   the   rule   that   higher   socio­ political principles would emanate from the central government in the form of  guides to administration. In   the   crucial   matter   of   the   friar   haciendas   and   lands   abandoned   by  Spaniards that had been taken over by the folk of the pueblos, these were  declared   national   property   and   those   who   held   them   in   the   course   of   the 

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

10

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

revolution   were   deemed   lessees.   Assessments   were   imposed   on   the   latter,  initially at the rate of half of the old rents. This was the first time ever in  Filipinas   that   levies   would   be   collected   on   land   by   the   government.  Thereafter, in order to make the haciendas more productive, it was decided to  place the lands under the management of the biggest property holders in the  pueblos. Also for the first time, and partly to rationalize the revenue system, duties  were imposed on the coasting or domestic trade, “whether by railroad, or by  sea or river” ­ the Manila­Dagupan railroad was under Filipino control. In October 1898, the treasury secretary reported that the P0.80 head tax,  and the assessments on the rich, were being collected. But he stressed that  total  revenue collections fell far short  of needs. He recommended that the  Chinese capitation tax, earlier suspended owing to sympathy on the part of  the   Chinese   for   the   revolution,   be   collected.   This   was   not   immediately  approved,   but   the   farming   out   of   licenses   for   opium   establishments   was  decreed in November. There   were   other   efforts   to   increase   revenues,   as   well   as   to   reduce  expenses from the central treasury. Pueblos where military facilities such as  hospitals were located, or where troops were stationed or temporarily camped  in transit, were made to defray their maintenance costs from pueblo funds.  The   pueblo   residents   made   spontaneous   contributions   of   livestock,   rice   or  money   in   these   cases.   Provincial   governments   were   urged   to   vote  contributions   to   the   war   effort:   for   instance,   in   December   1898   Isabela  province voted a P100,000 contribution. Cost­cutting   by   the   central   government   was   exemplary.   The  implementation   of   the   pay   schedule   for   the   army,   adopted   in   July,   was  indefinitely deferred. The 1899 budget (infra) incorporated the pay schedule,  but   the   costs   of   the   war  with   the   Americans   forced   the   government   to  authorize payments only of subsistence allowances; this meant that most of  the officers had to continue supporting their men. Salaries of military and  civilian officials of high rank were made subject to the availability of funds.  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 11

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

The poverty of most the pueblo folk made it impractical to burden them with  imposts,   aside   from   the   P0.80   poll   tax   paid   in   quarterly   P0.20   payments  prescribed by the regulations of June 20. As for the rich, it must be borne in mind that their contributions in money  and in kind had been up to then mostly unrecorded. The first step towards  regularizing the accounting of these contributions was the brief reference in  the June 20 regulations of assessments on the well­to­do based on ability to  pay. As the system developed, the assessments were treated simultaneously  as   “war   contributions”   on   the   payer's   side   and   as   borrowings   on   the  government side. This was detailed in the decree of November 30, 1898. The preamble of the decree stated that the money contributions by many  individuals in support of the  nation's  cause were from savings intended for  the  ­future of their families. The government was therefore “morally bound”  to guarantee their restitution at some future time. The mechanism was that  of a domestic loan, for the time being in the amount of P20,000,000. Bonds or  notes were to be issued in one, five, ten, twenty, twenty­five, fifty, and 100­ peso denominations; the notes were legal tender. They would bear no interest  until   after   the   recognition   of   independence,   at   which   time   the   legislature  would   determine   the   proper   rate.   The   loan   was   to   be   secured   by   all   the  property   of   the   nation.   After   independence,   all   income   from   the   friar  haciendas, including proceeds of rents and installment payments from lessees  and tenants, were to constitute a fund to redeem the loan. What is remarkable is that, from June to November 1898, the economic  thinking of the leaders of the Revolution had progressed from simple ideas of  revenue   administration   at   the   pueblo   level   to   a   bond   offering   for   a  P20,000,000 national domestic loan. The   first   budget   of   the   Republic   was   passed   by   the   legislature   and  promulgated   on   February   19,   1899.   The   war   with   the   Americans   was   a  furious two weeks old. The budget, based on a committee study begun the  previous   October,   not   only   presents   a   summary   of   the   finances   of   the  government, but is also illustrative of the political economy of the Republic.  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 12

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Table 1 presents the estimated national receipts and a summary statement of  expenditures by office. The   succeeding   budget   was   accompanied   by   a   similar   statement   of   the  estimated receipts and expenditures at the local government level. The latter  is shown in Table  3,  infra,  and shows receipts amounting to P826,900 and  expenditures at P704,602. Both budgets reflect the war­time footing of the  nation.   The   total   estimated   revenues   (P7,261,307)   were   far   below   the  P17,474,020 in the previous regime's 1896­1897 budget. The army and navy  appropriations   (P4,977,654)   made   up   more   than   70   per   cent   of   the   total  estimated expenditures (P7,029,331). This was despite the suspension of the  payment   of   salaries   to   the   higher   military   officers,   who   received   only  subsistence   allowances.   This   same   treatment   was   followed   for   civilian  salaries. Looking at the revenue side of Table 1, among the direct taxes were the  old   Urbana   and   Industria   taxes   and   the   Chinese   poll   tax;   these   were  temporary taxes, allowed pursuant to Article 94 of the constitution. But the  personal   cedulas   and   the   imposts   on   tribal   groups   were   abolished.   The  abolition was due to the government's view that, in the case of the cedulas,  “all personal taxation is by its very nature odious”; and in the case of the  imposts   on   tribal   groups,   that   they   were   contrary   to   the   Republic's   “holy  ideals   of   equality   and   fraternity.”   The   treasury   secretary   held   that   the  regular taxes ought to be imposed on the non­Christian Filipinos only “when  they   participate   equally   in   the   benefits   enjoyed   by   other”   Filipinos.  Consistent with these views, the government also abolished the prestacion  personal, a reminder of colonialism as well as weighing most heavily on the  poor. The   indirect   taxes   corresponded   to   the   customs   office   receipts   in   the  Spanish era budgets. Customs receipts had constituted more than 35 per cent  of total revenues in the 1896­1897 budget, with import duties accounting for  58 per cent of customs receipts and export duties 21 per cent. Now, all import  duties   were   suspended;   this   was   because   the   port   of   Manila   was   under  occupation by the Americans, so that the government sought to encourage the  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 13

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

entry of foreign goods, especially provisions, in the  ports under its control.  Moreover, the old consumption taxes on certain goods and services formerly  collected by the customs office were foregone. As for export duties, they were  estimated to produce only a third of the 1896­1897 export receipts. Of the special and contingent revenues, the major items were the incomes  from: the repossessed friar haciendas; the sale of official paper, postal, and  documentary stamps; the farming out of opium franchises (a vestige of the  old   monopolies);   and   war   contributions   from   individuals   and   local  governments. The ban on gambling and cockfighting was a deliberate loss of  revenues from old sources, including the lottery. The largest component of revenues was the emergency “war tax,” projected  at P4,050,000. The June 20 impost of a head tax of P0.80 annually essentially  preserved the old cedula personal, but the single rate was low. The budget  law abolished this tax due to the “general antipathy” against it; besides, work  was in progress toward the design of a  progressive personal income tax  system. In the meantime, it was decided to replace the head tax with the war  tax, with graduated rate classes based on wealth and income. The latter was  justified as placing the burden of payment on the well­to­do rather that on  the   poor   because,   the   budget   law   said,   the   poor   class   “has   suffered   most  keenly the economic crises that the last and present wars have produced, and  ... contributes the most men to the armed defense of our independence....”

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

14

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Table 1.

Estimated National Receipts and Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1899* Receipts

Direct Taxes: Urbana Industria Chinese poll tax Railway freight tax Arrears of taxes uncollected as of end of 1898 Indirect Taxes: Export taxes Customs fines and surcharges

P

62,223 622,534 300,000 32,000 1,016,757 430,850 1,200 432,050

Special and Contingent Taxes: Court fees collected by State representatives Balances of accounts Return of former years Profits from drafts drawn by private persons from one treasury upon another Post office box rentals Sale of printed books and of the "Heraldo Filipino" (the government newspaper) Unclaimed property Sale of useless State property Return of rent Tax on mines and 10 per cent for the State Forest products Coining of money Sale of lottery tickets, net profits Sale of stamped paper Sale of checks on the State Adhesive stamps on drafts and checks Ditto for mails, printed matter, sample medicines, warrants, newspapers, and confiscations Adhesive stamps on telegrams Ditto for receipts and accounts Ditto for signature fees P Sale of lands and buildings Income from convict labor and persons detained within or outside of institutions according to law Registry and notarial fees Rent from State buildings

200

500 100 3,000 1,000 2,000 85,000 100,000 45,000 11,000 50,000 22,000 10,600 16,000 24,000 2,000

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

15

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

[Table 1, continued] Income from opium Income from property of religious corporations restored to the State Undetermined State revenues Contributions for war P

115,200 250,000 4,500 100,000 843,600

Emergency Taxes: War Tax, until such time as the income tax is imposed 4,050,000 Grand Total Expenditures General Obligations Foreign Affairs Interior Affairs War and Navy Treasury Public Instruction Communications and Public Works Agriculture, Industry and Commerce P 281,583 89,040 203,550 4,977,654 354,380 35,468 361,366 21,688 P 6,434,407

Total

P 6,324,729

*Based on: John R.M. Taylor, comp., The Philippine Insurrection Against the United States  (1971), IV, 317,322­323.

The tax was to be paid by all domiciled persons, Filipinos and foreigners,  at least eighteen years and below sixty years of age, at rates fixed on the basis  of ownership, possession, or management of cash or other property assets, as  shown in Table 2. As   in   the   Spanish   system,   commissions   totalling   P202,500   were  appropriated for the collectors: pueblo heads, barangay cabezas, and pueblo  functionaries in charge of taxes and property. The local government estimates are shown in Table 3. The expenditures figures in Table 1 and Table 3 require brief explanation.  The headings in each section are not unusual, except that both the budgets 

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

16

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

for   the   national   and   local   governments   have   allocations   for   "Public  Instruction:" P35,468 and P302,156, respectively. These two outlays have to  be viewed complementarily. The national government outlay would cover the  costs of sending and supporting ten selected young Filipinos each year for  university studies abroad; the operations of the national university created  by  the  decree  of  October  19,  1898;  and   the  operations   of  special   technical  institutions. On Table 2. Class 1st Class. 2  Class.
nd rd th th th th th

Rate Classes of the War Tax* Cash or Property Cash or property assets worth from P25,001 and over From P15,001 to P25,000 From P10,001 to P15,000 From P5,001 to P10,000  From P 1,001 to P5,000 All males not in the above classes – i.e., unemployed All women not in the above classes – i.e., unemployed Non­commissioned officers and enlisted men in the  military and assimilated civilian personnel of the same  ranks, sexagenarians, the poor, the disabled, and insane Rate P 100 50 25 10 5 2 1 Gratis

3  Class. 4  Class. 5  Class. 6  Class. 7  Class. 8  Class.

*Source: John R.M. Taylor, comp., The Philippine Insurrection Against the United States  (1971), IV, Exh. 758.

Table 3.

Estimated Receipts and Expenditures at the  Local Government Level, Fiscal Year 1899* Receipts

Direct Taxes: Bridges, ferries, fords Weights and measures Fisheries Carriages, carts, tramways, and horses except those used in agriculture Registration and transfers of livestock ownership Pounds [for livestock]

5,500 31,000 3,500 50,000 7,000 1,000

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

17

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Slaughter houses 50 per cent of fees for interments

40,000 150,000 P 288,000

Indirect Taxes: Fees for civil trials Public markets Lease of municipal property Theatrical performances, horse races, and other public entertainments Licenses for fiestas One untimo (F 0.01) for each pound of beef, [Table 3, continued] Receipts pork, mutton, goat meat, and meat of other livestock Undetermined revenues

P 50,000 40,000 1,500 2,000 500

120,000 4,000 P 218,000

Emergency Taxes: Fees for registration of: Real property Births Deaths Marriage contracts

P 25,000 94,900 73,000 128,000 P 320,900

Total

P 826,900

Expenditures Public instruction Charitable institutions and Health Public works Prisons Leases Local administration services P 302,156 55,160 50,000 40,352 52,000 173,254

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

18

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Cemeteries Sundry expenses Unforeseen expenses Total

12,680 9,000 10,000 P 704,602

*Based on: John R.M. Taylor, comp., The Philippine Insurrection Against the United States  (1971), IV, 351,424­425.

the other hand, the outlay for the local governments was for the support of  popular   education:   grade   schools,   secondary   schools,   and   teacher   training  schools, and would be funded from the proceeds of municipal and provincial  government taxes. Another item in the national government's expenditures budget was the  small   amount   for   the   department   of   agriculture,   industry,   and   commerce  (P21,688). The outlay was small because the war with the Americans was  going on and the department would not be active in the field. The allocation  was therefore scaled down to support limited projects, such as: model farms;  research   and   experimental   stations   on   seed   varieties,   pest   control   and  fertilizers; livestock improvement; and collection of agricultural statistics. There were two extraordinary elements of the revenue programs. The first  was the national loan project, with a tentative target of P20,000,000 expected  to be raised through subscriptions by the well­to­do. The loan amount was  not   specified   in   the   budget,   but   amounts   of   P120,000   and   P80,000   were  allocated for interest payments and a sinking fund. In retrospect, the project  could not succeed. The cumulative effects on the economy of three years of  war had exhausted the resources of the well­to­do class. In April 1899, it was  officially   acknowledged   that   loan   subscriptions   were   woefully   inadequate,  with no improvement in sight. The   other   extraordinary   measure   followed   upon   the   realization   of   the  failure of the domestic national loan project. This was the project for a foreign  loan of P20,000,000 gold, authorized by the legislature in mid­July 1899. It  was a desperate measure. In late March the enemy had taken Malolos, the  capital   of   the   republic,   driving   the   government   to   San   Isidro   and  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 19

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija. In July, it was in Tarlac; here a rump congress  passed the foreign loan act. But the enemy offensive was unrelenting, with  more   and   more   troops   coming   from   the   United   States.   In   October,   the  government   moved   to   Bayambang,   Pangasinan.   In   December   1899,  Aguinaldo remained the president of the republic, but there was no longer a  legislature, cabinet, nor treasury. All true anti­colonial revolutions aim at national liberation. The kind of  society   that   results   from   a   successful   revolution   depends   on   whether   the  spirit of the revolution is marked by egalitarianism or privilege. The Filipino  revolution   was   fought   by   agrarian   workers   jointly   with   the   upper   class  element;   the   latter   defined   the   national   political   aspirations,   social  unification perspectives, and administrative policies. In   practice,   the   political   economy   of   the   Republic   was   aimed   at:   (a)  dismantling   of   the   old   system;   and   (b)   laying   down   of   new   socio­politico­ economic   foundations   to   ensure   egalitarianism,   and   to   achieve   efficiency  through technology and modernization. The two goals interfaced. The cedula personal as a head tax gave way to  the war tax based on wealth and property. The war tax was temporary;; in  late 1898,  the revolutionary  government  set  up  a  committee  to work  on  a  progressive   personal   income   tax   scheme.   The   prestación   personal   and   the  imposts on non­Christian tribes were abolished. There were three major moves away from the old and toward the new. In  principle: (a) the autonomy and authority of the people to manage their own  affairs   and   resources   through   their   municipal   and   provincial   governments  was   recognized.   As   concrete   moves:   (b)   taxation   of   domestic   trade   was  adopted as rational fiscal and economic policy; and (c) a modern cadastral  system with titling and registration was designed and a land reform policy  adopted. The new approach to land was historically necessary and inevitable. Since  the   conquest,  the  pueblo  lands   could   not   be  titled   to  the  cultivators;  now,  Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 20

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

many of the fighting men of the revolution came from families dispossessed of  their   holdings   by   the   friar   haciendas.   The   dispute   that   began   in   1887  between the inquilinos­tenants and the Dominican owners of the hacienda of  San   Juan   de   Bautista   (whose   boundaries   embraced   the   entire   pueblo   of  Calamba, Laguna) was notorious. The leading pueblo residents were evicted  and exiled without trial to presidios in Mindoro and the Visayas. They had  fatefully proposed a land reform program to the regime, under the guidance of  Jose Rizal, asking that parcels of the hacienda be sold or otherwise conveyed  to “those who had toiled to make the land tillable, those who had poured their  substance, labor, and sweat in the land.” The   1899   Constitution   settled   the   issue   of   the   friar   haciendas   in   its  “Additional   Article”   which   stated   that   as   of   May   24,   1898:   “all   the   lands,  buildings, and other properties in the possession of the religious corporations  in   these   islands   will   be   deemed   restored   to   the   Filipino   State.”   The  government of the Republic had alternative schemes available to effect land  reform through redistribution of the friar lands. Beyond   land   reform   and   toward   a   modern   land   system,   rules   were  promulgated   on   February   27,   1899   governing:   receiving   and   processing   of  claims to parcels of uncultivated as well as cultivated lands; fixing parcellary  boundaries;   adjudicating   claims   and   disputes;   and   registering   the  corresponding titles. This entailed cadastral surveys, title registration and,  ultimately, a land tax that was implicit in the war tax system. Overall,   there   was   good   faith   and   intelligence   in   the   approach   of   the  leaders  to  government   and   society.   They  sought  to  found   an  efficient   new  society   by   promoting   scientific   research,   disseminating   technology,   and  instituting   a   nationwide   secular   system   of   public   education.   These  progressive ideas were contributed by Filipinos who had been educated at the  university in Manila or had come home from university studies in Europe. But   opportunity   and   time   were   too   short   to   allow   the   Republic   to  constitute a comprehensive political economy, and to enable it to attain the  fruit of the beginning policies it had adopted.    Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic 21

AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES
................................................................................................................................................

Principal Sources
James H. Blount, The American Occupation of the Philippines. Quezon City. Malaya Press, 1968.  Reprinted. Original Edition New York. The Knickerbocker Press, 1913. Corpuz. The Roots of the Filipino Nation. Vol. 2. Emilio Reverter Delmas. Rebelión en elArchipielago Filipino. Barcelona. Centro editorial de  Alberto Martin. 1897. Vol. 1. James A. Le Roy, “Philippine Life In Town and Country.” Apolinario Mabini. La Renolución Filipina, con otros documentos de la epoca. Nos. 4 and 5 in  "Publicaciones de la Oficina de Bibliotecas Publicas." Manila. 1931. Planes   Constitucionales,   ccleccion   de   textos   constitucionales   ...   para   infornzacidn   de   los   miembros   de   la   Asamblea   Constituyente.  No.   1   in   "Manuales   de   Informacion."   Manila.  Bureau of Printing. 1934. John R.M. Taylor, comp. The Philippine Insurrection Against the United States. Pasay City,  Philippines. Eugenio Lopez Foundation. 1971. Vols. 1­5. U.S., Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department. A Pronouncing Gazetteer and Geographical   I}ictionary of the Philippine Islands. U.S., Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department, Reports of the Philippine Commission. 1900­1903, in one volume.  1902, Part 1. 1903, Part 2.  1904, Part 1.  1905, Part 1.  1906, Part 1.  1907, Part 1. U.S., Comisión Filipina. Censo de ... 1903. U.S., Congress, 55th Congress, 3d Session, Senate, A Treaty of Peace Between the United States  and Spain, Sen. Doc. No. 62, Part 1.

Four Wars; the Political Economy of the Filipino Republic

22

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful