SMS/SHS LUNCH AND LEARN

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STRATEGY SPOTLIGHT
INCREASE ENGAGEMENT IN YOUR CLASSROOM

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Whip Around / Pass
Ask students to think about a question related to the lesson. Then whip around the room and ask each student to share his/her idea or pass. Use it to activate schema or assess understanding.

INSON JENNIFER BR ETTEN INI_H LY N N F U

Mix and Match
Create a set of cards for a topic or unit. The cards could be terms and definitions , concepts and examples, math problems and answers, etc. GIve one card to each student. Students mix to connect pairs.

TRY T H E SO C RAT I C S E M I NAR
he Socratic method is based on a learning theory that it is essential to enable kids to think for themselves and learn to appropriately question others. Socrates engaged his students in dialogues by responding to them with questions, rather than just providing them with answers.

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the students. The goal is to encourage students to learn how to ask meaningful questions that stimulate thoughtful interchanges of ideas. It is not important that students should find the “right” answer. Students in a Socratic Seminar should listen carefully, avoid interrupting, and respond respectfully. Encourage students to paraphrase other students’ thoughts before responding . It is also important to encourage students to look each other in the “eyes” and to refer to each other by name as appropriate. In addition to teaching higher level thinking skills, this is a great opportunity to teach socialization skills. Socialization reinforces appropriate behaviors and promotes team building. Reference: http://www.studyguide.org/ socratic_seminar.htm

Pairs Compare
During a lecture or discussion ask students to form pairs. Pairs generate responses to questions. Then they join another pair to share, clarify, and extend their thinking.

Typically, students are given a resource to examine prior to the dialogue and given some open!ended or essential questions to consider. These types of questions allow students to think critically, analyze, apply, synthesize and evaluate. The key point is that this is a dialogue and not a debate. Students should be safe to participate honestly. The atmosphere should be one where biases and prejudices are put aside in order to encourage full participation by

Gallery Walk
Post questions on large chart, paper on a desk, a google doc, or even a word document. Students travel from question to question in groups to add ideas as well as agree or disagree with previously posted ideas. At the last question, it’s the groups responsibility to summarize and report to the class. In a math classroom, students could seek alternate ways to solve a problem.

TRY T H E SO C RAT I C S E M I NAR
During the Seminar 1. Students sit in a circle. Only the students in the circle participate 1. Choose a piece of text or literature in the dialogue. that encourages critical thinking skills 2. The teacher poses an openand relates to a topic you are ended question related to the studying. text to initiate dialogue. 2) Generate a few open-ended 3. Students respond to the questions which are designed to question using text support to promote diverse higher-level thinking. justify their responses. C) Using projected text, model prereading and during reading strategies 4. Encourage students to paraphrase other students’ which encourage students to interact responses and ask for with text. clarification as needed. D) Develop and review norms in a 5. Invite students to proffer Socratic Seminar with the students. questions for the group. Student Steps: P! T! Pre-Seminar Teacher Steps: A) Read and interact with text. B) Make notes and highlight important parts. Identify personal connections and areas in which clarification is needed. C) Form questions related to the text. D) Be prepared to discuss the text with classmates.
Resources Harmin, Merrill. Inspiring Active Learning: a Handbook for Teachers. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1994. Print. Kagan, Spencer. Cooperative Learning. San Juan Capistrano, CA: Kagan Cooperative Learning, 1994. Print. "Socratic Seminar ! Process." Saskatchewan Schools and School Divisions. 2003. Web. 08 Oct. 2010. <http://www.saskschools.ca/ curr_content/bestpractice/socratic/ process.html>. "Socratic Seminars ! StudyGuide.org." Home ! StudyGuide.org. 2009. Web. 08 Oct. 2010. <http://www.studyguide.org/ socratic_seminar.htm>. "Socratic Seminars." Journey to Excellence. 2004. Web. 08 Oct. 2010. <http:// www.journeytoexcellence.org/practice/ instruction/theories/miscideas/socratic/>.

nts tateme eS Outcom
Asking students to reflect on their learning is essential in the lifelong learning process. Asking students to complete outcomes statements encourages them to ponder and clarify their own learning. Students complete statements in response to class discussions, chapters in a textbook, interactive learning experiences, etc.

Sample Statements
I never knew... I was surprised by... I discovered... Now I know... I liked/ I disliked... I now need... I want to know more about... At first I thought...but now I know... I rediscovered... I’m beginning to wonder... I agree/disagree...

Post-Seminar Ideas -Allow the students to discuss their feelings regarding the process. -Brainstorm other themes relevant to the text. -Free write quick write about new thoughts, ideas, or understandings they've reached about the text. Ask the students to share what they learned and/or observed in a journal or notebook. * Assign a writing assignment such as: letter to the editor, poem, reflection, compare/contrast essay, summary/reaction paper, etc...

Deal an Outcome
Create cards with outcome statements written on one side. Give one card to each student. Ask students to respond to the card. Share with a partner, share with the whole group, or add an entry in a metacognitive log. Students could also submit a written response as a quick exit slip.

Outcome Ball
Using a permanent marker, write outcome statements on a beach ball. Toss the beach ball between classmates. Students complete a statement when they catch the ball.

Socratic Seminar can be used in the following ways: * to discuss current events * to discuss important issues in the classroom * to discuss topics that have more than one view point * to discuss literature * to discuss social situations * to problem-solve

WallWisher/Edistorm
Use a virtual wall to share your students’ ideas. On www.edistorm.com students can agree or even vote for favorite responses.