HP-UX 11i Installation and Update Guide

HP 9000 Computers
Important: Review the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet accompanying HP-UX 11i OE CDs before installing or updating to 11i. .

Manufacturing Part Number: 5971-2215 Edition 2, June 2001 Printed in U.S.A.

Legal Notices
The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this manual, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be held liable for errors contained herein or direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material. Warranty. A copy of the specific warranty terms applicable to your Hewlett-Packard product and replacement parts can be obtained from your local Sales and Service Office. Restricted Rights Legend. Use, duplication or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in sub-paragraph (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013. Rights for non-DOD U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are as set forth in FAR 52.227-19(c)(1,2). Hewlett-Packard Company 3000 Hanover Street Palo Alto, CA 94304 U.S.A. Copyright Notices. Copyright © 1983-2001 Hewlett-Packard Company, all rights reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation of this document without prior written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under the copyright laws. ©Copyright 1979, 1980, 1983, 1985-93 Regents of the University of California This software is based in part on the Fourth Berkeley Software Distribution under license from the Regents of the University of California. ©Copyright 1980, 1984, 1986 Novell, Inc. ©Copyright 1986-1992 Sun Microsystems, Inc. ©Copyright 1985, 1986, 1988 Massachusetts Institute of Technology ©Copyright 1989-1993, The Open Software Foundation, Inc. ©Copyright 1986 Digital Equipment Corp. ©Copyright 1990 Motorola, Inc. ©Copyright 1990, 1991, 1992 Cornell University ©Copyright 1989-1991 The University of Maryland ©Copyright 1988 Carnegie Mellon University ©Copyright 1991-2000 Mentat Inc. ©Copyright 1996 Morning Star Technologies, Inc. ©Copyright 1996 Progressive Systems, Inc. ©Copyright 1991-2000 Isogon Corporation, All Rights Reserved

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Trademark Notices. UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through The Open Group. X Window System is a trademark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MS-DOS and Microsoft are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OSF/Motif is a trademark of the Open Software Foundation, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries. Revision History: December 2000, Edition 1 — Initial version for HP-UX 11i. June 2001 — Edition 2. This guide’s printing date and part number indicate its current edition. The printing date changes when a new edition is printed. (Minor corrections and updates which are incorporated at reprint do not cause the date to change.) The part number changes when extensive technical changes are incorporated. New editions of this manual will incorporate all material updated since the previous edition. For the latest version, see the HP-UX 11i documentation section on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ Please direct comments regarding this guide to: Hewlett-Packard Company HP-UX Learning Products, MS 11 3404 East Harmony Road Fort Collins, Colorado 80528-9599 Or, use this Web form to send us feedback directly: docs.hp.com/assistance/feedback.html

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About this Guide
This guide describes installing HP-UX 11i on HP 9000 systems and assumes that you are the system’s administrator familiar with installing, updating and maintaining software on the system. If you need to set up your system in different languages, please refer also to Configuring HP-UX For Different Languages, available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com A localized version of that manual is available with localized media kits. Latest versions are available at: docs.hp.com (select: localized documentation). This guide uses these typographic conventions: Boldface Computer User input Words defined for the first time appear in boldface. Computer font indicates literal items displayed by the computer. For example: file not found Bold, computer text indicates literal items that you type. For example, to change to your account’s home directory, enter: cd Italics Manual titles, variable in commands and emphasized words appear in italics. For example, you would substitute an actual directory name for directory_name in this command: cd directory_name [ ] and | Brackets [] enclose optional items in command syntax. The vertical bar | separates syntax items in a list of choices. For example, you can enter any of these three items in this syntax: ls [-a | -i | -x]
Enter

Text in this bold, sans-serif font denotes keyboard keys and on-screen menu items. A notation like Ctrl-Q indicates that you should hold the Ctrl key down and press Q.

4

Contents

1. Preparing for Software Migration Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Identifying Model, OS and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Migrating from Previous HP-UX Releases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Firmware Upgrades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Updating Your Ignite-UX Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Installing Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Needing More Disk Space? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Selecting the Path to HP-UX 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Collect Key Install Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Back Up Your System!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Save Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Locate Source Media for Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 2. Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Installing HP-UX 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 After Cold-installing HP-UX 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Retrieving Information After Cold-installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Updating Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Procedure A: Install update-ux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Procedure B: Create a Network Depot (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Procedure C: Update to HP-UX 11i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

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Contents

Updating an Existing 11i System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Updating to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64-bit OS63 Changing Individual OE Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Changing Operating Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Updating Netscape Directory Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Installing ServiceGuard Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3. Verifying System Migration Verifying HP-UX Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Verifying Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 4. Updating Applications HP-UX Patching Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Updating Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Adding and Removing Individual Patches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Using Software Distributor Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Updating LicensePower/iFOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Maintaining Your HP-UX 11i System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 A. Booting HP 9000 Systems Halting the Autoboot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Booting Workstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Booting HP 9000 Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Booting V-Class Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Searching for Other Bootable Devices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

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Contents

B. In Case of Trouble Cold-install Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Common Update Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Analyzing Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Intermittent Sendmail Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Adjusting File System Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Problems with Large Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Un-installing HP-UX 11i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 Re-installing SD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Recovering a Corrupt System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Verifying and Adding Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126 Problems Affecting non-C Locales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 Web Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 C. Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Compatibility and Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132 Configuring Network Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 Setting Speed and Duplex Mode at Boot Time (workstation only) . .138 Autonegotiation and Auto-sensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 RJ-45 and AUI Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 What Happens During Card Initialization Sequence? . . . . . . . . . . . . .143

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Contents

V-Class PCI 10/100Base-TX Card Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Hardware Regulatory Statements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 FCC Statement (For U.S.A.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

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Preparing for Software Migration

1

Preparing for Software Migration
This chapter will help you assess the current state of your system (hardware, OS, disk space, etc.) prior to migrating to HP-UX 11i. Topics covered here include: • Introducing HP-UX 11i — Media kit contents, new features, operating environments and overview of the migration process. • System requirements — HP 9000 systems supported by HP-UX 11i. • Firmware upgrades — Some systems require a firmware upgrade to support 11i releases. • Installing diagnostics — Be sure to install the support tools. Disk space, memory and diagnostic requirements — Situations that may apply to your system. • Selecting the path to 11i — Look at your system state to decide whether to cold-install or update to HP-UX 11i. • Collect key install information — You’ll need this information when cold-installing HP-UX 11i. • Back up your system! • Save configuration files — so you can restore them after cold-installing. • Prepare source media for migration.

Chapter 1

9

Preparing for Software Migration Introduction

Introduction
This guide describes migrating HP 9000 systems to HP-UX 11i. This new version of HP-UX delivers hardware enablement, software functionality, and bundles of important HP-UX applications in Operating Environments. HP-UX 11i Operating Environments (OEs) are introduced in the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with the HP-UX 11i OE CDs. HP-UX 11i is the recommended next-level enterprise release for all HP-UX systems currently running HP-UX 10.x and 11.0. This manual deals only with the software steps required to update your HP-UX operating system. For hardware upgrades, either see the documentation included with your hardware or consult your HP Support Engineer.

IMPORTANT

Be sure to review this entire guide before proceeding to install or update your system. If you plan to update to HP-UX 11i rather than cold-install it, carefully review Appendix B for situations that may apply to your system. If you have just received a system that was ordered with “Instant Ignition,” the HP-UX 11i Operating Environment has already been installed. You do not need to re-install it.

Migration overview

Here’s an overview of this guide and migration process shown on the next page: • Chapter 1— Prepare for migration to HP-UX 11i. Assess your system and select the migration path, either cold-installation or update. Back up your current system and, if needed, create an install depot or archive. Order and install any additional hardware and software. • Chapter 2— Migrate to HP-UX 11i using either cold-installation or update. • Chapter 3— Verify the migration. • Chapter 4— Update other applications, as needed.

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Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Introduction

1. Prepare Your System • Enough disk space? (4GB root vol min) . • HP-UX 11i supported on your system? See page 13. • System requires firmware upgrade? See page 19. • Installing a new operating environment with HP-UX 11i? • Your applications certified to run on HP-UX 11i? Decide: Migrate by either cold-installing or updating. • Backup Your System: - Collect Key Install Information. - Backup existing system. - Save configuration file to tape, CD or another system. • Prepare source media for migration.
References: Chapter 1, Appendix B. Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i

(read Chapter 1 to determine path) 2. Cold-install HP-UX 11i 2. Update to HP-UX 11i
• Verify system requirements. • Insert HP-UX CD1. • Boot from CD. • Install HP-UX 11i. • Restore config & personal files. Backup your system.
Reference: Chapter 2.

• Verfify system requirements. • Insert HP-UX CD1. • Install update-ux. • Create an optional update depot. • Update to HP-UX 11i. Backup your system.
Reference: Chapter 2.

3. Verify the Migration 2. Cold-install HP-UX 11i Verify HP-UX installation using swlist and swverify.
Reference: Chapter 3.

4. Update Other Applications • Update non-OS applications with swinstall. • Install critical patches and remove unneeded patches.
References: Chapter 4 and HP-UX 11i Release Notes.

HP-UX 11i Migration Overview

Chapter 1

11

Preparing for Software Migration Introduction Installing or updating to HP-UX 11i ? Review the remainder of this chapter to help decide which path to take to migrate your system to HP-UX 11i. You basically have two choices: • Cold-install using Ignite-UX— This method overwrites everything on the target disk. Use cold-install for new systems and on existing systems when overwriting the root (/) volume will not cause loss of applications or data. The process described in this guide cold-installs a single system from local media. If you plan to install many systems simultaneously, you should plan on using an Ignite-UX server. Ignite-UX is a free product available on the HP-UX 11i CD1. Additional information on Ignite-UX and newer versions are available on the Web: software.hp.com/products/IUX/ • Update using update-ux — Use the update-ux command when you do not want to erase data or application files on your root disk. As explained in Chapter 2, update-ux adds or replaces functionality based on what you choose when running the command. Verify existing applications HP-UX 11i Operating Environments (OEs) provide a convenient way to install many needed applications in a single step. Contents of HP-UX 11i OEs are listed in the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with the 11i CDs. If you plan to install an OE, you should verify that your existing installed applications that are not included in the OE are certified to run on the new HP-UX 11i release:

Step 1. Go to this Web page: software.hp.com/HPUX-RDMP/ Step 2. Select: HP-UX 11i Application Release -> New/Updated Software Product List Step 3. Review the listing of supported applications to ensure that they are still supported. If needed, plan on updating applications not provided in an OE after you install or update to 11i.

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Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration System Requirements

System Requirements
Supported systems HP-UX 11i is supported on the HP 9000 systems listed below (newly supported system are shown in bold). For the latest list of supported systems, see: devresource.hp.com/STK/hpux_faq.html Model Workstations: Series 700: 712, 715/64/80/100/100XC, 725/100 B132L, B132L+, B160L, B180L B1000, B2000 C100, C110, C160L C160, C180, C180-XP, C200, C240, C360 C3000, C3600 J200, J210, J210XC J280, J282, J2240 J5000, J5600, J6000, J7000 Servers: A180, A180C A400, A500 Dx10, Dx20, Dx30, Dx50, Dx60 Dx70, Dx80, Dx90 Kx00, Kx10, Kx20 Kx50, Kx60, Kx70, Kx80 L1000, L2000, L3000 N4000-36, N4000-44 R380, R390 T500, T520 T600 V22xx, V2500, V2600 HP Superdome: SD16000, SD32000, SD64000 32-bit X X X X X X X X X X X 64-bit

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X

Chapter 1

13

Preparing for Software Migration System Requirements Unsupported hardware These workstations and graphics adapters are no longer supported: • Workstations: 705, 710, 715/33, 715/50, 715/75, 720, 725/50, 725/75, 730, 735, 750, 755. • Graphics adapters: GRX, CRX, CRX-24, CRX-48Z. • HP J3525A and J3526A PCI cards on these workstations: B1000, B2000, C3X00. J5000, J7000. Storage requirements HP-UX 11i memory and storage requirements are: • 64 MB memory, minimum. Exceptions: — All servers: 128 MB minimum. — A-Class servers with HP A5838A LAN-SCSI Combo Card: 256 MB minimum. • 128 MB swap space for updating or cold-installing. • 4GB root disk, minimum, wheither installing or updating to HP-UX 11i, with or without an OE. This can be a single disk drive or combination of physical disks configured as one root volume. Additional updating requirements are listed in Chapter 2.

IMPORTANT

Any last-minute install/update issues are in Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with the 11i CDs Be sure to review that booklet before continuing.

14

Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration System Requirements You May Only Need to Install Patch Bundles... If your system is already running HP-UX 11i, you may only need to install one or more patch bundles to bring your system up-to-date or to enable new hardware. Rather than doing a complete migration to the current 11i OS or OE, consider using swinstall to install the latest patch bundles to meet your system needs: Patch Bundle
HWEnable11i

Description Enables new hardware and delivers critical patches for HP-UX 11i systems. Defect fixes for HP-UX 11i OS and network drivers included in OEs. Defect fixes for 11i OE applications.

Available via:
HP-UX CD1 SupportPlus1

X

X

GOLDBASE11i

X2 X2

GOLDAPPS11i

Notes: 1 Support Plus bundles are available quarterly via CD and the Web. For more details and to download recent bundles, see this Web page: software.hp.com/SUPPORT_PLUS/
2 These bundles contains patches with the highest ratings from tests in HP’s Enterprise

Patch Test Center.

For instructions on installing patch bundles on an existing 11i system, see “Updating and Existing 11i System” in Chapter 2.

Chapter 1

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Preparing for Software Migration Identifying Model, OS and Software

Identifying Model, OS and Software
Before you can decide on the method to migrate to HP-UX 11i, you need to verify that HP-UX 11i is supported on your system and what software versions are currently on your system. Identify model To determine the model number of your system, enter: model Verify that 11i is supported on your system (see the previous table). Identify OS To identify the OS version that your system is currently running, enter: uname -r To update to HP-UX 11i, your system must be currently running either B.10.20 or B.11.00. After cold-installing or updating to HP-UX 11i, you’ll notice that uname identifies the initial 11i release as: B.11.11 Identify installed software To identify the software products on a system or media, use swlist. For example, to list all products and their revisions on a CD mounted at /cdrom , enter: /usr/sbin/swlist -s /cdrom To get table of contents and product details, enter: /usr/sbin/swlist -dvl product -a readme @ /cdrom swlist has many options to expand or narrow the listing to specific attributes; see the swinstall(1M) manpage or the Software Distributor Administrator Guide, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ After identifying all software products, compare the list with products that will be installed with the HP-UX 11i Operating Environment. See the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet. The update process will replace existing OS products and, optionally, an Operating Environment with new versions; other applications will not be touched unless specified in the update process. The cold-install process, however, will erase all software on the root volume before installing 11i and an optional Operating Environment. If you wish to retain any existing software, be sure to back up that software before migrating.

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Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Migrating from Previous HP-UX Releases

Migrating from Previous HP-UX Releases
You can cold-install HP-UX 11i and its accompanying Operating Environment on any supported system listed on page 13, running any HP-UX OS. If you choose to update an existing HP-UX OS to 11i, however, the system must be running either HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0. Updating from any other release directly to 11i is not a supported migration path. From: To HP-UX 11i with or without an operating environment3: Cold-install 11i or update to 10.20 before updating to 11i2. Cold-install 11i or update2. Cold-install 11i or update to 11.0 before updating to 11i2. Cold-install 11i or update2. Cold-install 1.

HP-UX 9.x -10.10 HP-UX 10.20 HP-UX 10.30 HP-UX 11.0 HP-UX 11.10 Notes:
1

Cold-install 11i using Ignite-UX. Can also change from 32-bit to 64-bit OS and install patches and other applications using an install archive. 2 Update using update-ux command. Can also change from 32-bit to 64-bit OS. The update-ux command updates the base OS plus any specified software bundle(s) including products in a specified Operating Environment. By default, update-ux does not “match target” on installed software.
3

Contents of HP-UX 11i Operating Environments are listed in the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with the 11i CDs.

For help updating from HP-UX 10.20 or 10.30, use the Software Transition Kit available at: devresource.hp.com/STK/

Chapter 1

17

Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades

Firmware Upgrades
Some systems may need a firmware upgrade prior to updating to 11i: • Servers: — A-Class — L-Class — N-Class • Workstations: — B-Class: B1000, B2000 — C-Class: C3000, C3600 — J-Class: J5000, J5600, J6000, J7000 Minimum firmware If you are about to install or upgrade one of the systems listed above, versions for 11i verify that it has the minimum required firmware version. If needed, install the patch(es) for your system listed here: Firmware and Patch for 11i Support Model
Minimum Firmware Available Patches Version HP-UX 10.20 HP-UX 11.0/11i

Firmware and Patch for OL* Support
Minimum Firmware Version Available Patches HP-UX 11.0 HP-UX 11i

A-Class B-Class C-Class J-Class L-Class N-Class
1OL*

40.50 2.9 2.9 2.9 40.48 41.02

n/a

PHSS_23155 / PHSS_23156 PHSS_23185 / PHSS_23186

(not supported)

PHSS_23184

(Also, OL* not available on workstations.1)

n/a n/a

PHSS_23447 / PHSS_23446 PHSS_22657 / PHSS_22658

40.28 41.02

PHSS_22655 PHSS_22657

PHSS_22656 PHSS_22658

= OnLine add, delete and replace. These patches check the firmware and only update the bootROM to be compatible with HP-UX 11i or OL*. 18 Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades If the needed firmware version or later is already on your system, you can skip the rest of this section. If not, or if you don’t know what firmware version is on your system, please read on. Check workstation Follow these steps to check workstation firmware version prior to firmware revision migrating to 11i: Step 1. As root, shut down the system: 1. Enter: shutdown -h 2. Switch the system OFF. Step 2. Switch the system ON and watch console messages. Press any key when prompted to cancel the automatic boot feature. Step 3. Check the firmware version displayed at the beginning of the boot process. If the firmware revision for your B-, C- or J-Class workstation is less than 2.3, it needs upgrading. Continue with “Downloading firmware patches” on page 22.

NOTE

Even if your workstation’s firmware is 2.3 or later, HP recommends (but does not require) that you update to the most current firmware revision (version 4.8/9 at print-time). HP continues to revise the firmware for all the systems listed above, adding support for more types of plug-in PCI cards and memory modules and improving the ability to debug dump output for OC/HPMC/panic. Updating to the latest firmware ensures that your workstation takes advantage of these improvements.

Checking server firmware revision

There are two methods to check firmware version on HP 9000 servers: OnlineDiagnostics or the boot display. Use OnlineDiagnostics if you do not want to reboot your system. Using OnlineDiagnostics: If the OnlineDiagnostics are not already on your system, you can find them on the 11.0 Support Plus CD.

Step 4. As root, run the Support Tools Manager (STM) utility: /usr/sbin/cstm

Chapter 1

19

Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades Step 5. Use the map command to find the device number (Dev Num) for the processors on your system; search for items with the product description CPU:
cstm>map systemA.hp.com Dev Num === 1 34 35 Path ==================== system ... 160 166 Product ========================= system () CPU (5c4) CPU (5c4)

Select any one of the processors (CPU) to use in the next step. Step 6. Use the CPU device number as input to the sel dev command to request information on that processor. For example:
cstm>sel dev 34; info -- Updating Map -Updating Map...

Step 7. Use the information log (il) command to find the firmware revision number:
cstm>il -- Converting a (5060) byte raw log file to text. -... (output lines are omitted) -- Information Tool Log for CPU on path 160 -Log creation time: Wed May 10 10:21:53 2000 Hardware path: 160 ...(output lines are omitted) Firmware Revision: 40.14

Step 8. Enter q to leave this screen. Then press Enter at the next prompt, and enter exit to exit the utility. Using the Boot Display (this requires a reboot): Step 1. As your system is booting up, interrupt the auto-boot sequence by pressing any key when prompted. For example:
... Primary boot path: 0/0/2/0.2 Alternate boot path: 0/0/2/0.2

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Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades
Console path: 0/0/4/0.0 Keyboard path: 0/0/4/0.0 Processor is booting from first available device. To discontinue, press any key with 10 seconds.

Step 2. You’ll see the boot Main Menu:
---Main Menu-------------------------------------------------Command Description ------------------------BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>] Boot from specified path PAth [PRI|ALT] [<path>] Display or modify a path SEArch [DIsplay|IPL] [<path>] Search for boot devices COnfiguration menu Displays or sets boot values INformation menu Displays hardware information ... HElp [<menu>|<command>] Display help for menu or command RESET Restart the system Main Menu: Enter command or menu>

Enter: IN

(for INformation)

Step 3. You’ll see the information menu:
---Information Menu------------------------------------------Command Description ------------------------ALL Display all system information BootINfo Display boot-related information Cache Display cache information ChipRevisions Display revisions of major VLSI FRU Display FRU information FwrVersion Display firmware information ... Main Return to Main Menu Information Menu: Enter command>

Enter: FV (for Firmware Version) You’ll see something like:
FIRMWARE INFORMATION Firmware Version: 40.14

Step 4. Continue with the boot (example commands are in bold): Chapter 1 21

Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades
Information Menu: Enter command > BO PRI Interact with IPL (Y, N, or Cancel)?> N Booting...

Downloading firmware patches

To get a firmware patch over the Web:

Step 1. Go to: itrc.hp.com From the home page, select: individual patches Step 2. If you are already registered, log in with your user ID and password. If not registered, following the instructions on the screen. Remember to save your user ID and password. Step 3. From the patch database main page, select hp-ux. Step 4. Select Series 700 for workstations or Series 800 for servers. Select the OS your system is running, either 10.20 or 11.00. Step 5. Choose Search By Keyword, enter the patch name for your system listed on page 18 and click search. The patch you entered or its successor should be listed. Select that patch (click select all, then add to selected patch list, then download). Ignore any comments that the firmware patch is “Not yet HP recommended”. Step 6. After downloading the patch, proceed to “Applying Firmware Patches” next.

To get a firmware patch free of charge via ftp: For the Americas and Asia-Pacific: ftp://us-ffs.external.hp.com For Europe: ftp://europe-ffs.external.hp.com

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Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Firmware Upgrades Applying firmware Follow these steps to install each patch you’ve downloaded on each patches system prior to updating it to 11i: Step 1. Back up your system! Step 2. Log in as root. Step 3. Copy the patch(es) to the /tmp directory. Step 4. Change your working directory to /tmp and unshar each patch. For example, to unshar patch PHSS_23184: cd /tmp sh PHSS_23184 Step 5. Run swinstall to install each patch. For example: /usr/sbin/swinstall -x autoreboot=true -x \ patch_match_target=true -s /tmp/PHSS_23184.depot

CAUTION

Do not interrupt the update process. Do not power down the system or perform any other similar action during the update. The process requires multiple reboots. Once the system has rebooted HP-UX completely, it’s safe to perform any other normal operation.

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23

Preparing for Software Migration Updating Your Ignite-UX Server

Updating Your Ignite-UX Server
The HP-UX 11i OE CD1 contains the complete Ignite-UX product. When you cold-install 11i from the media, a subset of Ignite-UX is used to perform the installation on a single system. If you plan to update an existing Ignite-UX server to install 11i on more than one system in your network, you should update your Ignite-UX server first. Follow the instructions for “Updating to HP-UX 11i” in Chapter 2. Updating your Ignite-UX server and using it to update other systems will ensure that you have the new make_tape_recovery(1M) command to backup and recovery your systems. You will also be assured of keeping consistent kernel configuration with specific drivers, daemons, and kernel tunables on all systems. The latest Ignite-UX software and documentation can also be downloaded from HP via the Web: software.hp.com/products/IUX/

24

Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Installing Diagnostics

Installing Diagnostics
HP-UX 11i automatically installs support tools on all systems to provide required hardware support. These tools, contained in the OnlineDiag bundle, give you a complete solution to verify, troubleshoot, and monitor HP 9000 system hardware, including CPUs, memory, interface cards, mass storage and other devices.

CAUTION

De-installing the OnlineDiag bundle prevents products with dependencies on the support tools from functioning correctly. This currently includes Predictive Support and iCOD client software. Not installing the OnlineDiag bundle also removes protections against hardware failures that the support tools provide. Without these tools, you will find it much harder to troubleshoot and fix the problem if a hardware failure occurs. To ensure the reliability of your computer system, we highly recommend installing the OnlineDiag bundle with HP-UX 11i.

The tools in OnlineDiag: • Protect you against some hardware failures (for example, some memory problems). • Notify you hardware events that may indicate impending failure. • Maintain logs that can give you critical help in determining the cause of failures. • Let you troubleshoot system problems with the system online or offline. For most computer systems, no special configuration of the support tools is necessary. For complete information, see the diagnostics Web site: docs.hp.com/hpux/diag/

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25

Preparing for Software Migration Needing More Disk Space?

Needing More Disk Space?
This section provides hints and information to help you determine your disk needs for HP-UX 11i. If you need more disk space (HP-UX 11i generally requires a 4GB root volume), be sure to order the equipment and plan on installing it after backing up your current system as explained later in this chapter. Planning hints • Record the hardware path to the CD drive. • Develop a clear configuration plan, including: — File system sizes. — Swap space size. — Dump device. — Disk and file-system parameters. — Mirroring information. • If installing application programs other than those supplied within an HP-UX 11i Operating Environment (OE), consider the vendor’s size recommendations. • When planning disk space, refer to these books: — Managing Systems and Workgroups: A Guide for System Administrators or Managing HP Superdome Complexes — Both manuals are available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and at:
docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90701/B2355-90701.html

— Disk and File Management Tasks on HP-UX — Prentice-Hall Hewlett-Packard Professional Books, 1997. Update requirements To update your HP 9000 server or workstation to HP-UX 11i, it must have the following: • Existing OS: HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0. If your system is running another HP-UX release, you must first update it to HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 before following these steps to update to 11i. See “Migrating from Previous HP-UX Releases” on page 17 for more information.

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Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Needing More Disk Space? • Disk space and memory: update-ux checks for required swap space but does not check for minimum memory: — 64 MB memory, minimum. — 128 MB free swap space, minimum. Total swap should be 1GB. — LVM partitions: — / (root): 30 MB free space. — /usr: 80-654 MB free space (see the next table). — /stand: 30 MB free space (to expand /stand, see Appendix B). — /var: 50 MB free space. — /opt: 30-580 MB free space (see the next table). — 4GB root volume, minimum. Disk-space requirements for the /usr and /opt partitions depend upon the update task. Typical requirements for various updates are listed next. Extra space needed with Technical Computing OE Cold-installing the HP-UX 11i Technical Computing OE installs all CDE languages, rather than just a selected language. To remove unneeded CDE language bundles after installing the TCOE, list them using swlist and remove unneeded bundles using swremove. See Chapter 4 for example uses of swlist and swremove.

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Preparing for Software Migration Needing More Disk Space?

Table 1-1

Update Free Disk-space Requirements for /usr and /opt HP-UX 11i Update Task 10.20 -> 11i default update: HPUXBase, HPUXBaseAux, network drivers, CDE and OnlineDiag 10.20 -> 11i OE 10.20 -> 11i Enterprise OE 10.20 -> 11i Mission Critical OE 10.20 -> 11i Technical Computing OE 10.20 -> 11i Minimal Technical OE 11.0 -> 11i default update: HPUXBase, HPUXBaseAux, HWEnable11i, BUNDLE11i, network drivers, CDE and OnlineDiag. 11.0 -> 11i OE 11.0 -> 11i Enterprise OE 11.0 -> 11i Mission Critical OE 11.0 -> 11i Technical Computing OE 11.0 -> 11i Minimal Technical OE 11i (no OE) -> 11i OE 11i (no OE) -> 11i Enterprise OE 11i (no OE) -> 11i Mission Critical OE 11i (no OE) -> 11i Technical Computing OE 11i (no OE) -> 11i Minimal Technical OE 11i OE -> 11i Enterprise OE 11i OE -> 11i Mission Critical OE /usr 554 MB 564 MB 614 MB 614 MB 654 MB 564 MB 404 MB /opt 80 MB 420 MB 580 MB 515 MB 580 MB 420 MB 80 MB

414 MB 474 MB 499 MB 474 MB 414 MB 225 MB 225 MB 225 MB 225 MB 225 MB 80 MB 80 MB

330 MB 530 MB 530 MB 500 MB 330 MB 310 MB 540 MB 540 MB 470 MB 310 MB 230 MB 230 MB

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Preparing for Software Migration Selecting the Path to HP-UX 11i

Selecting the Path to HP-UX 11i
Now that you have evaluated your system and ordered any additional needed hardware, you need to decide whether to cold-install HP-UX 11i on your system (overwrite everything on the root disk) or update it (replace the OS, patches and add an OE, while leaving other applications intact). Cold-install means installing system software on a new (un-installed) or existing system disk by completely rebuilding the root file system, erasing the existing operating system and data on that volume and installing the new operating system and specified software and data. An advantage of cold-install is that supported software can be installed without regard for the software currently on the system, or concern for cleaning up old software. Update means using the update-ux command and Software Distributor (SD) tools to selectively overwrite the operating system and application software from a media or network source depot. An advantage of performing an update is that it leaves user data, configurations and applications in place. Updating to HP-UX 11i requires that the system be running at 10.20 or 11.0, with or without extension or Additional Core Enhancement (ACE) packs installed. Here are some general guidelines: Cold-install when... We recommend using Ignite-UX to cold-install HP-UX 11i when: • You are managing several systems with similar OS configurations. • You need fast, predictable deployment. • Disk space needs reconfiguration. See “Needing More Disk Space?” on page 26. • Systems are organized with clean separation of the OS from user, application and data files. You can cold-install from any supported HP-UX OS. See the table on page 17. The cold-install process using Ignite-UX is described in Chapter 2.

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Preparing for Software Migration Selecting the Path to HP-UX 11i Update when... You should update rather than cold-install HP-UX 11i when you are updating from HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 and: • You are only updating a few (1-3) systems to 11i. • You are concerned about recovering unique applications and data on your root volume, such as custom desktops or applications, that are hard to restore. The update-ux command will not write over non-OS files when installing 11i. • Each system has a unique configuration. • Current disk space is sufficient for 11i (see page 20). If your system meets these requirements, follow the update procedure in Chapter 2.

NOTE

update-ux removes all 10.x patches from the system prior to updating to 11i. Any 10.x applications left on the system after the update may not be supportable if they required those patches. After migrating your system, see instructions for each remaining application to update it to 11i.

Updating network drivers

Installing or updating to HP-UX 11i will install a minimum set of default networking drivers that apply to the system (see the top part of the table at the end of Chapter 2). You may need to select or specify other available networking drivers to enable other cards on your system. This can easily be done during the install or update by following the instructions in Chapter 2. If you plan to update Netscape Directory Server (NDS) along with HP-UX 11i, see Chapter 2 for details. The update-ux command does not replace NDS with a new version by default. If the Distributed File System (DFS) is installed and in use on your HP-UX 10.20 system to manage large numbers of files, update-ux will remove it and associated data during the update to 11i. If you need to continue using DFS, do not update to HP-UX 11.x or 11i. If you system already is running any version of the Apache Web Server, installing or updating to an HP-UX 11i Operating Environment will not install the version of Apache included with the 11i OE. If you wish to install the version of Apache provided with HP-UX 11i, you should

Updating NDS

update-ux removes DFS

Installing or updating Apache

30

Chapter 1

Preparing for Software Migration Selecting the Path to HP-UX 11i swinstall it after migrating your system to 11i. See Chapter 4 for example uses of the swinstall command.

After deciding which migration path to follow, review the “Readme Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i” booklet for situations that may apply to your system. Then proceed to collect key system information and back up your current system as explained next.

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Preparing for Software Migration Collect Key Install Information

Collect Key Install Information
During the cold-install process, you will be prompted for your system’s identity and network addresses. Record the following data on paper or on another computer for access during the migration: • Hostname (for example, elvis) To get your system’s hostname, enter: hostname • Host IP address (for example, 15.0.68.12). To get the above system’s IP address, enter: nslookup elvis • Distributed Network Server (DNS) name (for example, memphis) and IP address. For this example, enter: nslookup memphis • Software depot name (for example, vegas) and IP address. For this example, enter: nslookup vegas

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Preparing for Software Migration Back Up Your System!

Back Up Your System!
In addition to your normal, periodic system backup procedures, you should create a backup tape or a network backup of your root volume group. Do this first before performing a cold-install or update, and again after the cold-install or update. If a problem occurs, it’s a very simple procedure to restore the system to its original state. This section offers three alternatives for performing system backups: fbackup, make_recovery and make_net_recovery. Using fbackup Many administrators use the basic fbackup command to back up the entire system to tape. You do not need to unmount any imported file systems; fbackup does not cross NFS boundaries unless specified. Using the normal tape location to do a full backup, mount a new tape and enter: fbackup -f/dev/rmt/0m -i -v Later, if you wish to return the system to its previous state, use the frecover command. See the fbackup(1M) manpage for examples. Ignite-UX recovery A better alternative to using fbackup/frecover is to use the recovery commands commands available with an Ignite-UX server. Ignite-UX recovery commands offer more flexibility than fbackup/frecover, including the ability to recover non-bootable systems. The Ignite-UX server software for HP-UX 11i is provided on the HP-UX 11i OE CD1, and can be either cold-installed along with 11i to create a new server or specified in the update-ux command to update an existing Ignite-UX server to 11i. See Chapter 2 for details.
Using The Ignite-UX server’s make_tape_recovery command creates a bootable make_tape_recovery recovery tape for an LVM or whole disk file system while it is up and

running. When a system has a logical volume layout, the recovery tape will only include data from the root volume group, plus data from any non-root volume group containing the /usr directory. To create the bootable recovery tape, enter: /opt/ignite/bin/make_tape_recovery -ACv where: v is for verbose mode and A specifies the entire root disk or

Chapter 1

33

Preparing for Software Migration Back Up Your System! volume group. If a tape drive other than the default (/dev/rmt/0m) will be used, modify the command to point to the device you want to use, for example a tape drive at /dev/rmt/3mn: /opt/ignite/bin/make_tape_recovery -ACv -d/dev/rmt/3mn To recover a failed system disk or volume group after a recovery tape has been made, simply load the recovery tape, boot the system, interrupting the boot sequence to redirect to the tape drive. Allow the install process to complete. Do not intervene. The system will reboot and, because map files for all associated volume groups have been saved on the tape, any other existing volume groups are imported and mounted automatically. Data which is not in the root volume group must be backed up and recovered using normal backup utilities. For more information on using make_recovery, see the make_tape_recovery(1m) manpage on an Ignite-UX server or Chapter 11 of the Ignite-UX Administration Guide. The guide is available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90738/B2355-90738.html
Using make_net_recovery

The Ignite-UX server also has the make_net_recovery command to create a system recovery archive on another system on the network. The archive created by make_net_recovery is specific to the system it was created for and its identity includes hostname, IP_address, networking information, and so on. In the event of a root disk failure, you use the Ignite-UX server to restore the system by installing the recovery archive. The contents of the system recovery archive always includes all files and directories which are essential to bringing up a functional system. This "essential" list is pre-defined by make_net_recovery. You can run make_net_recovery in its interactive mode to review the directories and files which make up the "essential list,” and also add or remove other data from the archive on a disk/volume group, file, or directory basis. For more information on using make_net_recovery, see the make_net_recovery(4) manpage or Chapter 11 of the Ignite-UX Administration Guide.

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Preparing for Software Migration Save Configuration Files

Save Configuration Files
If you are planning to cold-install HP-UX 11i rather than update an existing system, be sure to save the files that you will want to re-install. These include a number of configuration files in /etc, the contents of /usr/local, any local home directories (that is, those you do not import from another system), and any /opt directories that contain installed software. If multiple users are preparing for the cold-install, you might consider creating a directory (such as /backup) on another system. Do not create this directory on your root disk. Mount it with sam. Then create a subdirectory for each system or user (for example, /backup/your_sys). As root, copy the files. For example: Step 1. Copy all config files from /etc on a system named moe to system curly. On curly, enter: mkdir /backup/moe/etc rcp -p your_name@moe:/etc/* /backup/moe/etc/. Step 2. Copy your local home directory to the backup system. On curly: mkdir /backup/moe/home rcp -pr your_name@moe:/home/ /backup/moe/home/ and so on... Colors and fonts If you want to preserve your colors and fonts in VUE or CDE, execute: xrdb -q > xrdb.save Then save the xrdb.save file in your backup directory. Be aware that VUE is not supported beyond HP-UX 10.20.

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35

Preparing for Software Migration Locate Source Media for Migration

Locate Source Media for Migration
Now that you have backed up your system and important data files, and you have decided how to migrate to HP-UX 11i (cold-install or update), you need to locate the source media needed for the migration: • If you are migrating one system at a time — Migrate directly from the CDs in the HP-UX 11i media box: — HP-UX 11i OE CDs — Boot and install a new system or update an existing HP-UX 10.20 system. — Support Plus CD — Install current HP-UX 11i patch bundles to fix defects in the OS and OE applications. — HP-UX Application CDs — Install applications not installed with the OE or install a newer version of an OE application. Some applications installed with an 11i OE may be older versions than those available on the HP-UX Applications CDs supplied in the media box. Products available on Application CDs are listed in the CD_TABLE_OF_CONTENTS file on each CD. • If you plan to migrate many systems in your enterprise — We recommend using an Ignite-UX server to create a “golden image” from which to migrate. This install image can contain the 11i OS, and OE, other applications and any needed patches. Once the archive is in place, either on the Ignite-UX server or on another system, migration on each client system is a single-pass operation; you will only need to reboot each client once. For details on installing an Ignite-UX server with HP-UX 11.0, see the Ignite-UX Administration Guide, supplied on the HP-UX Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ This completes preparing the system. Now migrate your system to HP-UX 11i as explained in Chapter 2.

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i

2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i
This chapter describes migrating your system to HP-UX 11i using the HP-UX 11i Operating Environment (OE) CDs: • Cold-installing HP-UX 11i, page 38. • Updating HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 to 11i, page 48. • Updating HP-UX 11i to this June 2001 release, page 61. For help in deciding which migration path to follow for your system, please read Chapter 1. Contents of each OE are listed in the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with 11i CDs. More details on each application are in Chapter 4 of the HP-UX 11i Release Notes. Devices supported by network drivers are listed in the release notes. Other software bundles such as Ignite-UX are available for selection during cold-installation and update. The procedures in this chapter describe booting newer HP 9000 servers. The process differs for older servers, HP 9000 workstations, V-Class and partitioned systems such as HP Superdome. For help with V-Class servers, see Appendix A. Booting partitioned systems, such as HP Superdome and HP S-Class, are explained in the Managing HP Superdome Complexes manual, available on the Instant Information CD and on HP’s user-documentation Web site: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90701/B2355-90701.html

Chapter 2

37

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i

Cold-installing HP-UX 11i
This section describes cold-installing from the HP-UX 11i CDs, including the operating system, a selected Operating Environment (OE) bundle, network drivers, CDE language bundle, diagnostics and required patches from the Support Plus CD. The overall process is shown on the next page, along with alternate methods of cold-installing 11i: Alternate install methods • Installing from software depot(s) — Use Software Distributor commands to create depots containing OS, OE, and other software bundles, then install from the depots. For help with this method, see the swinstall(1M) manpage and the Software Distributor Administration Guide available on the Instant Information CD. • Installing from golden images — If you need to install the same OS/OE and applications on many systems in your network, use an Ignite-UX server as explained in the Ignite-UX Administration Guide available on the Instant Information CD. With Ignite-UX, you can create a single install image (golden image) containing OS/OE bundles, application bundles and patch bundles, then install the image on multiple systems in your environment. • If you’re new HP 9000 system was factory installed (we call this “factory integrated”), the cold-installation process described here has already been performed. Skip this chapter and proceed to install application software. Cold-installing HP-UX on partitioned systems HP-UX must be installed on the boot disk assigned to each partition after the partition has been configured. Configuring the boot disk is explained in the Managing Superdome Complexes manual, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on HP’s user-documentation Web listed above. Once each partition has been configured for installation, follow the cold-installation instruction on the following pages to install HP-UX on each partition’s boot disk. Installing or updating NDS Although the Netscape Directory Server (NDS) is included in HP-UX 11i OEs, you must explicitly select NDS during the install or update process described next to install it. If you do not select NDS, it will not be installed with 11i. For more on this, see “Updating Netscape Directory Server” on page 67. 38 Chapter 2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i

Determine install
approach

if factory integrated from CDs
Install 11i OS/OE using Ignite-UX
(see page 43)

use depots *

use golden image **
Create Install golden image using Ignite-UX Server**

Create 2 install
depots: OE depot: OS/OE, QPK. AR depot: Applications, QPK.
(see Notes below)

Install non-OE applications using swinstall
(see Chapter 4)

Install patches from Support Plus CD using swinstall
(see Chapter 4)

Install from depot(s) using Ignite-UX

Install image using Ignite-UX Server

Install non-OE applications using swinstall
(see Chapter 4)

Identify and install non-OE patches using Custom Patch Manager (CPM)

Install 3rd-party and internal software

Create archive/recovery image Done

Notes: QPK - Quality Pack from Support Plus CD contains patch bundles for OS/OE and applications. See Step 24 on page 47. * For help creating depots, see the Software Distributor Administration Guide. **Golden image can contain OS/OE, patches, and application bundles. For help creating golden images, see the Ignite-UX Administration Guide.

Cold-installing HP-UX 11i

Chapter 2

39

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i

IMPORTANT

If you have NDS version B.02.00.05 and are updating to HP-UX 11i, be sure to either select the new version of NDS during the update or remove the old version from your system. If you run NDS version B.02.00.05 with 11i, the server will cease to work and all client systems may lose the ability to have anyone log in.

After NDS is installed or updated with HP-UX 11i, additional configuration steps are required to initiate NDS. See the NDS release notes available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD for instructions. Installing MC/ServiceGuard If you are planning to install the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, MC/ServiceGuard will be automatically installed, removing any previous version of MC/ServiceGuard on the system. If you will require the ServiceGuard OPS Edition on the system rather than MC/ServiceGuard, review “Installing ServiceGuard Products” at the back of this chapter before continuing. After installing the 11i MC OE, follow the instructions in that section to replace MC/ServiceGuard with the ServiceGuard OPS Edition. If your system is on HP Mission Critical Support, discuss the proper method of installing and patching the Mission Critical OE with your HP Customer Engineer.

On Mission Critical support?

System Requirements
To cold-install HP-UX 11i, you must have the following: • A supported HP 9000 server or workstation. Supported systems are listed in Chapter 1. • The HP-UX 11i media (2-CD set). • 64 MB memory, minimum. • 128 MB swap space, minimum. • 4GB root volume, minimum, required when installing HP-UX 11i with or without an operating environment (OE).

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Chapter 2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i

Installing HP-UX 11i
Required media Have these CDs ready from the HP-UX 11i media box: • HP-UX 11i OE CDs 1 and 2, June 2001 or later. • Support Plus CD, June 2001 or later (for general release patch bundle, quality patch bundles and diagnostics. Typical install time Cold-installing HP-UX 11i typically takes from 2-3 hours, depending upon the system and whether you are installing only the OS or also installing an OE. To do a cold installation: Step 1. Insert the HP-UX 11i CD1 into the drive. Make sure any external devices connected to the target system are turned ON and operational. Then turn the system ON or cycle power. Step 2. Stop the autoboot: • On workstations, press and hold down the Esc key. • On servers, press any key. You will see the boot console menu. Boot procedures vary somewhat between computers. If you need help, enter: HELP Step 3. Ensure that Fast Boot is enabled (the full memory check run when Fast Boot is OFF may take several hours on a large system): 1. Select the Configuration Menu: CO 2. If the Fast Boot selection is available, switch Fast Boot ON: FB ON 3. Return to the Main Menu: MA Step 4. Search for bootable devices, using the choices displayed (for example, enter search or sea). You’ll see a table similar to this:
Path# ----P0 Device Path ----------SESCSI.2.0 Device Type ----------TOSHIBA CD-ROM

Chapter 2

41

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i
P1 P2 LAN.1.2.3.4 .5.6 FWSCSI.6.0 1.2.3.4 IBM DDRS-34560WS

Of the media listed, a fast/wide SCSI device (FWSCSI) is usually a disk, whereas a single-ended SCSI device (SESCSI) can be a disk or CD drive. CDs usually default to a device path ending in 2. Step 5. Boot from the CD drive using the listed path number. For the example shown above, enter: BO P0 Step 6. After a few minutes, you’ll be asked Interact with IPL? Press: n The install kernel will load (takes 3-5 minutes), after which a screen might ask you to enter the keyboard language of your console. Enter the number and press Return/Enter... and again to confirm. Step 7. When the initial Ignite-UX screen appears, take a moment to read how to navigate and select choices using this terminal interface:

• Use the Tab key to navigate between fields and the arrow keys to navigate within fields. • Press Return/Enter to select an item. Pressing Return/Enter or the space-bar opens a menu list. • To navigate more quickly, enter the underlined letter of an item (such as I for Install HP-UX). Step 8. Select: Install HP-UX

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i From the User Interface and Media Options screen, choose: • Source Location Options: Media-only installation • User Interface Options: Guided Installation — provides an install wizard with limited choices. Select if you are not familiar with Ignite-UX. Alternately, select Advanced Installation to see tabbed screens, enabling you to customize your system. Use this mode to change LVM settings and set system parameters, network services, file-system characteristics, and other configuration details. Minimum file-system requirement are listed on page 40. You can exit Guided Installation and restart the configuration using Advanced Installation at any time by either selecting the Cancel button or pressing C. Make your choices and select OK. Step 9. Whether using Guided Installation or Advanced Installation, proceed through each screen to configure your system: • Configurations: Lists the OS version (initially B.11.11). • Environments: Specify desired OE from those available on the CD. If your system is 32/64-bit capable, select the bundle for the OS word-width you wish to install, 32 or 64 (see the table at the back of this chapter). • Languages: Click the Languages... button to view CDE-languages bundles to be loaded. Global is set by default when installing on workstations, resulting in all available CDE-language bundles being installed. Global (Non-CDE) is set when installing on servers to indicate that a generic, CDE-language bundle will be installed. • Additional Software: Ensure that the needed networking driver(s) and other applications are selected for your system (see the table at the back of this chapter).

IMPORTANT

Do not de-select the HPUXBaseAux, HWEnable11i, OnlineDiag and/or BUNDLE11i bundles (BUNDLE11i is not needed with the Technical Computing or Minimal Technical OEs). If in doubt, leave the selections as default. Other software products may be selectable, however, we recommend that you do not de-select any products at this time. For more about OnlineDiag, see “Verifying and Adding Diagnostics”

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i in Appendix B.

TIP

If you’re installing an Ignite-UX server, be sure to select the entire Ignite-UX server product, B5725AA, thus installing the new make_tape_recovery(1M) command on your Ignite-UX server.

• At the end of the Guided Installation session, a screen allows you to review any messages that Ignite-UX encountered. If there are any errors, resolve them before continuing with the installation.

NOTE

Ignore any message stating that /var needs to be larger than available to hold a dump file. /var typically only needs to be set to 50-100% as large as the current memory to handle dump files.

Step 10. When finished configuring your installation: • With Guided Installation, select: Finish • With Advanced Installation, select GO! (at the bottom of any tab). A confirmation screen lists the disks that will be written to during installation and a log of any warnings or errors encountered. You have the chance to Cancel at this time. If you cancel, you return to the previous configuration screen. After you selecting Finish or GO!, the system configures the hard disk(s) and loads a minimum set of commands and libraries. SD then downloads all the products and patches from the first CD. Step 11. When prompted, replace HP-UX 11i CD1 with the requested CD from the media box. Software will be automatically loaded from each CD. If you see the message:
Unable to verify CD-ROM media content ...

You may have pressed Enter before changing the CD. If so, select the displayed Recovery Action 1: Retry software Load... and press Enter again. Step 12. The system automatically reboots after all software has been loaded.

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i Eject the last CD. Be sure to store all CDs in a safe place. You may need them later to install drivers or install/change the OE. Step 13. If you specified Ask at first boot during the installation screens, the set_parms command runs now so you can set the root password, date, time, time zone, IP address, and other network parameters. You may need to customize NFS mount gateways, file systems, and so forth after you log in. Changes to the kernel, such as adding devices, will require a reboot to enable them. Step 14. Before installing or updating applications, insert the HP-UX Support Plus CD and install the Quality Pack patch bundles to update the OS and OE applications on your system. For example: /usr/sbin/swinstall -s /cdrom QPK11.11.depot \ x patch_match_target=true -x autoreboot=true The Quality Pack delivers two 11i patch bundles: • GOLDBASE11i — patches for the 11i OS and OE network drivers. • GOLDAPPS11i — patches for 11i OE applications. For more about this package, see the Quality Pack page available on the Support Plus Web: software.hp.com/SUPPORT_PLUS/qpk.html Problems? If you encounter a problem during the cold-install process, first review Appendix B for possible solutions. Help may also be available on the Web: forums.itrc.hp.com/cm/FamilyHome/1,1148,117,00.htm

After Cold-installing HP-UX 11i
• Your task is nearly complete. If you cold-installed to enable a hardware upgrade, proceed with the hardware phase of the upgrade. Ask your HP Customer Engineer for more information. • To potentially improve performance, run sam as root and remove any unneeded network drivers. The drivers listed at the top of the table at the back of this chapter are installed by default. For help using sam, see its Help screens or the Managing Systems and Workgroups manual.

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Retrieving Information After Cold-installing
After completing the cold-install, you can retrieve the information you had previously saved onto another system. Here are some tips: Create a new root directory Consider creating a root home directory that is not /. This keeps the user root dot files out of the / directory. Make sure it is on the root volume by calling it something like /homeroot. This is especially important if you are using LVM and /home is a separate volume.

Step 1. From the CDE login screen, select Options -> Command Line Login and login as root. Step 2. Edit /etc/passwd to change the home directory from root to /homeroot and save it. Step 3. Create the /homeroot directory: mkdir /homeroot Step 4. Move root’s personal files (files beginning with . ) to /homeroot: mv /.[a-zA-Z]* /homeroot Step 5. Exit and log in again as root. Recover files Recover all the customized and personal files that you saved previously by merging them manually. For example, do not overwrite /etc/passwd with your old version. Instead, either paste in entries from your old files or merge the old information into the new files. If you had a local home directory, you can restore it as follows: • If you copied it to, say, /backup/moe/home, enter these commands: cd /backup/moe/home find -depth -print | cpio -pdm /moe/home • If you backed it up to tape with fbackup, enter: frecover -x -i /moe/home -v Restore other files Carefully use the same techniques to restore other files and directories, such as /usr, /local and /opt. For help in importing entire volume groups, see either the Managing Filesystems and Workgroups manual or the Managing HP Superdome Complexes manual.

Restore /home

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Cold-installing HP-UX 11i The commands above will not write over newer files, so your new operating system and any files you update are well protected.

This completes the cold-install process. Now verify the installation as explained in Chapter 3 and back up your new system using the same process you used before installation. Then install other required patches and software; see hints in Chapter 4.

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Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i
This section describes updating an existing HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 system to HP-UX 11i using the new update-ux command. To help you decide whether you should update or cold-install, see Chapter 1. Beginning with the 11i release, the update-ux command replaces swgettools to perform these OS update tasks: • Update the HP-UX OS from 10.20 or 11.0 to 11i, including adding a new Operating Environment (OE). • Update and existing 11i system to a later release. • Change the OS word-width from 32-bit to 64-bit on appropriate systems. • Change from one OE to another. About update-ux The update-ux command improves the usability and robustness of the update process by eliminating many of the manual steps required by swgettools in previous HP-UX updates. In addition to ensuring a safe environment on the target system for the OS update, update-ux performs these update preparation steps before initiating the update: • Before updating from HP-UX 10.20, update-ux performs these operations for you: — Verifies that FibreChannel Storage is not on the system. If present, it must be manually removed. — Ensures that you are not updating a diskless server. You’ll have to cold-install 11i on a diskless server, making it a stand-alone system. — Checks for minimal disk space in /, /stand, /opt, /usr and /var on a system using LVM. — Removes the no-longer-needed SW-DIST.RUPDATE fileset. — Removes any 10.x patch information and 10.20 OS bundle wrappers. — Upgrades to JFS version 3 if needed. • Before updating from HP-UX 11.0 or an earlier version of 11i,

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i update-ux performs these operations: — Checks for minimal disk space in /, /stand, /opt, /usr and /var on a system using LVM. — Removes HP-UX 11.0 OS bundle wrappers. If any requirements are not met, update-ux will display an appropriate message and exit. update-ux installs a new version of HP-UX Software Distributor (SD), plus any patches to it, from the source depot before initiating an OS update. Updating NDS If you plan to update Netscape Directory Server (NDS) along with HP-UX 11i, see “Updating Netscape Directory Server” on page 67. The update-ux command does not replace NDS with a new version by default. If the Distributed File System (DFS) is installed and in use on your HP-UX 10.20 system to manage large numbers of files, update-ux will remove it and associated data during the update to 11i. If you need to continue using DFS, STOP! Do not update to HP-UX 11.x or 11i. If you are planning to install the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, MC/ServiceGuard will be automatically installed, removing any previous version of MC/ServiceGuard on the system. If you currently have or will require the ServiceGuard OPS Edition on the system rather than MC/ServiceGuard, review “Installing ServiceGuard Products” at the back of this chapter before continuing. If you are updating a system containing MirrorDisk/UX and wish to continue using that product, and you are updating to either of the HP-UX 11i Technical OEs, you will need to re-install patch PHKL_23333 after the update. Although this patch is installed with the 11i update, you’ll need to re-install it after the update to 11i to re-enable the product. See Chapter 4 for help installing patches.

update-ux removes DFS

Installing MC/ServiceGuard

Updating MirrorDisk/UX

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Create archive/recovery image

use depot(s) Determine update-ux Determine
update approach source

Create depot(s)
(see page 54)

cold-install Cold-install from CDs, depots or golden image
(see page 41)

CDs Update OS/OE from 11i OE CDs using update-ux
(start at page 54)

Update to 11i OE from depot containing OS/OE and Support Plus bundles using update-ux
(see page 60)

Update non-OE
applications from Application CDs using swinstall Install patches from Support Plus CD using swinstall

Update non-OE
applications using swinstall
(see Chapter 4)

Identify and install non-OE patches Identify and install non-OE patches (use Custom Patch using Custom Patch Manager)

Install 3rd-party and internal software

Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i

Create archive/recovery image

Done

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i The update-ux command updates your system in this order: 1. Performs preparation steps including checking the root volume (see “About update-ux” on page 48). 2. Calls swinstall to install software bundles from CD1. swinstall does its Selection and Analysis processes on the software loaded from the CD, then replaces the existing OS with 11i OS bundles and default network drivers. 3. Prompts you after about an hour to replace CD1 with other CDs from the media box. After mounting each CD, update-ux calls swinstall again to load software and any additional software bundle(s) you specified in the update-ux command. 4. Reboots the system after all software has been loaded. These OS and network driver bundles are loaded by default:
HPUXBase32 or HPUXBase64 HPUXBaseAux HWEnable11i BUNDLE11i FibrChanl-00 (64-bit OS only) GigEther-00 RAID-00 (64-bit OS only) FDDI-00 (32-bit OS only) (other networked drivers if needed) OnlineDiag CDE-English (or appropriate language bundle(s))

Typical update times

The entire update process typically takes from 2 to 6 hours, depending upon the system being updated, whether you are updating only the OS or also adding an OE, the amount of existing user data on the system, etc. If you are only updating the OS (not including an OE) on a newer system, the update time will typically be 2-3 hours. If you encounter a problem during the update process, review Appendix B in this guide for possible solutions.

Monitoring the update process

IMPORTANT

Before proceeding, please back up your system; see Chapter 1.

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Updating Tips
Record software versions before updating To identify what software still needs updating after the OS update, print an swlist listing of all products and bundles beforehand. For example, enter: /usr/sbin/swlist | lp Then compare it with a similar swlist done after the update. Rebuild kernel Your update could fail if the HP-UX kernel fails in the starting before you update environment. To ensure that you have a reliable starting point, rebuild the kernel before you update: Step 1. As root, enter: /usr/sbin/mk_kernel Step 2. Fix any problems listed in the mk_kernel output. Step 3. Reboot your system to ensure that your new kernel boots. Disable CDE screen lock To prevent the CDE screen lock function from locking the keyboard during an update, disable the function now: Click the style manager icon on the front panel. Click the Screen icon. Select: Screen Lock: Off Also, do not lock the system using the front panel lock icon. Clean out your log To make it easier to check for problems encountered during an update, files rename the log files before starting an update: Step 1. cd /var/adm/sw Step 2. As root, rename each log file. For example: mv swagent.log swagent_old.log Monitor the update If you wish to view the update process in detail, open another term process window (drag it aside so you can also watch for any messages on the window running update-ux) and use the tail command to view swinstall messages being logged: tail -t /var/adm/sw/swagent.log 52 Chapter 2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i You may also wish to log all messages directed to the console by using the script command. For example, to log all messages into a file named: /tmp/updateOS, enter: script -a /tmp/updateOS To halt the script log process, enter: exit Running other commands You can run other commands during an update, such as viewing files, tail, etc. However, do not run other Software Distributor commands during an update; doing so may cause the commands to function improperly. If you encounter a problem during the update process, review Appendix B in this guide for possible solutions. After updating to an HP-UX 11i operating environment (OE), some OE products will need post-installation configuration to make them functional. This may be indicated by a message logged in /var/adm/sw/swagent.log. Refer to each product’s installation instructions for details. Location of OE product documentation is listed in the tables at the back of the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet and in the HP-UX 11i Release Notes. Release notes are in /usr/share/doc/ and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ All software doesn’t get updated The update-ux command updates the HP-UX OS and any software specified in additional software bundle(s) available on the source media. When an OE is specified, some products in the OE such as Apache Web Server, will not automatically get updated if a version of the product not previously installed with an OE already exists on the system. You’ll have to update or re-install those products after updating 11i. To verify the software versions after updating, list the products using the swlist command. To verify that all software products are compatible with the new OS, run swverify. These operations are explained in Chapters 3 and 4. After you update, please back up your system. We recommend using the Ignite-UX make_tape_recovery or make_net_recovery command to create a recovery archive immediately after updating to HP-UX 11i. By backing up your system, you will have a reliable system image to return to if subsequent system changes or a system failure corrupts your Chapter 2 53

Updating problems? Configuring OE applications

Verify the update

Back up your system!

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i system. To use these recovery commands, you need to first install the Ignite-UX bundle as shown later in the update examples. Use the same process you used to back up your system before migrating to HP-UX 11i. See “Back Up Your System!” in Chapter 1.

Procedure A: Install update-ux
You need the update-ux command installed to update from HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 to 11i. Follow these steps to install update-ux: Step 1. Insert the HP-UX 11i CD 1 and wait for the CD drive’s busy light to stop blinking. Step 2. Log on as root and find the CD-ROM device file name: ioscan -fnC disk A typical CD-ROM device name is: /dev/dsk/c1t2d0 Step 3. Create the directory /cdrom under root(/): mkdir /cdrom Step 4. Mount the CD onto the /cdrom directory as a file system. For example: mount /dev/dsk/c1t2d0 /cdrom Step 5. Install update-ux onto the target system: swinstall -r -s /cdrom SW-DIST.SD-UPDATE \ \@ /var/adm/sw/update-ux.root 2> /dev/null The -r option causes SD to write the log files to the alternate root. The 11i SD contains many new keywords that 10.20 and 11.00 SD do not recognize, so the install generates many warnings that can be ignored. Use of the alternate root facilitates ignoring the warnings.

Procedure B: Create a Network Depot (optional)
HP-UX 11i is delivered on two CDs, requiring you to swap CDs during the update process. If you want to update without having to swap CDs, you need to create a remote depot on an existing 11i system that contains all the necessary software, then update from that single source. As root, follow this procedure to create a network depot from the HP-UX 11i CDs onto a depot server or other system running HP-UX 11i in your 54 Chapter 2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i network: Step 1. Verify that you have at least 1,230 MB of free space to create the network depot on another system in your network. If this space is not available, use sam to either create a new volume group or extend an existing volume group. For help, see either SAM help or the Managing Systems and Workgroups manual. Step 2. Login as root and mount the logical volume on a new directory named /update. This directory will hold your network depot. Step 3. Insert the HP-UX 11i CD1 and wait for the CD drive’s busy light to stop blinking. Step 4. Find the CD-ROM device file name: ioscan -fn | more A typical CD-ROM device name is: /dev/dsk/c1t2d0 Step 5. Create the directory /cdrom under root(/): mkdir /cdrom Step 6. Mount the CD onto the /cdrom directory as a file system. For example: mount /dev/dsk/c1t2d0 /cdrom Step 7. Merge all products on the mounted CD to the target depot, for example /update/update-depot: swcopy -s /cdrom \* @ /update/update-depot Step 8. Unmount the CD from directory /cdrom: umount /cdrom Step 9. Insert the HP-UX 11i CD2. Wait for the drive’s busy light to stop blinking. Step 10. Repeat Steps 6 through 8 using CD2 and the Support Plus CD. The network depot is now ready to update your HP-UX 10.20 or 11.0 system to HP-UX 11i.

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Procedure C: Update to HP-UX 11i
By now you should have successfully installed update-ux onto the target system and, optionally, created an update depot containing all software bundles to be installed. Now you can proceed to update your target system as follows. update-ux syntax update-ux -s source_location [-?] [-a 32|64] [-n|-y] [-i] [-x option=value] [sw_spec] where: -ssource_location Specifies the source containing the new software depot. Possible locations are a local directory, a mounted CD containing a depot, or a remote system-and-depot combination. All paths used in the source_location must be absolute paths. If source_location is a remote system/depot combination, the remote system should be specified first, followed by the absolute path to the remote depot, separated by a colon with no spaces; for example: swperf:/var/spool/sw -? -a 32|64 Prints the usage statement. Specifies the OS architecture (word width), 32 bit or 64 bit. Omitting this defaults to the system’s currently set OS word-width. update-ux will halt if directed to install an unsupported word-width (only 64-bit OS is supported on B-, C- and J-class systems). Changing an existing system from 64-bit OS to 32-bit OS is not supported. update-ux issues a message and waits for your response to continue whenever something unexpected is attempted. Specify -n at first (or omit this option) to have update-ux “not continue” when an error is issued. When you have reviewed/resolved all errors, use -y instead of -n to have update-ux ignore all messages which would otherwise cause update-ux to wait for a user response. Specifies the swinstall interactive user interface to select software products from a depot or bundle during the update. For more information, see the

-n | -y

-i

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swinstall(1M) manpage. -x option=value Specifies swinstall options to be applied during the update. For a typical update, no swinstall options are required. swinstall -p (preview) is not supported. For information on swinstall options, see the swinstall(1m) manpage or the Software Distributor Administration Guide. sw_spec Specifies one or more optional software bundles to be updated, such as an operating environment (OE) bundle name, a network-driver bundle or Ignite-UX.

For more about update-ux, see the update-ux(1M) manpage. Examples Recommended update! Each of the following examples updates and reboots the system. • Update to HP-UX 11i and an OE: To update to HP-UX 11i and include an 11i Operating Environment, you need to specify the Operating Environment bundle name in the update-ux command. The OE bundles names are:
HPUX11i-OE HPUX11i-OE-Ent HPUX11i-OE-MC HPUX11i-TCOE HPUX11i-MTOE

For example, to update to 11i and install the default 11i OE, insert an HP-UX 11i CD1 in the local drive mounted at /cdrom. As root, enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE Or, to update to 11i and install the 11i Mission Critical OE, insert HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE CD1 in the local drive mounted at /cdrom and enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE-MC Each example updates the OS, installing all OS products listed on page 51, plus the OE bundle. Application software products included in the OE are represented by the bundle name. Any replaced product bundles and unneeded patch information are removed. Applications installed with each OE are listed at the back of the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet supplied with the CDs.

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• Update to HP-UX 11i OS (no OE): To update to HP-UX 11i, insert HP-UX 11i CD1 in the local drive mounted at /cdrom and enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom This example updates the HP-UX OS to 11i. All OS, networking, diagnostic and CDE bundles listed on page 41 are installed.

• Updating from a network depot: To update from an optional network depot on a remote system named homer, include the path to the depot in the update-ux command: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s homer:/update/updatedepot This example does a default HP-UX 11i OS update, running swinstall only once since a depot is used instead of HP-UX 11i CDs.

• Update using match_target To update to HP-UX 11i OE using match_target, enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -x match_target=true HPUX11i-OE This command adds all OS, networking, CDE and diagnostic bundles described in the previous example, plus the HP-UX 11i OE and any software selected by match_target. Software that is selected by match_target may not t be contained in a bundle. We do not recommend using match_target because: — match_target only installs filesets matching those already on your system. Filesets containing any new HP-UX 11i functionality introduced will not be selected. — Software that is installed may not include bundle wrappers, making identification of software on the system more difficult. To help avoid potential problems, update-ux always installs a minimum set of OS bundles and the match_target option selects additional software beyond the minimum set.

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NOTE

Do not use patch_match_target with update-ux when updating applications. Instead, use update-ux -i to invoke swinstall’s interactive mode, where you can specify match_target or patch_match_target to update existing applications and/or patches.

• Update using interactive software selection: To interactively select software for an update, use the -i option. For example: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -i For each CD, update-ux displays swinstall’s interactive user interface with software already selected to match the default update. Now you can change software selections, for example, selecting as non-default network driver or a Web browser, before performing the update. Since update-ux selects OS, networking, language and diagnostic bundles by default, the interactive user interface provides a way to de-select the default software and use a pure match_target instead. Due to the problems explained above, using a pure match_target is not recommended.

NOTE

Do not combine -i and -x options in the same update-ux command.

When the -i option is specified, swinstall’s interactive user interface is active only when swinstall is running to load software from each source location. When installing from HP-UX 11i CDs, you will have to select non-default software twice; once for each CD. If you do set swinstall options like match_target, be sure to re-select those options in the second swinstall session. For help using swinstall’s interactive mode, see the swinstall(1M) manpage or the Software Distributor Administration Guide.

• Update with selectable software such as an Ignite-UX server: To update to HP-UX 11i and include additional software such as Ignite-UX, enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom B5725AA Chapter 2 59

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating HP-UX 10.20/11.0 to 11i Products installed include the default HP-UX 11i OS bundles listed on page 51, plus the Ignite-UX server bundle, B5725AA. Now you can use Ignite-UX to install and recover other HP-UX 10.20, 11.0 and 11i systems in your network. After installing selectable software, complete any post-install configuration explained in the HP-UX 11i Release Notes available in /usr/share/doc/. To complete the Ignite-UX server installation, see Chapter 2 in the Ignite-UX Administration Guide, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD. In case of trouble The update-ux command returns an error value when it is not successful: 1 — Error during execution; update aborted. 2 — Update aborted via user action (-n or keyboard press). Messages are recorded in /var/adm/sw/swagent.log and /var/adm/sw/swinstall.log When updating Ignite-UX, also look at its log in /var/adm/sw/ Typical update-ux error messages and recovery actions are listed in Appendix B. Verify the update To verify the success of your update, review the update messages logged in /var/adm/sw/swagent.log. Also see the verification tips in Chapter 4.

This completes the update process. Now verify the update as explained in Chapter 3 and back up your new system as you did prior to this update. Then install required patches and other software as explained in Chapter 4.

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Updating an Existing 11i System
To update an existing HP-UX 11i system to the latest release, use the update-ux command (see the previous section) to install all new software from the newest HP-UX 11i CDs. For example, if your system includes the default HP-UX 11i OE, this command will update the OS and 11i OE applications from the HP-UX 11i CDs: Update the HP-UX 11i OE Insert HP-UX 11i OE CD1and enter (as root): Update the update-ux /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE All new software from these OS, OE and network driver bundles are installed:
HPUXBase32 or HPUXBase64 HPUXBaseAux HWEnable11i BUNDLE11i FibrChanl-00 (64-bit OS only) GigEther-00 RAID-00 (64-bit OS only) FDDI-00 (32-bit OS only) (other networked drivers if needed) OnlineDiag CDE-English (or appropriate language bundle(s)) HPUX11i-OE

The system automatically reboots after the update. Update HP-UX 11i OS (no OE) /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom New software from all OS and network driver bundles listed above are installed, followed by an automatic reboot. After updating an existing 11i system to the latest 11i release, use swinstall to update hardware drivers from the new HWEnable11i bundle. Insert either an HP-UX 11i OE CD1 or the latest Support Plus CD in your local CD-ROM drive and enter (as root): /usr/sbin/swinstall -x autoselect_patches=true \ -s /cdrom HWEnable11i

Update drivers

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating an Existing 11i System Update to another OE You can update the OS to the latest release and upgrade from one OE to another with a single update-ux command. For example, to update the OS and upgrade from HP-UX 11i OE to the Enterprise OE, insert the HP-UX Enterprise OE CD1 in the CD-ROM drive and enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE-Ent Be sure you have enough available disk space to handle the larger OE; see “Needing More Disk Space?” in Chapter 1. More about changing OEs is on page page 65.

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Updating to 64-bit OS
update-ux defaults to the OS word-width that your system is currently running. For example, if the target system is running 32-bit OS, this will be the default for the new OS to be installed.

NOTE

Changing an existing 64-bit OS to 32-bit is not supported. To return a 64-bit OS to 32-bit, use the Ignite-UX make_recovery or make_net_recovery command to restore the 32-bit OS.

You can update a system from 32-bit OS to 64-bit OS while updating to 11i, provided that you consider these hardware and firmware issues: • Is your system capable of running 64-bit operation? See the Supported Systems table in Chapter 1. • Is your system’s firmware recent enough to support 64-bit operation? See “Firmware Requirements” in Chapter 1. • 64-bit binary data cannot be used by 32-bit applications. 64-bit is useful if you need large address space, such as for use with very large databases and large-scale modeling. 64-bit applications can be compiled and linked on 32-bit systems; however, these applications cannot be run on a 32-bit system. If you're updating from HP-UX version 11.0 or higher, update-ux will determine if your hardware and firmware are compatible with 64-bit operation. If you're updating from HP-UX version 10.20, however, refer to the Software Transition Kit available on the HP-UX Applications CDs. The STK contains tools and documents to assess applications or libraries that run on HP-UX 10.20 and 11.0 and help transition them to the 11i 64-bit operation. The Web site also has release notes and a FAQ with details about supported systems and necessary firmware updates. If you’ve decided to update to a HP-UX 11i 64-bit OS, use this command (source is CDs mounted at /cdrom): /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -a 64

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Changing Individual OE Applications

Changing Individual OE Applications
HP strongly recommends that only a complete 11i Operating Environment (OE) be installed and that no products be added to or removed from the OE. HP-UX 11i OEs have been designed and tested to work as complete solutions. Installing or removing individual products in the OE may impact the quality of the OE. If you still wish to add individual OE products to an 11i system or remove a product from an installed OE, first please read this document available on HP’s documentation Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/os/11i/filesets.html Updating OE Applications Most applications included in HP-UX 11i OEs are also available as separate products on HP-UX Applications CDs supplied in the OE media box. Due to the product-testing process, some applications installed with an OE may be older versions than those available on the HP-UX Applications CDs. To identify product versions available on Application CDs, view the CD_TABLE_OF_CONTENTS file on each Application CD. If you wish to install a more-recent version of an OE application from an HP-UX Application CD, you may need a codeword when installing the newer version over the OE version. Use the codeword supplied on a separate document in the OE media box. Applications requiring a codeword during installation are indicated by (CW) in the tables at the back of the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet.

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Changing Operating Environments

Changing Operating Environments
Each HP-UX 11i media kit contains at least one Operating Environment (OE). The extra-cost Enterprise and Mission Critical OEs each contain the HP-UX 11i OE and the extra-cost OE. If you did not purchase an extra-cost OE, the HP-UX 11i OE bundle is supplied for servers and Technical Computing OE is supplied for technical workstations and technical servers. If you did not install one of these OE bundles of basic applications, you can do so later. Upgrading to a larger OE may require more disk space. See “Needing More Disk Space?” in Chapter 1. Adding an OE To install an OE on an 11i system not containing an OE, insert an HP-UX 11i CD1 in the CD drive (for example mounted at /cdrom) and specify the new OE using update-ux. For example, to add the HP-UX 11i OE, enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE After a few minutes, update-ux will prompt you to replace 11i OE CD1 with 11i OE CD2, then complete the update. Similarly, if you did not initially install or upgrade a workstation with the Technical Computing OE, you can add that bundle using update-ux from the Technical Computing OE CDs: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-TCOE Upgrading the OE To upgrade 11i to a higher-level OE, say, from 11i OE to Enterprise OE, you must first purchase the new HP-UX 11i Enterprise OE (or Mission Critical OE) media from HP. Then use update-ux to add the Enterprise OE software bundle to your server from those CDs. To upgrade from the HP-UX 11i OE to the Mission Critical OE, insert an HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE CD1 in the CD drive (for example mounted at /cdrom) and enter: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE-MC When the update is complete, the Mission Critical OE will be installed and the original HP-UX 11i OE bundle wrapper will be removed. Downgrading the OE If you wish to downgrade your system from a higher-level OE, say, from Mission Critical OE to 11i OE, first use update-ux to install the smaller Chapter 2 65

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Changing Operating Environments OE from the latest set of HP-UX 11i CDs, then use swremove to remove the unwanted OE bundle and its software. For example, to move from the 64-bit Mission Critical OE to the 64-bit default 11i OE: Step 1. As root, add default HP-UX 11i OE (in this example from CD1 and CD2 mounted, in turn, at /cdrom): /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -y HPUX11i-OE The -y option tells update-ux to ignore warning messages and complete the update. Step 2. Remove the Mission Critical software: /usr/sbin/swremove HPUX11i-OE-MC This command removes the IPD entries and software for the additional (superset) software in the Mission Critical OE, leaving the default HP-UX 11i OE software intact.

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Updating Netscape Directory Server

Updating Netscape Directory Server
If you have the HP J3667AA Netscape Directory Server (NDS) version 3.1 and plan to continue using NDS with HP-UX 11i, you should update to 11i as explained in Chapter 2. Be sure to specify the new NDS bundle in the update-ux command. For example, this command updates to the HP-UX 11i Operating Environment and also installs the new NDS 4.11 bundle, J4258BA: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE J4258BA For instructions on migrating your directory server database to version 4.11 after installing the new version of NDS, refer to the Netscape document, Managing Servers with Netscape Console 4.1, available on the Netscape website: www.netscape.com After migrating your directory server database to NDS 4.11, you should remove the old version of NDS using swremove. For example: /usr/sbin/swremove J3667AA

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Installing ServiceGuard Products

Installing ServiceGuard Products
For help with these procedures, refer to the MC/ServiceGuard manuals available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/mcoe/ Downgrading MC/ServiceGuard MC/ServiceGuard version A.11.09 is installed with the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE. If you have MC/ServiceGuard version A.11.12 or newer installed, you’ll need to remove it from each system in the ServiceGuard cluster before installing the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, which installs MC/ServiceGuard version A.11.09. Follow this procedure:

Step 1. Shut down the cluster: cmhaltcl -f Perform the remaining steps on each node: Step 2. Use the cmdeleteconf command to delete the binary settings files. Step 3. Un-install MC/ServiceGuard version A.11.12 (or newer) and the MC/ServiceGuard patch, PHSS_22541, if installed. Step 4. Install MC/ServiceGuard version A.11.09 from an HP-UX Application CD supplied with HP-UX 11i: /usr/sbin/swinstall -s /cdrom B5140BA Also install patch PHSS_22876 or later. For help on finding and installing patches, see Chapter 4. Step 5. Run the cmquerycl command to generate a new cluster ASCII configuration file, which will contain the correct settings and parameter names for MC/ServiceGuard A.11.09. Edit this file as necessary so that the new A.11.09 cluster configuration matches the previous MC/ServiceGuard configuration. Step 6. Execute the cmapplyconf command. Step 7. Run the cluster using the cmruncl command. Step 8. After the cluster is running, halt one node at a time and upgrade it to HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE: 68 Chapter 2

Migrating to HP-UX 11i Installing ServiceGuard Products /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -i HPUX11i-OE-MC Then restart the upgraded system in the cluster. Step 9. Repeat Step 8 until all nodes have been updated to HP-UX 11i. Replacing MC/ServiceGuard with ServiceGuard OPS Edition If you plan to install the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, but will require the ServiceGuard OPS (Oracle Parallel Server) Edition in place of MC/ServiceGuard, follow the appropriate procedure here. Both products cannot co-exist on the same system: If you now have or will have the ServiceGuard OPS (Oracle Parallel Server) Edition: • If you already have ServiceGuard OPS Edition on the system: 1. Halt the ServiceGuard OPS cluster. 2. Update to HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE using the -i option: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -i HPUX11i-OE-MC 3. In the swinstall user interface, de-select these MC/ServiceGuard and Event Monitoring System (EMS) filesets:
ServiceGuard Cluster-Monitor Package-Manager CM-Provider-MOF ATS-CORE EMS

ServiceGuard OPS Edition remains unchanged after the update, but may require updating. See the manual listed in step 3 below. • If you plan to install ServiceGuard OPS Edition after installing the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, follow these steps: 1. Install the Mission Critical OE, using either the cold-install or update process explained earlier in this chapter. 2. Use the swremove command to remove the MC/ServiceGuard and Event Monitoring System filesets listed above from the Mission Critical OE. 3. Install ServiceGuard OPS Edition as explained in the Configuring OPS Clusters with ServiceGuard OPS Edition manual, available on the Web: docs.hp.com/

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Installing ServiceGuard Products

Table 2-1

HP-UX 11i OS, OE and Driver Software on HP-UX 11i OE CDs SD Bundle Name Description

These HP-UX 11i OS bundles are installed by default: HPUXBase32 or HPUXBase64 HPUXBaseAux OnlineDiag HWEnable11i BUNDLE11i CDE-xxx FibrChanl-00 RAID-00 FDDI-00 GigEther-00 HP-UX 11i Base OS installation, either 32- or 64-bit OS software such as SD, SCR+DMI and parmgr HP-UX 11i Support Tools Support for new hardware Required OS patches Servers: CDE-English. Workstations: CDE-ALL PCI FibreChannel adapter (64-bit OS only) PCI RAID card, ver. B.11.11.01 (64-bit OS only) FDDI PCI driver (32-bit OS only) 10/100/1000BaseT Ethernet

Appropriate base OS bundle and standard software above are installed by default with each of these OE bundles: HPUX11i-OE HPUX11i-OE-Ent HPUX11i-OE-MC HPUX11i-TCOE HPUX11i-MTOE Internet environment for commercial servers Enterprise environment for commercial servers Mission Critical environment for commercial servers Environment for technical workstations and servers Minimal technical workstation environment

These network drivers are selectable when installing an OE: 100BaseT-00, 01 ATM-00, 01 FDDI-01, 02, 03 100BaseT (EISA, LAN) adapters, ver. B.11.11.00 (100BaseT-00 EISA is 32-bit OS only) ATM drivers (PCI, HSC), ver. K.11.11 FDDI (HCS, HPPB, EISA) drivers, ver. B.11.11.00

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Installing ServiceGuard Products Table 2-1 HP-UX 11i OS, OE and Driver Software on HP-UX 11i OE CDs SD Bundle Name HyprFabrc-00 TermIO-00,01 TokenRing-00,-01,-02 Description PCI/HSC HyperFabric2 driver, ver. B.11.11.01 MUX (PCI, EISA), ver. B.11.11.02 (TermIO-01 is 32-bit OS only) TokenRing drivers (PCI, HPPB, EISA), ver. B.11.11.00 (TokenRing-02 is 32-bit OS only)

Versions in bold have been updated from the previous release.

Chapter 2

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Migrating to HP-UX 11i Installing ServiceGuard Products

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Chapter 2

Verifying System Migration

3

Verifying System Migration
After installing or updating to HP-UX 11i, backing up the new system and adding/upgrading your applications, follow these steps to verify that your system is back in production. If you are having problems with updating to HP-UX 11i, see Appendix B.

Chapter 3

73

Verifying System Migration Verifying HP-UX Installation

Verifying HP-UX Installation
To verify that HP-UX 11i was successfully installed, use Software Distributor’s swlist and swverify commands: Step 1. To list all products on your system, enter: /usr/sbin/swlist -a state For example, running swlist on a newly installed partition on an HP Superdome system could list these product bundles:
CDE-English FDDI-00 GigEther-00 OnlineDiag CDE-English HPUX11i-OE HPUXBase64 HPUXBaseAux B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... B.11.11... English CDE Environment PCI FDDI;Supported ... PCI/HSC/EFF-HSC... Online Diagnostics HP-UX Internet Operating Environment Component HP-UX 64-bit Base OS HP-UX Auxilary Software

For a cold-install, compare your listing with the list of software products provided with 11i, as listed in the tables in the Read Before Installing or Updating to HP-UX 11i booklet. For an update, compare your listing with the swlist output obtained before the update. Software products whose versions have not changed haven’t been updated. Use the swverify command to determine whether those products are compatible with HP-UX 11i. Step 2. Run swverify to verify that each bundle is intact. For example, to verify that HP-UX 11i OS is intact, enter: /usr/sbin/swverify HPUXBase64 Or, to verify all software on your system, enter: /usr/sbin/swverify \* The Selection process locates all required filesets for the product. After the list you should see:
* Selection succeeded.

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Verifying System Migration Verifying HP-UX Installation Then the Analysis process verifies that each required file is loaded (existence and revision), all required dependencies are met, and runs any available verification scripts for the product. This will take some time. After the analysis you should see:
* Analysis succeeded.

If the analysis fails, either view /var/adm/sw/swagent.log to review the analysis log or run the swjob... command listed at the end of the swverify report sent to stdout. For help with these commands, see the swlist(1M) and swverify(1M) manpages and the Software Distributor Administration Guide.

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Verifying System Migration Verifying Applications

Verifying Applications
To verify that all required applications have been installed or updated, use swlist and swverify, as explained in the previous section. For example, to verify that the HP-UX 11i default operating environment is intact on your system, enter: /usr/sbin/swverify HPUX11i-OE If you get an error like this;
The product "xyz,l=/,r=B.xx.xx" is not compatible with this system’s architecture or operating system.

The indicated software (xyz) has not been updated to 11i. To update the software, mount the HP-UX 11i Applications CD that contains the software and install the new version using the swinstall command. For more details on using swinstall, see Chapter 4. The best way to verify each application’s operation is to exercise it. Open each application, view a working document or project, and perform typical production operations (edit a file, print a report, etc.). If the application does not work as expected, refer to the application’s help or documentation to determine the problem.

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Updating Applications

4

Updating Applications
This chapter provides hints on updating your applications and adding patches after updating to HP-UX 11i.

Chapter 4

77

Updating Applications HP-UX Patching Resources

HP-UX Patching Resources
The cold-install and update processes now includes installing critical patches from the HWEnable11i bundle provided with the HP-UX 11i media. Immediately after your system is running 11i, your should install any additional critical or required patches to your base OS and applications which may have occurred since the install 11i media was produced.

Use Custom Patch You can identify and download all needed patches for your system by Manager using HP’s Web-based Custom Patch Manager: itrc.hp.com/wps/bin/doc.pl/sid=00f2dea61cb1fc364e If you are already registered, log in with your user ID and password. If not registered, following the instructions on the screen. Remember to save your user ID and password. Once you have downloaded needed patches, install them using the swinstall command, as explained in “Adding and Removing Individual Patches” on page 81. Downloading When you need to find and download a single patch, use HP’s Patch individual patches Database. Begin at HP’s IT Resource Center Web: itrc.hp.com From the home page, select individual patches. If you are already registered, log in with your user ID and password. If not registered, following the instructions on the screen. From the patch database main page, select hp-ux and use the search tool to find required patches and download them. HP Security Bulletins HP Security Bulletins are emailed periodically to announce critical patches for your system. To subscribe, go to HP’s IT Resource Center Web: itrc.hp.com Select: Maintenance and Support -> Support Information Digests

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Updating Applications HP-UX Patching Resources HP-UX Support Plus To keep your OS and HP-UX applications up-to-date, critical patches and general-release patches are delivered periodically to subscribers of HP-UX Support Plus service. You will need to install those patch bundles when they arrive. For more information on Support Plus, go to its Web: software.hp.com/products/SUPPORT_PLUS/ After installing the needed patch bundles from the Support Plus CD supplied with 11i, you should maintain your system by using the patch management tools available on HP’s IT Resource Center. Other HP-UX Patching Resources If you are not familiar with patching HP-UX, documents in the Patch Management section of HP’s documentation Web may be helpful: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ General guidelines for patching HP-UX are provided in the HP-UX 11.0/11i Software Transition Kit: devresource.hp.com/STK/hpuxpatch.html Also see “Managing Patches” in the Software Distributor Administration Guide, available on the Instant Information CD.

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Updating Applications Updating Applications

Updating Applications
After migrating to HP-UX 11i and backing up your new system, you should update and/or install other applications not installed with the HP-UX 11i OE. Here are some tips: • To determine what products and versions are on your system, use swlist: /usr/sbin/swlist -l product • You can also verify that all products are compatible with the new OS by running swverify, as explained in Chapter 3. • Use swinstall to install new software or update each application not included in the HP-UX 11i OS and OE bundle(s) you just installed. For example, to install HP-UX 11i on other systems after installing 11i, insert HP-UX 11i CD1 and enter: /usr/sbin/swinstall -s /cdrom B5725AA After installing selectable software, complete any post-install configuration explained in the HP-UX 11i Release Notes, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD. To complete the Ignite-UX server installation, see Chapter 2 in the Ignite-UX Administration Guide, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD.

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Updating Applications Adding and Removing Individual Patches

Adding and Removing Individual Patches
If you migrated to HP-UX 11i via the update-ux command (Chapter 2), all previous OS patches were automatically removed from the system. If your new OS or OE requires any new patches, they can be installed from the HP-UX Support Plus media (see “HP-UX Patching Resources” on page 78). For a list of previous patches incorporated into 11i, see the file: /usr/share/doc/sw_patches.txt New or replacement patches may be required as dependencies for application software installed on your system. Before removing a patch or a patch bundle, determine the dependencies required by the installed software. This information can be found in the Release Notes for the products and the readme files for patches. If necessary, you may have to remove some installed software from your system. To remove any patches from your system, first determine which patches are installed. They may vary depending on system configuration and OS type (32-bit or 64-bit). To display installed patches, enter: /usr/sbin/swlist -l patch \*.\*,c=patch To preview the removal analysis, enter: /usr/sbin/swremove -p patch_name1 patch_name2 ... Patch dependencies must be interpreted manually from the patch documents. For help on adding patches, see the Software Distributor Administration Guide, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ General guidelines for patching HP-UX are provided in the HP-UX 11.0/11i Software Transition Kit: devresource.hp.com/STK/hpuxpatch.html

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Updating Applications Using Software Distributor Tools

Using Software Distributor Tools
Updating or recovering SD tools The latest version of Software Distributor (SD) tools are installed when you cold-install or use the update-ux command to update your OS, as explained in Chapter 2. If, after updating the OS, you find that an SD tool is missing or out-of-date, you need to update the entire SD toolset to the latest version from HP-UX 11i media. Updating SD is easily accomplished using the install-sd command. See “Re-installing SD” in Appendix B for details. Managing software depots After updating your depot-management server to HP-UX 11i, you can manage HP-UX 10.20, 11.00 and 11i software on the same system. This is the preferred depot-management solution. If your depot-management server is running HP-UX 11.0, however, it can handle 10.20 and 11.0 depots but not HP-UX 11i depots. For help setting up and using a depot-management server, see Chapter 4 in the Software Distributor Administration Guide, available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/

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Updating Applications Updating LicensePower/iFOR

Updating LicensePower/iFOR
HP plans to remove LicensePower/iFOR from HP-UX in a future release. To download the latest version of or patches for LicensePower/iFOR, go to Isogon’s Web site: www.isogon.com/support/sptlpifor/sptlpifor.htm Converting the database When upgrading to the LicensePower/iFOR version 4.0 license server, any existing version 3.0.x databases must be converted to version 4.0. This will ensure that existing licenses are made available in the new database (for other changes, see the readme file installed with 4.0). After installing version 4.0, perform this conversion: 1. Reconfigure the license server using the i4config from version 4.0. 2. Start the license server and run the i4tv verification utility to make sure the installation was successful. 3. Stop the license server. 4. Make sure the /var/opt/ifor is your current directory and that /opt/ifor/ls/bin is in your PATH. 5. Enter: v3tov4 This command completes without displaying messages. 6. Start the license server back up and run: i4admin. Licenses from the version 3.0.x database are now in the version 4.0 database.

IMPORTANT

Do not remove transition links while you are using this product.

Un-installing iFOR iFOR version 4 requires converting licenses from the previous version to version 4 a new format. If you un-install version 4 and then reinstall version 3.0.x, you will not be able to use the new version 4 database. You can restore the copies of the version 3.0.x database files that were saved with the "V3" extension in the /var/opt/ifor directory. This can be done by renaming these files and removing the "V3" extension. Doing this, however, will lose any licenses that were added when version 4 was installed.

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Updating Applications Maintaining Your HP-UX 11i System

Maintaining Your HP-UX 11i System
The following flowcharts offer recommended methods for maintaining your 11i system using HP’s software support services • HP-UX 11i OE media (distributed every other quarter) — Includes media for cold-installing or updating OEs. • HP-UX 11i application releases (distributed quarterly) — Includes media for HP-UX Applications and Support Plus. • Support Plus (distributed quarterly) — Includes HP-UX OS and OE application patches, plus support tools, iCOD and other support products. • Custom patch bundles are available for your system from Custom Patch Manager (CPM), a Web-based tool available at: itrc.hp.com

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Updating Applications Maintaining Your HP-UX 11i System

Encounter Problem

Receive New 3rd Party Software

Search patch database on itrc.hp.com

Download patches

Download patches

Update or create new install depot*

Update or create new install depot*

Install new version of software

Update software using swinstall with match_target

Create archive/recovery image * For help creating depots, see the Software Distributor Administration Guide.
Depot can contain applications fromHP-UX Application CDs, Support Plus CD, etc.

Reactive Software Maintenance

Chapter 4

85

Updating Applications Maintaining Your HP-UX 11i System

Receive new 11i OE

Receive Application Release

Receive Custom Patch Bundle

Create new OE install depot*

Create new AR install depot*

Create new OE and AR install depots*

Add Support Plus patch bundle(s) to depot.

Find and add
patches to depot
(use Custom Patch Manager)

Patch software using swinstall with patch_match_target

Update OS/OE using update-ux
(see Chapter 2)

Update software using swinstall

Create archive/recovery image

* OE depot contains OS/OE bundles and Gold patch bundles from Support Plus CD. AR depot contains non-OE applications. For help creating depots, see the Software Distributor Administration Guide. Depot can contain applications fromHP-UX Application CDs, Support Plus CD, etc.

Proactive Software Maintenance

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Chapter 4

Booting HP 9000 Systems

A

Booting HP 9000 Systems
This appendix describes booting various HP 9000 systems using the built-in Boot ROM firmware interface. As explained here, the built-in boot process differs between newer and older workstations and servers. For help booting partitions in HP Superdome and S-Class servers, see the Managing HP Superdome Complexes manual, available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ If you need help during the boot process, enter: help

Appendix A

87

Booting HP 9000 Systems Halting the Autoboot Process

Halting the Autoboot Process
1. Make sure any external devices connected to the target system are switched ON. 2. Switch ON the target computer or cycle power. 3. Insert the install media into the drive. At the Stop Autoboot message: • Workstations: Press and hold down Esc. • Servers: Press and hold down Esc or any other key. 4. See the appropriate following section for your system’s boot process.

If you need help during the boot process, enter: help

88

Appendix A

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting Workstations

Booting Workstations
Newer workstation After stopping the boot process, the system displays a menu: boot menu
Command Description Auto [boot|search] [on|off] Display or set auto flag Boot [pri|alt|scsi.addr] [isl] Boot from primary, alternate or SCSI Boot lan[.lan_addr] [install] [isl] Boot from LAN Chassis [on|off] Enable chassis codes Diagnostic [on|off] Enable/disable diagnostic boot mode Fastboot [on|off] Display or set fast boot flag Help Display the command menu Information Display system information LanAddress Display LAN station addresses Monitor [type] Select monitor type Path [pri|alt] [lan.id|SCSI.addr] Change boot path Pim [hpmc|toc|lpmc] Display PIM info Search [ipl] [scsi|lan [install]] Display potential boot devices Secure [on|off] Display or set security mode

When you see the boot menu: Step 1. Enter: search Step 2. If the CD device is identified in the list shown by the search command, proceed with the following steps. Otherwise, check the device and cable connections and repeat the search. Step 3. Enter: boot scsi.x Use the SCSI address of the boot device for x. Step 4. If you see the prompt, Interact with IPL (y or n)?, enter: n (The bottom selections may not appear unless you hold down Esc.)

Older workstation boot menu

Older HP 9000 Workstations display a menu similar to this:
b) Boot from specified device

Appendix A

89

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting Workstations
s) a) x) ?) Search for bootable devices Enter Boot Administration mode Exit and continue boot sequence Help

Select from menu:

To start a search for bootable devices, enter: s Older workstation search results
============================================================== =========== Searching for Devices with Bootable Media. To terminate search, press and hold the ESCAPE key. Device Selection Device Path Device Type and Utilities P0 scsi.6.0 HP 2213A IPL P1 scsi.3.0 HP HP35480A IPL P2 scsi.0.0 TOSHIBA CD-ROM XM-3301TA IPL Enter boot selection, (h)elp, or e(x)it: ============================================================== ===============

You will see a list of Pn selections, as shown above. If your boot device does not appear in the search list: Step 1. Check the hardware. To exit, enter: x Step 2. To initiate another search, enter: s Step 3. At the prompt Enter boot selection, enter the Pn device selection for the device containing your install media. If you know the SCSI address of the device beforehand, you can skip the search and simply enter this at the Select from menu prompt: b scsi.x After choosing the boot path and loading the Ignite-UX utility, the Ignite-UX keyboard languages screen appears (if your system has a PC-style keyboard). From this point on, respond to the requests for information on this and successive screens.

90

Appendix A

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting HP 9000 Servers

Booting HP 9000 Servers
As noted previously, you can halt the server autoboot process and redirect it to boot from the desired media device. To do so, press any key during the autoboot process to display a Main Menu: Newer server boot ----------------------- Main Menu -----------------------------------menu
Command Description BOot [PRI|ALT|<path>] Boot from specified path PAth [PRI|ALT] [<path>] Display or modify a path SEArch [DIsplay|IPL] [<path>] Search for boot devices COnfiguration menu Displays or sets boot values INformation menu Displays hardware information SERvice menu Displays service commands DIsplay Redisplay the current menu HElp [<menu>|<command>] Display help for menu or command RESET Restart the system --------Main Menu: Enter command or menu >

You only need to enter the initial capital letters for each command. Step 1. Determine the boot device that contains the Install CD. The Alternate Boot Device is typically set to the CD drive. If this is the case, enter: bo alt Step 2. To search for available boot devices, type: search (or sea) Newer server search results Here is a typical output:
============================================================== ======== Searching for potential boot device. This may take several minutes. To discontinue, press any key. Path Number Device Path Device Type P0 56/52.0 (dec) Seq. record access media P1 56/52.3 (dec) Seq. record access media P2 56/52.4 (dec) Random access media P3 56/52.6 (dec) Random access

Appendix A

91

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting HP 9000 Servers
media Main Menu: Enter command or menu > ============================================================== =========

For example, enter: bo pn where pn is the path number for the install device shown in the search output. You can also specify the device by the hardware path, such as 56/52.0, in place of the path number. Booting a server For Models 8x7, 845, 835, 870, and other older HP 9000 Servers, the boot display looks like this:
============================================================== Console path = 56.0.0.0.0.0.0 (dec) 38.0.0.0.0.0.0 (hex) Primary boot path = 52.2.0.0.0.0.0 (dec) 34.00000002.0.0.0.0.0 (dec) (hex)

(hex)

Alternate boot path = 52.0.0.0.0.0.0 34.0.0.0.0.0.0

64 MB of memory configured and tested. Autoboot from primary path enabled. To override, press any key within 10 seconds. Boot from primary boot path (Y or N)?> n Boot from alternate boot path (Y or N)?> Enter boot path, command, or ?> ==============================================================

Step 1. Switch the system ON. Step 2. Press any key to stop the autoboot process. Step 3. Insert the install CD. Step 4. Determine the hardware path of the install device from your system administrator. (There is no search capability to determine this information on older HP 9000 server models). • If the primary path shown on your screen is not the same as that for the install device, respond with n to Boot from primary boot path. In this case, you will then be asked if you want to boot from the alternate path, which is typically set to the CD device. • If the primary path shown on your screen matches that for the install

92

Appendix A

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting HP 9000 Servers device, respond with: y • If neither the primary or alternate device paths correspond to that for the CD device, respond with n to both prompts. In this case, enter the hardware path of the device (for example, 52.3.0) at the prompt:
Enter boot path, command, or ?>

Step 5. To the question Interact with IPL (y or n)?, enter: n

TIP

To start over at this point, simply switch the system OFF and ON again.

After choosing the boot path and loading Ignite-UX, the Ignite-UX keyboard languages screen appears (if your system has a PC-style keyboard). Respond to the requests for information on this and the following screens. Loading the install kernel takes 3 to 5 minutes.

Appendix A

93

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting V-Class Systems

Booting V-Class Systems
To boot the system from the Install media, follow the initial instructions on powering up the system and any external drive, as explained in “Halting the Boot Process” in this appendix. V2200 system boot console Portions of a typical V-Class boot display are shown below. To stop the system boot process and select the device with the install media, press any key within ten seconds after you see “System is HP9000 V2000 series”:
OBP reboot SPP2000, POST version 3.1.4.0, compiled 1997/06/27 10:38:45 LAB #0001

...
Booting OBP.

...
System is HP9000 V2000 series Autoboot and Autosearch flags are both OFF or we are in HP core mode. Processor is entering manual boot mode. ...

If the system is set to perform auto-boot, you will see the following:
Processor is starting the autoboot process. To discontinue, press any key within 10 seconds. ...

Press any key at this point. You will see the following boot menu (capital letters indicate minimum-required command):
Command AUto [BOot|SEArch ON|OFF] flag BOot [PRI|ALT|<path> <args>] BootTimer [time] CLEARPIM CPUconfig [<proc>] [ON|OFF] DEfault DIsplay Description Display or set the specified Boot from a specified path Display or set boot delay time Clear PIM storage Configure/Deconfigure Processor Set the sytem to defined values Display this menu

94

Appendix A

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting V-Class Systems
ForthMode IO system LS [<path>|flash] OS [hpux|sppux] PASSword PAth [PRI|ALT|CON] [<path>] PDT [CLEAR|DEBUG] state Switch to the Forth OBP interface List the I/O devices in the List the boot or flash volume Display/Select Operating System Set the Forth password Display or modify a path Display/clear Non-Volatile PDT

PIM_info [cpu#] [HPMC|TOC|LPMC] Display PIM of current or any CPU RESET [hard|debug] RESTrict [ON|OFF] to Forth mode Force a reset of the system Display/Select restricted access

SCSI [INIT|RATE] [bus slot val] List/Set SCSI controller parms SEArch [<path>] SECure [ON|OFF] TIme [cn:yr:mo:dy:hr:mn[:ss]] clock VErsion Command: Search for boot devices Display or set secure boot mode Display or set the real-time Display the firmware versions

To determine the boot path, enter: pa
Primary boot path = 1/0:0.4.0

Alternate boot path = 15/3 Console path Keyboard path = 15/1 = 15/1

Booting from the primary path

If your boot device (CD) is mounted at the primary path, enter: bo pri
Device Directory File Arguments : /pci@fe,90000/symbios@0,0/sd@4,0:cntl : LIF : HPUX : hpux

Appendix A

95

Booting HP 9000 Systems Booting V-Class Systems
Loading loaded. 101456 : HPUX ................... %%xxxxxx%% bytes + 61440 + 864184 start 0xd01cc0

Boot: disc(1/0/0.4.0;0)/disc(1/0/0.4.0;0):INSTALL 7245824 + 1328048 + 706428 start 0x29168 HPUX: kernel load begins ...

The Install kernel then loads from the CD device.

96

Appendix A

Booting HP 9000 Systems Searching for Other Bootable Devices

Searching for Other Bootable Devices
If your CD is not mounted at the primary path, enter sea (search) at the command prompt to see a general listing of devices. The CD will be listed with its hardware path. For example:
Command: sea Searching for Devices with Bootable Media. Device Selection Device Path Device Type

---------------------------------------------------------------P0 5/2:0.2.0 Disk : SEAGATE ST34371W 0484 P1 P2 0019 P3 0019 Command: 5/2:0.3.0 1/2:0.9.0 1/0:0.4.0 CD-ROM : TOSHIBA CD Disk Disk : SEAGATE ST19171W : SEAGATE ST19171W

For this example, boot the CD with: boot p1 The Install kernel then loads from the CD device.

Appendix A

97

Booting HP 9000 Systems Searching for Other Bootable Devices

98

Appendix A

In Case of Trouble

B

In Case of Trouble
This appendix describes: • Common cold-install problems, page 100. • Common update problems, page 101. • Problem configuring HP-UX 11i, page 109. • Intermittent sendmail problem, page 117. • Adjusting file system sizes, page 118. • Problems with large systems, page 122. • Un-installing HP-UX 11i, page 123 • Re-installing SD, page 124. • Recovering a Corrupt System, page 125. • Verifying and adding diagnostics, page 126. • Problems affecting Japanese systems. page 127. • Web resources, page 129.

Appendix B

99

In Case of Trouble Cold-install Problem

Cold-install Problem
Kernel build fails on 64-bit install On J2240 workstations having an SCSI floppy drive, cold-installing 64-bit OS will fail during the kernel build with an “unsatisfied symbols” error. Action: Edit the /stand/system file to delete the floppy driver: Step 1. In the shell provided, use vi to edit the /stand/system file: vi /stand/system Step 2. Delete the line: sflop Step 3. Press: Cntl D The install process should now rebuild the kernel and complete successfully. The SCSI floppy drive will be non-operational, and is not supported on this system with 64-bit 11i OS.

100

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems

Common Update Problems
As an install or update progresses, you will see messages relating to the progress being entered into the log file. These messages usually refer to normal behavior. ERROR and WARNING messages, however, have the following significance: ERROR WARNING Indicates a serious problem, usually requiring action from the user in order to proceed with an installation. Indicates something out of the ordinary and may require action.

If you see a message or experience unusual behavior, see the following pages for likely solutions.

Here are some update-ux error messages and typical recovery actions: Warning displays
WARNING: There were errors installing from the first depot. See the /var/adm/sw/swagent.log for details. WARNING: Continuing could cause the OS update to fail Do you want to continue ? (y/n)

Action: Press y to continue the update. Afterward, review /var/adm/sw/swagent.log. Selected locale not available
Warning! One or more of your selected locales are not available. Please invoke the commands "locale" and "locale -a" to verify your selections and the available locales. Continuing processing using the "C" locale.

Action: Ignore this message which appears when updating from 10.20 in every locale except C. The local environment, such as Japanese, is temporarily disabled during the update session. Multiple OE errors Installing both the HP-UX 11i Operating Environment and the
Enterprise Operating Environment on the same system is not a standard update path. If you continue with this operation, swremove(1M) the Enterprise Operating Environment after the update is complete.

Appendix B

101

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems Action: Complete the update. Then remove the HPUX11i-OE-Ent bundle using the swremove command.
Changing from the Enterprise Operating Environment to the Mission Critical Operating Environment at the same time as you change from a 32 bit OS to a 64 bit OS is not a tested operation...

Action: Although you can change OS word-width and move from one OE to another at the same time, we recommend performing separate operations. In this case: Step 1. Update OS to new word-width: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom -a 64 Step 2. Install the desired OE: /usr/sbin/update-ux -s /cdrom HPUX11i-OE-MC For more about changing OEs, see “Changing Operating Environments” in Chapter 2. Disk space usage error
To perform this OS update, it is required that the xxx partition have at least yyy KB of free space and it currently has zzz KB of free space

Action: Reconfigure your disk per the minimum recommendations in the message. Then run the update-ux command again. For help configuring disk space usage, see “Adjusting File System Size” in this appendix. swinstall analysis error
The analysis phase failed while installing from the first depot. See the /var/adm/sw/swagent.log for details.

Action: The swinstall analysis on software from HP-UX 11i CD1 failed and update-ux quit. Correct the indicated problem and run the command again. Post-update swverify error After updating your system to an HP-UX 11i OE, run swverify to ensure that all application software previously on you system is still compatible with the new OS. If you get an error like this:
The product "xyz,l=/,r=B.xx.xx" is not compatible with this system’s architecture or operating system.

The indicated software (xyz) has not been updated to 11i. To update the software, mount the HP-UX 11i Applications CD that contains the 102 Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems software and install the new version using the swinstall command. For more details, see Chapter 4. Root (/) volume lock error If update-ux quits after you extended a volume size, you may see an error containing these lines:
ERROR: The command: /var/adm/sw filter /var/adm/sw/update-ux/swinstall...

This error will be logged in /var/adm/sw/swinstall.log:
Error: Cannot lock “/” because another command hold a conflicting lock ...

This error indicates that other processes have locked the root volume, preventing update-ux from completing a successful update. Action: Wait 10 minutes and retry the update-ux command again. MirrorDisk/UX needs repatching After updating a system containing MirrorDisk/UX, an error message in /var/adm/sw/swagent.logwill state that a patch needs re-installing. For example:
WARNING: The patch,PHCO_23333, will install correctly on your current system configuration; however, if you ever choose to install the product B2491BA, "MirrorDisk/UX", you will need to reinstall this patch after installing the optional product. ...

This indicates that a patch for MirrorDisk/UX was installed with the update, but needs re-installing again to take effect. Action: Find the patch on the Support Plus CD, either in the GOLDAPPS11i or HWEnable11i bundle, and re-install it using the swinstall command. See Chapter 4 for help. Update fails on See “Kernel build fails on 64-bit install” on page 100. J2250 workstation with SCSI floppy drive Screen locks during update If the CDE screen lock function is enabled prior to an update, the screen could lock during the update, preventing you from interacting with the system. Disabling the screen lock function is explained under “Updating Tips” in Chapter 2.

Appendix B

103

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems Updating from a previous 11i release? After updating an existing 11i system to the latest 11i release, be sure to use swinstall to update hardware drivers from the new HWEnable11i bundle. Insert and mount either an HP-UX 11i OE CD1 or the latest Support Plus CD in your local CD-ROM drive and enter (as root): /usr/sbin/swinstall -x autoselect_patches=true \ -s /cdrom HWEnable11i Update fails if If the value of the nstrpty kernel parameter is specified as a formula (for nstrpty kernel example, nstrpty (NPTY*2)), then updating to 11i will fail with this parameter set as a error: formula

/var/tmp/BAAa10554/catalog/Streams-TIO/STRTIO-KRN/postinstall[ 82]: (NPTY): The specified number is not valid for this command. ERROR: The “postinstall” script for “Streams-TIO.STRTIO-KRN” failed (exit code “1”). The script location was “/var/tmp/BAAa10554/catalog/Streams-TIO/STRTIO-KRN/postinstall ”.

To prevent this, convert the value of nstrpty to a number. To check the kernel parameters, run SAM and select: Kernel Configuration
-> Configurable Parameters

Action: If the nstrpty kernel parameter is specified as a formula, then before you update, use SAM (Kernel Configuration -> Configurable Parameters) to change the formula to a numeric value. You do not need to rebuild the kernel or reboot the system. X.25 cards not supported on some workstations J3525A and J3526A PCI cards are not supported under HP-UX 11i on these workstations: • • • • • B1000 B2000 C3X00 J5000 J7000

If either of these cards is installed on a workstation listed above, the system will crash during the upgrade. If the workstation is already running 11i, it will crash when you try to add the card. These cards are supported on older B-, C- and J-Class workstations, as well as on L-[123]000, N- and A-Class servers and Superdome servers. Action: To see if these cards are installed in your system, enter:

104

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems ioscan -kf | egrep '(10140078)|(1133b921)' If one or both cards are installed, ioscan will output one or more rows containing the numbers 10140078 or 1133b921. Be sure to remove those cards before updating to 11i. Problem updating an MC/ServiceGuard cluster Changed PPA (Physical Point of Attachment) values in the Auto-Port Aggregation software product may cause problems during a rolling update to an MC/ServiceGuard cluster. After an HP-UX system upgrade from 11.0 to 11i (including installation of version B.11.11.00 of the Auto-Port Aggregation (APA) software, HP J4240A), the PPA values of existing link aggregates will be changed from 1xx to 9xx where xx is the link aggregate number. This change is designed for compatibility with the existing system’s network configuration files such as /etc/rc.config.d/netconf. Although the change will not affect the system’s network connectivity, it inadvertently causes problems with MC/ServiceGuard cluster software when there is a cluster currently configured on the system. Specifically, the MC/ServiceGuard cmrunnode command will hang while an upgrading node is trying to join the existing cluster. This problem will appear only during a rolling upgrade of a cluster that uses LAN cards configured with APA software. You can fix the problem by applying ServiceGuard 11.09 patch PHSS_22683, available from HP Support, and then performing a binary file conversion, as explained later. HP-APA (Auto-Port Aggregation, HP J4240A) is a networking technology that groups multiple physical fast Ethernet or multiple physical Gigabit Ethernet ports into a logical link aggregate. The technology can provide greater bandwidth for a logical network link, load balancing between physical links, automatic fault detection and recovery for environments which require high availability. PPA stands for physical point of attachment. This is a unique network ID assigned to each network interface in a system. In HP-UX 11i, it is equivalent to the card instance number. Since APA link aggregates are logical network interfaces, there is no hardware information associated with the interfaces. Thus their PPA values are in fact hard-coded. For more information about HP-APA, refer to the HP Auto-Port Aggregation Release Notes. Verify the Problem: If you have an existing MC/ServiceGuard cluster configured with APA link aggregates, and are planning to perform a

Appendix B

105

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems rolling upgrade from HP-UX 11.0 to 11i with the Mission Critical Operating Environment (MC-OE), you are likely to be in a situation where the problem can occur. To verify this before you upgrade, enter this command on each cluster node to see if you have Auto-Port Aggregation software installed: swlist | grep J4240A If the software is installed, use cmviewcl to display the cluster’s network configuration. Link aggregates appear in the output with a path of LinkAggx and a PPA name of lan1xx, as in this example: cmviewcl -v
CLUSTER STATUS cluster1 down NODE STATUS node001 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown NODE STATUS node002 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown

STATE unknown PATH LinkAgg0 LinkAgg1 STATE unknown NAME lan100 lan101

PATH NAME LinkAgg0 lan100 LinkAgg1 lan101

If your network parameter display includes LinkAggx entries instead of conventional hardware paths, then you are using automatic port aggregation, and you should follow the procedure below. In a rolling upgrade of the cluster, the MC/ServiceGuard nodes with the higher revision level will not be able to join the existing cluster via the cmrunnode command because MC/ServiceGuard continues to attach to the DLPI using the original link aggregate PPA values. In fact, running the cmrunnode command could result in freezing the network. Re-run the Binary Conversion Utility: During an 11i rolling upgrade, MC/ServiceGuard is not aware that the PPA values of configured link aggregates have been changed. MC/ServiceGuard will continue using the old PPA values, which are stored in the cluster configuration database (CDB) to start the upgrading node. This may cause unexpected behavior such as command hang. Manually re-executing the binary conversion utility will convert the values to latest ones in the CDB and effectively avoid the situation. Use the 106 Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems following procedure on each node: Step 1. Halt the node using the cmhaltnode command, then upgrade to the HP-UX 11i Mission Critical OE, with Auto-Port Aggregation software B.11.11.00. Step 2. After upgrading the node and applying any required patches from the Support Plus Media, obtain patch PHSS_22683 and apply it. Step 3. Enter: swconfig -x reconfigure=true ServiceGuard.CM-SG Step 4. Use cmrunnode to bring the node back into the cluster. Step 5. Use cmviewcl to display the converted aggregate names. For example, after node001 has been upgraded, the display would be as follows:
CLUSTER STATUS cluster1 down NODE STATUS node001 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown NODE STATUS node002 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown

STATE unknown PATH LinkAgg0 LinkAgg1 STATE unknown PATH LinkAgg0 LinkAgg1 NAME lan100 lan101 NAME lan900 lan901

After all nodes have been converted, all aggregate names will have been changed, as in this example: cmviewcl -v
CLUSTER STATUS cluster1 down NODE STATUS node001 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown

STATE unknown PATH LinkAgg0 LinkAgg1 NAME lan900 lan901

Appendix B

107

In Case of Trouble Common Update Problems
NODE STATUS node002 down Network_Parameters: INTERFACE STATUS PRIMARY unknown STANDBY unknown STATE unknown PATH LinkAgg0 LinkAgg1 NAME lan900 lan901

Analyzing Log Files
To help identify a problem with running update-ux, remember that errors are logged in two separate log files: • update-ux errors: /var/adm/sw/update-ux.log and /var/adm/sw/swagent.log • swinstall errors: /var/adm/sw/swinstall.log and /var/adm/sw/swagent.log SD commands log errors to /var/adm/sw/swagent.log, plus their own log. Simply checking more than one log file may reveal the problem you are troubleshooting.

108

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i

Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i
Read these items before installing or updating to 11i. Do not use CacheFS HP recommends that you do not enable or use the CacheFS feature of NFS (Network File System) under 11i until a patch is available. The CacheFS file system is a general purpose file system caching mechanism that improves NFS server performance and scalability by reducing server and network load. HP has discovered problems in the operation of CacheFS under HP-UX 11i: • The umount command sporadically hangs when you try to un-mount a cache directory. • Client caching ceases after a server file is altered more than once and the client attempts to re-read the server file. To discover whether or not CacheFS is already in use on your system, enter: bdf -t cachefs If the command returns anything other than a blank line, CacheFS is in use. You should disable it: unmount the filesystems in question and remount them without the cachefs option. Make sure the changes are reflected in /etc/fstab. Make sure all administrators know that they should not use a combination of commands such as the following; and comment them out of code and scripts:
cfsadmin -c -o options cache_directory mount -F cachefs -o backfstype=nfs,cachedir=cache_directory \ server:/mntdir /mntpnt [local_mount_point]

Contact your HP Support Representative if you need more information. A5838A adapter doesn’t support boot, swap, and dump The A5838A PCI adapter does not support the boot, swap, and dump commands under HP-UX 11i. The A5838A is a card with a PCI-to-PCI bridge; it supports multiple devices. To determine if an A5838A adapter is installed in your system, enter: ioscan -kfClan | grep btlan3

Appendix B

109

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i
lan 0 0/0/0/0 btlan3 CLAIMED INTERFACE HP PCI 10/100Base-TX lan 2 0/8/0/0/6/0 btlan3 CLAIMED A5838A PCI 100BaseTX/SCSI COMBO lan 18 0/8/0/0/7/0 btlan3 CLAIMED A5838A PCI 100BaseTX/SCSI COMBO lan 4 0/12/0/0/6/0 btlan3 CLAIMED A5838A PCI 100BaseTX/SCSI COMBO lan 20 0/12/0/0/7/0 btlan3 CLAIMED A5838A PCI 100BaseTX/SCSI COMBO

Core INTERFACE INTERFACE INTERFACE INTERFACE

HP HP HP HP

If the output shows that the A5838A PCI card is CLAIMED, as above, then the card is installed. Recommended Action (do one): • Remove the A5838A adapter before you install or update to HP-UX 11i; or • Leave the A5838A in the system, but do not connect boot, swap or dump devices to it while running 11i; or • Wait to upgrade to 11i until a patch is available. HP plans to fix this problem with one or more patches in the future. To check for patches, contact your HP Support Representative or check the HP IT Resource Center Web: itrc.hp.com Changes to hardware diagnostics monitors If you are updating from an old version of the hardware diagnostics, the old monitors for disc30, sdisk and disk array devices will no longer work. You may be affected if: 1. You are using a version of diagnostics earlier than February 1999 (an STM version lower than A.14.00). To check your version, enter: /usr/sbin/cstm The STM version is displayed in the start-up messages. Exit by entering: quit AND: 2. You customized the configuration files for the diaglogd exec programs (disk30_exec.cfg, sdisk_exec.cfg, and haraymon_exec.cfg). Check these files by looking in the directory /var/stm/config/diaglogd_progs/. If the files exist and monitoring is enabled inside the files, then your system may be affected.

110

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i Do these checks before you update your system to 11i. After Updating to 11i: To achieve the same results as with the obsolete monitors, use the EMS Hardware Monitors on the updated system. See the EMS Hardware Monitors User's Guide available at: docs.hp.com/hpux/diag/ FYI: As of the February 1999 release of the hardware diagnostics, there has been a change to the way monitoring is done for disc30, sdisk and the HA Disk Array Models 10, 20, and 30FC. Formerly, the diaglogd exec programs (pdisc30_exec, pharaymon_exec, and psdisk_exec) handled driver error entries for these devices. As of the February 1999 release, these programs have been deleted and their functionality is now provided by the EMS Hardware Monitors. Hardware information not captured on systems with floppy drive On systems with a floppy-disk drive attached, hardware information will not be captured in the System Configuration Repository (SCR) under 11i. After updating a system with a floppy drive from 10.20 to 11i, you will find a core file in /usr/dmi/bin, and hpuxci (HP-UX DMI Component Instrumentation) will not be running. This problem affects you if there is a floppy drive attached to (or installed in) your system, and you use the System Configuration Repository (SCR) to store hardware information. Since the hpuxci is not running, hardware information will not be captured. The problem occurs if /dev/floppy exists. A fix for the problem will be made available in the earliest follow-up patch release for 11i. In the meantime, if you depend on the SCR, you should either not update to 11i, or remove the floppy drive. FYI: If /dev/floppy exists, hpuxci sets default attributes for the device. The code that does this does not null-terminate the string passed to atoi() which results in a segfault (segmentation fault). The fix for this will terminate the string correctly. EISA cards not supported on 64-bit OS EISA I/O drivers for TermIO, FDDI, 100BT and Token Ring cards are supported on HP-UX 32-bit OS, but not 64-bit OS. You will not see an error or warning message stating that these EISA products will not work after installing or updating to 64-bit OS.

Appendix B

111

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i 100BT HSC-FX cards do not work on 11i The100BT HSC-FX cards, J3514A#002 and J3516A#002, do not work under 11i. The card is claimed, but the link does not come up. This card is supported on K-Class, D-Class and A-180 systems. If you are not sure whether or not the card is installed in your system, use the appropriate command: ioscan -kfClan | grep J3514A#002 (on K-Class) ioscan -kfClan | grep J3516A#002 (on A-180 or D-Class) If the card is installed, you will see the hardware path, interface number and other details displayed on the screen. To fix the problem, either install patch PHNE_22727 or replace the HSC-FX card with an HSC-TX card, J3514A#001 (K-class) or J3516A#001 (A-180 and D-Class). If you replace the card, you will also need an FX-to-TX converter. The converter is not an HP product but has been qualified for use with HP cards; it is made by Transition Networks, part number C/E-100BTX-FX-04(SC). PCI SCSI and token ring restrictions for OLA/R Online addition and replacement (OLA/R) of PCI HBAs is available in HP-UX 11i on the HP 9000 L-Class, N-Class, and Superdome systems. This feature allows you to add or replace a failed HBA without having to reboot the system. SCSI HBAs: Some restrictions in the ability to perform online addition (OLA) and/or online replacement (OLR) apply for the following SCSI HBAs: • • • • A4800A A5149A A5150A A5159A

Why Are Some Restrictions Needed? The SCSI attributes of initiator ID, speed, and auto termination cannot be changed online. They can be changed only in the Processor Dependent Code (PDC) at the Boot Console Handler (BCH) prompt; this means rebooting the system if it is not already at the BCH prompt. If these attributes have never been set in the PDC, they will have the

112

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i default values shown below: Attribute Initiator ID Speed 7 Fast for A4800A and A5159A Ultra2 for A5149A and A5150A Auto termination Not applicable for A4800A Enabled for A5150A (part number A5150-60101) Controlled by jumper settings for A5149A, A5150A (part number A5150-60001), and A5159A The A5149A HBA with part number A5149-60001 also has a problem in that the SCSI cable must be disconnected when performing an online replacement. See “What to Do” below for details. If you have an HP 9000 N-Class, L-Class, or Superdome system running HP-UX 11i and want to do OLA/R of the SCSI HBAs A4800A, A5149A, A5150A, and A5159A, you need to consider these restrictions. The things you need to do for online addition and online replacement are described below. For Online Addition: You can add an HBA online only if the values of the initiator ID and speed attributes are usable in your SCSI configuration. The initiator ID and speed attributes will be set to the current PDC values (if any) or be defaulted to the new HBA’s values (default values are in the table above). The auto termination attribute always uses the HBA’s default value. For Online Replacement: The online replacement operation preserves the initiator ID and speed settings across the replacement. The auto termination setting in PDC (applicable to the A5150A with part number A5150-60101) is not preserved across the replacement. For A5149A, A5150A with part number A5150-60001, and A5159A, remember to set the auto termination jumpers in the same position as they were on the replaced HBA. For online replacement of A5149A with part number A5149-60001, follow these steps: Step 1. From SAM, select: Areas -> Peripheral Devices -> Cards Appendix B 113 Default Value

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i Step 2. The available I/O cards are listed in the I/O Cards screen. Select the A5149A HBA you want to replace (be sure the entire line containing the adapter is highlighted). Step 3. On the menu bar, select: Actions -> Replace SAM performs a Critical Resource Analysis (CRA). See the Configuring HP-UX Peripherals manual for more about CRA. Step 4. When the CRA finishes, select OK to continue. See the Configuring HP-UX Peripherals manual for more information about what SAM normally does next. The follow error message appears:
OLRAD error: General error.

Do not be concerned about this message; it does not affect the result of the OLR process. Step 5. Select OK or press the Return/Enter key. A dialog box with this message appears:
Errors have prevented the completion of this on-line card operation. Should all suspended cards or ports be brought back on-line now? If [No] is selected, these cards or ports may be brought on-line later using Actions->Bring On-line.

Step 6. Select: No Step 7. Disconnect the SCSI cable from the A5149A’s external connector. The green power LED for the A5149A’s slot should be off. Step 8. Still in the I/O Cards screen, select: Options -> Refresh List Status reflects that the SCSI driver is suspended and slot power is OFF. Step 9. Replace the A5149A HBA as described in the “Managing PCI Cards with OLA/R” chapter of the Configuring HP-UX Peripherals manual. Step 10. Still in the I/O Cards screen, you’ll see the available I/O cards. Select the A5149A HBA you want to bring online (be sure the entire line containing the adapter is highlighted). Step 11. On the menu bar, select: Actions -> Bring On-Line

114

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i The following message appears:
Suspended ports to be resumed: hardware_path

Step 12. Select: OK The A5149A HBA is now online (Slot Power is ON) and the SCSI driver resumes (State is active). Step 13. Reconnect the SCSI cable to the A5149A HBA’s external connector. OLR of the adapter is complete.

NOTE

Any SCSI error messages written to /var/adm/syslog.log do not affect the result of the OLR process.

These restrictions affect the ability to perform online replacement (OLR) and online addition (OLA) on the SCSI HBAs: SCSI HBA A4800A A5149A (part number A5149-60001) A5149A (part number A5149-60101) A5150A (part number A5150-60001) A5150A (part number A5150-60101) A5159A Restrictions OLR OLA Yes Yes3 Yes Yes Yes1 Yes Yes2 Yes2 Yes2 Yes2 No Yes2

Notes: 1 Only if the replaced HBA was running with auto termination enabled. 2 Only if the PDC setting on the corresponding PCI slot has a usable initiator ID setting. The speed will be set to the current PDC value (if any) or be defaulted as shown in the previous table. 3 Must follow steps 1 through 15 of previous procedure.

Appendix B

115

In Case of Trouble Problems Configuring HP-UX 11i A5783A PCI token ring HBA If the A5783A PCI Token Ring HBA is using a universally administered MAC address, the MAC address is not preserved when the online replacement (OLR) is performed, and the new HBA uses a different universally administered MAC address. If you plan to use online replacement for an A5783A that uses a universally administered MAC address and is installed in an HP 9000 L-Class, N-Class, or Superdome system, you are affected. Note that the universally administered MAC address is used mainly with SNAplus2. Action: Change the configuration file for SNAplus2—or any software that uses the A5783A HBA—to use the new HBA’s universally administered MAC address. When you change the configuration file, the universally administered MAC address inconsistency problem is fixed. This problem is similar to what happens without OLR if an A5783A HBA fails: you must power off the system, replace the HBA, and then power the system back on; however, the configuration file issue exists. Unsupported HBAs: Online addition and replacement (OLA/R) is not supported on HP-UX 11i for these PCI HBAs: • • • • A5801A HIPPI A5838A SCSI/100BT A5856A RAID A6092A HyperFabric

116

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Intermittent Sendmail Problem

Intermittent Sendmail Problem
When updating from 10.20 Mail is not delivered if the sendmail daemon is started and the /etc/nsswitch.conf file contains these alias entries:
aliases: files aliases: files nis # Original entry # Modified entry

An error message similar to this is generated in this situation:
554 Switch map aliases: unknown member map aliases.nis

Step 1. Stop the sendmail daemon: /sbin/rc2.d/S540sendmail stop Step 2. Restart the sendmail daemon: /sbin/rc2.d/S54sendmail start Mail delivery should resume and the error should not occur again.

Appendix B

117

In Case of Trouble Adjusting File System Sizes

Adjusting File System Sizes
Update requirements The absolute minimum /usr file-system sizes needed to update to HP-UX 11i are listed in “Updating requirements” in Chapter 1. If the required file-system size for the bundle you copy to a depot exceeds the file system limit set by your disk installation, you will get an error condition during the copy process. You can use lvextend and extendfs in this situation to create a larger file system. You might have a problem updating your system(s) if any of these volumes are too small: /usr, /opt, /stand or /var. See “Updating requirements” in Chapter 1. If you try an update, swinstall will determine how much disk space is required. If sufficient space is not available, swinstall will report an error like this:
ERROR: The used disk space on filesystem "/var" is estimated to increase by 57977 Kbytes. This operation will exceed the minimum free space for this volume. You should free up at least 10854 Kbytes to avoid installing beyond this threshold of available user disk space.

In this example, you would need to increase the file system size of /var by 10 MB, which actually needs to be rounded up to 12 MB. Increasing /var Follow these steps to increase the size limit of /var:

Step 1. Determine if any space is available for the /dev/vg00: /sbin/vgdisplay /dev/vg00 You should see output like this:
- Volume groups VG Name /dev/vg00 VG Write Access read/write VG Status available Max LV 255 Cur LV 8 Open LV 8 Max PV 16 Cur PV 1 Act PV 1 Max PE per PV 2000

118

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Adjusting File System Sizes
VGDA PE Size (Mbytes) Total PE Alloc PE Free PE Total PVG 2 4 249 170 79 0

The "Free PE" indicates the number of 4MB extents available, in this case 79 (equivalent to 316 MB). Step 2. Change to single user state: /sbin/shutdown This will allow /var to be unmounted. Step 3. View mounted volumes: /sbin/mount You will see a display similar to the following:
/ on /dev/vg00/lvol1 defaults on Sat Mar 8 23:19:19 1997 /var on /dev/vg00/lvol7 defaults on Sat Mar 8 23:19:28 1997

Step 4. Determine which logical volume maps to /var. In this example, it is /dev/vg00/lvol7 Step 5. Unmount /var: /sbin/umount /var This is required for the next step, since extendfs can only work on unmounted volumes. If you get a “device busy” error at this point, reboot the system and log on in single-user mode before continuing Step 6. Extend the size of the logical volume: /sbin/lvextend -L new_size_in_MB /dev/vg00/lvol7 For example, to make this volume 332 MB: /sbin/lvextend -L 332 /dev/vg00/lvol7 Step 7. To extend the file system size to the logical volume size: /sbin/extendfs /dev/vg00/rlvol7 Step 8. Mount /var:

Appendix B

119

In Case of Trouble Adjusting File System Sizes /sbin/mount /var Step 9. Go back to the regular init state: init 3 or init 4, or reboot. Step 10. Wait 10 minutes after changing the system state or rebooting to let processes complete before your enter an update-ux command. Increasing /stand In some cases, you will need to increase the size of /stand prior to completing a successful update to HP-UX 11i. If the update-ux command fails with a message indicating that /stand is too small, follow these steps to increase the size of /stand. To increase /stand, you’ll first have to create a larger /swap volume, since both require contiguous blocks and are adjacent volumes. If you need help with this procedure, refer to the Managing Systems and Workgroups manual, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90701/B2355-90701.html Step 1. As root, use sam to create a new contiguous /swap volume of the required size, say, 300 MB. Name the new volume /dev/vg00/swap. Step 2. Using sam, verify that there is no bad block relocation and the new /swap volume is contiguous. Step 3. As root from a console window, remove and add primary swap and dump devices: 1. Remove the current dump device: lvrmboot -v -d lvol2 /dev/vg00 2. Add a new dump device: lvlnboot -d /dev/vg00/swap 3. Remove the current swap device: lvrmboot -s /dev/vg00 4. Add a new swap device: lvlnboot -s /dev/vg00/swap Step 4. Verify your change by entering: lvlnboot -v

120

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Adjusting File System Sizes
Boot Definitions for Volume Group /dev/vg00: Physical Volumes belonging in Root Volume Group: /dev/dsk/c0t6d0 (8/0/19/0.6.0) -- Boot Disk Boot: lvol1 on: /dev/dsk/c0t6d0 Root: lvol3 on: /dev/dsk/c0t6d0 Swap: swap on: /dev/dsk/c0t6d0 Dump: swap on: /dev/dsk/c0t6d0, 0

Step 5. If your changes are correct, reboot the system. Step 6. After the system reboots, view swap information by entering: swapinfo
Kb Kb Kb PCT START/ Kb TYPE AVAIL USED FREE USED LIMIT RESERVE dev 307200 45936 216208 0% 0 /dev/vg00/swap reserve - 113748 -113748 memory 85584 23492 62092 27% PRI 1 NAME

Step 7. To verify that the same configuration exists as before the reboot, enter (again): lvlnboot -v Step 8. As root, use sam to remove the old lvol2 entry from /dev/vg00. Step 9. Using sam, increase /stand to the required new size. Also change the size of any other volumes as needed. Step 10. Define your new volume as the boot volume at the next reboot: lvlnboot -b lvol1 /dev/vg00 Step 11. Reboot your system again. Return to Chapter 2 to update your system to HP-UX 11i using the update-ux command.

Appendix B

121

In Case of Trouble Problems with Large Systems

Problems with Large Systems
After a system is cold-installed, you may wish to add all the file systems that existed under the previous installation, either manually or using sam. However, for a large number of file systems (for example, over a hundred), some tables in the kernel may be too small to allow correct booting. This is because the newly-installed kernel contains default values for kernel tables sizes, and does not allow for special configurations made to the previous kernel. For example, the first boot after adding the file systems may result in error messages displayed to the console, such as:
inode: table is full proc: table is full file: table is full

The boot may fail in other ways. For example, you may have to repair file system manually: • The kernel may need to be re-configured before booting. The following settings should allow the kernel to be booted, but may not be optimal for performance:
ninode = 2048 (default is 476) nproc nfile = 1024 (default is 276) = 2048 (default is 790)

• Alternatively, you may re-configure the kernel using one of these methods: — Select an appropriate bundle of sam-tuned parameters from sam’s kernel configuration Actions menu. — Raise maxusers to a large value, such as 200. Determine the correct configuration for your system.

122

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Un-installing HP-UX 11i

Un-installing HP-UX 11i
If you cannot resolve problems after installing or updating to HP-UX 11i, you may wish to un-install 11i. The process depends upon the install/update process you followed: • Assuming that you have made a make_recovery or make_net_recovery tape using Ignite-UX, boot the system from that media to return the OS and any archived applications to the previous release. This is covered in Chapter 11 of the Ignite-UX Administration Guide, available on the HP-UX 11i Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90704/B2355-90704.html If you don’t use Ignite-UX or do not have a current make_recovery tape, read on... • If your applications and data are on a separate disk from the OS, cold-install the previous OS over 11i. This ensures a clean OS installation, removing all previous upgrade and patch information. • If applications and/or data are on the same volume with the OS, boot from the previously-saved system recovery tape to return to a previous OS. These "expert recovery" processes are in Chapter 11 of the Ignite-UX Administration Guide. To determine what applications are on the system and where they are located, use swlist. If you only need to remove applications or patches from the system, use swremove. See the Software Distributor Administration Guide for details.

Appendix B

123

In Case of Trouble Re-installing SD

Re-installing SD
If your system needs re-updating and/or you find that Software Distributor (SD) needs updating, you can re-install SD. To update SD, you must first load the install-sd utility onto your system, then use install-sd to get the new version of SD. Step 1. The install-sd utility is in the catalog/SW-DIST/pfiles directory on the HP-UX 11i OE CD1. If install-sd is not in /var/tmp, load it. For example, to load install-sd from a local CD mounted at /cdrom, enter: cp /cdrom/catalog/SW-DIST/pfiles/install-sd /var/tmp The install-sd command uses the /var/tmp directory by default and needs at least 2MB of free space. Step 2. Copy the swagent.Z file from the CD-ROM: cp /cdrom/catalog/SW-DIST/pfiles/swagent.Z /var/tmp Step 3. Make install-sd executable: chmod +x /var/tmp/install-sd

Step 4. Run install-sd to install the SW-DIST product onto your system: /var/tmp/install-sd -s /sd_cdrom For more about the install-sd command, see Appendix C of the Software Distributor Administration Guide, available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web: docs.hp.comhpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90699/B2355-90699.html Help on using install-sd is also on the Software Distributor Web: www.hp.com/go/sd/

124

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Recovering a Corrupt System

Recovering a Corrupt System
If your system will not boot at the login prompt, or the system boots but critical files are corrupt, adversely affecting system performance, it may be useful to restore system elements from the HP-UX Install/Update/ Recovery media. If there are little or no user applications or data on the system, the best recovery method is usually to cold-install the OS, as explained in Chapter 2. This will erase all data and software on the root disk. If you wish try to preserve user data or applications on the root disk, however, procedures are available to rebuild the OS. These “expert recovery” procedures are explained in Chapter 11 of the Ignite-UX Administration Guide. This guide is available on the HP-UX Instant Information CD (which you can view via an HP-UX or Windows/NT system), and also on the Web: docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/B2355-90738/B2355-90738.html

Appendix B

125

In Case of Trouble Verifying and Adding Diagnostics

Verifying and Adding Diagnostics
HP-UX 11i automatically installs Support Tools on all systems to provide required hardware support. These tools, contained in the OnlineDiag bundle, give you a complete solution for verifying, troubleshooting, and monitoring HP 9000 system hardware. This includes CPUs, memory, interface cards, mass storage devices, and other devices. To see if the diagnostic drivers are present and to use sam to install them if they are not: Step 1. cd /stand Step 2. Run the what command on the kernel file from which the system is booted, usually vmunix: /usr/bin/what vmunix | grep diag If the diagnostic drivers are there, the output contains diag1, and diag2 on workstations and diag0, diag1, and diag2 on servers. If not, load the drivers as follows: Step 3. As root, run sam: /usr/sbin/sam Step 4. From sam’s menus, select Kernel Configuration/Subsystems, then select the DIAGNOSTICS subsystem. Pull down the Actions menu and select Add Subsystem to Kernel. The third column of the matrix, Pending, should now show In for the DIAGNOSTICS subsystem. Step 5. Select Actions -> Process New Kernel. Confirm that you want to reboot the system when prompted. Help with using Support Tool Manager and the other diagnostics is in the Support Plus: Diagnostics User’s Guide, available on the Support Plus CD in: /cdrom/DIAGNOSTICS/DIAG_USR.PDF

126

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Problems Affecting non-C Locales

Problems Affecting non-C Locales
Difference between English and Japanese HP-UX STK The English and Japanese versions of the STK bundled with HP-UX 11i may contain differing documentation (the STK tools are identical for both languages). To verify that you have the latest Japanese documentation set, view these Web sites: devresource.hp.com/STK_ja_JP.SJIS devresource.hp.com/STK_ja_JP.eucJP Warning when See “Selected locale not available” on page 101. updating to non-C locales Restrictions with Netscape Communicator 4.75 The trial version of Netscape Communicator provided with HP-UX 11i OEs has these problems with several Asian locales, including Japanese, Korean and Chinese: • Asian-character input is not allowed in several dialogs. • Asian characters are not be displayed properly in some dialogs where a font switch is not available. Character-code handling with Perl and Apache You may encounter the following problems when trying to handle Asian character-codes with Perl15.005_03 bundled with HP-UX 11i: • In case of Japanese Shift-JIS code and T-Chinese BIG5 code, characters containing 0x5c will not be displayed correctly unless you add the backslash character (\). • In case of EUC-JP code, translation commands such as tr may not work properly. For example, when you try to convert a double-byte Hiragana character to a double-byte Katakana character, you may find the character itself has been changed, not just the type. Action: Get the patch jperl5.005_03 and apply it to Perl. This patch is open source and available at number of non-HP FTP sites. Follow these steps: Step 1. Get the Perl 5.005_03 source files at: devresource.hp.com.

Appendix B

127

In Case of Trouble Problems Affecting non-C Locales Step 2. Download patch jperl5.005_03 from an open-source Perl site. Step 3. Apply the patch to the source code, and build it.

NOTE

Once patched with jperl5.005_003, Perl cannot be used as Mod_perl under the Apache server.

128

Appendix B

In Case of Trouble Web Resources

Web Resources
• Latest versions of HP-UX manuals and white papers: docs.hp.com/hpux/os/11i/ Recently released manuals include: Ignite-UX Administration Guide Managing Systems and Workgroups Configuring HP-UX for Peripherals ServiceControl Manager Technical Reference HP-UX 9.x-11i Internationalization Features Whitepaper Configuring HP-UX For Different Languages • Local-language user manuals: docs.hp.com/ (select: localized documentation) • Latest HP-UX 11i information: unix.hp.com/operating/ • Ignite-UX information and download: software.hp.com/products/IUX/ • HP-UX 11.0 Software Transition Kit: devresource.hp.com/STK/ • Downloading HP-UX patches and patch information from your nearest HP IT Resource Center: itrc.hp.com Select the Maintenance and Support page, then select the appropriate Patching tools. To receive HP Security Bulletins, select: Maintenance
and Support -> Support Information Digests

• Software Distributor: www.hp.com/SD_AT_HP/ • LicensePower/iFOR from the core HP-UX: www.isogon.com/LPowerifor/suppdown.htm • HP-UX Support Plus: software.hp.com/SUPPORT_PLUS/ Appendix B 129

In Case of Trouble Web Resources

130

Appendix B

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking

C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking
This appendix describes configuring built-in PCI networking cards in HP 9000 workstations and HP 9000 V-Class servers. The information on the 100Base-FX/9000 (fiber) card is only applicable to the V-Class servers. The PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX/9000 products interface various types of HP 9000 computers to either a 10Base-T, 100Base-TX, or 100Base-FX network. The same card port that supports 100Base-TX operation can also support 10Base-T operation. The category-5 UTP cable used in 100Base-TX networks between devices such as an HP computer and a 100Base-TX hub must be less than 100 meters long. For more information on network topologies and associated specifications for 100Base-TX networking, refer to the IEEE 802.3u specification. Also, a useful practical reference is Fast Ethernet, Dawn of a New Network by Howard W. Johnson (published 1996 by Prentice Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458. Phone 800-382-3419. The ISBN number is 0-13-352643-7).

Appendix C

131

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Compatibility and Installation Requirements

Compatibility and Installation Requirements
The limits of the current PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX/9000 are: • The PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 card supports autonegotiation and autosensing. You should not normally need to manually configure the speed, autonegotiation, or duplex mode of the card. If your switch does not support autonegotiation but is set to full-duplex mode, there may be a mismatch between the card and the switch, because the card defaults to half-duplex for switches that do not support autonegotiation. You can determine what the card is set to using lanadmin -x and reset it if necessary using lanadmin -X. See “Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration” on page 136 for details. By default, autonegotiation is on. If you manually set the speed and duplex mode of the Base-TX card, autonegotiation will be turned off. The PCI 100Base-FX (fiber) card operates only at 100Mbits/s in either full or half-duplex mode, but the fiber card does not support autonegotiation. • Both full and half-duplex modes are supported. If your hub or switch does not support autonegotiation, ensure that your hub or switch is set to the desired duplex mode. • The PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX/9000 LAN software is for use with only the following protocols: TCP/IP, ARPA, and NFS. • When using the ioscan -f command to verify installation, the last digit of the H/W Path (hardware path) will show the port number of the card. The other fields of the output will show the driver as btlan, and the Hardware Type Description will show the product number of each link card. • The built-in PCI card for workstations has a nettl subsys_id of 173. The built-in workstation card also uses a dynamic major number. • On the built-in PCI card for workstations, the RJ-45 connector operates at either 10 or 100 Mbits/s, but the AUI connector operates only at 10 Mbits/s.

132

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Configuring Network Connectivity

Configuring Network Connectivity
These instructions apply to the PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX/9000 cards for the HP 9000 V-Class server and the PCI 10/100Base-TX card for HP 9000 Workstations. They assume that the PCI network card has been factory installed and the software already loaded on your disk. The PCI 10/100Base-TX card operates at both 10Mbits/s and 100Mbits/s. The Base-TX card supports autonegotiation and autosensing. The PCI 100Base-FX card operates only at 100Mbits/s, in either full or half-duplex mode, but the fiber card does not support autonegotiation. 1. Attach the system to the network: a. Ensure that the HP 9000 is shut down completely and the power is OFF. Ensure that the system is grounded. b. If your Base-TX network uses 8-pin RJ-45 connectors, attach the RJ-45 plug on your twisted-pair LAN cable into the RJ-45 connector on the PCI 10/100Base-TX card. The same RJ-45 connector is used for either 10 or 100 Mbits/s operation. If your network uses BNC connections, attach the LAN cable to the 10 Mbits/s BNC connector. If your network uses Attachment Unit Interfaces (AUIs), attach your 10 Mbits/s Media Access Unit (MAU) to the AUI connector. Only use one of the three connectors at a time; disconnect the other two connectors on the card.

Appendix C

133

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Configuring Network Connectivity

NOTE

The RJ-45 connection operates at either 10 or 100 Mbits/s, but the BNC and AUI connections operate only at 10 Mbits/s. Also, the Link Status LED is for the RJ-45 connector only; the Link Status LED is dark if the AUI or BNC port is used.

For 100 Base-FX (fiber), attach the fiber optic cable to the duplex SC connector. Cabling can be either 62.5 or 125 micron multimode fiber optic cable. The operating distances for fiber optic cable for V-Class systems are: • Node-to-repeater hub: 150 m. • Half-duplex from node to switch or hub: 400 m. • Full-duplex from node to switch or hub: 2km. c. Attach the free end of the cable to any unused port on the appropriate hub or switch (or into a wall jack that is connected to a hub or switch). Connect power cable to system. Set the hub or switch speed and duplex mode. The PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX cards operate in either full-duplex or half-duplex mode. The Base-TX card autonegotiates; the fiber card does not. If using the 100Base-FX card, set the duplex mode manually. d. Power up the system. When the system is up, any error messages will appear on the terminal display or system console. You can also use the dmesg command to retrieve start-up messages later. e. If you are using the RJ-45 connector on the PCI 10/100Base-TX or you are using the 100Base-FX card, verify that the Link LED on the card is on. The Link LED will remain dark if you are using either the BNC or AUI connector. 2. Configure the card using SAM: a. Log in as root and verify that the card and its hardware path are displayed by executing: ioscan b. Run the System Administration Manager: sam c. Double click Networking and Communications. d. Double click Network Interface Cards.

134

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Configuring Network Connectivity e. Highlight the PCI 10/100Base-TX or 100Base-FX card and choose Configure from the Actions menu. f. Fill in the form according to the instructions. g. Click on the OK button to activate the card. Then select Exit from the File menu until you exit SAM. 3. Verify the installation: a. Obtain the PPA (on HP-UX 10.20, it is the NMIDnumber) and the station address of your card by executing: lanscan b. To verify that no errors have occurred during installation, enter: linkloop -i PPA_number station_address If there is a problem, you can obtain error messages by entering: dmesg c. Verify connectivity with a remote system by entering: ping remote_IP_address netstat -in d. PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 or 100Base-FX installation is complete when you have successfully ran these two commands: linkloop ping e. To configure remote systems, see the Using PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 guide, available on the Instant Information CD and on the Web at: docs.hp.com/ Do this step only if remote systems have not been previously configured.

Appendix C

135

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration

Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration
Because this PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 LAN card supports autonegotiation, you should not normally need to manually set the duplex mode. Sometimes you may need to manually set the duplex mode of the card, for example, if the switch is operating at full-duplex but does not autonegotiate. Because the card defaults to half-duplex when autonegotiation is turned off, this could cause a mismatch between the card and switch (at either 10 or100 Mbits/s). To fix this, use lanadmin -X as described later in this section. The CSMA/CD media access method used in IEEE 802.3u-1995 is inherently a half-duplex mechanism. That is, at any one time, there can be only one sender of data on the link segment. It is not possible for devices on either end of the link segment to transmit simultaneously. Devices on both ends of a link segment can send data to each other simultaneously (full-duplex mode). While the details of full-duplex operation are not currently defined by IEEE 802.3u-1995 (full-duplex mode essentially involves “turning off ” the CSMA/CD access method which is the foundation of IEEE 802.3), the autonegotiation mechanism defined in IEEE 802.3u-1995 allows devices to advertise and configure themselves to operate in a full-duplex mode which is essentially vendor-specific. Devices that do not support autonegotiation can sometimes be manually configured to operate in full-duplex mode. Full-duplex mode is most-commonly found in either 10 Mbit/s or 100 Mbit/s switches rather than hubs. Full-duplex mode may provide a throughput advantage under some circumstances, depending upon the application. The PCI 10/100Base-TX and 100Base-FX/9000 (V-Class only) cards support both half- and full-duplex operation. Ensure that the speed, duplex mode, and autonegotiation of the associated switch are configured the same as on the PCI 10/100Base-TX card. If the switch supports autonegotiation on the ports connected to the cards, this should be enabled as explained in “Autonegotiation and Auto-sensing” on page 139. To list the current speed and duplex mode of a PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 card, use the -x option (lowercase x) in the lanadmin command. Determine the speed and duplex mode of your hub or switch before

136

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration performing manual configuration: lanadmin -x ppa To manually set the duplex mode of the interface, enter: lanadmin -X mode ppa where: mode can be any one of the following strings (fd or hd are case-insensitive): 10fd =10 full-duplex 10hd =10 half-duplex 100fd =100 full-duplex 100hd =100 half-duplex lanadmin -X auto_on ppa turns autonegotiation on. The ppa is the physical point of attachment on HP-UX 10.30 or 11.0. On HP-UX 10.20, use the nmid or Network Management ID of the card. You can get the ppa (nmid) from the output of the lanscan command. For example, if the ppa (nmid on HP-UX 10.20) of the 100Base-TX interface is 5, this command sets the card to 10Mbits/s and full-duplex: lanadmin -X 10fd 5 You must wait at least 11 seconds before attempting to use the specified network interface. If you want the Duplex Mode setting to be effective in all subsequent reboots, you must create a script that includes the appropriate command in the /sbin/init.d directory so it gets executed on each reboot. Manually configuring the speed or duplex setting of a switch port on some switches may disable that switch port from doing autonegotiation. Verify that both the card and the switch port are operating in the same speed and duplex mode as desired. If you use manual configuration to change the card to a different speed and duplex mode, you may need to turn autonegotiation on first before the manual setting takes place.

NOTE

Mismatches between the speed, autonegotiation, or duplex mode of the card and switch will cause incorrect operation.

Appendix C

137

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration

Setting Speed and Duplex Mode at Boot Time (workstation only)
With this method you may set both the speed and duplex mode of the interface, and have this setting be in effect across subsequent system reboots. To access the LAN configuration commands: From the boot console, select the Configuration Menu and from there select LAN Configuration. From this menu you can configure and display the current mode of the10/100 Base-T interface using these commands: LanConfig Display current configuration settings. LanConfig 10/Half_dx Operate in 10 Mbit/s, half-duplex mode.

LanConfig 100/Half_dx Operate in 100 Mbit/s, half-duplex mode. LanConfig 10/Full_dx Operate in 10 Mbit/s, full-duplex mode.

LanConfig 100/Full_dx Operate in 100 Mbit/s, full-duplex mode. LanConfig AUTO_detect (default) Enable auto-negotiation. If you don't use this method, the system boots up with the default setting AUTO_Detect.

138

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Autonegotiation and Auto-sensing

Autonegotiation and Auto-sensing
Autonegotiation enables devices sharing a link segment to operate at the optimal mode: 10Base-T or 100Base-TX and half- or full-duplex modes. If the PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 card is connected to a device, such as a switch, that is autonegotiating, the PCI card will autonegotiate with the device to mutually determine the highest possible speed and duplex settings. The fiber card (100Base-FX/9000) does not support autonegotiation.

NOTE

If the PCI 10/100Base-TX/9000 card is connected to a device that does not support autonegotiation or a device that has autonegotiation disabled, the PCI card will autosense the speed of the link and set itself accordingly. The card will be set to half-duplex in this case. If you want the card to operate in full-duplex mode, you have to set it using the method described previously in “Manual Speed and Duplex Mode Configuration.”

The PCI 10/100Base-TX card will sense when the connection between itself and a hub or switch on the other end of a link has been broken. If a connection is made to another (or the same) device, the autosensing process will be done again automatically. Autosensing is also done whenever the interface is reset.

Appendix C

139

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking RJ-45 and AUI Ports

RJ-45 and AUI Ports
The 10/100 Base-TX link works with both an RJ-45 and (on the V-class) an AUI port. The RJ-45 port can be used for either 100 Base-T or 10 Base-T networking; the AUI port is used only for 10 Base-T. Only one of these ports should be connected to a network at any given time. The link will normally attempt to automatically sense which port is connected and configure that port, unless this is overridden via the Boot Time LAN configuration described above. If the RJ45 port is not connected to the network, the system will configure itself to use the AUI port during boot-up or reset.

140

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Performance

Performance
The 100 Base-T product is initially set with a conservative value for the transmit threshold (that is, the number of bytes that must be in the transmit FIFO buffer before transmission can begin). The transmit threshold is set to a “store and forward” value. This means that the entire Ethernet frame must be in the transmit FIFO before transmission of data onto the wire will begin. The initial transmit threshold value is set to eliminate transmit underruns (that is, when the transmitter encounters an empty transmit FIFO during the transmission). However, it can also reduce transmit performance by not being able to pre-fetch the next packet until the current frame is completely transferred. This causes a slight delay between frames, resulting in an overall drop in transmit performance. The transmit threshold value is adjustable. Adjusting the threshold to either 1024 or 512 bytes can increase performance. If the transmit threshold is 1024 or 512, the CORE 100 Base-T interface will start transmitting data onto the wire after 1024 or 512 bytes are in the transmit FIFO. This allows the CORE 100 Base-T hardware to start pre-fetching the next frame in the transmit FIFO before the current frame is completely transmitted. This results in less time between subsequent frames and therefore increases the transmit performance. Setting the The CORE 100 Base-T product supports three levels of transmit transmit threshold threshold. These three levels are modified via lanadmin: lanadmin -S transmit_threshold PPA where: transmit_threshold of 512 is most aggressive. transmit_threshold of 1024 is somewhat aggressive. transmit_threshold of 1500 is conservative. After issuing lanadmin -S, you must wait at least 8 seconds before attempting to use the specified network interface. If you want the transmit threshold setting to be effective in all subsequent reboots, you must create an SD script and include the command in the /sbin/init.d directory so it gets executed on each reboot.

Appendix C

141

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Performance

CAUTION

Be careful when adjusting the transmit threshold. While lowering the threshold may increase performance, it also makes the CORE 100 Base-T interface more susceptible to Transmit Underrun errors.

A large number of transmit underrun errors (more than 1 out of every 1000 packets) may cause a noticeable drop in networking performance. The performance drop will depend on the application being used. Applications that send data in a continuous stream (FTP, for example) may have a more noticeable drop in performance (when more than 1 out of every 1000 packets have errors) than applications which are request-response in nature (NFS, for example). Transmit underrun errors may occur on some HP systems when there is sufficient bus contention from competing I/O devices on the system I/O bus. These errors can be monitored in two ways: 1. Examine the output from the netstat -I command. If the number of output errors is high (more than 1 out of every 1000 packets), then the system is most likely suffering from transmit underruns on the specified network interface, and corrective action must be taken to resolve the problem. 2. Turn on nettl errors and warnings for the network interface being monitored. The following command will turn on disasters, errors and warnings for the network interface with Instance number 1: nettl -log 0xe -e base100 -C 1

NOTE

Be sure to keep nettl disaster and error logging enabled at all times.

Check the nettl log file /var/adm/nettl.LOG00 for the following message:
HP CORE 10/100BASE-T driver encountered a Transmit Underflow

If a significant number of these messages occur and the timestamps for each of the messages are within 30 seconds of each other, the specified networking interface will suffer a noticeable performance drop. Corrective action must be taken to resolve this problem.

142

Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking What Happens During Card Initialization Sequence?

What Happens During Card Initialization Sequence?
Following is an overview of the initialization sequence for the PCI 10/100Base-TX and (for V-Class servers) the 100Base-FX cards. Initialization of a PCI 10/100Base-TX or 100Base-FX card happens during system bootup only, and it is driven by the btlan driver for the card. Whenever initialization fails, it prints a message on the console identifying the failure. You can later retrieve initialization messages after the system is fully booted up by using the dmesg command. Finally, the driver tries to establish a good data link between the card and the hub or switch. The Link Status LED is for the RJ-45 connector only. The link LED is lit only when the RJ-45 connector on the card is connected properly to a 10/100 Mbit/s switch or hub.When the RJ-45 cable connection is used, the link LED must be lit to indicate proper functioning. If there is no RJ-45 cable connection, or if the cable connection is bad, or if the hub or switch is not compatible, that is, not 10Base-T or 100Base-TX capable, no LEDS will be lit. Also, a message indicating the detection of a bad cable connection is printed on the console as well as logged in NETTL logs. The Link LED functions as follows: • LED solid green = link established in 100Base-TX mode. • LED solid yellow = link established in 10Base-T mode. • LED remains dark in 10Base2 (BNC) or 10Base5 (AUI) mode. The Status LED is dark if the AUI or BNC port is used. The Activity LED flashes whenever the switch is sending link pulses. If the activity LED on the card is not blinking, then there may be a problem with the driver or the card. Contact HP.

NOTE

The RJ-45 connection operates at either 10 or 100 Mbits/s, but the BNC and AUI connections operate only at 10 Mbits/s.

Appendix C

143

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking V-Class PCI 10/100Base-TX Card Specifications

V-Class PCI 10/100Base-TX Card Specifications
Physical: • Dimensions (A3738A): 5.839 x 4.78 inches. • Dimensions (A5172A): 5.075 x 3.9 inches. (PCI short card specification). Power requirement: +5 Volts @ 0.5 Amps max. Environmental: (degrees F = (1.8 x degrees C) + 32) • Operating temperature: 5 degreesC to 50 degreesC. • Humidity: 5 to 85% non-condensing. • Altitude: 3000 m. Electromagnetic: • FCC Class A: USA, Canada, and Latin America. • CISPR-22 Class A, EN55022 Class A: Europe. Cable Interfaces: • The 10-Mbit/s twisted-pair port is compatible with IEEE 802.3u-1995 Type 10Base-T. Cat 5 UTP. • The 100-Mbit/s twisted-pair port is compatible with IEEE 802.3u-1995 standard. Cat 5 UTP. The fiber card uses one-pair multimode fiber cable with duplex SC connectors. Cable Distances: (HP A5172A Fiber Card) • Node-to-switch cable distance up to 2 km for full duplex and up to 412 m for half duplex. • Node-to-repeater cable distance up to 137 m for half duplex. Line speeds are 100 Mbits/s half- and 200 Mbits/s full- duplex. Communications Standards: • IEEE 802.3u-1995 Type 10Base-T (10Mbit/s). • IEEE 802.3u-1995 standard for Base-TX and FX (100-Mbit/s) 144 Appendix C

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Hardware Regulatory Statements

Hardware Regulatory Statements
This section contains hardware regulatory statements for the V-Class PCI 100Base-TX product (A3738A) and 100Base-FX product (A5172A) use in the United States, Canada, Japan, and the European community. Refer to your PCI 10/100Base-TX 9000 Quick Install card for product installation instructions.

FCC Statement (For U.S.A.)
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement

WARNING

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that might cause undesired operation. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy, and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference. Hewlett-Packard’s system certification tests were conducted with HP-supported peripheral devices and cables, such as those received with your system. Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by Hewlett-Packard could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.

Appendix C

145

Configuring Built-In PCI Networking Hardware Regulatory Statements

Canada
WARNING This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations. Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.

EMI and LED Safety (European Community)

NOTE

This is a class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference, in which case you may be required to take adequate measures.

LED Safety - European Union - Optical Transceiver (A5172A only)

NOTE

This optical transceiver meets LED AEL Class 1 requirements per EN 60825-1:1994(+A11) and EN 60825-2:1994.

146

Appendix C

Index

Numerics 100BT HSC-FT card, not supported on 11i, 116 32-bit OS, changing from 64-bit OS, 63 64-bit OS, updating to, 63 A analyzing log files, 112 Apache, character-code handling w/ Perl, 131 Apache, updating an existing version, 31 applications changing OE apps, 64 updating, 80 AUI port, 144 autoboot, halting, 92 autonegotiation, 143 autosensing, 143 B boot device types, 41 boot information newer Series 800, 95 older Series 700, 93, 94 older Series 800, 96 Superdome, 38 V-class, 98 bundles OnlineDiag, 25 C CacheFS, configuring, 113 CD contents, 37 changing file system size, 122 changing OEs, 65 cold-install definition, 12 kernel build fails, 104 procedure, 41

saving key information, 32 troubleshooting, 104 typical problems, 104 vs. update, 28, 29 cold-installing advanced installation, 42 alternate methods, 38 flowchart, 39 guided installation, 42 install wizard, 42 required CDs, 41 required software bundles, 43 system requirements, 40 typical time, 41 configuration files save before cold-install, 35 configuring built-in PCI card, 137 configuring HP-UX, problems, 113 corrupt system, recovering, 129 critical patches, installing, 81 Custom Patch Manager, 78 D determine your disk needs, 26 DFS, removed by update-ux, 49 diagnostics bundle, 25 changes to hardware monitors, 114 overview, 25 verifying and adding, 130 Web pages, 25 web site, 25 diagnostics subsystem not installed, 130 disk space needs, 26, 28 disk space usage errors, 106 documentation Disk and File Management Tasks, 26

for planning disk space, 26 Managing HP-UX Software with SD-UX, 75, 81 E error messages, 105 error recovery, update-ux, 105 errors disk-space usage, 106 multiple I/O, 106 post-update verify, 106 root vol. locked, 107 swinstall, 106 update/install, 105 F Fast Boot, enable, 41 file system size, adjusting, 122 firmware patches, downloading, 22 firmware patches, installing, 23 firmware revision, identifying, 19 firmware upgrade, 18 G General Release patch bundle, 15 GOLDAPPS11i patch bundle, 15 GOLDBASE11i patch bundle, 15 H hardware monitors, changes, 114 HP-UX patch bundles, 15 security bulletins, 78 HP-UX 11i 100BT HSC-FT card supported, 116 default OS bundles, 51, 61

Index

147

Index

maintaining, 84 migration paths, 17 OLA/R support, 116 proactive maintenance, 85 reactive maintenance, 86 rebuilding kernel before updating, 52 release version, 16 software bundles, 70 support media, 84 un-installing, 127 updating, 61 updating the OS, 58 Web resources, 133 HWEnable11i patch bundle, 15 I Ignite-UX updating, 59 updating the server, 24 Web, 133 increasing /stand, 124 increasing /var, 122 install kernel autobooting (S800), 95 booting (s700), 93 stopping autoboot (S800), 95 installing ServiceGuard, 68 install-sd, 128 interactive mode, updating with, 59 IT Resource Center Web, 133 K kernel, rebuilding, 52 L large systems, 126 last-minute install/update issues, 14 LicensePower/iFOR, updating, 83

locales, problems with non-C, 131 M make_net_recovery, 34 make_tape_recovery, 33 match_target, using, 58 MC/ServiceGuard see ServiceGuard migration flowchart, 11 migration overview, 12 migration paths, 17 minimum memory requirements, 27 MirrorDisk/UX, updating, 107 multiple I/O errors, 106 N N-Class, upgrading firmware, 18 NDS, updating, 40, 67 Netscape, restrictions, 131 network depot, creating, 54 network drivers updating, 61 networking data save before cold-install, 32 networking, configuring, 135 O OEs adding, 65 bundle names, 57 changing, 65 changing applications, 64 contents (see Getting Started with HP-UX 11i booklet), 37 overview and contents, 10 updating, 48 OLA/R support on 11i, 116 OS HP-UX 11i software, 70

un-installing, 127 updating, 48 P patch bundles available bundles, 15 GOLDAPPS11i, 15 GOLDBASE11i, 15 HWEnable11i, 15 patches adding, 81 Custom Patch Manager, 78 downloading individual, 78 HP-UX security bulletins, 78 installed, 81 management tools, 79 removing, 81 resources, 79 PCI card configuring, 113, 137 initialization sequence, 147 setting speed and mode, 142 specifications, 136 PCI Token Ring card, configuring, 120 Perl, character-code handling w/ Apache, 131 precautions verify that applications are certified, 12 proactive maintenance, 85 Q Quality Pack patch bundle, 15 R reactive software maintenance, 86 recovering a corrupt system, 129 re-installing SD, 128 release version, 16 requirements

148

Index

Index

CDs for cold-install, 41 RJ-45 port, 144 root directory, creating a new, 46 root disk, minimum size, 14 S screen lock, disable during update, 52 SD managing depots, 82 re-installing, 128 tools, 82 Web, 133 selectable software, with update-ux, 59 selected locale not availavble, 105 sendmail intermittant problem, 121 ServiceGuard downgrading, 68 OPS Edition, 69 problems updating, 109 updating, 68 size, file system adjusting, 122 Software Distributor Administration Guide, 81 Software Transition Kit, 17 STK Web, 133 Superdome booting patitions, 38 installing HP-UX, 38 support, 25 Support Plus patch bundles, 15 services, 79 Web, 133 supported migration paths, 17 supported systems, 13 swinstall, 80 swinstall errors, 106

swlist, 74 swverify, 74, 76 T troubleshooting large systems, 126 troubleshooting installs/updates, 105 U un-installing HP-UX 11i, 127 update definition, 12 vs. cold-install, 29 update process all software doesn’t get updated, 53 flowchart, 50 monitoring, 52 recording software versions, 52 running other commands, 53 updating 11i, 61 update-ux analyzing log files, 112 command syntax, 56 do not use -i and -x together, 59 error codes, 60 examples, 57 installing the command, 54 multiple I/O errors, 106 overview, 48 preliminary checks, 48 specifying selectable software, 59 typical times, 51 using match_target, 58 updating applications, 80 creating a network depot, 54 DFS removed, 30 error codes, 60 existing 11i system, 61

flowchart, 50 from a network depot, 58 HP-UX 11i OS (no OE), 58 Ignite-UX, 59 Ignite-UX server, 24 MirrorDisk/UX, 107 NDS, 67 network drivers, 30, 61 NPTY parameter failure, 108 problem with floppy drives, 115 requirements, 26 selected locale not available, 105 ServiceGuard, 68, 109 tips, 52 to 64-bit OS, 63 to an 11i OE, 57 troubleshooting, 105 update-ux command, 56 using interactive mode, 59 using match_target, 58 X.25 cards not supported, 108 upgrade N-Class systems, 18 V V-class booting, 98 verifying HP-UX installation, 74 W web access Ignite-UX, 24, 133 Managing Superdome Complexes, 37 Software Distributor Administration Guide, 81 Web resources, 133 X X.25 cards not supported in 11i, 108

Index

149

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