SRI
in
the
Rockies
 
 STRATEGIC
MEMOS



 



 
 STRATEGIC
MEMORANDUM
 
 TO:
 
 SRI
In
the
Rockies
Attendees
 
 FROM:

 Brian
Reich
 
 SUBJECT:
 Thinking
Differently
 
 
 BIG
POINT:
How
we
promote,
discuss
and
create
engagement
opportunities
for
investors,
 and
prospective
investors,
around
socially
responsible
investing
must
change.
Right
now.
 
 Our
society
has
changed—dramatically—over
the
past
few
decades.

 
 We
often
talk
about
these
changes
in
the
context
of
business
(flattening),
government
and
politics
 (opening),
and
community
(connecting).
But
changes
are
being
seen
everywhere,
in
every
 community
and
every
sector
of
our
society.
They
are
being
felt
by
all
of
us.
Technology
and
the
 Internet
have
altered
how
we
communicate,
how
we
get
and
share
information,
and
what
media
 we
consume,
as
well
as
the
very
reasons
we
choose
to
engage
with
each
other,
online
as
well
as
off.

 
 Make
no
mistake
about
it,
these
forces
are
also
re‐shaping
how
individuals
invest
their
money
‐‐
 and
what
they
expect
from
the
companies
they
support
and
the
investment
advisors
they
look
to
 for
guidance
in
return.
 
 Some
of
these
changes
are
obvious.
Information
moves
faster;
people
are
more
closely
connected;
 audiences
actively
choose
what
they
want
to
see
and
hear,
and
who
they
trust.
Not
surprisingly,
 the
relationships,
as
well
as
the
types
of
support,
we
expect
from
organizations
are
changing
as
a
 result.
Today,
the
ubiquity
of
technology
makes
it
possible
to
spread
a
message
farther,
and
have
it
 be
embraced
by
more
people,
than
ever
before.
And,
especially
with
the
rise
of
social
platforms,
it
 is
clear
that
we
are
one
global,
interconnected
community,
capable
of
taking
decisive
action
on
 those
issues
we
passionately
share.


 
 But
not
all
of
these
changes
can
be
so
easily
glimpsed.
From
within
the
organization,
and
from
 without,
there
are
new
power
hierarchies,
new
relationships
between
consumers
and
producers,
 and
new
feedback
loops.
Consider
the
fact
that
most
organizations
now
receive
instant
feedback
 (e.g.,
real‐time
measurement
of
their
impact)
directly,
and
from
their
most
important
constituents.
 This
allows
any
number
of
adaptations—for
instance,
how
something
is
positioned
or
promoted— to
happen
on
the
fly,
and
often
without
attracting
attention
or
notice.

 
 Groups
that
choose
to
develop
deeper,
more
meaningful
relationships
with
their
audiences
are
 seeing
interest
among
customers
materialize
in
ways
never
before
imagined.
But
this
cuts
both
 ways.
While
new
tools
make
it
possible
for
everyone
to
have
a
platform
from
which
to
speak,
those
 organizations
that
still
attempt
to
maintain
strict
controls
over
their
message
often
find
 themselves
battling
for
attention
‐‐
and
in
some
cases
credibility
and
revenue
‐‐
from
the
very



 same
people
who
once
sustained
their
efforts.
Today,
indeed,
anyone
can
spark
a
bottom‐up,
 grassroots‐fueled
revolution
or
movement
that
has
power
no
individual
or
entity
could
have
 reasonably
hoped
to
generate
in
the
past.
 
 In
these
contexts—massive,
disruptive
change
across
every
sector—how
organizations
operate,
 organize,
and
communicate
must
be
re‐imagined
as
well.
This
means,
for
starters,
rethinking
the
 ways
that
media
can
contribute,
beyond
raising
awareness
and
supporting
education.
In
turn,
the
 passion
and
interest
of
individuals,
locally
and
globally,
must
be
re‐focused
and
re‐directed.
 Ultimately,
we
must
re‐envision
in
toto
what
we
promote
and
why,
how
and
where
our
content
 gets
discussed
and
distributed,
and
what
kinds
of
engagement
opportunities
for
investors
(and
 other
audiences)
we
create
along
the
way.
In
other
words:
everything
must
change.
 
 A
total
reset
in
thinking
 
 While
the
socially
responsible
investing
world
retains
significant
influence
over
how
business
is
 conducted
across
the
globe,
it
is
also
true
that
the
financial
world
has
changed
dramatically.
The
 recent
economic
slowdown,
taken
in
conjunction
with
the
increased
level
of
connection
among
 individuals,
has
elevated
both
our
awareness
as
well
as
our
scrutiny
of
how
businesses
operate,
 influence
and
are
influenced
by
forces
well
beyond
their
control.
Many
companies
are
feeling
 pressure
from
their
customers
and
investors
to
adapt
their
business
operation
to
align
with
 different,
and
more
socially
conscious,
objectives.

At
the
same
time,
mainstream
media
is
 struggling
to
provide
adequate
information
to
consumers
about
core
issues
that
affect
their
 financial
well‐being,
personal
health
and
the
security
of
their
communities.
Collectively,
these
 factors
create
a
powerful
opportunity
for
all
of
us—that
is,
we
can
create
more
meaningful
 relationships,
and
experiences,
between
the
people
who
work
in
socially
responsible
investing
and
 the
customers
they
serve.
 
 Keep
in
mind,
too,
that
the
changes
we
are
observing—the
socialization
of
the
investing
 experience—is
no
different
than
what
we
are
seeing
in
every
other
part
of
our
society.

And,
while
 so
much
is
changing,
the
focus
on
technology,
or
the
dominant
narrative
about
technology,
is
for
 the
most
part
misplaced
or
wrong.

Yes,
the
tools
and
channels
that
have
been
created
in
the
last
 few
years
have
generated
a
lot
of
excitement
and
attention,
and
for
good
reason,
but
it
is
their
use
 that
really
matters.
Our
understanding
of
these
uses
will
determine
our
ability
to
drive
the
 outcomes
that
we—individually
and
collectively—desire.
 
 The
fact
is:
For
all
the
new
and
exciting
opportunities
that
exist,
the
current
ways
that
most
 businesses
and
financial
advisers
(and
even
media)
interact
with
their
audience
follows
the
same,
 traditional
patterns.
That’s
not
a
good
thing.

It
is
necessary—no,
imperative—that
the
various
 forms
of
advertising,
educating,
engaging,
and
directing—the
decision‐making
of
individual
 investors
and
the
gestalt
operations
of
an
organization—are
more
appropriately
aligned
and
 integrated.
In
today’s
world,
success
can
only
be
redefined
as
that
concinnity,
or
harmonious
 adaptation
of
parts.
Your
investors
want
to
believe
that
their
support
of
your
efforts—the
time
 they
spend
and
money
they
invest—will
bear
results.

 
 To
shift
people’s
behavior,
to
create
the
kinds
of
connections
necessary
for
people
to
more
deeply
 engage
with
socially
responsible
investments,
we
have
to
begin
by
recognizing
that
the
ways
that



 we
reach,
educate,
engage,
and
mobilize
audiences
isn’t
working
anymore.
That's
the
bad
news.
 The
good
news
is
there
are
more
than
enough
tools
out
there
to
facilitate
the
activities
and
 behaviors
we
believe
are
needed
to
drive
revenue,
build
audience,
and
direct
action.
The
content
 we
deliver,
and
the
ways
our
audiences
use
that
content,
are
critical
to
our
success.
The
key
is:
We
 have
to
re‐think
how
to
communicate
and
drive
action
to
achieve
the
desired
outcomes.

We
have
 to
shift
the
ways
we
create,
distribute,
promote,
watch,
review,
share,
and
discuss
everything.
We
 have
to
reset.
 
 An
invitation
to
act
 
 The
public
is
more
engaged
than
ever
before
and
there
is
greater
interest
in
serious
issues,
as
well
 as
socially
responsible
investments
and
businesses
of
all
kinds,
that
at
any
point
to
date.
Coupled
 with
the
passion
and
commitment
that
people
show
towards
the
issues
they
care
about,
we
are
 now
seeing
an
unprecedented
opportunity
to
mobilize
action
in
new
and
exciting
ways.
And
so:
 This
is
your
invitation
to
act.

 
 Think
bigger
by
thinking
smaller.
There
are
dizzying
opportunities
for
technology
and
the
 internet
to
not
only
redefine
how
socially
responsible
investments
are
positioned,
marketed,
and
 monitored,
but
to
increase
the
influence(s)
that
these
investments
have
on
the
business
 environment
writ
large.

This
is
more
than
a
marketing
opportunity.

As
our
information
 experiences
have
changed,
must
our
organizational
goals
change
as
well.

 
 It
is
no
longer
necessary,
or
necessarily
desirable,
to
find
a
mass
audience;
today,
most
products
 and
services
get
pitched
to
a
small
niche.

We
can
achieve
more
on
a
global
scale
by
connecting
a
 series
of
smaller,
more
focused
efforts
successfully.

Too
often
we
lose
sight
of
this
principle
falling
 pretty
to
the
outside
(and
increasingly
unrealistic)
pressures
from
the
outside
world
to
define
 success
in
terms
of
being
"game
changers"
or
creating
blockbusters.

Instead,
we
should
be
asking
 ourselves:
What
can
we
do
with
a
small,
dedicated,
and
passionate
audience
instead?
What
must
 be
changed,
or
adapted,
within
our
society
to
ensure
that
the
commitments
that
investors,
 companies,
communities,
institutions
and
others
are
focused
and
activated
to
achieve
the
desired
 results?
What
can
we
learn
from
what
has
worked
in
other
sectors,
from
politics
or
sports,
 philanthropy
or
culture
at
large?
If
we
think
about
the
small,
important
changes
that
are
needed
 we
will
have
potential
to
realize
the
bigger
impacts
that
might
be
possible.


 
 Tell
more
stories.
Your
customers
know
what’s
important
to
them.

But
there
are
so
many
 choices,
so
many
competing
options
that
it
is
easy
to
feel
overwhelmed
and
confused.

How
do
you
 break
through
and
begin
to
establish
a
solid
relationship
with
your
audience?
More
than
anything,
 this
entails
a
collaborative
effort
that
is
considerably
more
open‐ended
than
the
traditional
 relationship
between
advisors
and
investors;
it
means
creating
coverage
and
content,
sharing
 information
and
telling
more
stories,
all
of
which
will
inform
your
audiences
and
support
their
 interests.
Indeed,
media—across
every
platform—can
and
should
be
changed.
And
what
dialogue
 emerges
in
and
through
(or
over
and
across)
these
opened
platform
becomes,
itself,
a
kind
of
 invaluable
content:
it
is,
in
sum,
a
generative
process.

 
 Do
More!
Everything
about
finance
is
already
big
–
big
business,
big
influence,
big
opportunity,
 big
anxiety.
Our
response
can’t
be
to
shrink
away.
Instead,
the
socially
responsible
investing
world



 must
do
more,
and
they
must
do
things
more
ambitiously.
You
must
invite
more
voices
into
the
 conversation.

You
must
change
the
regulations
and
break
down
the
barriers
that
prevent
open
 communication
and
growth
across
the
industry.

You
must
offer
more
options
and
choices
to
 investors.
 
 Fueled
by
technology,
we
all
have
the
ability
to
learn
or
discuss
whatever
we
believe
is
relevant.

 We
can
produce
and
distribute
information
that
reaches
a
more
diverse
(and
deeply
committed)
 audience
any
time,
any
place,
across
and
through
any
device
or
platform.
Beyond
just
being
 investors,
we
can
all
be
ambassadors.
This
means
aligning
the
audience
with
not
"just"
a
story
but
 with
the
issues
that
story
represents.
The
socially
responsible
investing
world
can
invite
its
 customers
to
help
expand
the
reach
and
impact
of
its
work,
to
help
shape
and
define
and
respond
 to
opportunities
and
challenges
that
arise
over
time.

It
has
always
done
this
historically,
but
in
a
 connected
society
the
challenges
are
new
and
different.

 
 It’s
Time
To
Change
Everything
We
Know
About
Socially
Responsible
Investing
 
 We
haven’t
seen
the
socially
responsible
investing
world
(nor
any
individual
fund
or
group
for
 that
matter)
fully
embrace
the
range
of
opportunities
that
technology
and
the
internet
have
 created.
Beyond
simple
inertia,
there
are
two
principle
reasons
for
this:
firstly,
organizations
are
 still
spending
too
much
time
trying
to
contain
the
conversations
that
their
audiences
are
having.
 These
organizations,
that
is
to
say,
are
engaged
in
an
ongoing,
and
losing,
effort
to
shape
and
 channel
their
audiences
interests
and
behaviors
to
suit
a
specific
and
limited
agenda.
Secondly,
 while
organizations
focus
on
how
to
communicate,
or
the
best
ways
to
deliver
a
message
–
 devoting
most
of
their
energy
to
the
tools
–
they
often
lose
sight
of
the
content
of
those
messages
 and
how
they
actually
relate
to
their
intended
audiences.
To
a
large
extent,
these
organizations
 have
been
operating
under
largely
the
same
rules
as
before,
even
as
the
world
around
us
is
 changing
in
unimaginable
and
exciting
ways.
 
 It
is
not
surprising
that
organizations
still
want
control.
But
the
truth
is:
No
organization
or
 institution
has
control
anymore.
The
audience
is
in
control,
and
organizations
must
embrace
this
 shift
in
order
to
succeed.
You
should
be
looking
to
support
and
enhance
the
interests
of
your
 audiences,
to
engage
them
in
conversation,
and
to
listen
to
what
they
are
saying.
Anyone
can
use
 the
tools
that
are
now
widely
available
online
to
conduct
campaigns,
send
notices,
or
promote
and
 sell
products;
these
things
can
be
done
more
efficiently,
and
more
cost
effectively,
than
ever
 before.
But
technology
alone
is
not
the
answer.


 
 What
we
do
with
these
tools
is
what
matters.
How
well
we
know
our
audience—and
how
well
we
 can
organize
to
meet
their
needs
and
satisfy
their
interests—is
what
will
define
the
outcome
of
 your
work.
Instead
of
looking
at
email
open
rates,
or
emphasizing
the
number
of
unique
clicks
per
 month
and
the
size
of
a
friend
list
on
Facebook
as
measures
of
success,
you
should
be
inviting
your
 audiences
to
participate
and
provide
feedback.
Merely
launching
new
tools
or
building
proprietary
 networks
does
nothing
unless
you
are
listening
to
their
input
and
in
turn
adapting
based
on
what
 you
hear.
In
so
doing,
you
can
build
trust
and
sustain
relationships
that
can
be
leveraged
long
into
 the
future.
 



 We
need
to
fundamentally
shift
the
way
we
think
about
what
we
create,
and
why.
Who
is
your
 audience?
What
do
they
want?
We
must
answer
these
questions
before
anything
else.
We
need
to
 find
a
new
approach.
While
the
socially
responsible
investing
world
has
an
opportunity
to
play
a
 unique
role
in
mobilizing
the
public
to
action
–
but
no
change
will
come
about
without
active,
 prudent
engagement.
We
must
demonstrate
that
a
shift
in
approach
offers
clear
benefits
to
all
 parties
involved.
And
until
we
do,
socially
responsible
investing
will
not
move
beyond
their
 current
levels
of
tepid
commitment,
and
our
own
energy
and
focus,
time
and
expertise,
will
 remain
less
than
fully
realized.
This
means
re‐shaping
the
way
socially
responsible
investing
is
 integrated
into
all
of
our
lives—not
just
those
who
are
already
part
of
the
community.

 
 It
is
possible.

We
just
have
to
start
by
changing
everything
we
are
doing.
 
 
 
 



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