You are on page 1of 52

A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PRODUCT
CATALOGUE

We are TRAMA Textiles,


the Association of Women for Artisan Development in Backstrap Loom
Weaving. We represent 17 weaving groups, totaling 400 women from five
departments in the western highlands of Guatemala: Sololá, Huehuetenango,
Sacatepequez, Quetzaltenango, and Quiché.
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Benefits of Buying Trama


Products:
The products we sell are purchased directly from the regional weavers who
belong to our association at fair prices that they determine. Our prices are
slightly higher than at other vendors; however, the profits go directly to
sustaining the weavers at a living wage.
TRAMA Textiles products are made with
the highest quality materials and
processes. Because we use top-quality
cotton thread, the colors will not bleed or
run together. We pre-wash our yarn, so
your weaving will not shrink when you
wash it. While other weavers use one
strand of yarn, we weave with two strands
of yarn wound together. This makes the
products more durable, higher-quality,
and longer-lasting. The women of
TRAMA often hand-dye the thread using
the natural colors and techniques that
their Mayan ancestors used.
Care Instructions:
 Hand wash in cold water
 Treat stains with mild detergent
 Lay flat to dry
Page 2
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Our Mission: to offer training, support, work and fair


wages to the women of Guatemala; to uphold our families and our
communities with honor, and to maintain and develop our art, stories,
designs, and textile traditions.

For us, the Spanish word trama, the “weft” or


binding thread, is interchangeable with the
word comida, or “food.” Our weavings clothe
us, warm our families through highland
winters, and carry our babies on our backs.
They unite our people from generation to
generation and sustain us as much as any
food.

The patterns of our textiles differ throughout our communities, varying


from village to village. From the highlands to the lowlands, throughout
México, Guatemala, Honduras, and Belize, each of our designs and
patterns tell a different story, a tradition passed down from our ancestors.
Page 1
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Product Information
TRAMA Textiles makes most of its products using the ancient art of backstrap loom
weaving, which requires a great deal of skill and time. Because our products are
hand-made, colors and patterns vary. Many of the color patterns are one-of-a-kind,
but we provide examples to help you make your selection. If you encounter a
problem with the quality of any product we will happily replace it for you. Because
TRAMA functions as a cooperative we may need up to two months’ advance notice
for bulk orders to allow time for production. If you are interested in colors or items
not shown in the catalogue, let us know and we will do our best to accommodate
you.
Wholesale Orders Shipping Information
We offer a wholesale discount of 10% for
orders of over $1000. If you would like to Currently, we use the Guatemalan postal service
special-order a product in bulk, just email for overseas orders. We are also happy to
us and we can work with you. accommodate you if you have a preferred shipping
company. Here is a sample of shipping costs at the
How to Order time of publication:
To place an order, email your product United States and Canada:
selection and quantities to 2-4 Kilos: Q328 ($41)
trama.textiles@yahoo.com. Please use the 4-6 Kilos: Q468 ($58.50)
product number listed to indicate 6-8 Kilos: Q588 ($73.50)
products and include color preference if
applicable. We will then send payment Europe and other countries:
instructions. If you have any other 2-4 Kilos: Q488 ($61)
questions or concerns please do not 4-6 Kilos: Q698 ($88)
hesitate to contact us by email. 6-8 Kilos: Q873 ($109)

Page 3
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

CATALOGUE INDEX
Clothing:
Scarves p. 6
Skirts p. 11
Tops p. 12
Accessories p. 15

Bags:
Handbags p. 20
Other Carriers p. 26

Home Goods:
Cushion Covers p. 32
Table Goods p. 37
Hammocks p. 44

Miscellaneous:
Stuffed Animals p. 46
Hackey Sacks and Dolls p. 48
Paper Goods p. 49
Page 4
Trama Textiles ♦ 3a Calle 10-56, Zona 1, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, C.A. ♦
(502)7765-8564 ♦ www.tramatextiles.yahoo.com ♦ tramatextiles@yahoo.com
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Clothing

Page 5
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SCARVES
SCARVES FROM
SAN ANTONIO
DE PADUA
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó,
Sololá
The members of this group speak
Kakchiquel, which is spoken by
around 400,000 people. These
scarves are made on the backstrap
loom, and represent the
construction of bee hives. Each
small square represents a hole
through which bees come and go
before it is filled with honey.
Although the scarves themselves
are not traditional, their form and
design are the same that are used
in the xerk, the typical Maya skirt
for men in Sololá.

RAINBOW SCARVES
30 cm x 142 cm
USD $10
Product A1

Colors and patterns may vary slightly from examples due to differences in computer displays
and the handmade nature of the products. Availability of our products varies. Orders of less
than 25 items are dependent on our in-store stock.

Page 6
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SCARVES

STRIPED SCARVES
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó,
Sololá
33 cm x 167 cm
USD $7
The women from San Antonio
Palopó, Sololá speak the Mayan
language Kakchiquel. These new
striped scarves are made using
traditional backstrap loom
techniques.

Product A2 Product A3 Product A4 Product A5 Product A6

Product A7 Product A8 Product A9 Product A10 Product A11

Colors and patterns may vary slightly from examples due to differences in computer displays
and the handmade nature of the products. Availability of our products varies. Orders of less
than 25 items are dependent on our in-store stock.

Page 6
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SCARVES
SINGLE-COLOR
SCARVES
35 cm x 160 cm
USD $6

Crema – Product B1 Negro – Product B2 Gris helado – Product B3

Rosado palido – B4 Zanahoria – B5 Oro amarillo – B6 Verde tierra – B7 Gris claro – B8 Morada clara – B9

Rosado fuerte – B10 Zapote – B11 Mostaza – B12 Limon – B13 Gris acero – B14 Rosa morada – B15

Rosado neon – B16 Chiltote – B17 Marron – B18 Verde perico – B19 Agua – B20 Uva – B21

Fusia – B22 Rojo – B23 Chocolate – B24 Verde jade – B25 Amanecer – B26 Malva – B27

Corinto – B28 Rojo oscuro – B29 Verde musgo – B30 Bosque – B31 Pacifico – B32 Morada – B33

Page 7
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SCARVES
SMALL MULTICOLOR
SCARVES
16 cm x 160 cm
USD $4

Product C1 Product C2 Product C3 Product C4 Product C5

Product C6 Product C7 Product C8 Product C9 Product C10

Product C11 Product C12 Product C13 Product C14 Product C15
Colors and patterns may vary slightly from examples due to differences in computer displays
and the handmade nature of the products. Availability of our products varies. Orders of less
than 25 items are dependent on our in-store stock.

Page 8
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SCARVES
NATURAL-DYED SCARVES
Asociación de Mujeres en
Colores Botánicos
San Juan La Laguna,
Sololá
38.5 cm x 190 cm USD $22
The women from Mujeres en Colores
Botánicos, or Women in Botanical
Colors, are located beside Lake Atitlán
in the department of Sololá. As noted by
their name, these women are known for
their specialty of using natural dyes for
their thread. The women in this group
all speak Tz’utujil, the most common
language spoken around the lake. They
have been working with TRAMA for
over 20 years, since the inception of the
organization in 1988.

Product D1 Product D2 Product D3 Product D4 Product D5

Product D6 Product D7 Product D8 Product D9 Product D10

Product D11 Product D12 Product D13 Product D14 Product D15

Page 9
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BELTS
The women who make these
sashes come from Pujujil and
Pujujil
speak Kaqchikel. They were
originally made to wear over
Sololá
traditional skirts, but today are 35 cm x 160 cm
also used as religious stoles. They
also look great tied as a belt over USD $8
jeans. The designs represent
plants, flowers, and stars, inspired
by the natural elements that the
women see in the mountains
where they live. The main colors
are typical of Solola, and the
members of this group continue
to use the designs and colors left
to them by their ancestors.

Product E1 Product E2 Product E3

Product F1 STOLES
San Pedro La Laguna
Sacatepequez
13 cm x 87 cm, 10 cm x 227 cm
USD $22
Product F2
These stoles are intended to be worn
by priests or ministers. The designs
include churches, crosses, and other
religious symbols. This type of
clothing originated with the influence
of Catholicism, when many Mayans
converted to Christianity.
Product F3

Page 10
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

SKIRTS
Santa Maria de Jesus
Sacatepequez
Modern: 127 cm x 91 cm, Typical: 96 cm x 87 cm
USD $12
Different groups make the fabrics for these wrap skirts, depending on which
groups need the work. There are two types: skirts made from the typical fabrics
used in Mayan traje (traditional dress), and skirts made from more modern
fabrics.

Modern Design G1 Modern Design G2 Modern Design G3

Modern Design G4 Modern Design G5 Traditional Design G6 Traditional Design G7


Page 11
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TOPS
PONCHOS
San Juan La Laguna
Solola
86 cm x 122 cm
USD $45
The women of San Juan La Laguna
make these ponchos based on Mayan
ceremonial güipiles, using ancient
designs passed on from their ancestors.
Through the influence of foreign styles,
the use of ponchos decreased, but they
began making ponchos again when they
saw that people appreciated their work.

Product H1

Product H2 Product H3 Product H4

Product H5 Product H6 Product H7

Page 12
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TOPS
SHIRTS
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
Sizes: Small, Medium, Large
USD $12
In ancient times, before the arrival of Europeans,
Mayan men wore camisas, but they were simple, and
not extravagantly decorated. That is why, to this day,
men’s shirts have small, subtle designs. The women’s
Men’s Design - J1 blouses have flower embroidery around the neck.

Men’s Design - J2 Men’s Design - J3 Men’s Design - J4

Women’s Design – J5 Women’s Design – J6 Women’s Design – J7

Page 13
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

DRESSES
GIRL’S DRESSES
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
Sizes: Small, Medium, Large
USD $10

These little dresses are embroidered


with flower designs by the same
women who make the camisas for
adults.

Product K1

Product K2 Product K3 Product K4


(2 year old size) (2 year old size) (6 year old size)

Page 14
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

ACCESSORIES
BRACELETS
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
These bracelets are primarily made by women in San Antonio de Padua in
Sololá. The butterfly designs are made at our office in Xela. However, all of the
groups make bracelets on occasion. Some bracelets are braided by hand, while
others are made on a special loom. Please let us know what colors you prefer.
14 cm long
USD $1.50

Product M1 Product M2

Product M3 Product M4

Page 15
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

ACCESSORIES
HATS – Product N1
Pujujil II, Sololá
Crown diameter: 16 cm
Brim diameter: 22 cm
Circumference: 48cm
These hats, made for children by a group
of weavers in Pujujil II, Sololá, use natural
designs, including plants, animals, and the
sun. Typical straw sombreros are too
uncomfortable for young children, so the
USD $12 women began crocheting hats to keep
Please let us know what colors you prefer. them warm and protect their heads.

HAIRBANDS – Product N2
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
1.25 cm x 75 cm
USD $3
Many Mayan women use
these hairbands to create
their traditional hairstyles.
They wrap the bands around
one or two pieces of hair and
then tie the ends together
around their heads to make
a coronet.

Please let us know what colors you prefer.

Page 16
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

ACCESSORIES
HEADBANDS – Product N3
Xemacoj
Santo Domingo Xenacoj
USD $3.50
These headbands are made by Mujeres Mayas.
While not traditional, the women make the
headbands to represent a corona, or crown. The
headbands are one-size-fits-all.

SOFT HEADBANDS
Product N4
Xemacoj
Santo Domingo Xenacoj
USD $3.50
These soft headbands, made by
Mujeres Mayas, are one-size-fits-all.

SCRUNCHIES – N5
Santa Maria de Jesus
Sacatepequez
USD $2
The women of Santa Maria de Jesus
originally began making scrunchies
because the women could not afford to
buy commercial hair accessories, and
they preferred to make products rather
than buying them, in order to preserve
Please let us know what colors you prefer. their textile traditions.

Page 17
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

ACCESSORIES
KEYCHAINS
Santa Maria de Jesus,
Sacatepequez
Rather than buying commercial
keychain decorations, weavers from
Santa Maria de Jesus created their
own. They utilize the same
techniques they use to make hackey
sacks, dolls, and tiny bags.
Bags: 7 cm x 5 cm, 7 cm diameter
Doll: 9 cm x 5 cm
USD $2

Product P1 Product P2 Product P3

Hackey Sack - Product P5

Doll - Product P4

Page 18
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Bags

Page 19
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BAGS
SHOPPING BAGS
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
This group lives beside Lake Atitlán, and
speak Kakchiquel. This fabric is made on
the telar de pie, the foot loom, which is a
traditional type of weaving brought by the
Spanish to the Americas over 500 years ago.
In Guatemala, women typically weave with
the backstrap loom, whereas men use the
foot loom. However, it is becoming more
common for Guatemalan women to use this
method as well.

Rectangular with Zipper


38 cm x 28 cm, strap 58 cm
USD $14

Large with Ties


50 cm x 35 cm, strap 62 cm
USD $17

Product Q1 Product Q2 Product Q3 Product Q4 Product Q5

Product Q6 Product Q7 Product Q8 Product Q9 Product Q10

Page 20
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BAGS
LARGE HANDBAGS
Kusamaj Junam
Santa Maria Jesus
42 cm x 29 cm, strap 56 cm
USD $12 While the woven fabric for these bags is made
with traditional backstrap loom techniques,
this is a new product invented by the women
of Santa Maria de Jesus. It has a zipper closure
and a convenient outer pocket.

Product R2 Product R3

Product R1 Product R4 Product R5

PADDED HANDBAGS
Kusamaj Junam
Santa Maria Jesus
35 cm x 35 cm, adjustable strap
USD $12

Product S1 Product S2 Product S3 Product S4

Page 21
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BAGS
SMALL HANDBAGS
This new bag design, made using traditional
backstrap loom fabrics, is modern in style. It
features a zipper closure, and an outer pocket
with velcro closure.

Product T2 Product T3 Product T4

Product T1

33 cm x 24 cm, strap 56 cm
Product T5 Product T6 Product T7 USD $12

Product T8

GUIPILE PATCH BAGS


Grupo Cuchumatanes
Todos Santos,
Huehuetenango
28 cm x 32 cm, adjustable strap
USD $15
This padded handbag incorporates a
patch of guipiles, the traditional
clothing worn by Mayan women.
Product T9
Page 22
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BAGS
MAYAN BAGS
Pujujil II
20 cm x 23 cm, strap 45 cm USD $15
These bags use the design known as jaspe, a
stripe of alternating black and white that
represents the transition between day and
night. It has a set of inner pockets to hold
credit cards or other necessities, and the flap
has a velcro closure.

Product U1 Product U2 Product U3 Product U4

GÜIPILE HANDBAGS
Product U5 Product U6 Product U7 Kusamaj Junam
Santa Maria Jesus
42cm x 35 cm, strap 55cm USD $12
These bags incorporate the traditional embroidered güipiles from Santa Maria
Jesus in a new shape. They have a zipper closure and a front pocket.

Product V1 Product V2 Product V3

Page 23
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

BAGS
TODOS SANTOS BAGS
Grupo Chuchumatanes
Todos Santos, Huehuetenango
These bags are made by the group Chuchumatanes in the community of Todos
Santos. The members of this group all speak Mam, of which there are about
500,000 speakers in Guatemala and 27,000 in Chiapas, Mexico. These bags are
made from cut up güipiles, the Maya women’s typical blouse.

Large
32 cm x 35 cm
USD $12

Medium
23 cm x 24 cm
USD $9

Small
19 cm x 21 cm
USD $7

Main color: morado Main color: rojo Main color: verde Main color: azul
Product W1 Product W2 Product W3 Product W4
Page 24
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
TODOS SANTOS PASSPORT BAGS
Grupo Chuchumatanes
Todos Santos, Huehuetenango
These bags are made by the group
28cm x 32cm Chuchumatanes in the community of
USD $5 Todos Santos. The members of this
Product X1 group all speak Mam, of which there are
about 500,000 speakers in Guatemala and
27,000 in Chiapas, Mexico. These
passport bags are made from cut up
güipiles, the Maya women’s typical
blouse.

BABY CARRIER
Pujujil II, Pujujil III,
Sololá
140 cm x 150 cm
USD $65
Product X2
Mayan women do not use strollers
or baby carriages; for many
centuries they have maintained the
tradition of carrying their babies in
pieces of fabric. They wrap their
babies in bright colors that
represent happiness and nature.
The designs use jaspe, a stripe of
alternating black and white that
represents the transition between
day and night.
Page 25
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
GLASSES CASES
Chirijox, Solola
San Martin, Quetzaltenango
9 cm x 15 cm, strap 15 cm
USD $4
Product X3
This is a new product for the women of
San Martin, Quetzaltenango, because it
does not have Mayan origins. With the
arrival of foreigners, the women began
using their traditional lion designs to
make cases that could be used to hold
glasses or cell phones.

SAN ANTONIO MAKEUP BAGS


San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
13 cm x 21 cm USD $6 Product X4
This product, also made by the Kakchiqueles of San Antonio, is made on the telar
de pie, with an embroidered detail of a lion. The lion represents the king of the
rainforest, the most powerful animal in the mountains.

Page 26
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
SAN MARTIN MAKEUP BAGS
La Típica Chile Verde
San Martin Sacatepequez
The group’s name, which means
The Typical Green Chile, also
represents a second name for their
town, Chile Verde, near the city of
Quetzaltenango, an originally Mam
city. Because of Chile Verde’s
proximity to Quetzaltenango, the
women of this group speak Mam.
They have been working with
TRAMA since it began in 1988.
These cosmetic bags are made from
cut güipiles. There are a variety of
designs and patterns employed in
the güipiles, including venado Because they are made from güipiles,
(deer), Catholic ceremonial designs the patterns of the bags vary. Inquire
with cups of Christ and incense, for the available designs, and we will
quetzales (the Guatemalan national work to accommodate you.
bird), snakes, mountains, farmers in
the fields, and cloths used in daily
activities.

13 cm x 21 cm
USD $7 Product Y1 Product Y2

Product Y3 Product Y4 Product Y5 Product Y6 Product Y7

Product Y8 Product Y9 Product Y10 Product Y11 Product Y12


Page 27
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
COSMETIC BAGS
Product Z1
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
13 cm x 21 cm
USD $6

COIN POUCHES
Product Z2
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
9 cm x 12.5 cm
USD $2.50

PENCIL CASES
Product Z3
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
8 cm x 21 cm
USD $5
Page 29
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
SAN ANTONIO BAGS
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
These cosmetic bags, coin pouches,
and pencil cases have traditionally
been made using backstrap loom
weaving, but today the weavers also
use floor loom techniques.

The images shown below are possible designs for the cosmetic bags, coin
pouches, and pencil cases on the previous page. When ordering please indicate
both the product number from the previous page and the design number below
and we will work to accommodate you.

Design ZZ1 Design ZZ2 Design ZZ3 Design ZZ4 Design ZZ5 Design ZZ6

Design ZZ7 Design ZZ8 Design ZZ9 Design ZZ10 Design ZZ11 Design ZZ12

Design ZZ13 Design ZZ14 Design ZZ15 Design ZZ16 Design ZZ17 Design ZZ18

Design ZZ19 Design ZZ20 Design ZZ21 Design ZZ22 Design ZZ23 Design ZZ24

Design ZZ25 Design ZZ26 Design ZZ27 Design ZZ28 Design ZZ29 Design ZZ30

Page 28
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

OTHER CARRIERS
BOLSITAS ADRIAN
Product AA1
8 cm x 8 cm, strap 70 cm
USD $2
The fabric for these small bags is
made in traditional backstrap loom
methods by women from all areas
of Guatemala. They are perfect for
carrying change or jewelry.

WATER BOTTLE CARRIERS


Pujujil II
Product AA2
11 cm x 17 cm, strap 68 cm USD $7
The women of Pujujil II began crocheting this product three years
ago.

Page 30
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Home Goods

Page 31
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PILLOW CASES
COTZAL PILLOWCASES
Flor de Maguey
Cotzal, Quiché
42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18
The women of this group, named Flor de Maguey all speak Ixil. They have been
working with TRAMA since its inception in 1988. The pattern of these
pillowcases is taken directly from the güipiles worn in Cotzal.
Cotzal translates from Ixil to
quetzal in Spanish, the national
bird of Guatemala and the name
of its currency. Not only does the
name of the village impart the
importance of the quetzal, but the
village Náhuatl, or spirit animal, is
a quetzal as well. In addition to
their cultural importance,
quetzales and other birds are
economically very important for
the area, as they are raised for
sale. Many of the multi-colored
patterns and shapes utilized in
their work are thus meant to
represent the birds and their
importance for the village.

Rojo - Product BB1 Azul - Product BB2 Verde - Product BB3

Page 32
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PILLOW CASES
SANTA MARIA JESUS
PILLOWCASES
Product BB4
42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18

The women of Santa Maria Jesus,


Sacatepequez, make these cushions
using the traditional designs and
techniques they also use for their
clothing. Their weaving style is
unique, because they work with the
threads held in front of the weaving,
rather than in the back.
Also available in red

PETZAL PILLOWCASES
La Petzaleña
San Rafael Petzal,
Huehuetenango
Product BB5
42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18
The members of this group, in the town of
San Rafael Petzal, speak Mam. The design of
this cushion cover is represents the
importance of agriculture in the Guatemalan
highlands. The diamonds signify the
cultivation of food crops, while the vertical
lines represent the division of the terreno,
fields among the farmers.
Page 33
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PILLOW CASES
SAN MARTIN PILLOWCASES
La Típica Chile Verde
San Martin Sacatepequez
Product BB6
42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18
The patterns used in these pillowcases are
taken directly from their güipiles. The
Copas pillowcases are Catholic ceremonial
designs, used in the napkins or tablecloths
of the Catholic Churches and in the güipiles
of their town. The Copas pattern shows
representations of the cup of Christ,
incense holders, candle holders, shields,
and quetzal.

Also available in green

SAN MARTIN VENA GRUESA


Product BB7
42 cm x 42 cm USD $18
In the Vena Gruesa pillowcases, the
zig-zagged lines represent the
abundance of snakes in the mountains
of San Martin. The space outside of the
concentric diamonds represents the
small roads running throughout the
village and the mountains. The plain
diamonds signify the small cloth that is
set on the floor when there is work to be
done, such as weaving or cooking. The
colors in Vena Gruesa also have
different meanings. Red represents the
blood of Christ, purple his clothing,
green the color of the mountains, and
orange purity. Page 34
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PILLOW CASES
CHIRIJOX PILLOWCASES
Catokib
Chirijox, Sololá
42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18
The women of this group lives in the village of Chirijox, and speak K’iché. The
embroidery on the black cushion covers depicts ancient Mayan designs, including
two-headed eagles, ceremonial dancing, and deer. The image on the white
cushion cover represents the alfombra, or mat that the weavers sit on while
working on the backstrap loom. The women sit on their knees to weave, with the
loom strapped around their backs, following the tradition of generations of Mayan
weavers.

White – Product BB8 Black – Product BB9

Page 35
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PILLOW CASES
CHIRIMASÁ PILLOWCASES
Chirimasá
Chirimasá, Sololá
The women of Chirimasá speak
K’iché, the most commonly spoken
Maya language in Guatemala. The
pattern on this cushion cover
represents the many roads between
the small villages in the Western
Highlands of Guatemala. Most
villages in Guatemala are very
small, and some are only accessible
by footpaths.

42 cm x 42 cm
USD $18

Product BB10 Product BB11

Product BB12 Product BB13

Product BB14 Product BB15

Page 36
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
TABLERUNNERS
San Antonio de Padua
San Antonio Palopó, Sololá
Product CC1
These tablerunners and sets of matching napkins
and placemats come from the village of San
Antonio de Padua. The stripe pattern is unique to
this pueblo (town).
33 cm x 203 cm
USD $22
*The colors shown below indicate the options for
both table runners and place settings.

MATCHING PLACEMATS AND NAPKINS

Placemats – Product CC3


42 cm x 50 cm
USD $46/ 6 settings

COCKTAIL NAPKINS
Product CC2
13.5cm x 14cm
USD $2

Page 37
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
TABLERUNNERS AND PLACEMATS
Mujeres Mayas
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
35 cm x 144 cm
USD $18
These table runners and placemats,
made by Mujeres Mayas, feature a
design called panal, which represents a
beehive full of honey. The women of the
group, who speak Kakchiquel, have
been working together since 2004.

Product DD1 Product DD2 Product DD3 Product DD4 Product DD5

Product DD6 Product DD7 Product DD8 Product DD9 Product DD10

Product DD11 Product DD12 Product DD13 Product DD14 Product DD15

Product DD16 Product DD17 Product DD18 Product DD19 Product DD20
Page 38
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
EMBROIDERED TABLERUNNERS
Mujeres Mayas
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
37 cm x 215 cm
USD $22

These table runners, made by


Mujeres Mayas, have a design
taken from a pattern in their
güipiles. The central peaks
represent volcanoes with
erupting smoke. Bordering the
volcanoes is a row of flowers
with wreaths to respectfully
mourn the dead. On the very
edge are curving lines to
represent rivers and their
passages.

Product EE1 Product EE2 Product EE3 Product EE4 Product EE5

Product EE6 Product EE7 Product EE8 Product EE9 Product EE10
Each table runner features a unique color pattern. The images shown here illustrate a
range of possible designs. Inquire for the available designs, and we will work to
accommodate you.
Page 39
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
PUJUJIL TABLERUNNERS
These tablerunners and placemats
use the design known as jaspe, a
stripe of alternating black and white
that represents the transition
between day and night.

39 cm x 184 cm
USD $22

PUJUJIL PLACEMATS
42 cm x 50 cm
USD $5

Product FF1 Product FF2 Product FF3 Product FF4 Product FF5

Product FF6 Product FF7 Product FF8 Product FF9 Product FF10

Page 40
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
STAR TABLERUNNERS
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
36 cm x 183 cm
USD $22

These new table runners incorporate


designs meant to represent stars,
derived from Mayan forms of
depicting nature.

Product GG1 Product GG2 Product GG3

Product GG4 Product GG5 Product GG6

Page 41
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
TABLECLOTHS
Pujujil II, III
102 cm x 150 cm
USD $45
The designs for these beautiful
tablecloths differ according to the
group that produces them. Each
design identifies the pueblo from
which it originates. The ones from
Pujujil II and III use the design
known as jaspe, a stripe of alternating
black and white that represents the
transition between day and night.

Product HH1 Product HH2 Product HH3

San Juan la Laguna

Product HH4 Product HH5 Product HH6

Page 42
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TABLE GOODS
TABLECLOTHS
San Juan Comalapa,
Sacatepequez
90 cm x 105 cm
USD $25
These tablecloths, made by
Mujeres Mayas, have a design
taken from a pattern in their
güipiles. The central peaks
represent volcanoes with
erupting smoke. Bordering the
volcanoes is a row of flowers
with wreaths to respectfully
mourn the dead. On the very
edge are curving lines to
represent rivers and their
passages.

Product JJ1 Product JJ2 Product JJ3

Product JJ4 Product JJ5

Page 43
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

HAMMOCKS
San Juan La Laguna
Sololá
In the past, the women of San Juan La
Laguna made hammocks from rope. To
make them more comfortable and soft, they
began to make them with woven cloth. The
diamond and stripe patterns are ornamental,
based on the typical repertoire of designs
used in the region.

117 cm x 227 cm
USD $60

Product KK1 Product KK2

Product KK3 Product KK4

Page 44
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Miscellaneous

Page 45
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TOYS
STUFFED ANIMALS
Mujeres Mayas
San Juan Comalapa, Sacatepequez
Product MM1
These animal toys, made by
Mujeres Mayas in Sacatepequez,
are made from fabric woven on
the telar de pie, or foot loom, the
traditional type of weaving
brought by the Spanish.
Approx. 12 cm x 16 cm
USD $8

Turtle

Cat Bird Horse Elephant

Page 46
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TOYS
STUFFED ANIMAL BACKPACKS
Mujeres Mayas
San Juan Comalapa, Sacatepequez
These animal backpacks, made by Mujeres
Mayas in Sacatepequez, are made from
fabric woven on the telar de pie, or foot
loom, the traditional type of weaving
brought by the Spanish.

Product MM2

Approx.
28 cm x 19 cm
USD $8

Mouse Backpack Bear Backpack

Rat Backpack Monkey Backpack Elephant Backpack

Page 47
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

TOYS
DOLLS
Product MM3
Santa Maria de Jesus,
Sacatepequez
Approx. 15 cm x 32 cm
USD $5
These are the dolls that the women of Santa
Maria de Jesus make for their own children.
The male and female dolls wear versions of
the typical Mayan traje (traditional dress) of
the region, and come accessorized with tiny
scarves and bags. They come with a cord to
hang on the wall.

HACKEY SACKS
San Pablo La Laguna
Product MM4
6 cm diameter USD $3
The hackey-sacks, which originated in
Guatemala, are crocheted and filled with
tiny plastic bits.

Page 48
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

PAPER GOODS
NOTEBOOKS
Mujeres Mayas
San Juan Comalapa, Sacatepequez
These notebook covers are made by Mujeres Mayas, with the same beehive pattern
as their table runners, representing a beehive full of honey. The covers have
sleeves to insert a notebook, and come with a ribbon placeholder. Lined white
paper inside.
Product NN1 - Large: 17 cm x 22 cm USD $5.50
Product NN2 - Small: 11.5 cm x 17 cm USD $4

BOOKMARKS
San Pedro La Laguna
Product NN3
5 cm x 15 cm
USD $1.50
A group from Santa Maria de Jesus
makes these lovely bookmarks using
traditional backstrap weaving
techniques.
Page 49
A 100% Worker-Owned Women’s Weaving Association

Thanks For Your Support!


The Association of Women for Artisan
Development would like to thank the
clients who have bought products here. It
helps the women, because it gives them
more work. For those who are reading our
catalogue, we would really appreciate it if
you would buy the women’s products,
because we are 400 women in total, and
50% of the women are widows without
husbands and greatly in need.
The majority were affected by the war that took place in Guatemala in the
1980s. It’s the only work that they can do to care for their children,
because they do not know how to read or write to be able to find other
work. The officers thank you for your unconditional support and hope
that when you come to Guatemala, you will visit us in our store and
weaving school; it will be a pleasure to serve you.
Amparo de León de Rubio Oralia Chopén
President Vice President
Consider Making a Donation:
We can always use donations to help us with our projects, including the purchase of a new computer
and Internet service for the office.
We are also working to purchase reading glasses for the women who have difficulty weaving.
We would love to have more money for our scholarship fund, because many of our members have
trouble sending their children to school.
Page 50