Strategic Planning for

Electronic Governance
Adegboyega Ojo, Elsa Estevez
Center for Electronic Governance
post P.O. Box 3058, Macau
email {ao,elsa}@iist.unu.edu
tel +853 28712930
fax +853 28712940
url http://www.iist.unu.edu
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Outline
Overview what will be taught
Introduction basic concepts and introduction to strategic planning Introduction basic concepts and introduction to strategic planning
Process process for developing an e-Governance strategic plan
Best Practices e-Governance strategies of leading countries
Summary summary of module
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Overview - Objectives
The course will teach:
1) core elements of an e-Governance strategy
2) how to design and conduct an e-readiness assessment exercise 2) how to design and conduct an e-readiness assessment exercise
3) how to develop the vision, goals and objectives for e-Governance
4) how to develop a portfolio of the required intervention programs
5) how to prioritize intervention programs
6) how to monitor and evaluate progress
Introduction Introduction
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Government
Government is a collection of institutions that act with authority and create
formal obligations. A Government may administer or supervise a state, a
set group of people, or a collection of assets.
who are these institutions? public agencies
what is the source of the authority? people
who is under these obligations? public agencies and people
why need a government? societal development
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Governance
1) Governance is a set of processes, formal and informal, through which
social action occurs.
2) It is also a guiding process through which societies make decisions,
manage daily activities and interact to achieve their goals.
government vs. governance government gets its work done through
governance processes
governance only for government? no, other organizations and groups
engage in governance as well
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e-Government
e-Government refers to the use by government agencies of information
technologies (such as wide area networks, internet, and mobile
computing) that have the ability to transform relations with citizens,
businesses, and other arms of government [World Bank].
drivers 1) better delivery of government services to citizens
2) improved interactions with business and industry
3) citizen empowerment through access to information
4) more efficient government management
benefits 1) less corruption
2) increased transparency
3) greater convenience
4) revenue growth
5) cost reduction
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e-Governance
e-Governance refers to the use of information and communication
technologies to transform and support the processes and structures of a
governance system.
observation 1) many definitions exist
2) the notion of e-Governance strictly depends on the
perspective taken on governance
our view 1) e-Governance = e-Government + e-Democracy + …
2) e-Government is about public service delivery
3) e-Governance, while including e-Government,
emphasizes participation, interaction and engagement of
stakeholders in decision processes
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e-Government Maturity
Gartner publish Îinteract Î transact Îintegrate
Specifies the level of maturity or development of e-Government.
Gartner publish Îinteract Î transact Îintegrate
UNDESA emerging Îenhanced Îinteractive Î transactional Î networked
OECD information Î interaction Îtransaction Î and transformation
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Government Stakeholders
Typical government stakeholders:
1) citizens
A person, group or any entity that can affect or is affected by an action
taken by government.
1) citizens
2) businesses
3) government employees
4) government ministries, department and agencies
5) union leaders
6) community leaders
7) politicians
8) foreign investors
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Strategic Planning
A strategic plan:
1) is a road map to lead an organization from its present state to its desired
Strategic planning involves determining the required actions to achieve a
desired vision considering the present state of an organization.
1) is a road map to lead an organization from its present state to its desired
medium or long term future state
2) specifies the mission, vision, goals, strategies and objectives
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Strategic Planning Process
Steps include:
• analyzing the present environment –
SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities, Threats)
• providing a vision statement
• refining vision into goals • refining vision into goals
• determining strategies using the
outcomes of SWOT analysis and
specified goals
• formulating concrete and measurable
objectives from strategies
• communicating and reviewing the
strategic plan
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Strategies
Attributes of a good strategy:
1) builds on strength
2) resolve weaknesses
3) exploit opportunities
4) avoid threats
with respect to specific goals
Note:
1) implementing a strategy may unveil and cause new threats as well as
opportunities
2) long term strategies therefore must be accompanied by periodic reassessments
of strengths, weaknesses and opportunities and threats
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e-Governance Strategy
A plan for the development of e-Governance specifying, among other
things, the vision, goals, milestones, concrete initiatives, priorities,
challenges and enabling policies for the e-Governance agenda as a whole.
1) a sound strategy is essential for any e-Governance initiative to succeed
2) strategy provides the roadmap for transforming a governance system
into the desired state through ICT support
3) strategy must have the support of all major stakeholders
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e-Governance Strategy – Why?
1) creating the right policy and institutional framework from the start
2) maximizing the use of ICT initiatives within government
3) managing the increasing costs of ICT in government
4) mapping path from pilot experiments to sustainable, scalable systems
5) pursuing real economic development goals and not just technology 5) pursuing real economic development goals and not just technology
6) designing technology architecture (infrastructure, data and standards) for
the public sector
Courtesy: Deepak Bhatia, ISG Group WB
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e-Governance Strategy Elements
Key elements include:
1) definition of e-Governance
2) formulation and communication of the expected value of e-Governance
3) goals, objectives and targets 3) goals, objectives and targets
4) enabling and supporting policies
5) portfolio of initiatives and a process for executing them
6) methodology for e-Readiness assessment
7) business models for sustainability
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Tutorial Discussion
1) Who are the stakeholders of your organization?
2) How does your organization create value for these stakeholders?
3) How could your organization create more value to these stakeholders?
4) Would e-Government enable the creation of more value?
Process Process
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Strategic Planning Process
Major steps include:
1) assessing e-Governance readiness
2) elaborating the vision and expected contributions
3) formulating strategic goals
4) determining required interventions
5) setting the objectives
6) identifying priorities
7) establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8) determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9) providing a business model
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Step 1: Readiness Assessment
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions
5. setting the objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Assessing Readiness
Readiness assessment investigates the following eight areas:
1.1 political conditions
1.2 regulatory framework
1.3 organizational conditions
1.4 human and cultural conditions
1.5 financial conditions
1.6 communication environment
1.7 technology infrastructure
1.8 data and information systems
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Political Readiness
Checklist:
e-Governance requires strong commitments from political leaders, the
private sector and civil society to carry out the necessary transformations.
1) commitment to good governance
2) awareness of the leverage of e-Governance to good governance
3) leadership to manage the required change and buy-in from stakeholders
4) national identity and perception of government
5) citizen and civil society’s participation in government affairs
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Regulatory Readiness
1) Essential for secure information exchange within government and
between government, citizens, and businesses.
2) Necessary for creating economic conditions for accessible ICT
infrastructure, services and equipment.
Checklist:
1) privacy legislation
2) security standards
3) degree of liberalization of the telecommunications industry
4) positive fiscal environment for acquiring ICT equipment
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Organizational Readiness
1) e-Governance requires and causes evolutionary changes of
institutional arrangements.
2) Guiding such transformations requires appropriate management and
coordination.
Checklist:
1) administrative structures and legacies
2) public administration reform
3) civil service reform
4) central coordination unit
5) inter-governmental relations
6) change agent and management
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Human and Cultural Readiness
Checklist:
1) Positive orientation, knowledge and skills are required within the public
sector to initiate, implement and sustain e-Governance
2) Cultural aspects may cause overall resistance to change.
1) culture, traditions and languages
2) attitude to change
3) educational levels
4) culture of information and knowledge sharing
5) ICT literacy and online users
6) organizational culture in the public administration
7) managerial skill in the public sector
8) service orientation of public administration towards its clients
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Financial Readiness
1) Start-up costs of e-Governance can be high.
2) Proper resource planning and access to innovative financing
mechanisms is important and critical for e-Government sustainability.
Checklist:
1) available financial resources
2) resource allocation process
3) national income structure
4) access to alternative funding mechanisms
5) partnership with private sector
6) access to capital markets
7) mechanism for venture investment
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Communication Readiness
1) e-Governance needs to be understood and accepted by all
stakeholders to ensure that its benefits flow to the society as a whole.
2) Communication with all stakeholders is therefore essential to the
change processes inherent during the deployment of e-Government.
Checklist:
1) knowledge of all stakeholders
2) knowledge of stakeholders’ communication culture and channels to
reach them
3) existence of a communication plan
4) awareness and understanding of ICT and e-Governance
5) information and knowledge sharing
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Infrastructure Readiness
1) Poor technological infrastructure is a major bottleneck for developing
countries aiming to implement and maintain e-Government.
2) Legacy systems present significant challenges.
3) Demographic and geographic conditions affect the distribution of
economic activities and consequently the provisioning of ICT
infrastructure by both the government and the private sector.
Checklist:
1) telecommunication infrastructure
2) penetration rates of telecommunication
3) urban versus rural demographic bias
4) software and hardware
5) IT standards
infrastructure by both the government and the private sector.
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EAC Infrastructure Readiness
Countries Online
Population
Telephone
(Fixed)
Telephone
(Mobile)
PC /100
Persons
Population
Burundi 60,000
(2006)
31,100
(2005)
153, 200
(2005)
0.200
(2005)
8,390,505
Kenya 2,770,000 293,400 6,485,000 0.700 36,913,721
[courtesy CIA Fact Book 2007 and UNDESA Global e-Government Report 2005]
(2006) (2006) (2006) (2005)
Rwanda 64,000
(2006)
22,000
(2005)
290,000
(2005)
0.000
(2005)
9,907,509
Tanzania 184, 3000
(2005)
169,135
(2007)
6,720,000
(2007)
0.600
(2005)
39,384,223
Uganda 750,000
(2006)
108,100
(2006)
2,009,000
(2006)
0.400
(2005)
30,262,610
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Data and Information Readiness
Checklist:
Information systems, records and work processes must be in place to
provide the necessary data to support e-Government.
1) legacy systems
2) available and accessible data
3) data collection procedures and data/information standardization
4) data and information quality and data security
5) capacity for data analysis and information utilization
6) information policy
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Notes on Readiness Assessment
1) e-Readiness assessment serves an advisory tool which aims at:
a) raising awareness about the motivation and the prerequisites to
establish a foundation for successful e-Governance
b) identifying the weak-links in the environment for remedial action b) identifying the weak-links in the environment for remedial action
c) informing broad sectoral e-Government strategy and action plan
d) providing a monitoring and evaluation tool
2) e-Readiness assessments should be carried out regularly using a
consistent approach and collecting identical sets of data
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Tutorial Discussion
1) Are the eight dimensions sufficient for readiness?
2) What other dimensions should be considered? 2) What other dimensions should be considered?
3) How would you design a country-wide e-readiness assessment?
4) Study the relevant UNDESA e-Government readiness survey
questionnaires and state what modifications you think are desirable for
their adoption in your organization.
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Step 2: Visioning Process
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Vision
An e-Governance vision is a medium or long term statement concerning
broad goals which provides a roadmap and general guidance for
institutional change.
1) must be clear, intuitive and simple
2) states what will be done and what will not be done
3) can be central or public agency specific
4) considers needs and opportunities
5) must be aligned with national development strategy
6) involves consensus building by stakeholders
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Example – Vision Statements
Western Australian
Government
A more efficient public sector that delivers integrated
services and improved opportunities for community
participation.
Government of Andhra
Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh will leverage Information Technology to
attain a position of leadership and excellence in the
information age and to transform itself into a knowledge information age and to transform itself into a knowledge
society
Danish Government Digitalization must contribute to the creation of an
efficient and coherent public sector with high quality of
service, with citizens and businesses in the centre.
Mongolia Establishing the information society and founding the
knowledge-based society in Mongolia by enhancing
extensive applications of ICT in all sectors of society. By
2012, Mongolia will become one of the top ten ICT
developed countries in Asia.
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Visioning
Steps in the vision building process include:
1) identifying and consulting stakeholders
2) allowing stakeholders to present or explain their own vision for e-
Governance Governance
3) draft a common vision based stakeholders’ visions
4) aligning vision with more general national and local development needs
and opportunities
5) consolidating and agree on final vision
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Step 3: Strategic Goals
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Strategic Goals
Strategic goals typically include:
1) social and economic development using ICT
Statements that set the direction for e-Governance based on the vision.
2) effective delivery of quality public services, which are accessible and
affordable
3) improved capacity of government in participatory and consultative
decision making processes which progresses democracy
4) increased satisfaction of stakeholders through accountability, efficiency,
effectiveness, and cost reduction
5) Coordinated and transparent policy design, policy implementation, policy
maintenance, and policy review
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Example – Goals 1
Kenya 1) Improve collaboration between government agencies through
reduction in the duplication of efforts, and enhance efficiency and
effectiveness of resource utilization;
2) Improve Kenya’s competitiveness by providing timely information
and delivery of government services;
3) Reduce transaction costs for the government, citizens and the
private sector through the provision of products and services
electronically; and
4) Provide a forum for citizens’ participation in Government activities.
[Courtesy Vincent Okongo]
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Example – Goals 2
Danish e-Government
Goals
1) Public sector must provide coherent services with
citizens and businesses in the center.
2) e-Government must result in improved service quality
and the release of resources.
3) Public must work and communicate digitally.
4) e-Government must be based on a coherent flexible
infrastructure. infrastructure.
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Mongolia – Goals 3
Citizens Provide citizen-centered services for improving citizens’
convenience, including:
• provision of on-line public service
• provision of multi-channel delivery
Businesses Provide integrated information and service in each industry and Businesses Provide integrated information and service in each industry and
enhancing the enterprise competitiveness including:
• provision of one-stop public service
• disclosure of administrative information and processes
Government Standardization of administration processes and computerizing
administration including:
• computerization/automation of administration
• integration of administration
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Tutorial Discussion
1) Do you know the major concerns of your stakeholders?
2) As an internal stakeholder, what is your vision for your organization? 2) As an internal stakeholder, what is your vision for your organization?
3) State at least one strategic goal based on your vision?
4) What is likely to be the major challenge in achieving this vision and the
strategic goals?
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Step 4: Interventions
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation
9. providing a business model
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Determining Interventions
Required intervention must consider the dimensions considered in the e-
governance readiness assessment:
The creation of an enabling environment for the development of e-
Governance based on the outcome of the e-readiness assessment,
strategic vision, goals and objectives.
governance readiness assessment:
1) leadership
2) regulations
3) organizations
4) human resources
5) financial resources
6) communication
7) technology
8) data requirements
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Creating Leadership
Activities of this group include:
Leaders are a small group of e-Champions capable of providing political
leadership with good understanding of the complexities of e-Governance.
1) defining broad deliverables
2) setting priorities
3) mobilizing necessary administrative mechanism and resources
4) assisting to overcome resistance and legacies
5) sharing values and building consensus while possibly preserving
cultures
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Example - Leadership
United Kingdom’s
e-Champions Network
by IDeA –
Improvement and
Development Agency
• Each local authority in England and Wales should have
two champions: one councilor and one officer.
• Their job is to champion e-Government within the
authority and ensure that the authority is on-track to
meet the 2005 target for having services online.
Development Agency
meet the 2005 target for having services online.
• All 388 English local authorities are now part of IDeA’s
e-champion network.
• Regular briefings and events on major issues and
members of the network have access to useful reports
and information as well as networking opportunities
through events and online communities.
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Regulatory Framework
Legal and regulatory measures typically cover:
1) data integration and sharing between public agencies
New laws and regulations are required for e-Governance adoption.
2) use of public information by third parties, especially private sector,
safeguarding privacy and security
3) digital exchange and transactions between government agencies,
citizens and businesses
4) recognition of digital exchange of information and digital transactions
5) reaching citizens affordably and enabling citizens to reach government
affordably
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Example: Regulations
Data Privacy
United Kingdom
Data Protection Act, 1984, amended 1998
• protects personal privacy and enables international
free flow of personal data by harmonization
Electronic Document
USA
Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment 1996
• directs all federal agencies to use electronic
information technology to foster public availability of information technology to foster public availability of
electronic documents
• grants individuals the right to access records in the
possession of federal government
Electronic Signature
European Union
Electronic Signature Directive 1999
• recognizes electronic signatures within the European
Union and can be used as evidence in legal
proceedings
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Mongolia - Regulations
The legal framework for Mongolian ICT industry is developed based on the key
findings as well as lesson learned from Korean legal framework.
Legal Framework
Acts on Acts on Acts on ICT Infrastructure
to be model
Informatization Promotion ICT Industry Promotion Construction
• Framework Act on
Informatization Promotion
• e-Government Act
• e-Petition Act
• Act on Opening
Administration
Information
• Software Industry
Promotion Act
• Digital Contents Industry
Promotion Act
• Framework Act on e-
Commerce
• Framework Act on
Informatization Promotion
• Act on Resolution for
Digital Divide
• Privacy Promotion Act
• e-Signature Act
• Communication Security
Promotion Act
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan
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Organization
1) Two prevalent models for implementing e-Governance: centralized and
decentralized models.
2) Whichever model is adopted, central coordination is required through
an agency which is either independent or nested within a ministry.
Activities of central coordination:
1) coordinate the implementation of the e-Governance strategy
2) review e-readiness on a regular basis
3) coordinate advocacy and awareness campaigns
4) coordinate the use of seed funding for co-financing new and innovative
pilot projects
5) provide advice on possible public-private partnerships
6) monitor, evaluate and report on progress made in e-Government
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Example - Organization
USA
(e-Government Act of
2002)
• Establishes an Administrator for the office of Electronic
Government within the Office of Management and
Budget.
• Administrator assists OMB Director by implementing e-
Government and other initiatives provided in the act. Government and other initiatives provided in the act.
• Establishes a CIO Council consisting of representation
from CIO’s of all major federal agencies.
United Kingdom
(e-Government Unit of
the Cabinet Office)
• formulates IT strategy and policy
• develops common IT components for use across
government
• promotes best practices across government
• delivers citizen-centered online services
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Example – Cabinet Office of Kenya
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
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Future e-Government Organization
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
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Developing Human Capacity
Skills required by public administrations:
Public administration, citizens, businesses and local IT community must
be equipped with the skills required for e-Governance.
1) change management
2) program management
3) IT systems development
4) IT service management
5) IT outsourcing management
6) client relationship management
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Example – Capacity Development
Italy Skills for Managers
Department of Public Administration in co-operation with Department
for Innovation Technologies
Two programs:
1) information society skills for top managers of state governments -
National School for Public Administration
2) management skills for middle managers of regional and local
administration
USA CIO University – Government sponsored training program
Learning objectives in 12 broad topics:
1) policy and organizational
2) leadership /managerial
3) process/change management
4) performance assessment
5) project/program management, etc.
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Mongolia – Human Capacity 1
Key Findings
for Education
• establish an e-School model to develop ICT human resource
expert throughout Mongolia
• strengthen information education programs to close the
regional gap in informatization needed to establish e-Mongolia
• need to provide people with various educational programs to
increase the ICT usage
• prepare ICT education programs to educate ICT experts
including instructors, civil servants and high-level people including instructors, civil servants and high-level people
• Need for equipment to provide on-line service properly and
education of on-line service usage
• developing human capacity
Critical
Information
Requirement
• establishment of ICT education programs and human
resource development program
Strategy • Building infrastructure for e-Government
Project • ICT literacy and HRD program development
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
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Mongolia – Human Capacity 2
Project
Objectives
• to develop educational programs and provide study guide based
on the trainees’ talents and abilities
• to provide the Cyber training course in order to expand the
opportunity of education and increase effect of the education
• to enhance informatization mind of the people and promote
professionalism of ICT personnel
Scope • establishing ICT education policy by developing ICT education Scope • establishing ICT education policy by developing ICT education
programs…
• expanding institutes and channels for informatization educati0n
• building a Cyber education center
• developing programs to educate ICT professionals
Expected
Effects
• distance learning is to save time and costs
• digital divide is to be closed by providing ICT education to the
alienated class, such as low-income families and local residents
• educational association between academic institutes and
businesses shall effectively educate ICT professionals who are
human resource for the nations industrial development
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Financing
Issues to consider:
Availability of funds determine the type of e-Government projects that can
be carried out.
1) e-Government is cross-cutting, pooling of resources across agencies
may be necessary
2) reward system could be developed for management and employees to
stimulate the drive for e-Government
3) extra-budgetary resources should be considered, e.g. partnership with
private-sector in infrastructure development and maintenance
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Funding Strategies
Public Private
Partnership
• government and private organizations share the costs, risks
and benefits in e-Governance development
Outsourcing • government invests directly but external enterprises carry out
the development
• government owns the system and has complete control
Issuance of
Bonds
• bonds are issued by the government
• returns from investment are use to offset bond
Advertising • controlled traditional advertisement on the government web
sites
Government-
Enterprise
• project development is the responsibility of the enterprise
• investment by enterprise is covered by transaction fees
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e-Gov Budget Figures
United States • USD 48.6 billion on ICT, 2002
• 0.5% of GDP
United
Kingdom
• GBP 12.4 billion (~USD 22 billion) on ICT, 2003
• 1% of GDP
EU • USD 1.3 billion, 2000 est. to rise to USD 4 billion in 2005 EU • USD 1.3 billion, 2000 est. to rise to USD 4 billion in 2005
Singapore • SD 1.30 (USD 822, 369 million), 2003
• 0.8% GDP
Taiwan • NTD 36.2 billion (USD 1.04 billion), 2003
• 0.4% of GDP
Russia • Rubbles 1.3 billion (~ USD 531, 353 million), 2003
• 0.01% of GDP
[Courtesy Michael G. Mimicopoulos, UNDESA 2004]
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Mongolian Budget Security Plan
[Courtesy Mongolia e-Government Master Plan, 2005]
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Communicating
Communication strategies entail:
1) creating interest and expectations towards the benefits of e-Government
Creating awareness and buy-in from all stakeholders.
2) addressing the interests of politicians, managers, employees,
businesses and citizens
3) making stakeholders appreciate the change process
4) demystifying technological jargons
5) using media such as TV, radio, newspaper and billboard
6) organizing conferences, workshops and seminars can be helpful to raise
political awareness and support
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Provisioning Technology
Technology interventions include:
Providing the necessary technology infrastructures.
1) making fixed line telecommunication available and affordable
2) making mobile telecommunication available and affordable
3) obtaining technical assistance for access to international best practices
to address technical constraints
4) developing the national ICT policy
5) teaming up with the private sector in resolving technical issues
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Provisioning Data
A number of actions must be taken to ensure data availability:
1) standardizing data across agencies to facilitate exchange
Data is required at different phases of e-Governance implementation.
2) defining the roles and responsibilities of different agencies in the data
standardization process
3) obtaining agreement on some key identifiers, for instance geographic
locations, personal or institutional identifiers
4) ensuring that data capture is only through a single source
5) guaranteeing the safety and security concerns relating to data
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Example – Data Provisioning
USA Data Reference Model (DRM) in Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA):
1) DRM helps promote common identification, use and appropriate
sharing of data across government in three areas: categorization, sharing of data across government in three areas: categorization,
exchange and structure
2) DRM allows higher re-use of IT investments as a shared service
within their own architecture
3) DRM is the major feature of the FEA and considered the most
difficult model to develop
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-66
Step 5: Objectives
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Strategic Objectives
Specific and measurable statements about strategic goals.
A strategic objective specifies:
1) specific action
2) extent of action
3) target for action
4) timeline for action
Strategic objectives are related to the interventions and are implemented
through programs and projects.
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Example 1 – Danish Objectives
Danish e-Government
objectives for the goal:
By the end of 2006:
• at least 60% of the population uses the public sector’s
digital services (2003: 40%)
public sector must
provide coherent
services with citizens
and businesses in the
centre
• at least 95% of all businesses use the public sector’s
digital services (2002: 72%)
• at least 60% of all public authorities receive at least a
quarter of all documents from citizens and businesses
in digital form (2003: citizen 15 percent, businesses
21%)
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Example 2 – Nepali Objectives
2011
Stage 3
Transacting
Fully integrated
Stage 4
Value portal
Value-networked
Value-chain creation
Transaction
Multi-channel service
Gov.-wide collaboration system
2007
Stage 1
Publishing
Isolated from other agencies
No process innovation
Stage 2
Interacting
Partially integrated in cluster
Internal BPR
Fully integrated
Cross-agency BPR
On-line public services
Standardization of information sharing platform
Information sharing system
Organization of e-Government
Gov.-wide collaboration system
Knowledge-based administration system
[courtesy eGMP proposal]
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Mongolia - Strategies and Projects
Strategy Projects
• providing on-line public • government representative portal
Government to Citizen
• providing on-line public
services
• diversification on
service channel
• government representative portal
• passport management system
• real estate registration system
• social insurance system
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-71
Mongolia - Strategies and Projects
Strategy Projects
• opening administration
information and process
• recruitment and employment information system
Government to Business
information and process
• providing one-stop
public service
• e-Customs
• e-Procurement
• business registration and approval management
system
• intellectual property management system
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-72
Mongolia - Strategies and Projects
Strategy Projects
• computerization of
government administration
• national identification system
• e-Tax
Government to Government
• integration of government
information system
• standardization of
government administration
• e-Tax
• immigration management system
• e-Educational administration system
• administration portal (e-Approval, e-Document)
• enterprise architecture
• integrated government-wide information system
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
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Step 6: Prioritizing
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Criteria for Prioritizing
Criteria for prioritization include:
e-Governance cannot be introduced through a single initiative, but
through small achievable steps which can build success and credibility.
1) available resources
2) value potentials
3) sustainability
4) impact on social, economic and governance dimensions
Priorities must be people and development centered and defined within the
context of government vision and objectives.
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-75
Mongolia – Priorities 1
Importance
Emergency
consideration on policy, requirements of users, and
phase
Effect/Impact
consideration on the objectives and other factors to
Effect/Impact
implement the project
Feasibility
Technological
Realization
consideration on the technological level and capacity
to implement the project
Institutional
Realization
consideration on the law and regulation to implement
the project
[courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia]
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Mongolia – Priorities 2
Order Project
Importance Feasibility
Emergency
Effect/
Impact
Technological
Realization
Institutional
Realization
1 government representative portal 8 9 8 8
2 passport registration system 7 7 6 7
3 real estate registration system 7 7 7 7
4 social insurance system 6 8 7 6
5 recruitment/employment info system 7 6 6 7
6 e-Customs 7 7 8 7 6 e-Customs 7 7 8 7
7 e-Procurement 6 7 7 6
8 business registration and approval… 7 7 7 6
9 intellectual property management… 6 7 7 7
10 national identification system 9 9 7 7
11 e-Tax 7 8 8 7
12 immigration management system 7 7 8 7
13 e-Educational administration system 7 8 8 7
14 administration portal 9 8 8 6
15 enterprise architecture 8 8 7 6
16 integrated gov.-wide information… 9 9 8 8
1-4: G2C, 5-9: G2B, 10-16: G2G
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Mongolia – Priorities 3
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Mongolia – Priorities 4
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Impact of Possible G2C Services
Service Economic
Impact/Benefits
Social
Impact/Benefits
Governance
Impact/Benefits
employment
opportunities
reduced advert and
communication cost
easier access to
information on
job opportunities
openness, higher
degree of
fairness
reduced transaction cost
job opportunities
easier (standard)
application
fairness
social security
contributions
reduced transaction cost easier to receive
benefits
transparency
land registration reduced transaction cost easier to transfer
properties
rule of law,
transparency
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Impact of Possible G2B Services
Service Economic
Impact/Benefits
Social
Impact/Benefits
Governance
Impact/Benefits
custom
declaration
lower transaction cost
timely declaration
ease of declaration
with online help
lower thresholds for
small sized firms
accountability and
transparency
social
contributions for
employee
reduced transaction cost
timely payment received
electronically
increased coverage
easier to comply with
rules
transparent
application with
online support
access to socio-
demographic
and other
government
databases
new business opportunities
new service opportunities for
government
greater use of
information for
planning and provision
of services for both
public and private
organizations
transparency
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Impact of Possible G2G Services
Service Economic
Impact/Benefits
Social
Impact/Benefits
Governance
Impact/Benefits
computerizing core
business of
government
reduction in transaction
cost
counter corruption
employment
opportunities
speedier processing
accountability
counter corruption
decentralized data
processing with
data reuse can lead to
significant cost savings
ease of use to data security
processing with
integrated access
to virtual data
warehouse
significant cost savings
cost of digital data
capture is low
eliminates
redundancies
speeds up operation
privacy
transparency
e-Procurement in
Government
lower transaction cost increased use of
existing capacity
within government
competition with
private sector service
provider
transparency
accountability
competitiveness in
cross agency service
delivery
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General Principle
Have the big picture, start with some quick wins, consolidate fast.
development
think big
1
time
scale fast
start small
3
2
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Step 7: Involving Stakeholders
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Identifying Stakeholders’ Roles
Typical stakeholders roles:
Identifying and filling stakeholders roles is important for assigning
responsibilities.
project team those who will directly work on e-Governance projects
suppliers suppliers of technologies, resources and expertise
operators agency employees who will operate the e-Governance systems
champions entities to drive and seek justification for the projects
sponsors entities paying for the expense and efforts for the projects
owner management of the agency that will own and use the system
others others with significant influence on the project
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Example - Stakeholders
1) Office of the President, Chief Executive and ministry/agency in charge of e-
Government
2) Legislature or parliament
3) Government agencies
4) Political parties 4) Political parties
5) Citizens
6) Unions
7) NGOs
8) Traditional leaders
9) Research institutions
10) International agencies
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Step 8: Monitoring and Evaluation
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Levels
There are numerous levels for monitoring and evaluation activities during
the implementation of e-Governance.
We consider the following levels during implementation:
1) implementation plan level
2) project plan level
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Implementation Plan Level
Monitoring:
• tracks the amount of resources committed for implementing e-
Government.
Evaluation:
• measures the impact on the implementation of the outcomes and of key
indicators of progress
• measured through both quantitative and qualitative performance
indicators
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Project Plan Level
Monitoring:
• examines the linkages between inputs used for implementation of
activities and the direct deliverables
• systematic approach to allow quick review of project performance • systematic approach to allow quick review of project performance
Evaluation:
• measures the impact of deliverables on the performance of the
organization where the project was implemented
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Indicators for e-Governance
1) overall classification of government institutions based on the level of
Two categories of qualitative and quantitative performance indicators can
be identified to measure e-Governance progress.
1) overall classification of government institutions based on the level of
transformation attained
2) more qualitative measures directly relating to broad outcome areas:
a) economic
b) social
c) governance
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Indicator Set 1
Time Indicators
after 12 months • number of government departments that have started
digitizing their basic data
• number of local governments that have established web • number of local governments that have established web
presence
after 3 years • number of institutions and local governments that are in
each maturity levels – informational, one-way interactive,
two-way interactive, and transactional
after 5 years • number of institutions that conform to the government portal
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Indicator Set 2 – Economic
Outcomes Performance Indicators
alternative and more cost effective
delivery of services
• % reduction in transaction and overall operating
costs
• % of transactions performed on-line
redeployment and rebalancing of
the civil service
• number of personnel retrained
• increased number of staff with new required skills
• ratio of professional staff to general service staff • ratio of professional staff to general service staff
increase in employment • % unemployed
• % employed in ICT related industry
• online job market established
improved revenue collection on
taxes and service levies
• on-line taxation system in place
• % increase in tax coverage
• % increase in tax revenue
promotion of internal and external
investment
• business registration system
• % increase in foreign direct investment
• % increase in internal investment
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Indicator Set 2 – Social
Outcomes Performance Indicators
increased access to quality
education
• e-learning systems in place
• teacher ICT education programme in place
• number of schools with ICT education
• number of schools with Internet access
improved educational
management capacity
• education management information system
management capacity
better delivery and access to
health services
• tele medical services in place
• telemedicine service system
improved health management
capacity
• number of medical doctors connected online
• integrated hospital information system
improved social welfare • % increase in eligible households and
individuals entitled to social welfare
move to development oriented and
people centered service delivery
culture
• % increase in customer satisfaction
• % increase in people using on-line services
• availability of personalized portals for
citizens and businesses
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Indicator Set 3 - Governance
Outcomes Performance Indicators
greater accountability
and transparency in
public administration
• % of government business processes open to the
public (tendering, procurement, recruitment, etc.)
• on-line availability of government’s budget, expenditure
• on-line access to government reports, documents
better coordination and
cooperation between
• sharing of government data and information across
agencies cooperation between
government agencies
agencies
improved
communications and
public relations
• availability of online interaction with public
• % of people interacting with government online
• timely response by government
greater public
participation
• posting policy drafts online for public participation in
policy development process
enabling legal
infrastructure
• legislation available online, with explanatory notes
• legislation in place to deal with e-documentation, e-
record keeping, e-authentication, e-signature, etc.
• legislation in place concerning e-protection, privacy,
and cyber crime
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Nepal - Indicators
Indicators Current
1
st
Phase
(2008)
2
nd
Phase
(2011)
UN government index 126 100 80 UN government index 126 100 80
Visit for getting services 90% 70% < 40%
Connectivity of government agencies Isolated Ministry level All agencies
Connection method Dial-up xDSL, LAN High speed
[courtesy eGMP proposal]
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Step 9: Business Model
1. assessing readiness
2. elaborating vision and expected contributions
3. formulating strategic goals
4. determining required interventions 4. determining required interventions
5. setting objectives
6. identifying priorities
7. establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement
8. determining monitoring and evaluation indicators
9. providing a business model
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Developing a Business Model
A business model includes:
1) how e-Government solutions would be developed – outsourcing versus
A plan for ensuring the sustainability of e-Government in terms of
resources and adoption.
1) how e-Government solutions would be developed – outsourcing versus
internal development
2) funding options for provided services - pay-as-you-go, bonds, transaction
fees, partnership with third parties, etc.
3) how to ensure take up of the various e-Services to be offered
4) how to attract the participation of private sector in the continued
development of the e-Governance
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Example – Business Model
Hong Kong
SAR
Hong Kong’s Electronic Service Delivery Scheme is a mutually
beneficial relationship between the government and an operator.
Parties Involved:
1) Government
• enhance backend system
• pay per transaction fee after reaching a pre-agreed
transaction level
2) Operator
• develop, operate and maintain the infrastructure and front
end services
• put up commercial services and advertisements in the portal
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Strategy Imperatives
1) services must be accessible, affordable and user-friendly
2) technology must be reliable, scalable and interoperable
Strategy must consider services, technology, processes and people.
2) technology must be reliable, scalable and interoperable
3) processes must be re-engineered, collaborative, integrated and
trustworthy
4) people must be trained, oriented and carried along
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Tutorial Discussion
1) Which criteria do you consider when prioritizing potential e-Governance
initiatives in your organization?
2) List three services that could be offered electronically by your 2) List three services that could be offered electronically by your
organization to citizens and businesses.
3) What type of impact are services listed in question 2 likely to have?
4) Identify a set of useful economic, social and governance indicators for
monitoring the development of services listed in question 2.
Best Practices Best Practices
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Case Studies – Leading Countries
Country E-Readiness E-Participation
United States (1) - 0.9062
(3) - 0.9048
Global E-Government Readiness Report 2005
Denmark (2) - 0.9058 (7) - 0.7619
Singapore (7) - 0.8503
(2) - 0.9841
South Korea (5) - 0.8727
(5 - tie to Canada) - 0.8730
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United States
1. United States
2. Denmark
3. Singapore
4. South Korea
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-104
United States – Vision
Guiding Principles:
The strategic vision is to reform government operations – how it goes
about its business and how it treats the people it serves.
1) citizen centered – not bureaucratic and agency-centered
2) result oriented – producing measurable improvements for citizens
3) market based – actively promoting innovation
e-Government is one of the five key elements of the President’s
Management Agenda and Performance Plan.
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-105
United States - Goals
Specific goals outlined by the US Government:
1) simplify work processes to improve service to citizens
2) use annual budget process and other OMB requirements to support e-
Government implementation
3) improve project delivery through development, recruitment and retention
of qualified IT workforce
4) continue to modernize agency IT management around citizen-centered
lines of business
5) engage agency leadership to support e-Government project
implementation
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-106
United States – Major Challenges
leadership support strengthening the connections between Lead Agencies,
Partner Agencies, CIO's towards cooperative
implementation of projects
parochialism addressing current policies and budget practices that
reinforces “small-hat” agency centric thinking
funding providing more resources in general (dollar and staff) and
make the budget process more transparent and effective
communication providing better understanding of the inter-relationship
among the e-Government initiatives and improving the
interfaces between OMB and Lead Agencies
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-107
United States - Initiatives
govBenefits.gov a single point of access to determine eligibility for
government benefits and services
recreation one-stop online access to information on recreational sites
IRS free filing free online preparation and electronic tax filing
online access for loans online access to locate loans online access for loans online access to locate loans
USA services government-wide citizen and customer service
e-rulemaking participation in high-quality, efficient rule making process
geospatial one-stop federal and state agencies access to map related data
consolidated health
informatics
enable communication between federal heath enterprises
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United States – Initiatives (cont)
G2C GovBenefits.Gov, Recreation One-Stop, IRS free filing, Online Access
for Loans, USA Services, e-Rulemaking*
G2B e-Rulemaking*, Expanding Electronic Tax Products for Businesses,
Federal Asset Sales, International Trade Process Streamlining, One-
Stop Business Compliance, Consolidate Health Informatics Stop Business Compliance, Consolidate Health Informatics
G2G Geospatial one-stop, Disaster Management, SafeCom, E-Vital, E-Grant
G2E e-Training, Recruitment One Stop, Enterprise HR Integration, e-
Clearance, e-Payroll, e-Travel, Integrated Acquisition Environment, e-
Records Management
Horizontal e-Authentication
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United States – Readiness
tele-density fixed lines – 268 million (2005) or 900/1000 people
mobile cellular – 219,400,000 (2005) or 735/1000 people
internet internet users – 205,326,680 (2005) or 688/1000 people
literacy figures age 15 and above that can read and write (2003 est.) - 99%
population 301,139,947 (July 2007 est.)
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-110
Denmark
1. United States
2. Denmark
3. Singapore
4. South Korea
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-111
Denmark - Vision
Digitalization must contribute to the creation of an efficient and coherent
public sector with a high quality of service, with citizens and businesses
in the centre.
1) Five signposts drawn-up to monitor the realization of the vision.
2) A set of specific targets are specified for each of the five signposts.
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Denmark – Signposts 1,2
Signpost 1: Public sector must provide coherent services with citizens and
businesses in the centre
1) at least 60% of the population uses public sector’s digital services
2) at least 95% of all businesses use the public sector’s digital
services
3) at least 60% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all 3) at least 60% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all
documents from citizens and businesses in digital form
Signpost 2: e-Government must result in improved service quality and the release
of resources
1) at least 75% of all digitalization projects release resources, and at
lest 25% do so on a large
2) the level of satisfaction of citizens and business with quality of
public services is increased
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Denmark – Signposts 3, 4
Signpost 3: The public sector must work and communicate digitally
1) at least 80% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all
documents sent by other public authorities in digital form (2003:
37%)
2) at least 60% of all public authorities can communicate securely in
digital form with other public authorities, citizens and businesses
3) at least 60% of all authorities utilize electronic case management
Signpost 4: e-Government must be based on a coherent and flexible infrastructure
1) no more than 15% of all public authorities state that the absence of
common public sector is a significant obstacle (2003: 30%)
2) no more than 15% of public authorities state that the lack of
common public sector standards is a significant obstacle
3) a total of at least 1.1m digital certs have been issued to citizens,
workers and businesses
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Denmark – Signpost 5
Signpost 5: Public sector manager must lead the way and ensure that their own
organizations are capable of realizing the vision:
1) no more than 10% of public authorities state that lack of political
will and clear goals is a significant obstacle
2) at least 75% of all digitalization projects lead to simplification of
working practices, and at least 25% do so on a large scale
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Denmark – Major Challenges
lack of familiarity with the
vision and strategy
in-depth knowledge of the vision and strategy is not
wide-spread.
wide-spread “bunker-
culture”
existing culture does not support inter-organizational
approaches and actions.
unresolved “sow-harvest”
issues
improvements in efficiency that follow a digitalization
process may be harvested by other organizations.
lack of managerial
commitment and skills
poor management insight into business thinking and
familiarity with project management.
one-sided IT thinking generally too much focus on technical aspects of IT
without due regard to organizational issues.
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-116
Denmark – Initiatives
G2C income tax declaration, job searches by labour offices, social security
contributions, personal documents, car registration, application for
building permission, declaration to the police , public libraries,
certificates request and delivery, announcement of moving, health
related services. related services.
G2B social contributions for employees, corporate tax declaration,
notification, VAT declaration and notification, submission of statistical
offices, customs declaration, environment-related permits, public
procurement.
Horizontal portal, e-Identification infrastructure, e-Procurement infrastructure,
joint electronic document management system (FESD).
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-117
Denmark - Readiness
tele-density fixed lines – 3,487,800 (2004 Est.) or 630/1000 persons
mobile cellular – 5.168 Million (2004) or 940/1000 persons
internet internet users – 3,762,500 (2005) or 69%
literacy figures age 15 and above that can read and write - 99%
population 5,450,661
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Singapore
1. United States
2. Denmark
3. Singapore
4. South Korea
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-119
Singapore - Vision
To be an Integrated Government (iGov) that delights customers and
connects citizen through Infocomm.
It is a government that works as one, across organizational boundaries, It is a government that works as one, across organizational boundaries,
to reap synergies and exploit new opportunities in all aspects, whether in
providing information that engages citizens, or being intelligent and
interactive in fully understanding customers need to deliver quality
services that delight them.
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Singapore - Targets
1) 8 out of 10 users are satisfied with the overall quality of e-services
2) 9 out of 10 users would recommend transacting with government
through e-services
3) 8 out of 10 users are very satisfied with the level of clarity and
usefulness of information published online on government policies,
programmes and initiatives
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Singapore – Strategic Thrusts
Identified 4 strategic thrusts:
1) increasing reach and richness of e-services 1) increasing reach and richness of e-services
2) increasing citizens’ mindshare in e-engagement
3) enhancing capacity and synergy in government
4) enhancing national competitive advantage
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Singapore – New Initiatives
There are three major initiatives under the iGov2010 plan:
Unique Establishment
Identifier
• establishing a Unique Establishment Identifier (UEI) for
establishments in place of the use of multiple
identifiers.
m-Government • driving the implementation of m-services and the m-Government • driving the implementation of m-services and the
deployment of central infrastructure for m-services
• ensuring a consolidated approach by government
agencies towards the implementation of m-services
Singapore Government
Enterprise Architecture
• providing a blueprint covering Business Area
Architecture (BA), Information Architecture (IA),
Solution Architecture and Technical Architecture (TA)
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-123
Singapore – Past Initiatives
G2C eCitizen Portal, Online Tax Filing
eCitizens cover: culture, recreation and sports, defense and security,
education, learning and employment, family and community
development, health and environment, housing, and transport and travel
G2B TradeNet (EDI System), Online Government Procurement
G2G E-Court of Justice, Pay Per Use Electronic Toll Booths
G2E Pac@Gov (pay and claim portal for payroll services), PRAISE
(promotion, ranking and appraisal system), TRAISI (training
administration system on the intranet for ministry of education staff)
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Singapore - Testimony
Singapore’s huge success in e-Government is attributed to the close Singapore’s huge success in e-Government is attributed to the close
cooperation between Government agencies, private sector, academia,
research institutes, community groups, civic and voluntary organizations.
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-125
Singapore - Readiness
tele-density fixed lines – 1,847,800 (2005) or 410/1000 persons
mobile cellular – 4,256,800 (2005) or 950/1000 persons
internet internet users – 2,421,800 (2005) or 540/1000 persons
literacy figures age 15 and above that can read and write - 92%
population 4,492,150 (July 2006 est.)
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-126
South Korea
1. United States
2. Denmark
3. Singapore
4. South Korea
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-127
South Korea - Vision
To become the “World’s Best Open e-Government” as follows:
1) increase on-line public services to 85%
2) rise into top 10 ranking in the world for business support
competitiveness
3) reduce visits for civil service applicants to 3 visits per year
4) raise the utilization rate of e-Government programs to 60%
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-128
South Korea - National Goals
1) build a democracy with the people
2) build a society of balanced social growth 2) build a society of balanced social growth
3) contribute to an era of peace and prosperity in northeast Asia
4) GNP per capita of USD 20,000
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-129
South Korea - Goals
Achieving the vision requires to:
1) innovate the way government works 1) innovate the way government works
2) innovate civil services
3) innovate information resource management
4) reform the legal system
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South Korea – Agenda / Programs
Goal 1: Innovate the way government works
1. Establishing e-working
process
1. digitalizing document processing procedures
2. comprehensive informatization of national and
public finance
3. realizing local e-Government
4. building e-Auditing system 4. building e-Auditing system
5. realizing e-National assembly
6. building integrated criminal justice service
system
7. comprehensive informatization of HR
management
8. e-Diplomacy system
9. real-time management of national agenda
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-131
South Korea – Agenda / Programs
Goal 1: Innovate the way government works
2. Expanding Sharing of
Administrative Information
10. expanding of administrative information
sharing
3. Service Oriented BPR 11. developing Government Business Reference
Model
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-132
South Korea – Agenda / Programs
Goal 2: Innovate civil services
4. Enhancing Civil Service 12. enhancing internet-based civil services
13. integrated national disaster management
service
14. advanced architectural administrative
information system information system
15. integrated tax service
16. integrated national welfare service
17. comprehensive food and drug information
service
18. comprehensive employment information
service
19. internet-based administrative judgment service
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-133
South Korea – Agenda / Programs
Goal 2: Innovate civil services
5. Enhancing Business
Support Service
20. single-window for business support service
(G4B0)
21. integrated national logistics information
service service
22. e-Commerce service
23. comprehensive foreigner support service
24. support for exporting e-Government solutions
6. Increasing Electronic
Citizen Engagement
25. increasing on-line citizen participants
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-134
South Korea – Agenda / Programs
Goal 3: Innovate Information Resource Management
7. Comprehensive
Standardization of
Information Resource
26. building a government-wide NCIA
27. strengthening e-Government communications
networks (e Gov Net)
28. establishing government wide ITA
8. Strengthening Information 29. building information security system 8. Strengthening Information
Security System
29. building information security system
9. Strengthening Information,
Organizations and
Personnel
30. restructuring informatization organizations and
personnel
Goal 4: Reforming the Legal System
10. Legislation 31. reforming the legal system for e-Government
and security
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-135
South Korea - Readiness
tele-density fixed lines – 23.745.000 (2005) or 486/1000 persons
mobile cellular – 38.342.000 (2005) or 785/1000 persons
internet internet users – 33.900.000 (2005) or 694/1000 persons
literacy figures age 15 and above that can read and write - 97.9%
population 48,846,823 (July 2006 est.)
Summary Summary
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-137
Strategic Planning Summary
1) a clear vision understood by all stakeholders is the first step
2) the strategic planning process should involve all major stakeholders
3) readiness assessment is one of the most crucial aspects of strategic
planning as it establishes the current state of the organization
4) readiness assessment must implicitly determine the strength, weakness,
opportunities and threat of the organization
5) strategies are determined based on readiness assessment results as
well as the strategic goals
6) stakeholders involvement throughout the whole process is critical
7) a business plan is essential for the sustainability of e-Governance
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-138
Strategic Planning Process
Nine activity areas shown:
• e-readiness assessment may be
carried out in parallel with vision and
goal elaboration (1, 2, 3)
• required interventions are the strategies
derived through the e-readiness results derived through the e-readiness results
and available goals (4)
• setting priorities helps the formulation
of effective and viable objectives (5, 6)
• providing a business plan and
determining control mechanisms (7, 8)
• strategic plan must be communicated
to all stakeholders (9).
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-139
Major Sources of Information
UNPAN Virtual library of e-Governance and Public Sector Reports
E-Readiness Questionnaires for Central, Agency and Civil Society
UNDESA Global e-Government Readiness Reports
Plan of Action for e-Government Development
OECD E-Government Imperative
InfoDev E-Government Handbook for Developing Countries
E-Government Strategy Documents for:
• United States, New Zealand, Singapore, Denmark, Pakistan, Western
Australian Public Sector
UNeGov.net-School-Planning-140
Acknowledgement
We wish to thank:
1) East Africa Community and its member states
2) Canadian e-Policy Resource Center
3) E-Government Directorate, Office of the President, Republic of Kenya
4) All participants 4) All participants for supporting the event.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-2

Outline

Overview Introduction Process Best Practices Summary

what will be taught basic concepts and introduction to strategic planning process for developing an e-Governance strategic plan e-Governance strategies of leading countries summary of module

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-3

Overview - Objectives

The course will teach: 1) core elements of an e-Governance strategy 2) how to design and conduct an e-readiness assessment exercise 3) how to develop the vision, goals and objectives for e-Governance 4) how to develop a portfolio of the required intervention programs 5) how to prioritize intervention programs 6) how to monitor and evaluate progress

Introduction .

a set group of people. who are these institutions? what is the source of the authority? who is under these obligations? why need a government? public agencies people public agencies and people societal development . or a collection of assets.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-5 Government Government is a collection of institutions that act with authority and create formal obligations. A Government may administer or supervise a state.

manage daily activities and interact to achieve their goals. through which social action occurs. 2) It is also a guiding process through which societies make decisions. formal and informal. other organizations and groups engage in governance as well .net-School-Planning-6 Governance 1) Governance is a set of processes. governance governance only for government? government gets its work done through governance processes no. government vs.UNeGov.

drivers 1) 2) 3) 4) 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) better delivery of government services to citizens improved interactions with business and industry citizen empowerment through access to information more efficient government management less corruption increased transparency greater convenience revenue growth cost reduction benefits . businesses. and mobile computing) that have the ability to transform relations with citizens.net-School-Planning-7 e-Government e-Government refers to the use by government agencies of information technologies (such as wide area networks.UNeGov. and other arms of government [World Bank]. internet.

while including e-Government.net-School-Planning-8 e-Governance e-Governance refers to the use of information and communication technologies to transform and support the processes and structures of a governance system. observation 1) many definitions exist 2) the notion of e-Governance strictly depends on the perspective taken on governance 1) e-Governance = e-Government + e-Democracy + … 2) e-Government is about public service delivery 3) e-Governance. interaction and engagement of stakeholders in decision processes our view .UNeGov. emphasizes participation.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-9 e-Government Maturity Specifies the level of maturity or development of e-Government. Gartner UNDESA OECD publish Î interact Î transact Î integrate emerging Î enhanced Î interactive Î transactional Î networked information Î interaction Î transaction Î and transformation .

department and agencies 5) union leaders 6) community leaders 7) politicians 8) foreign investors .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-10 Government Stakeholders A person. Typical government stakeholders: 1) citizens 2) businesses 3) government employees 4) government ministries. group or any entity that can affect or is affected by an action taken by government.

A strategic plan: 1) is a road map to lead an organization from its present state to its desired medium or long term future state 2) specifies the mission. strategies and objectives .net-School-Planning-11 Strategic Planning Strategic planning involves determining the required actions to achieve a desired vision considering the present state of an organization.UNeGov. goals. vision.

UNeGov. Opportunities. Weaknesses.net-School-Planning-12 Strategic Planning Process Steps include: • analyzing the present environment – SWOT (Strengths. Threats) • providing a vision statement • refining vision into goals • determining strategies using the outcomes of SWOT analysis and specified goals • formulating concrete and measurable objectives from strategies • communicating and reviewing the strategic plan .

weaknesses and opportunities and threats .net-School-Planning-13 Strategies Attributes of a good strategy: 1) builds on strength 2) resolve weaknesses 3) exploit opportunities 4) avoid threats with respect to specific goals Note: 1) implementing a strategy may unveil and cause new threats as well as opportunities 2) long term strategies therefore must be accompanied by periodic reassessments of strengths.UNeGov.

goals.UNeGov. 1) a sound strategy is essential for any e-Governance initiative to succeed 2) strategy provides the roadmap for transforming a governance system into the desired state through ICT support 3) strategy must have the support of all major stakeholders . priorities.net-School-Planning-14 e-Governance Strategy A plan for the development of e-Governance specifying. milestones. concrete initiatives. among other things. the vision. challenges and enabling policies for the e-Governance agenda as a whole.

scalable systems 5) pursuing real economic development goals and not just technology 6) designing technology architecture (infrastructure.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-15 e-Governance Strategy – Why? 1) creating the right policy and institutional framework from the start 2) maximizing the use of ICT initiatives within government 3) managing the increasing costs of ICT in government 4) mapping path from pilot experiments to sustainable. data and standards) for the public sector &RXUWHV\ 'HHSDN %KDWLD .6* *URXS :% .

objectives and targets 4) enabling and supporting policies 5) portfolio of initiatives and a process for executing them 6) methodology for e-Readiness assessment 7) business models for sustainability .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-16 e-Governance Strategy Elements Key elements include: 1) definition of e-Governance 2) formulation and communication of the expected value of e-Governance 3) goals.

net-School-Planning-17 Tutorial Discussion 1) 2) 3) 4) Who are the stakeholders of your organization? How does your organization create value for these stakeholders? How could your organization create more value to these stakeholders? Would e-Government enable the creation of more value? .UNeGov.

Process .

net-School-Planning-19 Strategic Planning Process Major steps include: 1) assessing e-Governance readiness 2) elaborating the vision and expected contributions 3) formulating strategic goals 4) determining required interventions 5) setting the objectives 6) identifying priorities 7) establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement 8) determining monitoring and evaluation indicators 9) providing a business model .UNeGov.

9. 8. 5. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting the objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model . 7. 2. 4.UNeGov. 3. 6.net-School-Planning-20 Step 1: Readiness Assessment 1.

1 1.2 1.6 1.3 1.8 political conditions regulatory framework organizational conditions human and cultural conditions financial conditions communication environment technology infrastructure data and information systems .5 1.UNeGov.4 1.7 1.net-School-Planning-21 Assessing Readiness Readiness assessment investigates the following eight areas: 1.

the private sector and civil society to carry out the necessary transformations.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-22 Political Readiness e-Governance requires strong commitments from political leaders. Checklist: 1) commitment to good governance 2) awareness of the leverage of e-Governance to good governance 3) leadership to manage the required change and buy-in from stakeholders 4) national identity and perception of government 5) citizen and civil society’s participation in government affairs .

Checklist: 1) privacy legislation 2) security standards 3) degree of liberalization of the telecommunications industry 4) positive fiscal environment for acquiring ICT equipment . and businesses.UNeGov. citizens.net-School-Planning-23 Regulatory Readiness 1) Essential for secure information exchange within government and between government. services and equipment. 2) Necessary for creating economic conditions for accessible ICT infrastructure.

2) Guiding such transformations requires appropriate management and coordination.net-School-Planning-24 Organizational Readiness 1) e-Governance requires and causes evolutionary changes of institutional arrangements.UNeGov. Checklist: 1) administrative structures and legacies 2) public administration reform 3) civil service reform 4) central coordination unit 5) inter-governmental relations 6) change agent and management .

Checklist: 1) culture. implement and sustain e-Governance 2) Cultural aspects may cause overall resistance to change. traditions and languages 2) attitude to change 3) educational levels 4) culture of information and knowledge sharing 5) ICT literacy and online users 6) organizational culture in the public administration 7) managerial skill in the public sector 8) service orientation of public administration towards its clients .net-School-Planning-25 Human and Cultural Readiness 1) Positive orientation.UNeGov. knowledge and skills are required within the public sector to initiate.

UNeGov. Checklist: 1) available financial resources 2) resource allocation process 3) national income structure 4) access to alternative funding mechanisms 5) partnership with private sector 6) access to capital markets 7) mechanism for venture investment .net-School-Planning-26 Financial Readiness 1) Start-up costs of e-Governance can be high. 2) Proper resource planning and access to innovative financing mechanisms is important and critical for e-Government sustainability.

2) Communication with all stakeholders is therefore essential to the change processes inherent during the deployment of e-Government.UNeGov. Checklist: 1) knowledge of all stakeholders 2) knowledge of stakeholders’ communication culture and channels to reach them 3) existence of a communication plan 4) awareness and understanding of ICT and e-Governance 5) information and knowledge sharing .net-School-Planning-27 Communication Readiness 1) e-Governance needs to be understood and accepted by all stakeholders to ensure that its benefits flow to the society as a whole.

UNeGov. Checklist: 1) telecommunication infrastructure 2) penetration rates of telecommunication 3) urban versus rural demographic bias 4) software and hardware 5) IT standards .net-School-Planning-28 Infrastructure Readiness 1) Poor technological infrastructure is a major bottleneck for developing countries aiming to implement and maintain e-Government. 3) Demographic and geographic conditions affect the distribution of economic activities and consequently the provisioning of ICT infrastructure by both the government and the private sector. 2) Legacy systems present significant challenges.

135 (2007) 108.384.100 (2006) Telephone (Mobile) 153.400 (2006) 22. 200 (2005) 6.721 9.000 (2007) 2.000 (2006) 184.000 (2006) Telephone (Fixed) 31.907.223 30.390.009.400 (2005) Population Burundi Kenya Rwanda Tanzania Uganda 8.600 (2005) 0.000 (2005) 6.770. 3000 (2005) 750.913.000 (2006) 2.485.UNeGov.200 (2005) 0.505 36.700 (2005) 0.net-School-Planning-29 EAC Infrastructure Readiness Countries Online Population 60.100 (2005) 293.509 39.610 [courtesy CIA Fact Book 2007 and UNDESA Global e-Government Report 2005] .000 (2006) PC /100 Persons 0.000 (2005) 169.000 (2005) 0.000 (2006) 64.262.720.000 (2006) 290.

UNeGov. records and work processes must be in place to provide the necessary data to support e-Government. Checklist: 1) legacy systems 2) available and accessible data 3) data collection procedures and data/information standardization 4) data and information quality and data security 5) capacity for data analysis and information utilization 6) information policy .net-School-Planning-30 Data and Information Readiness Information systems.

net-School-Planning-31 Notes on Readiness Assessment 1) e-Readiness assessment serves an advisory tool which aims at: a) raising awareness about the motivation and the prerequisites to establish a foundation for successful e-Governance b) identifying the weak-links in the environment for remedial action c) informing broad sectoral e-Government strategy and action plan d) providing a monitoring and evaluation tool 2) e-Readiness assessments should be carried out regularly using a consistent approach and collecting identical sets of data .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-32 Tutorial Discussion 1) 2) 3) 4) Are the eight dimensions sufficient for readiness? What other dimensions should be considered? How would you design a country-wide e-readiness assessment? Study the relevant UNDESA e-Government readiness survey questionnaires and state what modifications you think are desirable for their adoption in your organization.UNeGov. .

9. 3. 2. 5.net-School-Planning-33 Step 2: Visioning Process 1. 7. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model . 6. 4. 8.UNeGov.

UNeGov. 1) must be clear.net-School-Planning-34 Vision An e-Governance vision is a medium or long term statement concerning broad goals which provides a roadmap and general guidance for institutional change. intuitive and simple 2) states what will be done and what will not be done 3) can be central or public agency specific 4) considers needs and opportunities 5) must be aligned with national development strategy 6) involves consensus building by stakeholders .

Mongolia will become one of the top ten ICT developed countries in Asia. Government of Andhra Andhra Pradesh will leverage Information Technology to Pradesh attain a position of leadership and excellence in the information age and to transform itself into a knowledge society Danish Government Digitalization must contribute to the creation of an efficient and coherent public sector with high quality of service. with citizens and businesses in the centre.UNeGov. Mongolia .net-School-Planning-35 Example – Vision Statements Western Australian Government A more efficient public sector that delivers integrated services and improved opportunities for community participation. Establishing the information society and founding the knowledge-based society in Mongolia by enhancing extensive applications of ICT in all sectors of society. By 2012.

net-School-Planning-36 Visioning Steps in the vision building process include: 1) identifying and consulting stakeholders 2) allowing stakeholders to present or explain their own vision for eGovernance 3) draft a common vision based stakeholders’ visions 4) aligning vision with more general national and local development needs and opportunities 5) consolidating and agree on final vision .UNeGov.

2. 3. 5. 8.UNeGov. 7. 9. 4. 6.net-School-Planning-37 Step 3: Strategic Goals 1. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model .

Strategic goals typically include: 1) social and economic development using ICT 2) effective delivery of quality public services. policy maintenance.UNeGov. efficiency. policy implementation. and cost reduction 5) Coordinated and transparent policy design.net-School-Planning-38 Strategic Goals Statements that set the direction for e-Governance based on the vision. which are accessible and affordable 3) improved capacity of government in participatory and consultative decision making processes which progresses democracy 4) increased satisfaction of stakeholders through accountability. effectiveness. and policy review .

3) Reduce transaction costs for the government. [Courtesy Vincent Okongo] . and 4) Provide a forum for citizens’ participation in Government activities.UNeGov. citizens and the private sector through the provision of products and services electronically.net-School-Planning-39 Example – Goals 1 Kenya 1) Improve collaboration between government agencies through reduction in the duplication of efforts. 2) Improve Kenya’s competitiveness by providing timely information and delivery of government services. and enhance efficiency and effectiveness of resource utilization.

2) e-Government must result in improved service quality and the release of resources.UNeGov. 4) e-Government must be based on a coherent flexible infrastructure. . 3) Public must work and communicate digitally.net-School-Planning-40 Example – Goals 2 Danish e-Government Goals 1) Public sector must provide coherent services with citizens and businesses in the center.

including: • provision of on-line public service • provision of multi-channel delivery Provide integrated information and service in each industry and enhancing the enterprise competitiveness including: • provision of one-stop public service • disclosure of administrative information and processes Standardization of administration processes and computerizing administration including: • computerization/automation of administration • integration of administration Businesses Government .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-41 Mongolia – Goals 3 Citizens Provide citizen-centered services for improving citizens’ convenience.

what is your vision for your organization? State at least one strategic goal based on your vision? What is likely to be the major challenge in achieving this vision and the strategic goals? .net-School-Planning-42 Tutorial Discussion 1) 2) 3) 4) Do you know the major concerns of your stakeholders? As an internal stakeholder.UNeGov.

7.UNeGov. 6. 8. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation providing a business model . 2. 3. 9.net-School-Planning-43 Step 4: Interventions 1. 5. 4.

Required intervention must consider the dimensions considered in the egovernance readiness assessment: 1) leadership 2) regulations 3) organizations 4) human resources 5) financial resources 6) communication 7) technology 8) data requirements .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-44 Determining Interventions The creation of an enabling environment for the development of eGovernance based on the outcome of the e-readiness assessment. strategic vision. goals and objectives.

net-School-Planning-45 Creating Leadership Leaders are a small group of e-Champions capable of providing political leadership with good understanding of the complexities of e-Governance. Activities of this group include: 1) defining broad deliverables 2) setting priorities 3) mobilizing necessary administrative mechanism and resources 4) assisting to overcome resistance and legacies 5) sharing values and building consensus while possibly preserving cultures .UNeGov.

• Regular briefings and events on major issues and members of the network have access to useful reports and information as well as networking opportunities through events and online communities. . • All 388 English local authorities are now part of IDeA’s e-champion network. • Their job is to champion e-Government within the authority and ensure that the authority is on-track to meet the 2005 target for having services online.net-School-Planning-46 Example .UNeGov.Leadership United Kingdom’s e-Champions Network by IDeA – Improvement and Development Agency • Each local authority in England and Wales should have two champions: one councilor and one officer.

net-School-Planning-47 Regulatory Framework New laws and regulations are required for e-Governance adoption. especially private sector.UNeGov. citizens and businesses 4) recognition of digital exchange of information and digital transactions 5) reaching citizens affordably and enabling citizens to reach government affordably . safeguarding privacy and security 3) digital exchange and transactions between government agencies. Legal and regulatory measures typically cover: 1) data integration and sharing between public agencies 2) use of public information by third parties.

1984. amended 1998 • protects personal privacy and enables international free flow of personal data by harmonization Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment 1996 • directs all federal agencies to use electronic information technology to foster public availability of electronic documents • grants individuals the right to access records in the possession of federal government Electronic Signature Directive 1999 • recognizes electronic signatures within the European Union and can be used as evidence in legal proceedings Electronic Signature European Union .net-School-Planning-48 Example: Regulations Data Privacy United Kingdom Electronic Document USA Data Protection Act.UNeGov.

Regulations The legal framework for Mongolian ICT industry is developed based on the key findings as well as lesson learned from Korean legal framework. to be model Legal Framework Acts on Informatization Promotion • Framework Act on Informatization Promotion • e-Government Act • e-Petition Act • Act on Opening Administration Information Acts on ICT Industry Promotion • Software Industry Promotion Act • Digital Contents Industry Promotion Act • Framework Act on eCommerce Acts on ICT Infrastructure Construction • Framework Act on Informatization Promotion • Act on Resolution for Digital Divide • Privacy Promotion Act • e-Signature Act • Communication Security Promotion Act [courtesy e-Government Master Plan .net-School-Planning-49 Mongolia .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-50 Organization 1) Two prevalent models for implementing e-Governance: centralized and decentralized models. central coordination is required through an agency which is either independent or nested within a ministry.UNeGov. 2) Whichever model is adopted. evaluate and report on progress made in e-Government . Activities of central coordination: 1) coordinate the implementation of the e-Governance strategy 2) review e-readiness on a regular basis 3) coordinate advocacy and awareness campaigns 4) coordinate the use of seed funding for co-financing new and innovative pilot projects 5) provide advice on possible public-private partnerships 6) monitor.

formulates IT strategy and policy develops common IT components for use across government promotes best practices across government delivers citizen-centered online services United Kingdom • (e-Government Unit of • the Cabinet Office) • • .Organization USA (e-Government Act of 2002) • Establishes an Administrator for the office of Electronic Government within the Office of Management and Budget.net-School-Planning-51 Example . • Establishes a CIO Council consisting of representation from CIO’s of all major federal agencies.UNeGov. • Administrator assists OMB Director by implementing eGovernment and other initiatives provided in the act.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-52 Example – Cabinet Office of Kenya [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-53 Future e-Government Organization [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .

Skills required by public administrations: 1) change management 2) program management 3) IT systems development 4) IT service management 5) IT outsourcing management 6) client relationship management .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-54 Developing Human Capacity Public administration. citizens. businesses and local IT community must be equipped with the skills required for e-Governance.

etc.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-55 Example – Capacity Development Italy Skills for Managers Department of Public Administration in co-operation with Department for Innovation Technologies Two programs: 1) information society skills for top managers of state governments National School for Public Administration 2) management skills for middle managers of regional and local administration CIO University – Government sponsored training program Learning objectives in 12 broad topics: 1) policy and organizational 2) leadership /managerial 3) process/change management 4) performance assessment 5) project/program management. USA .

civil servants and high-level people Need for equipment to provide on-line service properly and education of on-line service usage developing human capacity establishment of ICT education programs and human resource development program Building infrastructure for e-Government ICT literacy and HRD program development • • [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .net-School-Planning-56 Mongolia – Human Capacity 1 Key Findings for Education • • • • • • Critical Information Requirement Strategy Project • establish an e-School model to develop ICT human resource expert throughout Mongolia strengthen information education programs to close the regional gap in informatization needed to establish e-Mongolia need to provide people with various educational programs to increase the ICT usage prepare ICT education programs to educate ICT experts including instructors.UNeGov.

such as low-income families and local residents educational association between academic institutes and businesses shall effectively educate ICT professionals who are human resource for the nations industrial development .net-School-Planning-57 Mongolia – Human Capacity 2 Project Objectives • • • Scope • • • • Expected Effects • • • to develop educational programs and provide study guide based on the trainees’ talents and abilities to provide the Cyber training course in order to expand the opportunity of education and increase effect of the education to enhance informatization mind of the people and promote professionalism of ICT personnel establishing ICT education policy by developing ICT education programs… expanding institutes and channels for informatization educati0n building a Cyber education center developing programs to educate ICT professionals distance learning is to save time and costs digital divide is to be closed by providing ICT education to the alienated class.UNeGov.

g.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-58 Financing Availability of funds determine the type of e-Government projects that can be carried out. pooling of resources across agencies may be necessary 2) reward system could be developed for management and employees to stimulate the drive for e-Government 3) extra-budgetary resources should be considered. e. partnership with private-sector in infrastructure development and maintenance . Issues to consider: 1) e-Government is cross-cutting.

UNeGov. risks and benefits in e-Governance development • government invests directly but external enterprises carry out the development • government owns the system and has complete control • bonds are issued by the government • returns from investment are use to offset bond • controlled traditional advertisement on the government web sites • project development is the responsibility of the enterprise • investment by enterprise is covered by transaction fees Issuance of Bonds Advertising GovernmentEnterprise .net-School-Planning-59 Funding Strategies Public Private Partnership Outsourcing • government and private organizations share the costs.

4 billion (~USD 22 billion) on ICT.01% of GDP [Courtesy Michael G. 369 million). 2000 est. 2003 • 0. 2002 • 0.30 (USD 822.6 billion on ICT. 2003 • 1% of GDP • USD 1.UNeGov.5% of GDP • GBP 12. UNDESA 2004] .3 billion (~ USD 531. to rise to USD 4 billion in 2005 • SD 1. 2003 • 0.8% GDP • NTD 36. 353 million).04 billion). Mimicopoulos. 2003 • 0.2 billion (USD 1.net-School-Planning-60 e-Gov Budget Figures United States United Kingdom EU Singapore Taiwan Russia • USD 48.4% of GDP • Rubbles 1.3 billion.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-61

Mongolian Budget Security Plan

[Courtesy Mongolia e-Government Master Plan, 2005]

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-62

Communicating
Creating awareness and buy-in from all stakeholders.

Communication strategies entail: 1) creating interest and expectations towards the benefits of e-Government 2) addressing the interests of politicians, managers, employees, businesses and citizens 3) making stakeholders appreciate the change process 4) demystifying technological jargons 5) using media such as TV, radio, newspaper and billboard 6) organizing conferences, workshops and seminars can be helpful to raise political awareness and support

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-63

Provisioning Technology
Providing the necessary technology infrastructures.

Technology interventions include: 1) making fixed line telecommunication available and affordable 2) making mobile telecommunication available and affordable 3) obtaining technical assistance for access to international best practices to address technical constraints 4) developing the national ICT policy 5) teaming up with the private sector in resolving technical issues

A number of actions must be taken to ensure data availability: 1) standardizing data across agencies to facilitate exchange 2) defining the roles and responsibilities of different agencies in the data standardization process 3) obtaining agreement on some key identifiers. for instance geographic locations.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-64 Provisioning Data Data is required at different phases of e-Governance implementation. personal or institutional identifiers 4) ensuring that data capture is only through a single source 5) guaranteeing the safety and security concerns relating to data .

net-School-Planning-65 Example – Data Provisioning USA Data Reference Model (DRM) in Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA): 1) DRM helps promote common identification.UNeGov. exchange and structure 2) DRM allows higher re-use of IT investments as a shared service within their own architecture 3) DRM is the major feature of the FEA and considered the most difficult model to develop . use and appropriate sharing of data across government in three areas: categorization.

net-School-Planning-66 Step 5: Objectives 1. 4. 2.UNeGov. 7. 9. 6. 8. 3. 5. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model .

net-School-Planning-67 Strategic Objectives Specific and measurable statements about strategic goals. A strategic objective specifies: 1) specific action 2) extent of action 3) target for action 4) timeline for action Strategic objectives are related to the interventions and are implemented through programs and projects.UNeGov. .

net-School-Planning-68 Example 1 – Danish Objectives Danish e-Government objectives for the goal: public sector must provide coherent services with citizens and businesses in the centre By the end of 2006: • at least 60% of the population uses the public sector’s digital services (2003: 40%) • at least 95% of all businesses use the public sector’s digital services (2002: 72%) • at least 60% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all documents from citizens and businesses in digital form (2003: citizen 15 percent.UNeGov. businesses 21%) .

UNeGov.-wide collaboration system Knowledge-based administration system Cross-agency BPR Stage 2 Interacting Partially integrated in cluster Internal BPR 2007 Stage 1 Publishing Isolated from other agencies No process innovation On-line public services Standardization of information sharing platform Information sharing system Organization of e-Government [courtesy eGMP proposal] .net-School-Planning-69 Example 2 – Nepali Objectives Stage 4 Value portal Value-networked Value-chain creation 2011 Stage 3 Transaction Transacting Multi-channel service Fully integrated Gov.

Strategies and Projects Government to Citizen Strategy • providing on-line public services • diversification on service channel Projects • • • • government representative portal passport management system real estate registration system social insurance system [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .net-School-Planning-70 Mongolia .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-71 Mongolia .UNeGov.Strategies and Projects Government to Business Strategy • opening administration information and process • providing one-stop public service Projects • • • • recruitment and employment information system e-Customs e-Procurement business registration and approval management system • intellectual property management system [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .

UNeGov.Strategies and Projects Government to Government Strategy • computerization of government administration • integration of government information system • standardization of government administration Projects • • • • • • • national identification system e-Tax immigration management system e-Educational administration system administration portal (e-Approval.net-School-Planning-72 Mongolia . e-Document) enterprise architecture integrated government-wide information system [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .

3.UNeGov. 4. 2. 5. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model . 7.net-School-Planning-73 Step 6: Prioritizing 1. 9. 8. 6.

economic and governance dimensions Priorities must be people and development centered and defined within the context of government vision and objectives.UNeGov. .net-School-Planning-74 Criteria for Prioritizing e-Governance cannot be introduced through a single initiative. but through small achievable steps which can build success and credibility. Criteria for prioritization include: 1) available resources 2) value potentials 3) sustainability 4) impact on social.

and phase consideration on the objectives and other factors to implement the project consideration on the technological level and capacity to implement the project consideration on the law and regulation to implement the project [courtesy e-Government Master Plan in Mongolia] .net-School-Planning-75 Mongolia – Priorities 1 Emergency Importance Effect/Impact Technological Realization Feasibility Institutional Realization consideration on policy. requirements of users.UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-76 Mongolia – Priorities 2 Importance Feasibility Order Project Effect/ Technological Institutional Emergency Impact Realization Realization 1 government representative portal 8 9 8 8 2 passport registration system 7 7 6 7 3 real estate registration system 7 7 7 7 4 social insurance system 6 8 7 6 5 recruitment/employment info system 7 6 6 7 6 e-Customs 7 7 8 7 7 e-Procurement 6 7 7 6 8 business registration and approval… 7 7 7 6 9 intellectual property management… 6 7 7 7 10 national identification system 9 9 7 7 11 e-Tax 7 8 8 7 12 immigration management system 7 7 8 7 13 e-Educational administration system 7 8 8 7 14 administration portal 9 8 8 6 15 enterprise architecture 8 8 7 6 16 integrated gov.-wide information… 9 9 8 8 1-4: G2C. 5-9: G2B.UNeGov. 10-16: G2G .

net-School-Planning-77 Mongolia – Priorities 3 .UNeGov.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-78 Mongolia – Priorities 4 .

UNeGov. higher degree of fairness .net-School-Planning-79 Impact of Possible G2C Services Service employment opportunities Economic Impact/Benefits reduced advert and communication cost reduced transaction cost easier (standard) application social security contributions land registration reduced transaction cost reduced transaction cost easier to receive benefits easier to transfer properties transparency rule of law. transparency Social Impact/Benefits easier access to information on job opportunities Governance Impact/Benefits openness.

net-School-Planning-80 Impact of Possible G2B Services Service custom declaration Economic Impact/Benefits lower transaction cost timely declaration Social Impact/Benefits ease of declaration with online help lower thresholds for small sized firms Governance Impact/Benefits accountability and transparency social contributions for employee reduced transaction cost timely payment received electronically increased coverage easier to comply with rules transparent application with online support access to sociodemographic and other government databases new business opportunities greater use of information for new service opportunities for planning and provision government of services for both public and private organizations transparency .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-81 Impact of Possible G2G Services Service computerizing core business of government decentralized data processing with integrated access to virtual data warehouse e-Procurement in Government Economic Impact/Benefits reduction in transaction cost counter corruption data reuse can lead to significant cost savings cost of digital data capture is low lower transaction cost Social Impact/Benefits employment opportunities speedier processing ease of use to data eliminates redundancies speeds up operation increased use of existing capacity within government competition with private sector service provider Governance Impact/Benefits accountability counter corruption security privacy transparency transparency accountability competitiveness in cross agency service delivery .UNeGov.

consolidate fast. start with some quick wins.UNeGov. development think big 1 3 scale fast 2 start small time .net-School-Planning-82 General Principle Have the big picture.

8. 6. 2. 4. 3. 7.net-School-Planning-83 Step 7: Involving Stakeholders 1. 9. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model . 5.UNeGov.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-84

Identifying Stakeholders’ Roles
Identifying and filling stakeholders roles is important for assigning responsibilities. Typical stakeholders roles:
project team suppliers operators champions sponsors owner others those who will directly work on e-Governance projects suppliers of technologies, resources and expertise agency employees who will operate the e-Governance systems entities to drive and seek justification for the projects entities paying for the expense and efforts for the projects management of the agency that will own and use the system others with significant influence on the project

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-85

Example - Stakeholders
1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) Office of the President, Chief Executive and ministry/agency in charge of eGovernment Legislature or parliament Government agencies Political parties Citizens Unions NGOs Traditional leaders Research institutions

10) International agencies

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-86

Step 8: Monitoring and Evaluation
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model

We consider the following levels during implementation: 1) implementation plan level 2) project plan level .net-School-Planning-87 Levels There are numerous levels for monitoring and evaluation activities during the implementation of e-Governance.UNeGov.

Evaluation: • measures the impact on the implementation of the outcomes and of key indicators of progress • measured through both quantitative and qualitative performance indicators .net-School-Planning-88 Implementation Plan Level Monitoring: • tracks the amount of resources committed for implementing eGovernment.UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-89 Project Plan Level Monitoring: • examines the linkages between inputs used for implementation of activities and the direct deliverables • systematic approach to allow quick review of project performance Evaluation: • measures the impact of deliverables on the performance of the organization where the project was implemented .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-90 Indicators for e-Governance Two categories of qualitative and quantitative performance indicators can be identified to measure e-Governance progress. 1) overall classification of government institutions based on the level of transformation attained 2) more qualitative measures directly relating to broad outcome areas: a) economic b) social c) governance .UNeGov.

UNeGov. one-way interactive. and transactional • number of institutions that conform to the government portal after 3 years after 5 years . two-way interactive.net-School-Planning-91 Indicator Set 1 Time after 12 months Indicators • number of government departments that have started digitizing their basic data • number of local governments that have established web presence • number of institutions and local governments that are in each maturity levels – informational.

net-School-Planning-92 Indicator Set 2 – Economic Outcomes alternative and more cost effective delivery of services redeployment and rebalancing of the civil service increase in employment Performance Indicators • % reduction in transaction and overall operating costs • % of transactions performed on-line • number of personnel retrained • increased number of staff with new required skills • ratio of professional staff to general service staff • % unemployed • % employed in ICT related industry • online job market established • on-line taxation system in place • % increase in tax coverage • % increase in tax revenue • business registration system • % increase in foreign direct investment • % increase in internal investment improved revenue collection on taxes and service levies promotion of internal and external investment .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-93 Indicator Set 2 – Social Outcomes increased access to quality education Performance Indicators • • • • • • • • • • e-learning systems in place teacher ICT education programme in place number of schools with ICT education number of schools with Internet access education management information system tele medical services in place telemedicine service system number of medical doctors connected online integrated hospital information system % increase in eligible households and individuals entitled to social welfare % increase in customer satisfaction % increase in people using on-line services availability of personalized portals for citizens and businesses improved educational management capacity better delivery and access to health services improved health management capacity improved social welfare move to development oriented and • • people centered service delivery culture • .UNeGov.

etc. expenditure on-line access to government reports.UNeGov. and cyber crime better coordination and • cooperation between government agencies improved communications and public relations greater public participation enabling legal infrastructure • • • • • • • . e-signature. etc. recruitment. privacy. procurement.net-School-Planning-94 Indicator Set 3 . with explanatory notes legislation in place to deal with e-documentation. legislation in place concerning e-protection.) on-line availability of government’s budget. erecord keeping. documents sharing of government data and information across agencies availability of online interaction with public % of people interacting with government online timely response by government posting policy drafts online for public participation in policy development process legislation available online. e-authentication.Governance Outcomes greater accountability and transparency in public administration Performance Indicators • • • % of government business processes open to the public (tendering.

UNeGov.Indicators 1st Phase (2008) 100 70% Ministry level xDSL. LAN 2nd Phase (2011) 80 < 40% All agencies High speed Indicators UN government index Visit for getting services Connectivity of government agencies Connection method Current 126 90% Isolated Dial-up [courtesy eGMP proposal] .net-School-Planning-95 Nepal .

6. 7. 8. assessing readiness elaborating vision and expected contributions formulating strategic goals determining required interventions setting objectives identifying priorities establishing mechanisms for stakeholders involvement determining monitoring and evaluation indicators providing a business model . 5. 9. 3.UNeGov. 4.net-School-Planning-96 Step 9: Business Model 1. 2.

3) how to ensure take up of the various e-Services to be offered 4) how to attract the participation of private sector in the continued development of the e-Governance . etc.pay-as-you-go. partnership with third parties. transaction fees.UNeGov. A business model includes: 1) how e-Government solutions would be developed – outsourcing versus internal development 2) funding options for provided services .net-School-Planning-97 Developing a Business Model A plan for ensuring the sustainability of e-Government in terms of resources and adoption. bonds.

operate and maintain the infrastructure and front end services • put up commercial services and advertisements in the portal .net-School-Planning-98 Example – Business Model Hong Kong Hong Kong’s Electronic Service Delivery Scheme is a mutually SAR beneficial relationship between the government and an operator. Parties Involved: 1) Government • enhance backend system • pay per transaction fee after reaching a pre-agreed transaction level 2) Operator • develop.UNeGov.

processes and people.net-School-Planning-99 Strategy Imperatives Strategy must consider services. integrated and trustworthy 4) people must be trained. 1) services must be accessible. oriented and carried along . collaborative. technology. affordable and user-friendly 2) technology must be reliable. scalable and interoperable 3) processes must be re-engineered.UNeGov.

3) What type of impact are services listed in question 2 likely to have? 4) Identify a set of useful economic.UNeGov.net-School-Planning-100 Tutorial Discussion 1) Which criteria do you consider when prioritizing potential e-Governance initiatives in your organization? 2) List three services that could be offered electronically by your organization to citizens and businesses. social and governance indicators for monitoring the development of services listed in question 2. .

Best Practices .

tie to Canada) .0.9062 (2) .9841 (5 .0.0.0.0.9058 (7) .8503 (5) .0.0.0.7619 (2) .8730 .net-School-Planning-102 Case Studies – Leading Countries Global E-Government Readiness Report 2005 Country United States Denmark Singapore South Korea E-Readiness (1) .9048 (7) .8727 E-Participation (3) .UNeGov.

United States Denmark Singapore South Korea .UNeGov. 3. 4. 2.net-School-Planning-103 United States 1.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-104 United States – Vision The strategic vision is to reform government operations – how it goes about its business and how it treats the people it serves. Guiding Principles: 1) citizen centered – not bureaucratic and agency-centered 2) result oriented – producing measurable improvements for citizens 3) market based – actively promoting innovation e-Government is one of the five key elements of the President’s Management Agenda and Performance Plan. .

recruitment and retention of qualified IT workforce 4) continue to modernize agency IT management around citizen-centered lines of business 5) engage agency leadership to support e-Government project implementation .UNeGov.net-School-Planning-105 United States .Goals Specific goals outlined by the US Government: 1) simplify work processes to improve service to citizens 2) use annual budget process and other OMB requirements to support eGovernment implementation 3) improve project delivery through development.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-106 United States – Major Challenges leadership support strengthening the connections between Lead Agencies. Partner Agencies. CIO's towards cooperative implementation of projects addressing current policies and budget practices that reinforces “small-hat” agency centric thinking providing more resources in general (dollar and staff) and make the budget process more transparent and effective providing better understanding of the inter-relationship among the e-Government initiatives and improving the interfaces between OMB and Lead Agencies parochialism funding communication .

UNeGov. efficient rule making process federal and state agencies access to map related data enable communication between federal heath enterprises .gov recreation one-stop IRS free filing online access for loans USA services e-rulemaking geospatial one-stop consolidated health informatics a single point of access to determine eligibility for government benefits and services online access to information on recreational sites free online preparation and electronic tax filing online access to locate loans government-wide citizen and customer service participation in high-quality.Initiatives govBenefits.net-School-Planning-107 United States .

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-108

United States – Initiatives (cont)
G2C G2B GovBenefits.Gov, Recreation One-Stop, IRS free filing, Online Access for Loans, USA Services, e-Rulemaking* e-Rulemaking*, Expanding Electronic Tax Products for Businesses, Federal Asset Sales, International Trade Process Streamlining, OneStop Business Compliance, Consolidate Health Informatics Geospatial one-stop, Disaster Management, SafeCom, E-Vital, E-Grant e-Training, Recruitment One Stop, Enterprise HR Integration, eClearance, e-Payroll, e-Travel, Integrated Acquisition Environment, eRecords Management

G2G G2E

Horizontal e-Authentication

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-109

United States – Readiness

tele-density

fixed lines – 268 million (2005) or 900/1000 people mobile cellular – 219,400,000 (2005) or 735/1000 people

internet literacy figures population

internet users – 205,326,680 (2005) or 688/1000 people age 15 and above that can read and write (2003 est.) - 99% 301,139,947 (July 2007 est.)

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-110

Denmark

1. 2. 3. 4.

United States Denmark Singapore South Korea

Vision Digitalization must contribute to the creation of an efficient and coherent public sector with a high quality of service. 1) Five signposts drawn-up to monitor the realization of the vision.net-School-Planning-111 Denmark . 2) A set of specific targets are specified for each of the five signposts. . with citizens and businesses in the centre.UNeGov.

2 Signpost 1: Public sector must provide coherent services with citizens and businesses in the centre 1) at least 60% of the population uses public sector’s digital services 2) at least 95% of all businesses use the public sector’s digital services 3) at least 60% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all documents from citizens and businesses in digital form Signpost 2: e-Government must result in improved service quality and the release of resources 1) at least 75% of all digitalization projects release resources.net-School-Planning-112 Denmark – Signposts 1. and at lest 25% do so on a large 2) the level of satisfaction of citizens and business with quality of public services is increased .UNeGov.

1m digital certs have been issued to citizens. 4 Signpost 3: The public sector must work and communicate digitally 1) at least 80% of all public authorities receive at least a quarter of all documents sent by other public authorities in digital form (2003: 37%) 2) at least 60% of all public authorities can communicate securely in digital form with other public authorities. workers and businesses .net-School-Planning-113 Denmark – Signposts 3.UNeGov. citizens and businesses 3) at least 60% of all authorities utilize electronic case management Signpost 4: e-Government must be based on a coherent and flexible infrastructure 1) no more than 15% of all public authorities state that the absence of common public sector is a significant obstacle (2003: 30%) 2) no more than 15% of public authorities state that the lack of common public sector standards is a significant obstacle 3) a total of at least 1.

net-School-Planning-114 Denmark – Signpost 5 Signpost 5: Public sector manager must lead the way and ensure that their own organizations are capable of realizing the vision: 1) no more than 10% of public authorities state that lack of political will and clear goals is a significant obstacle 2) at least 75% of all digitalization projects lead to simplification of working practices.UNeGov. and at least 25% do so on a large scale .

UNeGov. improvements in efficiency that follow a digitalization process may be harvested by other organizations. generally too much focus on technical aspects of IT without due regard to organizational issues. existing culture does not support inter-organizational approaches and actions. poor management insight into business thinking and familiarity with project management. .net-School-Planning-115 Denmark – Major Challenges lack of familiarity with the vision and strategy wide-spread “bunkerculture” unresolved “sow-harvest” issues lack of managerial commitment and skills one-sided IT thinking in-depth knowledge of the vision and strategy is not wide-spread.

job searches by labour offices. corporate tax declaration. joint electronic document management system (FESD). VAT declaration and notification. application for building permission. personal documents. environment-related permits. health related services. social contributions for employees. declaration to the police . e-Procurement infrastructure. public procurement.net-School-Planning-116 Denmark – Initiatives G2C income tax declaration. portal. e-Identification infrastructure. submission of statistical offices. announcement of moving. car registration. public libraries. notification. certificates request and delivery. customs declaration. social security contributions.UNeGov. G2B Horizontal .

) or 630/1000 persons mobile cellular – 5.99% 5.762.UNeGov.487.500 (2005) or 69% age 15 and above that can read and write .800 (2004 Est.net-School-Planning-117 Denmark .168 Million (2004) or 940/1000 persons internet users – 3.450.Readiness tele-density internet literacy figures population fixed lines – 3.661 .

4.UNeGov. 3. United States Denmark Singapore South Korea . 2.net-School-Planning-118 Singapore 1.

. across organizational boundaries. It is a government that works as one. whether in providing information that engages citizens.net-School-Planning-119 Singapore .Vision To be an Integrated Government (iGov) that delights customers and connects citizen through Infocomm.UNeGov. to reap synergies and exploit new opportunities in all aspects. or being intelligent and interactive in fully understanding customers need to deliver quality services that delight them.

net-School-Planning-120 Singapore .Targets 1) 8 out of 10 users are satisfied with the overall quality of e-services 2) 9 out of 10 users would recommend transacting with government through e-services 3) 8 out of 10 users are very satisfied with the level of clarity and usefulness of information published online on government policies.UNeGov. programmes and initiatives .

net-School-Planning-121 Singapore – Strategic Thrusts Identified 4 strategic thrusts: 1) increasing reach and richness of e-services 2) increasing citizens’ mindshare in e-engagement 3) enhancing capacity and synergy in government 4) enhancing national competitive advantage .UNeGov.

UNeGov.net-School-Planning-122 Singapore – New Initiatives There are three major initiatives under the iGov2010 plan: Unique Establishment Identifier m-Government • establishing a Unique Establishment Identifier (UEI) for establishments in place of the use of multiple identifiers. Solution Architecture and Technical Architecture (TA) . • driving the implementation of m-services and the deployment of central infrastructure for m-services • ensuring a consolidated approach by government agencies towards the implementation of m-services Singapore Government • providing a blueprint covering Business Area Enterprise Architecture Architecture (BA). Information Architecture (IA).

learning and employment. PRAISE (promotion. education.net-School-Planning-123 Singapore – Past Initiatives G2C eCitizen Portal. and transport and travel G2B G2G G2E TradeNet (EDI System). recreation and sports. Pay Per Use Electronic Toll Booths Pac@Gov (pay and claim portal for payroll services). family and community development. TRAISI (training administration system on the intranet for ministry of education staff) . health and environment. housing. Online Government Procurement E-Court of Justice.UNeGov. defense and security. ranking and appraisal system). Online Tax Filing eCitizens cover: culture.

private sector. . civic and voluntary organizations. research institutes. community groups.Testimony Singapore’s huge success in e-Government is attributed to the close cooperation between Government agencies.net-School-Planning-124 Singapore . academia.UNeGov.

) internet literacy figures population .800 (2005) or 950/1000 persons internet users – 2.256.UNeGov.492.800 (2005) or 410/1000 persons mobile cellular – 4.Readiness tele-density fixed lines – 1.421.150 (July 2006 est.net-School-Planning-125 Singapore .92% 4.800 (2005) or 540/1000 persons age 15 and above that can read and write .847.

3. 4. 2.net-School-Planning-126 South Korea 1. United States Denmark Singapore South Korea .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-127 South Korea .Vision To become the “World’s Best Open e-Government” as follows: 1) increase on-line public services to 85% 2) rise into top 10 ranking in the world for business support competitiveness 3) reduce visits for civil service applicants to 3 visits per year 4) raise the utilization rate of e-Government programs to 60% .UNeGov.

National Goals 1) 2) 3) 4) build a democracy with the people build a society of balanced social growth contribute to an era of peace and prosperity in northeast Asia GNP per capita of USD 20.net-School-Planning-128 South Korea .000 .UNeGov.

net-School-Planning-129 South Korea .UNeGov.Goals Achieving the vision requires to: 1) innovate the way government works 2) innovate civil services 3) innovate information resource management 4) reform the legal system .

net-School-Planning-130 South Korea – Agenda / Programs Goal 1: Innovate the way government works 1. e-Diplomacy system 9. building e-Auditing system 5. Establishing e-working process 1. realizing local e-Government 4. building integrated criminal justice service system 7.UNeGov. comprehensive informatization of national and public finance 3. realizing e-National assembly 6. real-time management of national agenda . digitalizing document processing procedures 2. comprehensive informatization of HR management 8.

net-School-Planning-131 South Korea – Agenda / Programs Goal 1: Innovate the way government works 2.UNeGov. Expanding Sharing of Administrative Information 3. Service Oriented BPR 10. expanding of administrative information sharing 11. developing Government Business Reference Model .

Enhancing Civil Service 12.net-School-Planning-132 South Korea – Agenda / Programs Goal 2: Innovate civil services 4. comprehensive food and drug information service 18. enhancing internet-based civil services 13. internet-based administrative judgment service .UNeGov. integrated national disaster management service 14. integrated national welfare service 17. advanced architectural administrative information system 15. integrated tax service 16. comprehensive employment information service 19.

support for exporting e-Government solutions 6. comprehensive foreigner support service 24. e-Commerce service 23. single-window for business support service (G4B0) 21. Increasing Electronic Citizen Engagement 25. increasing on-line citizen participants . integrated national logistics information service 22.net-School-Planning-133 South Korea – Agenda / Programs Goal 2: Innovate civil services 5. Enhancing Business Support Service 20.UNeGov.

Strengthening Information. establishing government wide ITA 8.net-School-Planning-134 South Korea – Agenda / Programs Goal 3: Innovate Information Resource Management 7. strengthening e-Government communications networks (e Gov Net) 28. 30. building information security system 9. restructuring informatization organizations and Organizations and personnel Personnel Goal 4: Reforming the Legal System 10. Comprehensive Standardization of Information Resource 26. Legislation 31. Strengthening Information Security System 29. reforming the legal system for e-Government and security .UNeGov. building a government-wide NCIA 27.

) .000 (2005) or 486/1000 persons mobile cellular – 38.UNeGov.745.846.823 (July 2006 est.342.000 (2005) or 694/1000 persons age 15 and above that can read and write .net-School-Planning-135 South Korea .97.000 (2005) or 785/1000 persons internet literacy figures population internet users – 33.9% 48.Readiness tele-density fixed lines – 23.900.

Summary .

opportunities and threat of the organization 5) strategies are determined based on readiness assessment results as well as the strategic goals 6) stakeholders involvement throughout the whole process is critical 7) a business plan is essential for the sustainability of e-Governance .net-School-Planning-137 Strategic Planning Summary 1) a clear vision understood by all stakeholders is the first step 2) the strategic planning process should involve all major stakeholders 3) readiness assessment is one of the most crucial aspects of strategic planning as it establishes the current state of the organization 4) readiness assessment must implicitly determine the strength. weakness.UNeGov.

UNeGov. 2. . 8) • strategic plan must be communicated to all stakeholders (9). 6) • providing a business plan and determining control mechanisms (7. 3) • required interventions are the strategies derived through the e-readiness results and available goals (4) • setting priorities helps the formulation of effective and viable objectives (5.net-School-Planning-138 Strategic Planning Process Nine activity areas shown: • e-readiness assessment may be carried out in parallel with vision and goal elaboration (1.

Western Australian Public Sector . Agency and Civil Society Global e-Government Readiness Reports Plan of Action for e-Government Development E-Government Imperative E-Government Handbook for Developing Countries E-Government Strategy Documents for: • United States.net-School-Planning-139 Major Sources of Information UNPAN UNDESA OECD InfoDev Virtual library of e-Governance and Public Sector Reports E-Readiness Questionnaires for Central. Pakistan. New Zealand. Denmark.UNeGov. Singapore.

Republic of Kenya All participants for supporting the event.UNeGov. . Office of the President.net-School-Planning-140 Acknowledgement We wish to thank: 1) 2) 3) 4) East Africa Community and its member states Canadian e-Policy Resource Center E-Government Directorate.

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