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ELL Lesson

Name: Emily McGann

Date: December 3, 2010

Grade Level/Subject: 1st grade Science

Prerequisite Knowledge:
Students have experienced snow before

Approximate Time: 45 minutes

Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:


Students will identify winter weather vocabulary out of a list of weather vocabulary.
Students will illustrate and explain a winter scene.

Content Standards:
STATE GOAL 11: Understand the processes of scientific inquiry and technological design to
investigate questions, conduct experiments and solve problems.
A. Know and apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry.
11.A.1a Describe an observed event.
11.A.1b Develop questions on scientific topics.
STATE GOAL 12: Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and interconnections
of the life, physical and earth/space sciences.
E. Know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of the Earth
and its resources.
12.E.1b Identify and describe patterns of weather and seasonal change.

Materials/Resources/Technology:
Paper Pencil

Implementation:

Time
Opening of lesson: (Objectives, hook, behavior expectations)
Ask students what they think of when they think of winter weather?
What do they think of when they think of storms?
Can you describe a storm, like a blizzard, for me?
Write these words down on the board (students can include general weather
words they learned in other parts of the unit and we will categorize them
later):
Sun Sunny Cloud Cloudy Wind
Windy Thermometer Temperature Rain Rainy
Snow Fog Foggy Humid Meteorologist
Hot Cold Cool Warm Umbrella
Puddle Watch Warning Wet

What can you do to protect yourself against the dangers of the storm (like
the cold, windiness, impaired vision, etc.)?
Info for teachers (explain to students at their level): Winter storms are
among nature's most impressive weather spectacles. Their combination of
heavy snow, freezing rain, and high winds can totally disrupt modern
civilization: closing down airports and roads, creating power outages, and
downing telephone lines. Winter storms remind us how vulnerable we are to
nature's awesome power.
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/winter_storms/index.htm

Talk about the dangers of winter storms, like blizzards, and discuss
strategies for keeping your body warm and protected. Connect the strategies
you have to the student responses.

Teacher says: “If you do need to go outside in very cold temperatures,


follow these basic guidelines to keep your body warm and protected:
-Bundle up and pay extra attention to your hands, feet, and head.
-If you're going to be outside for an extended period of time, try to
come in and warm up every 30 to 60 minutes.
-If your fingers, toes, nose, ears, or any other part of your body feels
numb, go inside as soon as possible.
-If you get wet or feel numb, go inside and remove wet clothing as
soon as possible. Wiggle your fingers and toes to increase
circulation.”
Procedures: Include critical thinking questions and accommodations for individual
needs

Invite children to glance out the classroom window, then brainstorm a flurry
of weather words together. Add the children's responses to the words on the
chalkboard.

Ask children which words have to do with winter.


Have children circle those words on the chalkboard.
Ask them to explain their reason for choosing the winter word.
Have children share their experiences with winter weather. Ask them to:
Tell about favorite things you do in winter weather.
Tell about a time you were in a winter storm.

ELL strategies: I will have some students write the words on the board, I
will have some write their experiences with winter weather on paper, other
will draw and explain their experiences in words, etc. How do I address
ELLs with this lesson? Students may act out their experiences if they cannot
find the right words to describe it. There will be pictures next to each word
(hot= picture of sun).

When students are writing or depicting the difference between a blizzard


watch and a blizzard warning, I will allow more time to students who take
longer to complete assignments. For the students would move more quickly
and excel at first grade science topics, I will allow them to research radar pictures of
blizzard watches and warnings and have the describe the movement of the blizzard.
For students will no background knowledge on blizzards, I will show pictures of
blizzards and explain with the students what it feels like to be in a snow. Those with
limited knowledge of blizzards may be paired up with an “expert” to work on their
“Blizzard Watch and Warning” journal page. Students who need a quiet place to
work and do their “Blizzard Watch and Warnings” journal page can go to our
literature center or to the rug with a folder behind their journal page to complete the
task. I will allow students to move anywhere in the room that they want to be
comfortable to complete their task and get rid of some energy through
Summary/Closing:
Students will learn what a “blizzard watch” and “blizzard warning” are in
future lessons, so the students will create pictures of winter weather (with
light snow falling, snow already on the ground, and snow falling heavily and
covered the ground). We will use these pictures to make connections to a
“blizzard watch” and “blizzard warnings.” Students will describe, using at
least 3 words from our list, and through a picture (or ELLs will just draw
pictures) of what winter weather would look like on their Journal paper.
Student Assessment:
Evaluate the Journal pages for use of at least 3 words from list and
understanding of winter weather in pictures (way people dressed, evidence of
snow, etc.).

ELL rationale:
Classroom Make Up
This first grade classroom with be comprised of 18 students. The gender is at about a 50-50 ratio
with half the students being female and half the students being male. There are 6 Native Spanish speakers
in the classroom, 2 of the students just moved to the United within the past year. The 6 Spanish-speaking
students are pulled out of the classroom for half of the day, while the 2 students new to the country are only
in my classroom for a couple hours out of the day. There are students of Korean, Guinean (French African),
and Vietnamese background along with the majority of the students with a predominantly white, American

Purpose
Students are to learn about a blizzard, how it affects people, and how to describe it. There is a
special focus on the words that meteorologists and the weathermen on the news use to describe the severity
and reality of the storm, a warning or a watch. Students will work with a lot of key vocabulary in this
lesson, so the words will be translated into the various languages and give illustrations with them to help
students understand what they mean. The vocabulary could have been translated into Korean, French, or
Vietnamese as well, but those students understand English enough to stay in the classroom all day because
they were either raised in the United States or moved here before they learned to talk, so they do not need
the extra assistance with vocabulary. It might be interesting to use those words to make a comparison
between languages if you wanted to talk about different cultures.

Strategies/Skills
* Using translation of words used and key vocabulary.
* Providing pictures and illustrations along with discussion and key vocabulary
* Provide comprehensible input by using gestures that express what you are saying
* Can use video of blizzards to build background knowledge for students
* Explain cultural expressions such as “I’m freezing my toes off” and “I have icicles hanging from
my nose.” Students unfamiliar with cold weather may not understand what happens, where people
get cold the most, or what it feels like to be very cold.
* Label illustrations and draw pictures for words
*Group discussion of personal experiences
*Allowing to write, draw, or verbally explain understanding
Incorporation of Multicultural Materials, Information, and Student Experiences
English Language Learners have words translated for them with pictures attached to show a
cultural representation of the word in our culture and one that is relevant to their culture as well. The
students share their personal experiences with blizzards and snow, so everyone can build their concept of a
blizzard. Information with be said slowly and with a lot of gestures (sheltering instruction), so students can
absorb and understand the most material possible. The school has a pull-out program for the first graders,
so they can get the added help they need in the ELL classroom with a teacher who speaks Spanish, if
something is misunderstood or the concept was not grasped at all.

Use of L1 Language
The main classroom teacher may only know a few Spanish words, if any, so the Spanish-speaking
ELL students are pulled out of the classroom for half or more of the day. Code switching is accepted in this
classroom, as long as teacher can understand their response in context and know what they were trying to
convey. Students are expected to read, write, and speak English, but there are content books written in
Spanish available for the student’s use in the classroom library.
Instructions often include a lot of pictures and minimal reading because students have a hard time
reading at this age, regardless of the language they speak. Directions are given verbally, non verbally, and
through illustrations as well.

Supplemental Materials
Books on blizzards (with lots of pictures)
Videos and pictures about blizzards
Spanish-English content books on weather
Translation sheet of key vocabulary
Markers to draw and illustrate understanding
Tape recorder in case teacher wants to refer back to a student’s response.

Accommodations and Possible Questions- throughout lesson


ELL strategies: I will have some students write the words on the board, I will have some write their
experiences with winter weather on paper, other will draw and explain their experiences in words, etc. How
do I address ELLs with this lesson? Students may act out their experiences if they cannot find the right
words to describe it. There will be pictures next to each word (hot= picture of sun).

When students are writing or depicting the difference between a blizzard watch and a blizzard warning, I
will allow more time to students who take longer to complete assignments. For the students would move
more quickly and excel at first grade science topics, I will allow them to research radar pictures of blizzard
watches and warnings and have the describe the movement of the blizzard. For students will no background
knowledge on blizzards, I will show pictures of blizzards and explain with the students what it feels like to
be in a snow. Those with limited knowledge of blizzards may be paired up with an “expert” to work on
their “Blizzard Watch and Warning” journal page. Students who need a quiet place to work and do their
“Blizzard Watch and Warnings” journal page can go to our literature center or to the rug with a folder
behind their journal page to complete the task. I will allow students to move anywhere in the room that they
want to be comfortable to complete their task and get rid of some energy through walking.