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INTRODUCTION ABOUT STUDY

1. Definition: ³Give a man a fish he will eat it. Train a man to fish, he will feed his family´. This is a saying which highlights the importance of training. Training is a learning experience in that it seeks a relatively permanent change in an individual that will improve the activity to perform on the job. It involves the changing of skills, knowledge, attitudes or behaviour. It may mean changing what employees know, how they work, their attitudes toward their work, or their interaction with their coworkers or supervisor. Training is a learning experience that is planned & carried out by the organization to enable more skilled task behaviour by the trainee. Training provides the ability to detect & correct error. Training provides skills & abilities that may lie called on the future to satisfy the organization¶s human resource needs. 2.PRINCIPLES OF EFFECTIVE TRAINING: The facility is organized, staffed and managed to provide training that supports the facility mission Training requires a strong commitment from NPP line management to support training programmes that contribute to fulfilling company goals and objectives.

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The training mission must be clear, and individual roles and responsibilities need to be defined. NPP management must effectively direct and adequately support training activities.  A systematic approach to training is used as the primary management tool for establishing training programmes and conducting training activities. Once established, training programmes are used to train and qualify personnel. Personnel entering initial training programmes possess expected entry-level knowledge, skills, and experience.  Training activities are funded and staffed adequately to implement and maintain the training programmes. Training facilities, equipment, and materials effectively support training activities.  Training records are maintained to support management information needs and to provide required historical data.  The training staff possesses the technical and instructional knowledge, skills and attitudes to fulfill their assigned duties  Training managers, instructors, and programme development personnel possess and maintain the educational, technical, and experience qualifications required for their respective positions.  The instructional skills training programme develops the necessary instructor capabilities to fulfill training programme requirements in all applicable training settings.

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To maintain their level of skills, trainers must refresh their plant knowledge by regular periods of work or observation in the plant.  The training programme content for competent job performance is identified and included in the training programmes.  New or modified tasks selected for training are analyzed to identify new knowledge and skills to be included in the training programmes.  The initial training programme incorporates the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare trainees for task or duty area qualification. Plant personnel, training staff, and other subject matter experts, as appropriate and as needed, develop and maintain a valid plant specific task list as the basis for the training programme.  A systematic process is used to determine job performance requirements, specify training programme content, prepare supporting training

materials, and maintain the training programme.  Instructors are prepared to deliver effective and consistent training.  Trainees are evaluated regularly using written, oral, and/or performance examinations and quizzes. Remedial training and reevaluation are provided when performance standards are not met satisfactorily.  Training programmes are evaluated and modified to ensure they remain consistent with the necessary job function.

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Feedback from managers, supervisors, trainees, and former trainees is used to evaluate and modify training programmes. The conduct of training is monitored and evaluated regularly in all settings.  Trainee performance measured during training is used to evaluate and modify the training programmes. 3.Measuring the effectiveness of training Training managers are always hard-pressed to prove the effectiveness of the training programmes they conduct. Mohan Bangaruswamy gives an update on one of the most popular techniques²the Donald Kirkpatrick model One of the most popular methodologies for measuring training effectiveness was developed by Donald Kirkpatrick. This model articulates a fourstep process. Level 1: Reactions: The analysis at this level serves as inputs to the facilitator and training administrator. It enables them to make decisions on continuing the programme, making changes to the content, methodology, etc. Level 2: Participant learning: Measuring the effectiveness of training at this level is important as it gives an indication about the quantum of change vis-à-vis the learning objectives that were set. It provides critical inputs to fine-tuning the design of the programme. It also serves the important aspect of being a lead indicator for transfer of learning on to the job context.

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Level 3: Transfer of learning: At this level, we measure the application of the learning in the work context, which is not an easy task. It is not easy to define standards that can be utilized to measure application of learning and there is always this question that preys on the minds of various people: µCan all changes be attributed to the training?¶ Inputs at this level can come from participants and their supervisors. It makes sense to obtain feedback from the participants on the application of learning on the job. Level 4: Results: Many organizations would like to measure effectiveness of training at this level; the fact remains that it is not very easy to do this, as it is improbable that we can show direct linkage. However, it is worthwhile making the attempt even if the linkage at this level is indirect. 4.WARNING FLAGS: Careful analysis of deficient training programmes by INPO resulted in identification of common problems, which were identified and grouped into the following seven categories cited as warning flags, presented at the IAEA Specialists Meeting on Evaluating the Effectiveness of Training for Nuclear Facility Personnel held in Pasco, Washington, USA in 1999.

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4.1. Lack of line management ownership: Strong involvement and participation of training and line management are vital components of robust training programmes. Conversely, weak ownership of training programmes has contributed to degraded training effectiveness. An indicator of weak ownership of the training programme may be infrequent monitoring and observation of training activities. Direct observation of training activities is a necessary input to the manageron the health of the training programme. 4.2. Weak self-assessments Most stations perform self-assessments to identify weaknesses and areas for improvement in their training programmes. However, problems have resulted from these self assessments being less aggressive or less critical than necessary to identify problems. Contributing to these problems may be that training or line managers do not participate or properly direct the self-assessment. As a result, problems not identified tend to grow and amplify themselves until they are selfevident and have caused significant degradation in the training programmes. 4.3. Student dissatisfaction Student dissatisfaction with training results in students not participating in the training, not asking questions, or not providing comments. Instructors should be aware of this sort of passive feedback. Students may provide feedback after training that the material presented was not applicable to them or to their jobs.

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4.4. Isolationism Learning from others is a necessary component of a robust training programme. Stations without benchmarking or other methods of learning from other stations often do not recognize when degradation begins in training content, methods, or other programme attributes. One method used to learn from other stations is to participate in evaluations or peer reviews. 4.5. Weak use of a systematic approach Training is not part of the strategy for improving plant performance. In these cases, there is a poor link between known human performance problems and training being provided. In addition, some stations created new positions as a result of organizational. These new positions required new knowledge or skills, but the analysis was not considered as part of the change process. 4.6. Insufficient line management training expertise A working, practical knowledge of training processes and content by the responsible managers is necessary to maintain a robust training programme. The training manager is normally not able to provide this level of support for all the training programmes.

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4.7. Distractions from training The complete text for this warning flag is ³Distracting activities that focus management attention away from training.´ Every station has many varied concerns and activities, in addition to training, that must be managed in accordance with appropriate priorities. However, significant degradation in training programmes has resulted when a major station problem or regulatory issue caused management attention to be focused exclusively on that issue. 5. EVALUATION METHODS OF TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS: Training evaluation is a critical component of analyzing, designing, developing, and implementing an effective training programme. This section addresses the key elements of determining training effectiveness through evaluation activities. Several key elements of training programme effectiveness that should be addressed are: (a) Training design and development This element requires correctly designed and developed training. However, even though properly designed and developed to a defined set of job relevant criteria, if the recipients are already qualified to do the job, this training will not be effective, resulting in a waste of time and resources. (b) Training delivery The second element is addressed using a defined set of activities and methods to evaluate training delivery effectiveness.

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(c) Training implementation. The third element is critical to help management allocate resources most effectively. This element addresses activities and methods that will ensure that training to be developed is needed and that it has resulted in improved performance. Training must be evaluated in terms of how much the participation learned, how well they are using their new skills on the job & whether the training program achieved its desired results. (I) Performance ± based evaluation measures a) Post ± Training Performance Method: Evaluating training programs based on how well employed can perform their jobs after they have received the training. b) Pre- Post- Training Performance Method: Evaluating training programs based the difference in

performance before & after one receives training. c) Pre- Post Training Performance with control group Method: Evaluating training by comparing pre- post training results with individuals who did not receive the training.

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Need for Employee Training Training is necessary for improving the quality of work of employees. There are some other factors, giving rise to the need for training.  Effective performance  Production of quality goods & services  Fast changing technique  To keep pace with the development of technology  Change of profession. Importance of Training:  Training is the corner ± stone of sound management, for its makes employees more effective & productive.  The need for the training in part depends upon the company¶s selection and promotion policies. Companies that attempt to employ only people who already have the needed skills, place less emphasis on training.  On the other hand, firms that stress promotion from within may have to take special steps to ensure that employees develop the skills which will be needed.

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There is an ever present need for training men so that new & changed techniques may lie taken advantage & improvements effected in the old methods, which are usefully inefficient.  Training is a practical & vital necessity because, it enables employees to develop & rise within the organization, & increase their market value, earning power & job security. Conclusion: Training is a critical component in any organization's strategy, but organizations don't always evaluate the business impact of a training program. Given the large expenditures for training in many organizations, it is important to develop business intelligence tools that will help companies improve the measurement of training effectiveness. These tools need to provide a methodology to measure, evaluate, and continuously improve training, as well as the organizational and technical infrastructure (systems) to implement the methodology.

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OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

2.1 Objectives of the Study Primary Objectives  To analyze the effectiveness of the existing training programmes in the company.  To find out the opinions & suggestions of the trainees regarding the contents, trainers & training facilities in the company.

Secondary Objectives  To identify the extent of participation & alertness of employees during the training programmes.  To find out the Improvement in their skills and knowledge after attending the training programme.

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Scope of the Study

The main aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of training programme conducted at Congruent Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Chennai, focuses on finding out the efficiency of employees after the programme & also to find out the opinion of the trainees towards the programme, trainer, contents & organization. The present study seeks to find out training validity (whether the trainees have learnt during training) & transfer validity (whether what has been learnt is translated to enhance performance in the organization). The employees of the organization gave response during the data collection as well as the management also gave the details which related to this dissertation.

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Limitations of the Study 

Some of the respondents were unwillingness to answer the questions. 

Some of the respondents were afraid to give true information in some cases. 

There may be personal bias on the part of employees while answering to the questions. 

Due to Working time of the workers this study took some more time on collection of the data.

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1.2.Industry profile

Although Ireland¶s indigenous software industry gained international prominence during the late 1990¶s, it has a history that extends back over three decades with a particular focus on product development and selling abroad. During the past decade Ireland has gained a reputation as a leading European hub for software development with the majority of our indigenous firms focusing on significant product development in market segments such as systems software and middleware; telecommunications software; e-learning and healthcare; and insurance and banking applications.

Ireland¶s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006-2013) states that ³Ireland by 2013 will be internationally renowned for the excellence of its research, and will be to the forefront in generating and using new knowledge for economic and social progress, within an innovation driven culture.´ By building critical mass to effect these changes this will ensure that Ireland by 2013 will become a ³best-connected´ New Software Economy.

Computer software products accomplish discrete tasks and are sold as complete packages. Categories include applications, such as word processors and Web browsers; operating systems, such as Windows and Linux; and utilities.

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Most software purchases are made by businesses seeking better tools to manage the complexities of running operations, record keeping, and controlling the flow of money in and out of an enterprise. It's not always the quality of the code that determines the most successful software, but how well that software meets an actual business need. Probably the quickest way to talk yourself out of a job in this segment is to make the technology seem more important than the end user.

Innovation, Research and Development

y

The technology sector accounts for over half of total business expenditures on R&D.

y

The Industrial Development Agency Ireland invested ¼470 million in industry R&D projects in 2006.

y y

The Government allocated ¼8.2 billion to scientific research in 2006. Science Foundation Ireland was established in 2003 to fund centres for specific areas of research in engineering, technology and science.

y

Ireland ranks second in Europe in the Wallstreet Journal Index of Economic Freedom.

y

Ireland ranks highest in terms of global innovation capability in an evaluation of 26 OECD countries.

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·Productivity The sector accounts for 16% of total value added in industry and services.
y

y

GDP figures suggest that Irish productivity is among the highest in the world.

Multiplying Platforms

In the old days, software developers had to develop products for just a few different types of devices: PCs, servers, supercomputers, and the like²all of them variations on the computer. These days, with each passing year there are more varied types of devices that contain computer chips and need software to tell them how to operate²everything from in-car global positioning systems (GPS), to cell phones that allow users to play video games, to personal digital assistants (PDAs) that can send and receive email, to "smart" household appliances. This increasing variety means a need for more and more new software programs. Meanwhile, the growing use of wireless networking technologies means an even greater variety of software types. The result of all this: Plenty of work for good software developers.

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Open Source More companies, such as Credit Suisse First Boston and Merrill Lynch, are seeing the benefits of not having to pay for software and upgrades and beginning to adopt Linux environments. What's more, many organizations and even countries feel Linux adoption is a way to curb Microsoft¶s monopolistic power. Computer makers such as Dell and Hewlett-Packard are responding by shipping PCs and servers loaded with Linux. And big business-software providers such as BEA Systems, SAP, and VERITAS are making products that run on Linux.

Gaming Video games now take in more of Americans' money than movies on the big screen, which are themselves less products of photography and more shifting digital displays rendered with extremely powerful animation software. Video game giant Electronic Arts had revenue in excess of $3 billion in 2005, and lots of other players in this space are making a pretty penny.

Productivity Productivity includes word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, database management, graphic design, and other applications that help people do their jobs. Key players: Adobe (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign), Microsoft (Word, PowerPoint, Excel), Autodesk (computer-aided design applications).

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Enterprise The term denotes the large and expensive software packages sold by the likes of Oracle, SAP, and IBM that enable companies to organize the complex flow of materials, payments, and data necessary for the vast cast of global operations that keep the modern corporation working, as well as less expensive niche software packages sold by smaller, niche players in the enterprise software space.

Education Educational software helps your kids learn to read, teaches you geography or a foreign language, stimulates logical thinking, and so on. This category also comprises children's educational games, the so-far slow-to-catchon electronic-book industry, teaching resources, and music instruction. Key players: Disney, Microsoft, Scholastic.

Job Prospects Much of the activity in computer software is happening in Silicon Valley, but you also might check out opportunities in other high-tech regions including Boston, Austin, Minneapolis, New York City, Denver, Dallas, Atlanta, Boca Raton, and the Research Triangle region of North Carolina.

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Successful software businesses are of course built on more than technical talent. Sales, marketing, and customer service provide many jobs for those who prefer thinking and talking about software to actually writing it. On the technical side, high-level software architecture skills are likely to become more valuable as the nuts and bolts of software projects are outsourced overseas

Software Engineer Software engineers are programmers who write the code that makes the software products run. Tasks include implementing and debugging the software. Senior software engineers do some of these same things but also make higherlevel design decisions.

Product Specialist As a product specialist you master a specific area within the software development process and attend to relevant projects. For instance, you might take on the area of customer service and help develop customer service procedures for titles published by your company.

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Graphic Artist Some of the happiest people in this business are the visual designers. The tools and techniques are constantly changing and improving²and though you have to report to the same project or product manager the programmers do, you're often given much more leeway and room for creativity. Customers also understand and pay a lot of attention to the graphics, and if they like yours, you have an enviable career ahead of you

Technical Support Specialist Tech-support people staff the phones and answer questions from consumers who recently purchased the product. If you don't have a tech background, this is a great way to break into the industry, and recent college grads from various backgrounds can do very well in this area of the company.

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COMPANY PROFILE

Congruent is a desired software development partner for both large and start-up organizations. It has the resources, dedication and experience to work well on crucial and time sensitive projects. Congruent worked like our extended arm for the development of our direct marketing website BOGOPOD.com." Congruent will take part in the event through booth participation (Booth No#1309) where senior executives from the company will interact with third party administrators and plan provider organization detailing the services offered and communicate Congruent¶s value propositions.

About Congruent SEI CMMi Level 5 and ISO 9001:2000 certified Congruent Solutions is a pioneer in providing IT and back-office pension plan administration services to the retirements industry. Congruent has offices in California, New

Jersey, London, Luxembourg, and Singapore, while its delivery centre is based in Chennai, India. The company has an excellent track record in developing solutions on Microsoft, Java and Open Source technologies. Its trained administrators manage both Defined Contribution and Defined Benefit plans.

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Congruent to offer FAS 158 and Funding Valuation services Chennai, March 10, 2009: Congruent Solutions, a pioneer in providing IT and back-office pension plan administration services to the retirement services in the USA. Congruent provides comprehensive plan administration for Defined Benefit plans. Congruent¶s trained administrators handle the entire process from data scrubbing to liability calculations, liability change comments and analyses, and actuarial reports. The Funding Valuation determines the plan¶s liabilities ± the amount of money needed to pay the benefits earned by the members to the date of the valuation.

Congruent Solutions is an SEI CMMi Level 5 and ISO 9001:2000 certified software & KPO services company with presence in United States, Asia Pacific, Europe. To support mission critical business processes and applications, we have put in place world-class infrastructure in our delivery center based in Chennai, India.

strengths

y y y y

Skilled team Large company maturity with the soul of a small company Robust Infrastructure Domain knowledge with industries certifications

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Congruent Solutions provides Technology Services and Pension Plan Administration Services. We have an excellent track record in successfully incubating offshore delivery centers for organizations looking to outsource technology and business processes for the first time in a cost-effective manner.

Congruent is a mature IT services company with an excellent track record in developing solutions using Microsoft, Java & Open source technologies. Our BPO division provides comprehensive back office services to the Pension Plan Administration industry.

Congruent focuses on providing solutions in two major domains namely Retirement/Pensions Administration and Education. The focus gives us the ability to speak the same language as our customers and function as an extended delivery arm for clients worldwide.

Congruent Research Labs The recently launched Congruent Research Lab identifies emerging technologies in its area of focus and builds frameworks and small

products/prototypes on those technologies to develop competencies in nascent technology areas.

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Core Values

y

We put our customers first, as without them we have no reason to be in business.

y

We encourage high levels of cooperation and communication among our customers, our suppliers and ourselves.

y

We value openness and transparency in all our communication and believe in not committing what we cannot deliver

y

We deploy our resources to create value for our customers, our stockholders, our communities and ourselves.

y

We are passionate about excellence at an individual and organizational level in everything we do

y y

We treat each other with the utmost respect We provide a safe and rewarding place to work, a place where we are proud of our company and our work, and have fun doing what we do.

y

We believe that we all are caring, loyal, honest individuals; doing our best to further interests of our company and our colleagues.

y

We work together towards building a great company, taking personal responsibility for our tasks and our actions

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Leadership

At Congruent, a strong Leadership is working towards common goals and a set of shared vision and values, steering the company towards exponential growth...

Value Proposition

Congruent is the only company based out of India to be ISO 9001:2000 certified for its Pension Plan Administration (401k) Services. We have a robust infrastructure and security practices that assures our customers of data security.

More importantly, we speak your language. Due to our single focus on Pension Plan Administration space, we have a very short learning curve in understanding your processes. Key members of our team are also undergoing NIPA and ASPPA certifications to further enhance our knowledge of the industry.

y y y

4 years of pension administration (401k) experience Experience in working on SunGard Relius, Omni, SRT, ASC Stringent focus on security & quality: CMMi Level 5 & ISO 9001:2000 certified

y y y y

Seasoned In-house pension administration staff Robust process and domain knowledge Reduce Operational cost Training in a various DC and DB related domain areas

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Application Development

Congruent¶s

application

development

services

help

organization

automate business process using technology in a very cost effective manner. We have unmatched experience in developing web applications using Microsoft, Java and Open Source technologies.

We have a mature software development methodology providing an excellent framework for migration of client requirements to our development centre, development, testing and finally transitioning of the developed application to the clients place. SPLMŒ, a tool built 'in-house' provides 24/7 window on the work-in-progress.

Our services include

y y y y

Customized application development Enhancements Migration Re-engineering

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Maintenance

Maintenance of applications is as critical to businesses as developing. Changes in business processes and user patterns call for constant

enhancements and maintenance. Our Fixit methodology highlights our expertise in handling such client needs.

Product Development

Product development services demands a process framework that allows quick turn-around times, delivering multiple builds, ability to replicate product technology platform as well as test environments and transparency in efforts spent by the offshore team. Congruent¶s processes are geared to address these requirements and over the years, we have mastered the art of managing product development services for organizations.

Microsoft

Congruent has an extremely strong Microsoft practice. One of our applications for a leading utilities company made it to the InfoWorld Top 100 list in 2004.

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We have been delivering sophisticated applications using the latest technologies from Microsoft. Being a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner, Congruent has extensive experience in working with Microsoft¶s .NET family of products, COM+, multi-threaded architecture and MSMQ (Microsoft Message Queues), etc.

Resource Correlator

Designed and developed several Web applications for an important player in e-learning. The Resource Correlator application is a client server application used by companies to correlate resources like books, CD-ROMs, toys etc, with the knowledge base that provides information about the curriculum, criteria, standards etc.

Congruent Research Labs

With a new technology appearing on the scene, the decision making process can become a nightmare for CTOs.

Congruent Research Lab (CRL) is a farsighted initiative undertaken by us. CRL serves two purposes, one, it acts as a lab where we experiment newer technologies and are tested, two, we undertake Research Outsourcing assignments on behalf of organizations that would want to make a rational decision on the choice of technology.CRL operates under the aegis of Mr. Dorai Thodla, a Silicon Valley veteran.

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Work Culture

We know how important it is for our employees to strike a balance between their work and personal lives. Our flexible working arrangements include Flex time as well as Telecommuting (Work From Home) for employees.

The performance of an employee plays a major role in approval of his/her telecommuting request. There is a list of specific positions that are ineligible for telecommuting due to the nature of the job and not because of gender, race, age, etc. Eg: Front office, System administration and General Administration are some of the jobs in the exclusion list.

With the convenience of laptops, mobile phones, internet access to e-mail and technological innovations, and Congruent¶s serious commitment to flexibility in the workplace, we offer our people a flexible approach on a need basis.

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1.4.Review of Literature

The review of related literature is an essential part of a research project. Survey of related literature and studies implies locating, reading, evaluating reports of research as well as reports of casual observation and opinion that are related to the individuals planned research projects. Several studies have been made in the effectiveness of training. Very limited number of studies, however, could be found and attempting to find out comprehensively the effectiveness of training programme in organization. Many researchers have attempted to find out briefly review the work already undertaken and methodology employed. A brief review of select studies has been presented in the following pages. Vocational Training of Unemployed Workers in Belgium In this paper they estimate, for the 1989-93 period in Belgium, the effect of vocational classroom training on the rate of transition from unemployment. They propose a ³control function´ estimator accounting for variable treatment effects. In the absence of interaction effects between explanatory variables this estimator identifies treatment effects free from selection bias.

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A natural experiment induces exogenous sub-regional variation in the training supply. This provides over-identifying restrictions that cannot be rejected. During participation, the transition rate decreases by 23% to 30%. Afterwards it increases by 47% to 73%. Making training available for a broader population would, however, reduce the effectiveness of the programme. JEL Classification: C41, J24, J64, J68 Sisson (1994) defines the strategic level contribution of HR as ³the overall and coherent long term planning and shorter term management, control and monitoring of an organization¶s human resources so as to gain from them the maximum added value and to best position them to achieve the organization¶s corporate goals and mission´. A Strategic HR Plan enables organizations to align resources to corporate strategy. It provides information on how the HR functions will support the goals and strategies of the organization and ensure that HR planning and practices are consistent across the organization. It outlines how the gaps between future and present capability will be addressed. The strategic HR plan supports and is aligned to the corporate mission, vision, values and strategies. It is an essential planning document. It is important that the strategic HR plan is developed only after a clear direction is established and understood. It is important that we can avoid the situation where the strategic HR plan drives strategy.

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Jeff Hyman (2000) defines training as a planned process to modify the attitude, knowledge or skill behavior through learning experience to achieve effective performance in an activity or range of activities. Its purpose is to develop the abilities of the individual and satisfy the current and future needs of the organization. Tom Peters says the competitive edge will be maintained by those organizations, which use their workforce more efficiently. From this it follows that effective training is paramount for survival and growth. Clinical supervision has a vital role in postgraduate and, to some extent, undergraduate medical education. However it is probably the least investigated, discussed and developed aspect of clinical education. This large-scale, interdisciplinary review of literature addressing supervision is the first from a medical education perspective. To review the literature on effective supervision in practice settings in order to identify what is known about effective supervision. The empirical basis of the literature is discussed and the literature reviewed to identify understandings and definitions of supervision and its purpose; theoretical models of supervision; availability, structure and content of supervision; effective supervision; skills and qualities of effective supervisors; and supervisor training and its effectiveness.

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The evidence only partially answers our original questions and suggests others. The supervision relationship is probably the single most important factor for the effectiveness of supervision, more important than the supervisory methods used. Feedback is essential and must be clear. It is important that the trainee has some control over and input into the supervisory process. Finding sufficient time for supervision can be a problem. Trainee behaviors and attitudes towards supervision require more investigation; some behaviors are detrimental both to patient care and learning. Current supervisory practice in medicine has very little empirical or theoretical basis. This review demonstrates the need for more structured and

methodologically sound programmes of research into supervision in practice settings so that detailed models of effective supervision can be developed and thereby inform practice. J.kevin Ford (1997) explains that the concept of training effectiveness has been expanded in recent years to incorporate notions about trainee & organizational characteristics. Training needs to be viewed as more central to the functioning of organizations alongside financial, strategic & operational concerns The challenge for training researchers is to infuse the ³old bottles´ current training effectiveness paradigms with ³new wine´ - expanded & enhanced thinking about the potential offered through sound training design.

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Biswajeet Pattanayak (2002) discussed training effectiveness is to impart new entrants the basic knowledge & skill they need for an intelligent performance of defined tasks. To assist employees to function more effectively in their present positions by exposing them to latest concepts, information & techniques & developing the skills they will need in their future roles. To broaden the minds of managers by providing them with opportunities for an interchange of experiences within & outside with a view to correct the narrow outlook that may arises from over specialization 1. Ensure that the management commits itself to allocate major resources & adequate time to training. 2. Ensure that training contributes to competitive strategies of the firm. Different strategies need different HR skills for implementation. 3. Ensure that a comprehensive & systematic approach to training exists, & training & retraining are done at all levels on a continuous & ongoing basis.

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Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean deals his article reviews theories and conceptual frameworks necessary to describe three factors affecting transfer of training. This information helps HRD professionals understand why people wish to change their performance after attending a training program, what training design contributes to people's ability to transfer skills successfully, and what kind of organizational environment supports the transfer. This article also provides HRD implementation strategies to help organizations achieve a high level of transfer.

According to C.B Mamoria, the principles of an effective training programme are The objectives & scope of a training plan should be defined before its development is begun, in order to provide a basis for common agreement & co-operative action. The techniques & processes of a training programme should be related directly to the needs & objectives of an organization.

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Dirk D.Stener, Gregory H.Dobbins, Wanda A.Trahan (July 1991) discussed in the journal of organizational behaviour in the topic of an Attribution model of training. In this topic author discussed about the training research is often criticized for being a theoretical. Further, the research has typically ignored the role of the trainer. We present a model that applies attribution theory to the training process with a focus on the attributions that trainers make for trainee behavior and their implications for training effectiveness. The impact of trainees own attributions is also discussed. The model indicates how characteristics of both trainers and trainees can influence the attribution processes. Researchable propositions are presented in conjunction with the major points.

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CHAPTER - 2

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This section deals with the research design to be used, data collection methods used, Sampling techniques to be used, field work to be carried out, analysis and interpretation to be done, limitations inherent in the project and finally, coverage (Scope) of the research work. Research Design: A Research Design is purely and simply the framework or plan for a study that guides the collection and analysis of data. It is a blueprint that is followed completing the study. Descriptive Research Design: Descriptive research design is also called explanatory design. This is the one that simply describes something such as demographic characteristics of employees. The descriptive study is typically concerned with determining frequency with which something occurs or how tow variable vary together. This study is typically guided by an initial hypothesis.

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Sample Size : For my project work I have taken 100 samples which include top, middle and lower level management people and other staff members of the Congruent

Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Chennai.
Field of study: The research has conducted the study among the employees of

Congruent Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Chennai.
Period of study: The period of study consists of 1 months (August 2009) Data Collection : In a broader sense two types of data are available to researcher. These are, á Primary Data and á Secondary Data

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Primary Data: Through the secondary data are less expensive and can be collected within a shorter time period yet, these data do not solve the research problems completely. This may de due to different units of its measurement; different classes employed to report data, data may be outdated at the time of the publication, this data may be adequately processed, it may not be sufficient and so on. When theses conditions prevail, logical and ultimate resort is the primary data. Secondary Data: After identifying and designing the research problem and determining specific information required to solve the problem, I looked for the data and sources of data which may yield the desired results. Some secondary data are often available in one or other in the exiting sources. Therefore it was worthwhile to use these first and only when the secondary data sources are exhausted, the next step of looking into the primary data was considered. All the available secondary data was not usable at all. So I had to seek primary data for the new problems as they hardly have suitable relationship with the old problems, already explored. Survey: Survey is the most commonly used method of primary data collection in research. This is widely used because of its extreme flexibility. Survey research is a systematic gathering of data from respondents through questionnaires. The purpose of behaviour of the population having surveyed. A questionnaire is a formal list of questions to be answered in the survey.

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Survey technique: The survey technique that I have chosen for my project is the personal interview method. In the personal interview method, I questioned the respondents in a face-to-face meeting. First I tried to identify the potential respondent and attempted to secure the respondent's cooperation in answering a list of predetermined questions. A chose this method because it provides critical type of information on knowledge, intentions, demographic characteristics, attitudes, opinion and life styles. Questionnaire design: The term questionnaire refers to a self-administered process whereby the respondent himself/herself reads the questions and record his/her without the assistance of an interviewer. A questionnaire is more structured and standardized than the interview schedule. I have asked some direct questions, some indirect questions, open end questions, closed end questions and rating scale in my questionnaire. Revising and pre-testing questionnaire: Although re examinations, revision and pre-testing of a questionnaire does not guarantee perfection, yet it can prevent to a great extent the loss of time, money and effort due to poor design of questions.

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I conducted a pre-test to the test the questionnaire's preliminary draft with a small group of sample taken for final study. I checked out the wording, number and sequencing of questions, choices for respondent, information sought and instruments clarity as a whole. Sampling techniques: It is difficult to collect information about each of the population units as is done under complete census method or complete enumeration survey. I resorted to the sampling approach. Method of sampling: Non-probability convenient sampling: In non-probability sampling, the chance of any particular unit in the population being selected is unknown. In this method, the sample units are chosen primarily on the basis of my convenience. Simple Percentage Analysis: Simple Percentages refers to a special kind of ration. Percentages are used in making comparisons between two or more series of data. Percentages are used to describe relationships. Percentages can also be compare the relative terms, the distribution of two or more series of data.

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CHAPTER-3 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Table 1 Opinion about the Age Group of the Respondents S.No Age Group No of Respondents Percentage (%)

1 2 3

<25 26-35 36-45 Total

32 47 21 100

32 47 21 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.46% of respondents are in 26-35Yrs of age group 2. 33% of respondents are in <25Yrs of age group 3. 21% of respondents are in 36-45Yrs of age group Inference 46% of respondents are in 26-35Yrs of age group

44

45

Table 2 Opinion about the Gender of the Respondents S.No Gender No. Respondents 1 2 Male Female Total Source: Primary Data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.68% of respondents are male 2. 32% of respondents Female Inference 68% of respondents are male 68 32 100 of Percentage Respondents 68 32 100 of

46

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Table 3 Opinion about the Department of the Respondents S.No Department Respondents 0 Production 1 73 IT 2 17 Personnel 3 10 Finance 4 100 Total 100 10 17 73 0 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.73% of respondents are IT Department

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2. 17% of respondents are Personnel Department 3. 10% of respondents are Finance Department Inference 73% of respondents are IT Department

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Table 4 Opinion about the Designation of the Respondents S.No Designation Respondents 1 Management 13 13 No. of % of Respondents

2 Officers 32

32

3 Accountant 8

8

4 Staff 47

47

100 Total 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.47% of respondents are Staff

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2. 32% of respondents are Officer¶s 3. 13% of respondents are Management 4. 8% of respondents are Accountants Inference: 47% of respondents are Staff

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Table 5 Opinion about the Educational Qualification

S.No

Educational Qualification No of Respondents Percentage (%)

1 2 3

Technical/Diploma Degree Professional Total

18 40 42 100

18 40 42 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.42% of respondents are completed Professional 2. 40% of respondents are completed Degree 3. 18% of respondents are completed Technical/Diploma Inference 42% of respondents are completed Professional

52

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Table 6 Opinion about the Experience of the Respondents

S.No

Experience

No of Respondents 24 51 25 100

Percentage (%) 24 51 45 100

1 2 3

<2Yrs 2-4Yrs >4Yrs Total

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.51% of respondents are 2-4Yrs Experience 2. 24% of respondents are <2Yrs Experience 3. 24% of respondents are >4Yrs Experience Inference 51% of respondents are 2-4Yrs Experience

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Table 7 Opinion about the Income of the Respondents S.No 1 5000-8000 13 Income No. of Respondents % of Respondents 13

2 8000-12000 67

67

3 12000-20000 18

18

4 >20000 2

2

100 Total 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.67% of respondents are 8000-12000 Income option 2. 18% of respondents are 12000-20000 Income option

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3. 13% of respondents are 5000-8000 Income option 4. 3% of respondents are <20000 Income option Inference 67% of respondents are 8000-12000 Income option

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Table 8 Opinion about the Trainers Interaction with the Trainees S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied 27 68 4 1 27 68 4 1 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

4 5

Highly Dissatisfied 0 Total 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.68% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees 2. 27% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees 3. 4% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees

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4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees 5. 0% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees Inference 68% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees

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Table 9 Opinion about the subject knowledge of Trainers S.No Opinion 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total No. of Respondents 19 70 10 1 0 100 % of Respondents 19 70 10 1 0 100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers 2. 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers 3. 10% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees subject knowledge of Trainers

60

4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers 5. 0% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers Inference 70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers

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Table 10 Opinion about the Relationship between trainers and trainees S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.52% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees 2. 36% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees 3. 10% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees 36 52 10 1 1 100 Respondents 36 52 10 1 1 100 No. of % of

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4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees 5. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees Inference 52% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees

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Table 11 Opinion about the ability to clear doubts and queries S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 19 67 13 1 0 100 19 67 13 1 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.67% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries 2. 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries

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3. 13% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees ability to clear doubts and queries 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries 5. 0% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries Inference 67% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries

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Table 12 Opinion about the Duration of Training Programmes S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 15 71 10 3 1 100 15 71 10 3 1 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.71% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes 2. 15% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes

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3. 10% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes 4. 3% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes 5. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes Inference 71% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes

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Table 13 Opinion about the Training given before implementing any change S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 12 70 15 2 1 100 12 70 15 2 1 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change 2. 15% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Training given before implementing any change

68

3. 12% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change 4. 2% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change 5. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change Inference 70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change

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Table 14 Opinion about the Training centre Infrastructure S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 41 50 8 1 0 100 41 50 8 1 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.50% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure 2. 41% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure

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3. 8% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure 5. 0% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure Inference 50% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure.

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Table 15 Opinion about the Organization of the Training programme S.No 1 2 3 4 5 Opinion HS S N D HD Total Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.66% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme 2. 24% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme 3. 9% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Organization of the Training programme No. of Respondents 24 66 9 1 0 100 % of Respondents 24 66 9 1 0 100

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4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme 5. 0% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme Inference 66% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme

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Table 16 Opinion about the freedom to ask questions and doubts S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 51 41 6 1 1 100 51 41 6 1 1 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.51% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts 2. 41% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts

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3. 6% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts 5. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts Inference 51% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts

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Table 17 Opinion about the effectiveness of training method S.No Opinion Respondents 1 HS 2 S 3 4 5 N 1 D 1 HD 1 1 15 15 47 47 36 36 No. of % of Respondents

Total

100

100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.47% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method 2. 36% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method

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3. 15% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a effectiveness of training method 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method 5. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method Inference 47% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method

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Table 18 Opinion about the improvement of self-confidence S.No Opinion Respondents 1 HS 2 S 3 4 5 N 0 D 1 HD 1 0 3 3 40 40 56 56 No. of % of Respondents

Total

100

100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.56% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence 2. 40% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence

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3. 3% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a improvement of self-confidence 4. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence 5. 0% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence Inference 56% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence

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Table 19 Opinion about the Development of Communication Skill S.No Opinion Respondents 1 HS 2 S 3 4 5 N 0 D 1 HD 1 0 3 3 41 41 55 55 No. of % of Respondents

Total

100

100

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.55% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill 2. 41% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill

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3. 3% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Development of Communication Skill 4. 1% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill 5. 0% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill Inference 55% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill

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Table 20 Opinion about the Development of skill in the particular area S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 16 64 17 3 0 100 16 64 17 3 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.64% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area 2. 17% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area

82

3. 16% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area 4. 3% of respondents are highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area 5. 0% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area Inference 64% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area

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Table 21 Opinion about the Evaluation of the Training Programme S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total` 19 62 18 1 0 100 19 62 18 1 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.62% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme 2. 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme

84

3. 18% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme 5. 0% of respondents are Highly Dissatisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme Inference 62% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme

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Table 22 Opinion about the field visit during training programme S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 62 30 7 1 0 100 62 30 7 1 0 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.62% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme 2. 30% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme

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3. 7% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a field visit during training programme 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme 5. 0% of respondents are Highly Dissatisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme Inference 62% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme

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Table 23 Opinion about the training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge S.No Opinion Respondents 1 2 3 4 5 HS S N D HD Total 35 54 9 1 1 100 35 54 9 1 1 100 No. of % of Respondents

Source: Primary data INTERPRETATION: Incisive analysis of the above table reveals the following facts 1.54% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge 2. 35% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge

88

3. 9% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge 4. 1% of respondents are Dissatisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge 5. 1% of respondents are Highly Dissatisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge Inference 54% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge

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FINDINGS 

46% of respondents are in 26-35Yrs of age group. 33% of respondents are in <25Yrs of age group. 21% of respondents are in 36-45Yrs of age group  73% of respondents are IT Department. 17% of respondents are Personnel Department. 10% of respondents are Finance Department  47% of respondents are Staff. 32% of respondents are Officer¶s. 13% of respondents are Management. 8% of respondents are Accountants  51% of respondents are 2-4Yrs Experience. 24% of respondents are <2Yrs Experience. 24% of respondents are >4Yrs Experience  67% of respondents are 8000-12000 Income option. 18% of respondents are 12000-20000 Income option. 13% of respondents are 5000-8000 Income option. 3% of respondents are <20000 Income option 

68% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Trainers
Interaction with the Trainees. 27% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Trainers Interaction with the Trainees.  70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainer. 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a subject knowledge of Trainers  52% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees. 36% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Relationship between trainers and trainees

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67% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries . 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a ability to clear doubts and queries  71% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes . 15% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Duration of Training Programmes  70% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training given before implementing any change. 15% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Training given before implementing any change  50% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure . 41% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Training centre Infrastructure  66% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme. 24% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Organization of the Training programme  51% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts. 41% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a freedom to ask questions and doubts  47% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method. 36% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a effectiveness of training method

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56% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence. 40% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a improvement of self-confidence  55% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill. 41% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Development of Communication Skill  64% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area. 17% of respondents are Neutral that there should be a Development of skill in the particular area  62% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme. 19% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a Evaluation of the Training Programme  62% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme. 30% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a field visit during training programme  54% of respondents are Satisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge. 35% of respondents are Highly Satisfied that there should be a training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge

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SUGGESTIONS 

The organization can give more importance to the good relationship prevailing between trainers & trainees also.  Organization For the respondents who are not having any improvements in their job, special coaching & understudy can be given for them.  The organization the training programmes conducted can be more practical.  The organization can welcome the employee feedback. Ask how they feel about the training received and if it measured up to their expectations.  The organization may encourage the employee¶s to tell what was they learned.  The organization may test how they intend to use this new knowledge or skill.  The organization should try to get commitments from the employee¶s to apply this information to the job.  The organization may suggest that the employee¶s share worthwhile materials or concepts with the other staff.  The organization may check back with the employee over the following three to six months to make certain that he or she is following through with plans and ideas routinely.

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The organization may give the employee¶s responsibility for the knowledge gained through training. 

The organization can provide more field visits during the training programme. 

The organization Improvement need in the availability of training materials.  The organization should conduct more training programmes in order to improve the employee¶s skill.  The organization has to verify whether all employees are attending all the training programmes conducted.

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CONCLUSION

This study reveals the employee¶s opinions regarding the training programmes in Congruent Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Chennai. In order to improve the efficiency of employees in his present job & prepare himself for a higher level job, the effective training programmes are necessary. It is also needed to learn the company¶s policies, new technologies, changing environments. From the findings drawn from this study, we clearly came to know ³56% of respondents are Satisfied ,40% of respondents are Highly Satisfied with the improvement of self-confidence´. The commitment of respondents are excellent. The improvements are needed in some cases such as field visits, availability of training materials, good relationship between the trainers & trainees. Some suggestions are given based on the findings. It is sure if the management implements the given suggestions, the performance of the employees will be gained. training programme towards expectation of

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APPENDIX

A STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TRAINING PROGRAMME IN Congruent Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Chennai.

1. Name: _________________________________ 2. Age: 3. Gender: 4. Department : Below 25 26-25 Male Production Personnel 5. Designation : Management Accountant 6. Educational Qualification: Technical/diploma Professional 7. Experience in this organization: 2-4 years 8. Monthly income: Rs. 5000 TO 8000 Less than 2 years More than 4 years Rs. 8000 TO 12000 36-45 Female IT Finance Officer¶s Staff Degree

Rs. 12000 TO 20,000

Rs. 20,000 And Above

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Please tick appropriate degree of agreement according to your choice. HS- Highly Satisfied S-Satisfied N-Neutral Satisfied D-Dissatisfied HD- Highly Dissatisfied

8. Interaction with the trainees HS S N D HD

9. Subject knowledge of the trainers HS S N D HD

10. Relationship between the trainers and trainees. HS S N D 11. Ability to clear doubts and queries. HS S N D 12. Duration of training programme HS S N D HD

HD

HD

13. Training given before implementing any change HS S N D HD

14. Training centre Infrastructure HS S N D HD

15. Organization of the training programme HS S N D HD

16. Freedom to ask questions & doubts HS S N D HD

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17. Training methods are effective HS S N D HD

18. Improvement of self - confidence HS S N D HD

19. Development of communication skill HS S N D HD

20. Development of skill in the particular area HS S N D HD

21. Evaluation of the training programme. HS S N D HD

22. Field visit during training programme HS S N D HD

23. Training is provided to develop employee¶s knowledge HS S N D HD

24. Suggestions, if any, ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ________________________ THANK YOU

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books: Personnel Management and Industrial Relationship P.C.TRIPATHI Sultan Chand Publications 2002. Human Resource Development( Quarterly), Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean Volume 12, Issue 2, Date: June 2001, Pages: 195-208 AIMA study. (1998). World Class Management-Benchmark for the Millenium. Business Today. Feb22. Anderson,G. (2000). Performance Appraisal. Human Resource Manual. London. Blackwell Press. Journals: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Dirk D. Steiner, Gregory H. Dobbins, Wanda A. Trahan, Volume 12, Issue 4, Date: July 1991, Pages: 271-286

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