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STRATEGIES FOR

RE-ORGANISATION
RE ORGANISATION AND
RE-ORIENTATION OF THE NIGERIA
POLICE

A PAPER PRESENTED BY CP MARVEL AKPOYIBO


(COMMISSIONER OF POLICE, LAGOS STATE)
ON BEHALF OF
SIR.(DR.) MIKE M. OKIRO CFR, NPM, mni
INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF POLICE
AT
THE POLICE SERVICE COMMISSION RETREAT
HELD IN
OSOGBO,OSUN STATE
ON 18TH TO 20TH AUGUST, 2003
OUTLINE
•• Preamble
•• Mission Statement
•• IGP 9-Way Test
•• Imperatives
I ti ffor R
Re-organisation
i ti &RRe-
orientation in the Nigeria Police Force
•• Strategies for Re-organisation & Re-
orientation
•• Impacts of Re-organisation & Re-
orientation on current policing Trend
•• Conclusion
PREAMBLE
• PROTOCOL
• I’m delighted to present this paper “Strategies for
Re-organisation and Re-orientation of the Police” at this
Stakeholders’ Retreat aptly tagged “Understanding
Stakeholders Understanding The
Mandate and Operation of Police Service Commission in the
context off Rule off Law” organised
g byy the Commission.
• This Retreat could not have come at a better time than now,
particularly in view of the on-going reforms by the Federal
Government and the current police leadership at various levels
aimed at repositioning the Force.
PREAMBLE CONTD

• The return to democratic rule in May 1999, ushered in a new


operational
p environment,, necessitatingg a p
paradigmg shift in our
basic policing approach. This in turn calls for conscious and
sustained efforts by the IGP and the Force leadership at
reforming the polity and inculcating the tenets of democratic
policing in our officers. This is the crux of this presentation.
• Thoughg ppast ppolice leadershipp have made g great efforts and
indeed recorded significant progress in repositioning the
Force, it is our considered opinion that a lot more can still be
done in this critical area.
area
• It is also the IGP’s belief that it is only through appropriate
reforms
e o s ((re-organisation
e o g s o andd re-orientation)
eo e o ) that we ccan fully
u y
achieve the target set out in the Mission Statement and the 9-
Way Test
MISSION STATEMENT
“To create a safer and more
secured
d environment,
i conducive
d i
for meaningful
g Socio-economic
development that is critical to
the realization of Mr. President
President’’ss
Economic Agenda of taking
Nigeria into the league of the top
twenty (20) economies of the
world by the year 2020””””
IGP 9-WAY TEST
¾ TRANSPARENCY / ACCOUNTABILITY
¾ WAR ON
O COCORRUPTION
O
¾ CRIME PREVENTION/PROACTIVE POLICING
¾ INTELLIGENCE / CRIME DATA BASE
¾ TRAINNING
¾ POLICE PUBLIC IMAGE / PUBLIC RELATIONS
¾ HUMAN RIGHTS
¾ COMMUNITY POLICING
¾ INTER-AGENCY COOPERATION
IMPERATIVES FOR RE-ORGANISATION &
RE-ORIENTATION
RE ORIENTATION OF THE NIGERIA POLICE
• Changing social, Political, Cultural and Economic
conditions;
• Increasing sophistication and dynamism of crime and
other emerging challenges – terrorism (domestic &
int’l), cyber crime, kidnappings, etc;
• Need to continually keep pace with evolving best
practices in policing- both domestically and
internationally;
y;
• Re-organization and Re-orientation as a sine quo non
for the successful implementation
p of our Mission
Statement and the 9-Way Test.
STRATEGIES FOR RE-ORGANISATION AND
RE-ORIENTATION (REFORMS)
(1) Structural Re-organisation
• Establishment of additional PMF Squadrons – designed to
improve our capacity to respond to challenges of violent
crimes and increasingg cases of militancy.
y
• Strengthening and re-vitalising the Criminal Intelligence
Bureau (CIB) as a tool for pro-active and pragmatic policing.
• Creation of specialised units like Anti-Terrorism and Special
Anti- Robbery Squads.
• Creation of additional duty posts :Divisional PPROs, Conflict
Resolution Officers, Pipeline Vandalization Officers,
Community Policing Officers, Juvenile, Old people and
Women welfare Officers.
(2) INTERNAL TRANSPARENCY AND
ACCOUNTABILITY
AS A TOOL FOR REFORMS
• Z
Zero tolerance
t l t corruption
to ti andd other
th un-ethical
thi l
practices.
• Production of Schedule of Duties, Force Orders and
Administrative Instruction Book to enable officers get
acquainted with Force policies and directives.
• On-going
g g review of Police Acts & Regulations.
g
• Regular briefings and periodic tour of Police Formations
• Strengthening of IGP,
IGP Zonal and Command Monitoring
Units
(3) CRIME-PREVENTION;-AS A TOOL FOR
REFORMS
Crime Prevention has the following advantages:-
‰Nibs crime
‰Nib i ini the
h bud
b d
‰Prevents victimisation
‰Promotes community safety. Martin Luther King
says, ‘To
‘T chaos
h or to
t community…’
it ’
‰Contributes to sustainable development
p
‰As a long term benefit, reduces cost associated
with the operations of the criminal justice system.
system
CRIME PREVENTION STRATAGIES
• Physical presence of Officers and men at
vulnerable points through increased
deployment of vehicular and foot patrols
• Cooperation and collaboration with State
Governments and NGOs
• Negotiation with GSM service providers to
avail tthee po
ava police
ce o
of hotlines
ot es aandd GS
GSM Phones
o es
so as to improve communication networks
within the Police operational system and the
general public.
Crime prevention strategies cont

• Establishment of static point / vehicle patrol


teams
• Regular supervision of all static /vehicle patrol
teams
• Effective
Eff ti control
t l off the
th operation
ti room for f
proper co-ordination etc
(4) EFFECTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS
AS A TOOL FOR REFORMS
• Partnership and collaboration with members of the public and
other stakeholders on all relevant aspects of policing
• Conscious efforts at educating members of the public on their
civic rights and responsibilities
• Conscious efforts at bridging the gap between the police and
the p
public for ppurposes
p of improving
p g trust and confidence
• Empowering of FPRO and command PPROs on investigation
of cases of abuse of office and professional misconduct by
Police Officers
• Appropriate punishment to erring Police Officers as deterrence
Effective PR contd.

•• Regular and robust interaction with media practitioners for


the purposes of explaining all grey areas relating to our
operations
•• Regular release of crime prevention tips to members of the
public
•• Internalising the concept and philosophy of community
policing as PR and crime management strategy
•• St
Strengthening
e gt e g Policeol ce Co
Community
u ty Co
Consultative
sultat ve Co
Committees
ttees
(PCCC) –– formerly known as PCRC- to serve as a bridge
between the police and the public
•• Improved d inter –– agency co-operation andd harmonious
h co-
existence
•• Deployment of police information boxes in Lagos and Abuja
both as a PR tool and a crime management strategy.
(5) HUMAN RIGHTS AS A TOOL
FOR REFORMS
•• Training of officers and men to appreciate and respect
the concepts of constitutionalism,
constitutionalism rule of Law and due
process in line with Federal Government policy
•• Establishment of Human Right Desks at both
Commands and Divisional levels
•• Increased collaboration with NGOs and other
stakeholders on human rights –– related issues
•• Inclusion of Human Right topics in syllabi of Police
training institutions
•• Disciplinary measures against officers violating the
rights of other citizens
(6) SPORTS DEVELOPMENT
•• Conscious efforts at restoring the past glory of the Force in areas
of sports
•• The use of Police sporting activities like the recently concluded
““People-Police Marathon’’ tagged ‘‘Race against crime’’, as a
unifying
f f
factor and
d as a tooll for
f promoting good d will
ll andd
neighbourliness
•• Using
U i sports t as tool
t l for
f keeping
k i youths th engaged d and
d away from
f
crime
•• Using police sporting activities,
activities particularly the upcoming Police
Games as a tool for high profile PR activities
•• Using sports as a tool for facilitating both formal and informal
interaction and as an avenue for information sharing.
(7) TRAINING AND
RE-TRAINING
RE TRAINING AS A TOOL OF REFORM
•• Training is an invaluable tool for re-orientation and
attitudinal
ttit di l change
ch ge
•• Improves capacity and enhances productivity
•• Constant and regular training and re-training of
Officers is a priority of our administration
•• Following measures have been taken to strengthen
our trainingg culture:
–– Updating of the syllabi of Police training institutions in
line with current trends of policing
p g
Training & Re-training contd.

–– Promotion of ““On-
On the - job –– Training
Training”” through regular
seminars workshops, lectures and other forms of in-service
training
–– Conscious effort at sourcing specialized trainings both
domestically and internationally through bilateral and
multilateral arrangements
–– Promoting the culture of inter-agency trainings both at the
senior and jjunior levels of the Force
–– Increased funding of Police training institutions and
colleges
–– Promoting the h culture
l off training as a prerequisite for
f
promotion
–– Emphasis on computer literacy as an integral component of
our e-Policing policy
(8) HOUSING & OTHER WELFARE-
RELATED PACKAGES
• This administration is embarking on a special Police
Housing Scheme to boost the morale of our personnel and
promote a healthier mentality
• The scheme is an owner – occupier programme
• First phase of the project already commenced at Karshi
village
g ,FCT
• 78 2-bedroom flats apartment also purchased by the
Force at Mararaba and have since been allocated to
Officers.
• Plans have also been concluded for the Foundation
L i Ceremony
Laying C off the
h Housing
H i Scheme
S h i Lagos.
in L
Housing contd.

•• A
Appeall for
f donation
d ti off Land
L d for
f the
th project
j th
have received
i d
commendable support from various state Governors as
shown below;
below;-

STATE LAND (HECTRES)


1 C/RIVER 68,882
2 LAGOS 64,442
3 TARABA 68
4 EKITI 50
5 EDO 30
6 KOGI 30
7 SOKOTO 25
CONTD

STATE LAND (HECTRES)


8 KEBBI 25
9 NIGER 22.06
10 ADAMAWA 10
TOTAL 133 584 06
133,584.06
HOUSING &OTHER WELFARE-RELATED PACKAGES CONTD

• Apart from housing, other welfare-related


packages include:
– Promotions as and when due;
– P
Prompt t Payment
P t off Salaries;
S l i
– Police Insurance Scheme;
– Direct Funding of Divisions;
– Car and Motorcycles Revolving Loan Scheme etc.
(9)PUBLIC –– PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP
•• Our partnership with state Governments and
other
h stakeholders
k h ld h
have yielded
i ld d positive
ii
results.
•• The partnership has led to the resuscitation of
special security outfits like the RRS in Lagos
and other similar outfits across the nation
•• Partnership with State governments have also
helped
p in improving
p g our logistics
g as
exemplified in the table bellow ;-
PPP cond.

S/N STATE APC VEHICLE B/PROOF VEST


O DONATED
DONATED
1 LAGOS 10 250 1,500
2 TARABA 4
3 FCT 65
4 KANO 44
5 ANAMBRA 20
6 RIVER 10
IMPACTS OF THE REFORM
POLICIES
•• Improvement in public perception and rating
•• Increased
d public
l confidence
fd and
d trust in the
h police
l
•• Increased cooperation, support and collaboration
from both the public and private sectors
•• Gradual reduction in crime level across the
Federation, with cosmopolitan Lagos as a typical
example,
p , as illustrated with the graphs
g p below:
OUR REPORT CARD:
VEHICLES STOLEN FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

VEHICLES STOLEN FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008


140

140
132
JAN.'08

120 120 FEB. '08


120

MAR. '08 APR. '08


100

100 100
99

NO. OF VEHICLES STOLEN


MAY. '08 JAN.'08
80 JUN. '08
FEB. '08
MAR. '08
APR. '08
CLES STOLEN

80 80 MAY. '08
77 JUN. '08
JUL. '08
60
VEHICLES STOLEN
NO. OF VEHIC

60 MONTHS
40 JUL. '08

20
40
38

0
VEHICLES STOLEN
JAN.'08 132

20 FEB. '08 120


MAR. '08 100
APR. '08 99
MAY '08
MAY. 08 80
JUN. '08 77
JUL. '08 38

0
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
MONTHS
Report
p Card contd
ARMED ROBBERY CASES RECORDED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008
ARMED ROBBERY CASES RECORDED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

9
9

MAY. '08
8 8 8

JAN.'08 MAR. '08


7
7 7 7

FEB. '08 JUN. '08


6

6 6 6

ARMED ROBBERY CASES


JAN.'08
5 FEB. '08
ROBBERY CASES

MAR. '08
APR. '08
5
MAY. '08
APR. '08 JUN. '08
4 JUL. '08

NO. OF A
ARMED ROBBERY
NO. OF ARMED R

4 4
JUL. '08
3

3 3
2

MONTHS

2 1

0
1 ARMED ROBBERY
JAN.'08 7
FEB. '08 6
MAR. '08 7
APR. '08 4
MAY. '08 8
0
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08 JUN. '08 6

MONTHS JUL. '08 3


Report
p Card Contd
VEHICLES RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

VEHICLES RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008


140

140

JAN.'08

120
126

120

100

FEB '08
FEB. 08
100

OF VEHICLES RECOVERED
MAR. '08 MAY. '08 JAN.'08
80 JUN. '08
FEB. '08
90
MAR. '08
APR. '08
APR. '08 MAY. '08
COVERED

80 80 80 JUL. '08 JUN. '08


77 JUL. '08
60
NO. OF VEHICLES REC

NO. O
VEHICLES RECOVERED
67

62
60
40

MONTHS

40 20

0
VEHICLES RECOVERED
20
JAN.'08 126
FEB. '08 90
MAR. '08 80
APR. '08 67
MAY. '08 80
JUN. '08 77
0 JUL. '08 62
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
MONTHS
Report
p Card Contd
ARMED ROBBERS ARRESTED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

ARMED ROBBERS ARRESTED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008


60

60

FEB. '08, 53

53 50
APR. '08

50

48

MAR. '08
40

NO. OF ARMED ROBBERS ARRESTED


JAN.'08
40 40 FEB. '08
JAN.'08 MAR. '08
APR. '08
BERS ARRESTED

30 MAY. '08
JUL. '08 JUN. '08
JUL. '08
MAY. '08 JUN. '08
32
NO. OF ARMED ROBB

30 NO. OF ARMED ROBBERS ARRESTED

28
20

25 25

MONTHS
20
10

0
10 NO. OF ARMED ROBBERS ARRESTED
JAN.'08 32
FEB. '08 53
MAR. '08 40
APR. '08 48
MAY. '08 25
JUN. '08 25
JUL. '08 28
0
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
MONTHS
Report
p Card Contd
MURDER CASES RECORDED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008 MURDER CASES RECORDED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

25 25

FEB. '08 APR. '08


20
20 20 20 JAN.'08

JUN. '08
19

18

15
JAN.'08

OF MURDER CASES
FEB. '08
15 MAR. '08
APR. '08
ER CASES

MAR. '08 JUL. '08 MAY. '08


JUN. '08

NO. O
JUL '08
JUL. 08
NO. OF MURDE

MURDER
12 12 10

10
MAY. '08

5
7

MONTHS

0
MURDER
JAN.'08 19
FEB. '08 20
MAR. '08 12
APR. '08 20
MAY. '08 7
0
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08 JUN. '08 18

MONTHS JUL. '08 12


Report
p Card Contd
ARMED ROBBERS THAT DIED DURING ENCOUNTERS
WITH THE POLICE FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

18

ARMED ROBBERS THAT DIED DURING ENCOUNTERS WITH THE POLICE

18
16 16

FEB. '08
16

14 14

MAR. '08
14

12 12 APR. '08
12

NO. OFARMEDROBBERSTHATDIED
BBERS THAT DIED

JAN.'08
MAY. '08
10 FEB. '08
10 10 MAR. '08
APR. '08
MAY. '08
NO. OF ARMED ROB

NO. OF ARMED ROBBERS THAT DIED JAN.'08 JUN. '08


8 JUL. '08

JUN. '08 JUL. '08


8 8

6
7 7

6
4
MONTHS

2
4

0
NO. OF ARMED ROBBERS THAT DIED
JAN.'08 8
2 FEB. '08 16
MAR '08
MAR. 08 14
APR. '08 12
MAY. '08 10
JUN. '08 7
JUL. '08 7
0
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
MONTHS
ARMS RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008 ARMS RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

40 40

MAR. '08

36
35
FEB. '08
35
34
JAN.'08

32 MAY. '08
30

30 30

JUN. '08
JUL. '08
25

VERED
26
JAN.'08
25 25 APR. '08
FEB. '08

NO. OF ARMS RECOV


MAR. '08
APR. '08
NO.. OF ARMS RECOVERED

20
MAY. '08
22
JUN. '08
JUL. '08
20 ARMS RECOVERED

15

MONTHS

15
10

10 5

0
ARMS RECOVERED
5
JAN.'08 32
FEB. '08 34
MAR. '08 36
APR. '08 22
MAY. '08 30

0 JUN. '08 26
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08 JUL. '08 25
MONTHS
Report
p Card Contd
AMMUNITION RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008 AMMUNITION RECOVERED FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

7000 7000

MAY. '08

6 109
6,109 6000
6000

5000

5000

NO. OF AMMUNITION RECOVERED


D
JAN.'08
4000
FEB. '08
MUNITION RECOVERED

MAR. '08
4000 APR. '08
MAY. '08
JUN. '08
JUL. '08
AMMUNITION RECOVERED 3000
NO. OF AMM

N
3000

2000

2000
APR. '08
1000

MAR. '08
FEB. '08
JAN.'08 MONTHS JUN. '08

JUL. '08
1000 1,022
0
AMMUNITION RECOVERED
JAN.'08 412
593
532 FEB. '08 532
412 385 593
MAR. '08
08
APR. '08 1,022
108 6,109
MAY. '08
0
JUN. '08 385
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
JUL. '08 108
MONTHS
Report
p Card Contd POLICEMEN KILLED DURING ENCOUNTER WITH ARMED ROBBERS FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL.
2008
POLICEMEN KILLED DURING ENCOUNTERS WITH ARMED ROBBERS
FROM JAN. 2008 TO JUL. 2008

8
8

FEB '08
FEB. 08
7

7 7

MAR. '08
6

6 6

NO. OF POLICEMEN KILLED


JAN.'08
5 FEB. '08
MAR. '08
JAN.'08 JUN. '08 APR. '08
EMEN KILLED

4
MAY. '08
JUN. '08
JUL. '08
POLICEMEN KILLED
NO. OF POLICE

4 4 4

3
APR. '08
2

2 2 MAY. '08
1

MONTHS

JUL. '08
1 1 0
POLICEMEN KILLED
JAN '08
JAN. 08 4
FEB. '08 7
MAR. '08 6
APR. '08 2
0 0
MAY. '08 1
JAN.'08 FEB. '08 MAR. '08 APR. '08 MAY. '08 JUN. '08 JUL. '08
MONTHS JUN. '08 4
JUL. '08 0
OUR REPORT CARD CONTD
•• The multiplier effects of the IGP’’s reforms policies
aree gradually
g d ll being
bei g felt across
c oss eevery
e ststrata
t of oour
society.
•• Even our robust
b bbut ever critical
i i l media,
di h have
acknowledged our innovative and proactive policing
strategies,
i and d have
h iindeed
d d paidid glowing
l i tributes
ib to
the IGP and his team.
•• Check out the following pictorial news from the The
Nation Newspaper of yesterday, Sunday, 17th
August, 2008:
The image cannot be display ed. Your computer may not hav e enough memory to open the image, or the image may hav e been corrupted. Restart y our computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, y ou may hav e to delete the image and then insert it again.
CONCLUSION
•• In spite of the numerous challenges militating against our operational
efficiency and the full implementation of our re-organisation and re-
orientation
i i policy,
li iti is
i heart-warming
h i to note that
h thishi administration
d i i i has
h
made substantial progress in reducing crime level and improving public
perception. These have increased public confidence and the quality of
supportt and d cooperation
ti from
f members
b off the
th public.
bli
•• The gains achieved have continued to inspire the Federal Government, State
governments and other stakeholders to continue to support us in core areas
off welfare,
lf l i i and
logistic d other
h relevant
l needs.
d
•• It is our strong belief that with GOD on our side, we will attain our goals
through conscious and sustained efforts at re-organising and re-orienting
the Force.
•• We seek the support, prayers and understanding of all.
•• Thank yyou for listening g and remain blessed.