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I N D EPEN D EN T P U B L I C AT I O N BY RACONTEUR.

NET #0582 24/04/2019

FUTURE
WORKPLACE
03 MAKING WORKPLACES
MORE ECO-FRIENDLY 08 AFORRETURN TO NATURE
OFFICE WORKERS 16 BUILDING ON TECH
TO GET SMARTER
02 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 03

FUTURE ENVIRONMENT

WORKPLACE
Making workplaces
Distributed in

Published in association with


more eco-friendly
Many UK businesses are trying to reduce plastic waste and enhance energy efficiency
in sustainable workplaces, but change is more difficult in a shared office space

Joel Clark Goldman Sach's critical to a more energy efficient


Contributors
new European HQ office, and the future workplace should
in London
Joel Clark Nick Easen anking giant Goldman put much greater onus on employees
Freelance writer
and editor, he covers
Award-winning
freelance journalist and
B Sachs told its 6,000 London to manage this, says Mr Winston.
employees: “Plastic isn’t “Increasingly we are seeing that
workplace issues, broadcaster, he produces
as recyclable as many think. That’s rather than pushing ever further
technology, regulation, for BBC World News,
risk management, and writes on business, why we’re eliminating it.” towards automation, sustainable
capital markets trading economics, science, Ubiquitous plastic bottles sold buildings need to give their inhabit-
and derivatives. technology and travel. from the bank’s vending machines, ants a higher level of interaction so
cafés and shops have been replaced they can regulate their own lighting
Anna Codrea-Rado Cath Everett
Culture and technology Freelance journalist by glass, aluminium and cardboard and heating through apps,” he says.
journalist, founder of specialising in workplace alternatives as part of a multi-fac- If the future workplace is one where
FJ&Co, a community and employment issues, eted drive to make the business buildings become more interactive
platform for freelance she also writes on the more environmentally responsible. and energy efficient, and reduction
journalists, her work has impact of technology on
Goldman Sachs will move to a of waste is driven from the high-
been published in The society and culture.
New York Times, The brand new European headquarters est levels of senior management, it
Guardian and WIRED. in London this summer; a building may well be the shared offices that
with a top sustainability rating and lag behind. With a growing num-
Peter Crush Christine Horton a green roof garden that will use an ber of small businesses and start-
Freelance business Long-term contributor
advanced rainwater harvesting and ups renting office space in trendy
journalist, specialising to specialist IT titles,
in human resources and including Channel filtration system to irrigate plants shared spaces, it is incumbent upon
management issues, he Pro and Microscope, she and reduce water consumption. the providers of those spaces to set
was deputy editor of writes about technology’s Meanwhile large numbers of car sustainability within the terms of
HR magazine. impact on business.
parking spaces for senior executives leases and ensure recycling facili-
have been replaced with extensive ties are consistently available.
Sarah Dawood Rich McEachran
Deputy editor at Design Freelance journalist and provision for cyclists. impact and do our bit to help safe- “It can be very hard to tackle car- Providers of shared office space
Week, she specialises in copywriter, covering Such initiatives offer a glimpse guard our planet,” says Allen & bon emissions in shared office have a mixed reputation on this
the creative industries and startups, technology and of how the future workplace might Overy partner Paul Flanagan. buildings because individuals and front. Entrepreneur Kevin Sefton
the public sector, notably innovation, his work has evolve if companies and employees Reducing plastics usage is only companies often can’t make sig- began his career at accounting firm
education, contributing to appeared in The Guardian,
take seriously their responsibility to one component of the drive towards nificant changes to the infrastruc- Arthur Andersen in the 1990s and is
The Guardian. The Daily Telegraph and
Professional Engineering preserve the planet, reduce their car- a more eco-friendly workplace, how- ture or energy efficiency. There is now co-founder of Untied, a startup
magazine. bon footprint and cut plastics usage. ever. Heating, lighting, electricity still lots that can be done, and it that seeks to simplify the submis-
Goldman Sachs reckons it is on track and gas consumption all play a role comes down to identifying hot- sion of personal tax returns. Having
to remove 85 per cent of the plastics it in the overall impact an office might spots of energy consumption and used many shared offices in recent
consumes by the end of 2019. have on the environment, while engaging employees to think more years, he has become depressed
“Reducing our reliance on sin- food consumption and business about these issues,” says Jonathan at the widespread apathy towards
gle-use plastics is a natural next step travel must also be considered if a Winston, occupier support manager environmental issues.
Publishing manager Head of production in our commitment to divert 100 company is to tackle sustainability for Low Carbon Workplace. “The amount of waste that is gen-
Ben Bruce Justyna O'Connell per cent of our business waste from at all levels. Since 2010, Low Carbon Workplace erated from shared offices is stagger-
landfills by 2020,” says Kyung-Ah Turning a conventional office into – a partnership between the Carbon ing; very often they have trashcans
Associate editor Digital content executive
Park, head of the environmental a sustainable, energy efficient work- Trust, fund manager Columbia with no recycling. Twenty years ago
Peter Archer Fran Cassidy
markets group at Goldman Sachs. place may be more complex than Threadneedle Investments and at Arthur Andersen I would eat from
Managing editor Design “It’s our small, daily habits that reducing plastics, as it requires man- property developer Stanhope – has a china plate with metal cutlery in
Benjamin Chiou Joanna Bird make the biggest difference; using agement buy-in, budget and long- acquired and refurbished nine com- the staff canteen and there were
Grant Chapman
a reusable cup or bottle whenever term planning. And as many busi- mercial office buildings in London no single-use plastics. Now it’s the
Sara Gelfgren
possible, carefully separating trash nesses occupy only part of larger to make them more energy efficient. complete opposite; there is a huge
Kellie Jerrard
Harry Lewis-Irlam from recycling and only requesting office buildings, bringing about Better management of heating and missed responsibility in shared
Celina Lucey plastic cutlery when we need it.” meaningful change can be difficult. enhanced use of natural light are offices,” says Mr Sefton.
Samuele Motta Goldman Sachs is not alone. Some shared office providers take
Following the airing of Blue Planet their responsibility to the environ-
Head of design
II and the growing awareness of ment more seriously than others, he
Tim Whitlock KEY DRIVERS FOR BUSINESSES MAKING BUILDING
the harmful effects of plastic waste adds, but if neither the shared office
ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS
on marine life, many businesses nor the individual tenant busi-
Although this publication is funded through advertising and have looked to cut single-use plas- nesses take action, the carbon foot-
tics as part of broader sustainabil- print will only increase.
sponsorship, all editorial is without bias and sponsored features
Energy cost-savings 82%
are clearly labelled. For an upcoming schedule, partnership ity programmes. Olly Olsen, co-founder and co-chief
inquiries or feedback, please call +44 (0)20 3877 3800 or Law firm Allen & Overy has elim- executive of the Office Group, which
email info@raconteur.net inated disposable cups, plastic bot- Greenhouse gas footprint reduction 71% operates 35 office spaces in the UK,
Raconteur is a leading publisher of special-interest content and
tles and takeaway boxes from its says: “We do receive suggestions and
research. Its publications and articles cover a wide range of topics,
including business, finance, sustainability, healthcare, lifestyle and
London office. It estimates that it Increasing energy security 68% queries from our members, and with
technology. Raconteur special reports are published exclusively in used more than 6.5 million dispos- so many companies under each roof
The Times and The Sunday Times as well as online at raconteur.net able catering items in 2018 and plans Enhanced brand or reputation 64% it is harder to rollout common prac-
The information contained in this publication has been obtained to donate the money it saves from tices across such a diverse member
from sources the Proprietors believe to be correct. However, buying and disposing of packaging, base. There are a number of prior-
no legal liability can be accepted for any errors. No part of this
Attracting/retaining employees 64%
amounting to roughly £100,000, to ities we are currently focused on,
publication may be reproduced without the prior consent of the
two conservation charities. from our waste management proto-
Publisher. © Raconteur Media
“By making these small changes
Customer attraction/retention 63% cols, compliance, to transitioning
to our catering waste, we can make a from traditional energy sources to
@raconteur /raconteur.net @raconteur_london big difference to our environmental Johnson Controls 2018 renewables across the portfolio.”

raconteur.net /future-workplace-2019
02 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 03

FUTURE ENVIRONMENT

WORKPLACE
Making workplaces
Distributed in

Published in association with


more eco-friendly
Many UK businesses are trying to reduce plastic waste and enhance energy efficiency
in sustainable workplaces, but change is more difficult in a shared office space

Joel Clark Goldman Sach's critical to a more energy efficient


Contributors
new European HQ office, and the future workplace should
in London
Joel Clark Nick Easen anking giant Goldman put much greater onus on employees
Freelance writer
and editor, he covers
Award-winning
freelance journalist and
B Sachs told its 6,000 London to manage this, says Mr Winston.
employees: “Plastic isn’t “Increasingly we are seeing that
workplace issues, broadcaster, he produces
as recyclable as many think. That’s rather than pushing ever further
technology, regulation, for BBC World News,
risk management, and writes on business, why we’re eliminating it.” towards automation, sustainable
capital markets trading economics, science, Ubiquitous plastic bottles sold buildings need to give their inhabit-
and derivatives. technology and travel. from the bank’s vending machines, ants a higher level of interaction so
cafés and shops have been replaced they can regulate their own lighting
Anna Codrea-Rado Cath Everett
Culture and technology Freelance journalist by glass, aluminium and cardboard and heating through apps,” he says.
journalist, founder of specialising in workplace alternatives as part of a multi-fac- If the future workplace is one where
FJ&Co, a community and employment issues, eted drive to make the business buildings become more interactive
platform for freelance she also writes on the more environmentally responsible. and energy efficient, and reduction
journalists, her work has impact of technology on
Goldman Sachs will move to a of waste is driven from the high-
been published in The society and culture.
New York Times, The brand new European headquarters est levels of senior management, it
Guardian and WIRED. in London this summer; a building may well be the shared offices that
with a top sustainability rating and lag behind. With a growing num-
Peter Crush Christine Horton a green roof garden that will use an ber of small businesses and start-
Freelance business Long-term contributor
advanced rainwater harvesting and ups renting office space in trendy
journalist, specialising to specialist IT titles,
in human resources and including Channel filtration system to irrigate plants shared spaces, it is incumbent upon
management issues, he Pro and Microscope, she and reduce water consumption. the providers of those spaces to set
was deputy editor of writes about technology’s Meanwhile large numbers of car sustainability within the terms of
HR magazine. impact on business.
parking spaces for senior executives leases and ensure recycling facili-
have been replaced with extensive ties are consistently available.
Sarah Dawood Rich McEachran
Deputy editor at Design Freelance journalist and provision for cyclists. impact and do our bit to help safe- “It can be very hard to tackle car- Providers of shared office space
Week, she specialises in copywriter, covering Such initiatives offer a glimpse guard our planet,” says Allen & bon emissions in shared office have a mixed reputation on this
the creative industries and startups, technology and of how the future workplace might Overy partner Paul Flanagan. buildings because individuals and front. Entrepreneur Kevin Sefton
the public sector, notably innovation, his work has evolve if companies and employees Reducing plastics usage is only companies often can’t make sig- began his career at accounting firm
education, contributing to appeared in The Guardian,
take seriously their responsibility to one component of the drive towards nificant changes to the infrastruc- Arthur Andersen in the 1990s and is
The Guardian. The Daily Telegraph and
Professional Engineering preserve the planet, reduce their car- a more eco-friendly workplace, how- ture or energy efficiency. There is now co-founder of Untied, a startup
magazine. bon footprint and cut plastics usage. ever. Heating, lighting, electricity still lots that can be done, and it that seeks to simplify the submis-
Goldman Sachs reckons it is on track and gas consumption all play a role comes down to identifying hot- sion of personal tax returns. Having
to remove 85 per cent of the plastics it in the overall impact an office might spots of energy consumption and used many shared offices in recent
consumes by the end of 2019. have on the environment, while engaging employees to think more years, he has become depressed
“Reducing our reliance on sin- food consumption and business about these issues,” says Jonathan at the widespread apathy towards
gle-use plastics is a natural next step travel must also be considered if a Winston, occupier support manager environmental issues.
Publishing manager Head of production in our commitment to divert 100 company is to tackle sustainability for Low Carbon Workplace. “The amount of waste that is gen-
Ben Bruce Justyna O'Connell per cent of our business waste from at all levels. Since 2010, Low Carbon Workplace erated from shared offices is stagger-
landfills by 2020,” says Kyung-Ah Turning a conventional office into – a partnership between the Carbon ing; very often they have trashcans
Associate editor Digital content executive
Park, head of the environmental a sustainable, energy efficient work- Trust, fund manager Columbia with no recycling. Twenty years ago
Peter Archer Fran Cassidy
markets group at Goldman Sachs. place may be more complex than Threadneedle Investments and at Arthur Andersen I would eat from
Managing editor Design “It’s our small, daily habits that reducing plastics, as it requires man- property developer Stanhope – has a china plate with metal cutlery in
Benjamin Chiou Joanna Bird make the biggest difference; using agement buy-in, budget and long- acquired and refurbished nine com- the staff canteen and there were
Grant Chapman
a reusable cup or bottle whenever term planning. And as many busi- mercial office buildings in London no single-use plastics. Now it’s the
Sara Gelfgren
possible, carefully separating trash nesses occupy only part of larger to make them more energy efficient. complete opposite; there is a huge
Kellie Jerrard
Harry Lewis-Irlam from recycling and only requesting office buildings, bringing about Better management of heating and missed responsibility in shared
Celina Lucey plastic cutlery when we need it.” meaningful change can be difficult. enhanced use of natural light are offices,” says Mr Sefton.
Samuele Motta Goldman Sachs is not alone. Some shared office providers take
Following the airing of Blue Planet their responsibility to the environ-
Head of design
II and the growing awareness of ment more seriously than others, he
Tim Whitlock KEY DRIVERS FOR BUSINESSES MAKING BUILDING
the harmful effects of plastic waste adds, but if neither the shared office
ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS
on marine life, many businesses nor the individual tenant busi-
Although this publication is funded through advertising and have looked to cut single-use plas- nesses take action, the carbon foot-
tics as part of broader sustainabil- print will only increase.
sponsorship, all editorial is without bias and sponsored features
Energy cost-savings 82%
are clearly labelled. For an upcoming schedule, partnership ity programmes. Olly Olsen, co-founder and co-chief
inquiries or feedback, please call +44 (0)20 3877 3800 or Law firm Allen & Overy has elim- executive of the Office Group, which
email info@raconteur.net inated disposable cups, plastic bot- Greenhouse gas footprint reduction 71% operates 35 office spaces in the UK,
Raconteur is a leading publisher of special-interest content and
tles and takeaway boxes from its says: “We do receive suggestions and
research. Its publications and articles cover a wide range of topics,
including business, finance, sustainability, healthcare, lifestyle and
London office. It estimates that it Increasing energy security 68% queries from our members, and with
technology. Raconteur special reports are published exclusively in used more than 6.5 million dispos- so many companies under each roof
The Times and The Sunday Times as well as online at raconteur.net able catering items in 2018 and plans Enhanced brand or reputation 64% it is harder to rollout common prac-
The information contained in this publication has been obtained to donate the money it saves from tices across such a diverse member
from sources the Proprietors believe to be correct. However, buying and disposing of packaging, base. There are a number of prior-
no legal liability can be accepted for any errors. No part of this
Attracting/retaining employees 64%
amounting to roughly £100,000, to ities we are currently focused on,
publication may be reproduced without the prior consent of the
two conservation charities. from our waste management proto-
Publisher. © Raconteur Media
“By making these small changes
Customer attraction/retention 63% cols, compliance, to transitioning
to our catering waste, we can make a from traditional energy sources to
@raconteur /raconteur.net @raconteur_london big difference to our environmental Johnson Controls 2018 renewables across the portfolio.”

raconteur.net /future-workplace-2019
04 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 05
Commercial feature
So not only does it appear that via phone, in real time with one OPINION
voice won’t be disappearing from another, digital channels make
our lives as feared, advances in tech- room for conversations over time.
nologies, such as artificial intelli- I’ll email or text you my question
gence (AI), may be set to drive a new and you can get back to me when you
way of using voice in the future. have time. For many young workers,
Philipp Bohn, vice president of they feel that approach is more con-

‘Innovative technology
Atos’ unified communications siderate of others’ time.’”
services business Circuit, says: We’re all making fewer voice calls
“We can use AI to transcribe and than we used to. A 2018 report by

can be revolutionary
translate voice sessions. A lot of communications regulator Ofcom
intelligence and data is needed shows that the number of voice
to understand who’s talking, and calls made on mobile phones in
understand all the various lan-
guages, dialects, nuances and
speech habits we naturally pro-
the UK has fallen for the fi rst time,
along with traditional text mes-
saging, as users switch to messag-
but we need to think
cess as humans. A huge amount of
knowledge is shared through voice
conversations and with AI-based
ing services such as WhatsApp and
Facebook Messenger.
But while picking up the phone
hard about its use’
transcription it becomes more might be dying out, an employee’s
accessible. Voice is not dead, we voice certainly is not, says Julien
are at the beginning of a new, excit- Lesaicherre, director of Workplace by
ing innovation cycle. Facebook. “Technology will continue
Ultimately, young peoples’ pref- to advance, but the power of human echnology is changing our benefit supermarkets by letting

Tech fact, not


erence for messaging shouldn’t be connection will always remain T world faster, and more them employ fewer people and
judged too harshly, says Cara Silletto, prominent, so providing a platform completely, than ever therefore save money. Their cus- workplaces simply aren’t working, but
a workforce retention adviser who to enable employees to collaborate in before. All sectors have to be aware tomers up and down the UK have technology is now seen as leading the
specialises in bridging the genera- the way that best suits them is abso- of developments such as automa- come to loathe the robotic voice change to make things better.

tech friction
tional divide within businesses. lutely paramount,” he says. tion and the internet of things, telling them “there is an unidenti- Just as consumer technology is
“I often hear older workers say It seems communicating by voice innovations which might yet prove fied item in the bagging area”. designed to be customer centric, the
they think face-to-face communica- isn’t going anywhere, but choice to be godsends, or fresh hells. So what of our workplaces? workplace technology your business
tion is dying and that younger work- will be key. In line with the expec- Workplace and facilities profession- Innovative technology can be revo- adopts must be  employee centric. It
ers lack communication skills, but tations of the next generation of als are not immune with increasing lutionary but, to make sure it ulti- should solve the challenges of your
workforce and be something your
Work-enabling technology
I just believe our communication employees, businesses will need developments in the technology we mately benefits us, we need to think
strategies evolve and innovators are to provide a range of communica- employ to manage buildings. hard about its use. At fi rst glance, employees can’t live without.
COMM U NICATIONS isn’t appropriate. “There will always
be instances where voice is needed,
creating new options,” she says.
“Instead of forcing everyone to
tion methods that suits the needs of
both the organisation and the next
I’m not going to argue that these
technologies aren’t important or
employers and managers might
love the idea of tracking staff move-
in convenient workspaces This isn’t workplace fiction, it is work-
place fact. And it exists for one simple
empowers employees to excel

Don’t hang up
use-cases like emergency services, have conversations, face to face or wave of workers. aren’t going to have an impact. ments; we know how to do it, but reason: it’s what employees really want.
healthcare and legal where voice They do. But I do believe that peo- what sort of impact will this have In the same way we welcome eBay noti-
will be the primary mode of com- ple, in my industry and outside, on people while they are at work? fications about auctions ending soon
munication,” says Mr Chaudhuri. have missed out on its true impact. The aim for all workplace profes- or Facebook reminders telling us it’s a

the office desk 70% 61%


Interestingly, despite the huge We are so fascinated with what sionals should be to use technol- mproving the employee expe- friend’s birthday, we are living in a time
I
80%
research and development invest- technology can do for us as profes- ogy not for its own sake, or to drive rience is in the top three where relevancy is king. If technology
ments made by these unified com- sionals that we have lost sight of efficiencies, but to improve the focus areas for global human is out of sight, but serves a purpose,
munications vendors into develop-
of large of employees Providing a platform wider potential. overall experience. In my opinion, resources leaders who want to support people are clear: bring it on.

phone just yet


ing messaging and collaboration When a breakthrough is made the company that has understood business growth in 2019, says Gartner. It Take the relatively, in theory, simple
applications, there may yet be life in
businesses use
collaborative
across all
generations
to enable employees that is supposedly going to help this the best is Uber. They removed makes complete sense: a happy work- task of attending an external meeting.
the traditional desk phone.
chat apps, up prefer short and to collaborate in the us work better, smarter or more the old frustrations involved in force leads to improved productivity, It’s booked in an employee’s online cal-
An independent survey by tech from 53 per sweet over long effectively, facility managers don’t getting a taxi and replaced it with greater talent retention and ultimately of people claimed technology endar, scheduled for a few hours time,
marketplace Spiceworks shows cent in 2016 and detailed
way that best suits sufficiently consider how the new an almost seamless, personalised better customer experiences. not working properly creates a across town. But, unbeknown to them,
negative experience at work
most companies remain commit- modes of them is absolutely technology can benefit the work- and convenient service. And there is solid research to back this transport problems are creating havoc.

Messaging and collaboration apps seem increasingly ted to their desk phones, with 93 per
cent still using them. Further, most
communication
paramount
ing experience for everyone else
instead of simply helping to man-
But the Californian company, not
yet ten years old, has completely
up. Workplace futurist Jacob Morgan
revealed findings in the Harvard Business
How much easier would this employ-
ee’s life be if tech informed them of
popular, particularly among younger members of Review showing companies focusing on this and suggested that if they left

52 %
employees are using them as their age the building better. revolutionised the way people get
Business Chat Apps in 2018: Top Players and Adoption Plans, Spiceworks
primary communications device, At the end of the day, that is what around globally. It didn’t only use employee experience had four times the now, rather than when they’d initially
staff, but there’s still life left in the old desk phone
Microsoft/YouGov
much more so than their smart- we should be concerned about. technology for streamlining or to average profit and more than twice the planned, they’d still get there on time?
phones or Skype, or other collabora- Some companies, in other sec- drive up profits. Instead, it used the average revenue of those that didn’t. Or, what if, mid-journey, artificial intel-
tion services on laptops or desktop IN THE PAST YEAR, HOW OFTEN HAVE YOU USED tors, have already grasped this. latest methods of communication, Despite this evidence, the modern ligence predicts they’ll still be late, but
Christine Horton computers. THE FOLLOWING MEANS OF COMMUNICATION Amazon has risen to dominate the GPS locators, payment methods and workplace doesn’t seem to be working that a co-working space with spare
Importantly too, the human factor WITH COLLEAGUES OR YOUR FIRM’S CLIENTS? world, not because they embrace more to make getting from A to B as when it comes to supporting workers, capacity was just a short distance
will remain a core component of any every technological novelty going simple, cost effective and pleasant optimising space effectively and provid- dream of interacting with away? At least they could decide to still
common gripe levelled by messaging and collaboration solu- business’ success in the future. Email and use it to create efficiency, as possible for the customer. The ing technology that enhances positive workplace technology have a Skype call instead. The technol-
A the older generation against tions that can be easily integrated “There’s no question that digi- but because they carefully decide profits will take care of themselves. experiences for employees. that offers personalised ogy would update the other attendees
young people is that they into the workplace. It’s a worldwide tal communication has become a which ones improve the experi- In short, the technology itself Without sensible, work-enabling experiences, similar to the and book everything for them.
t messaging
spend too much time on their smart- market that IDC estimates will be huge part of the workplace, but Instan ence of their customers. doesn’t matter, the experience does; technology, workplaces merely create likes of Uber or Google For chief executives and facilities
phones, immersed in messaging apps worth more than $22 billion by 2021. despite that, the demand Every day The company strives more and and the best role of the former is to friction; what McKinsey & Company call managers, this is actually good news.
nference
ne/co
or browsing social media. Whether However, the tech firms argue for communication, more for same-day delivery of any- improve the latter. That is where the “organisational drag”. With one-size- With the type of technology infrastruc-
cal
the complaint is fair or not, it’s hardly they are not abandoning voice, but soft skills, teamwork, Ph o l thing to anyone. It already knows value of technology lies. fits-all workplaces simply no longer ture Cloudbooking provide, includ-
a surprise that young adults between offering customers the opportunity empathy, listening, nferenc exactly what a customer is going possible, workspaces increasingly staff dream of interacting with work- ing tech that monitors where people
e o co in g
the ages of 18 to 21 use text and chat to use whichever communications persuasion are even V id to order, before the customer need technology that enriches rather place technology that offers the same go, which spaces are occupied, how
more than any other generation, and best suits their needs. “What these greater than ever,” Most days does. This might sound vaguely than enrages. sort of personalised experience they often and by how many, decisions can
they rate chat almost as favourably as collaboration tools offer is choice,” says Josh Bersin, 100% Orwellian, but it’s this that has McKinsey says the average com- already get in their personal lives from be made more strategically using data.
an in-person meeting, according to a says Howard Lewis, surface busi- founder of Bersin allowed it to continue to shorten pany loses 25 per cent of its produc- the likes of Google or Uber. We believe this means employers have
2018 survey by Microsoft. ness group lead at Microsoft UK. by Deloitte, a delivery times. tive capacity simply by putting people The reality for a significant 59 per the opportunity to create even better
But with the imminent arrival of “Choice about how we communicate research and Those of us building the work- together in one place, dealing with all cent is that technology is not working as experiences, with staff feeling they’re
75% 25% Sometimes
this Generation Z into the workforce, and the tools that will best suit the advisory firm places of the future need to learn the inefficient policies and processes they expect and actually prevents them being set free by technology, rather
what effect will that have on how project and the team in question.” focused on from this mindset and adopt sim- this entails, technology deficiencies doing their jobs properly. If only they than it being their master.
organisations communicate? Could Amrit Chaudhuri, senior vice management, ilar ambitions. It’s possible, but included. Not only this, its research finds had bespoke technology-enabled expe-
50% that with each additional 10 per cent riences at work; this is what 61 per cent
we see the desk phone, or even voice president of product marketing at leadership and only when technology is posi-
itself, become redundant within unified communications vendor human resources Rarely tioned right. There is, however, a increase in staff headcount, firms lose 2 agreed would make them happier about
a few years? Moreover, is it wise to RingCentral, also maintains voice technology. cautionary tale in every supermar- per cent in productivity. coming to work each day. For more information please visit
shun legacy systems such as the desk will always remain a critical part of Mr Bersin points ket in the UK. This all creates a strong case to create While this may not be a huge sur- cloudbooking.com
phone just to accommodate the pref- business communications, pointing to a 2018 study by Self-service checkouts have personalised working experiences for prise, the extent to which there is such
erences of future generations? out: “Think about how many people Bloomberg that found become ubiquitous across the the workforce, designed to support indi- high expectation about technology
Unified communications compa- join video meetings with their cam- 45 per cent of HR leaders Never country in recent years, but while Chris Moriarty vidual as well as provide the best envi- making working life easier possibly is.
nies – tech firms that combine voice, era turned off.” believe the biggest drawback shops will insist they make cus- Director of insight and engagement ronment for everyone. But it makes sense. At Cloudbooking we
video and messaging platforms for He also notes there are circum- with new graduates is they lack tomers’ lives easier, we all know Institute of Workplace and Facilities In the latest Cloudbooking report, we believe “Experience” is what employees
businesses – are already investing in stances when messaging simply soft skills, if not technical expertise. The Economist 2018
the truth. Self-service checkouts Management found more than half (52 per cent) of crave and good experiences at that. Most
04 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 05
Commercial feature
So not only does it appear that via phone, in real time with one OPINION
voice won’t be disappearing from another, digital channels make
our lives as feared, advances in tech- room for conversations over time.
nologies, such as artificial intelli- I’ll email or text you my question
gence (AI), may be set to drive a new and you can get back to me when you
way of using voice in the future. have time. For many young workers,
Philipp Bohn, vice president of they feel that approach is more con-

‘Innovative technology
Atos’ unified communications siderate of others’ time.’”
services business Circuit, says: We’re all making fewer voice calls
“We can use AI to transcribe and than we used to. A 2018 report by

can be revolutionary
translate voice sessions. A lot of communications regulator Ofcom
intelligence and data is needed shows that the number of voice
to understand who’s talking, and calls made on mobile phones in
understand all the various lan-
guages, dialects, nuances and
speech habits we naturally pro-
the UK has fallen for the fi rst time,
along with traditional text mes-
saging, as users switch to messag-
but we need to think
cess as humans. A huge amount of
knowledge is shared through voice
conversations and with AI-based
ing services such as WhatsApp and
Facebook Messenger.
But while picking up the phone
hard about its use’
transcription it becomes more might be dying out, an employee’s
accessible. Voice is not dead, we voice certainly is not, says Julien
are at the beginning of a new, excit- Lesaicherre, director of Workplace by
ing innovation cycle. Facebook. “Technology will continue
Ultimately, young peoples’ pref- to advance, but the power of human echnology is changing our benefit supermarkets by letting

Tech fact, not


erence for messaging shouldn’t be connection will always remain T world faster, and more them employ fewer people and
judged too harshly, says Cara Silletto, prominent, so providing a platform completely, than ever therefore save money. Their cus- workplaces simply aren’t working, but
a workforce retention adviser who to enable employees to collaborate in before. All sectors have to be aware tomers up and down the UK have technology is now seen as leading the
specialises in bridging the genera- the way that best suits them is abso- of developments such as automa- come to loathe the robotic voice change to make things better.

tech friction
tional divide within businesses. lutely paramount,” he says. tion and the internet of things, telling them “there is an unidenti- Just as consumer technology is
“I often hear older workers say It seems communicating by voice innovations which might yet prove fied item in the bagging area”. designed to be customer centric, the
they think face-to-face communica- isn’t going anywhere, but choice to be godsends, or fresh hells. So what of our workplaces? workplace technology your business
tion is dying and that younger work- will be key. In line with the expec- Workplace and facilities profession- Innovative technology can be revo- adopts must be  employee centric. It
ers lack communication skills, but tations of the next generation of als are not immune with increasing lutionary but, to make sure it ulti- should solve the challenges of your
workforce and be something your
Work-enabling technology
I just believe our communication employees, businesses will need developments in the technology we mately benefits us, we need to think
strategies evolve and innovators are to provide a range of communica- employ to manage buildings. hard about its use. At fi rst glance, employees can’t live without.
COMM U NICATIONS isn’t appropriate. “There will always
be instances where voice is needed,
creating new options,” she says.
“Instead of forcing everyone to
tion methods that suits the needs of
both the organisation and the next
I’m not going to argue that these
technologies aren’t important or
employers and managers might
love the idea of tracking staff move-
in convenient workspaces This isn’t workplace fiction, it is work-
place fact. And it exists for one simple
empowers employees to excel

Don’t hang up
use-cases like emergency services, have conversations, face to face or wave of workers. aren’t going to have an impact. ments; we know how to do it, but reason: it’s what employees really want.
healthcare and legal where voice They do. But I do believe that peo- what sort of impact will this have In the same way we welcome eBay noti-
will be the primary mode of com- ple, in my industry and outside, on people while they are at work? fications about auctions ending soon
munication,” says Mr Chaudhuri. have missed out on its true impact. The aim for all workplace profes- or Facebook reminders telling us it’s a

the office desk 70% 61%


Interestingly, despite the huge We are so fascinated with what sionals should be to use technol- mproving the employee expe- friend’s birthday, we are living in a time
I
80%
research and development invest- technology can do for us as profes- ogy not for its own sake, or to drive rience is in the top three where relevancy is king. If technology
ments made by these unified com- sionals that we have lost sight of efficiencies, but to improve the focus areas for global human is out of sight, but serves a purpose,
munications vendors into develop-
of large of employees Providing a platform wider potential. overall experience. In my opinion, resources leaders who want to support people are clear: bring it on.

phone just yet


ing messaging and collaboration When a breakthrough is made the company that has understood business growth in 2019, says Gartner. It Take the relatively, in theory, simple
applications, there may yet be life in
businesses use
collaborative
across all
generations
to enable employees that is supposedly going to help this the best is Uber. They removed makes complete sense: a happy work- task of attending an external meeting.
the traditional desk phone.
chat apps, up prefer short and to collaborate in the us work better, smarter or more the old frustrations involved in force leads to improved productivity, It’s booked in an employee’s online cal-
An independent survey by tech from 53 per sweet over long effectively, facility managers don’t getting a taxi and replaced it with greater talent retention and ultimately of people claimed technology endar, scheduled for a few hours time,
marketplace Spiceworks shows cent in 2016 and detailed
way that best suits sufficiently consider how the new an almost seamless, personalised better customer experiences. not working properly creates a across town. But, unbeknown to them,
negative experience at work
most companies remain commit- modes of them is absolutely technology can benefit the work- and convenient service. And there is solid research to back this transport problems are creating havoc.

Messaging and collaboration apps seem increasingly ted to their desk phones, with 93 per
cent still using them. Further, most
communication
paramount
ing experience for everyone else
instead of simply helping to man-
But the Californian company, not
yet ten years old, has completely
up. Workplace futurist Jacob Morgan
revealed findings in the Harvard Business
How much easier would this employ-
ee’s life be if tech informed them of
popular, particularly among younger members of Review showing companies focusing on this and suggested that if they left

52 %
employees are using them as their age the building better. revolutionised the way people get
Business Chat Apps in 2018: Top Players and Adoption Plans, Spiceworks
primary communications device, At the end of the day, that is what around globally. It didn’t only use employee experience had four times the now, rather than when they’d initially
staff, but there’s still life left in the old desk phone
Microsoft/YouGov
much more so than their smart- we should be concerned about. technology for streamlining or to average profit and more than twice the planned, they’d still get there on time?
phones or Skype, or other collabora- Some companies, in other sec- drive up profits. Instead, it used the average revenue of those that didn’t. Or, what if, mid-journey, artificial intel-
tion services on laptops or desktop IN THE PAST YEAR, HOW OFTEN HAVE YOU USED tors, have already grasped this. latest methods of communication, Despite this evidence, the modern ligence predicts they’ll still be late, but
Christine Horton computers. THE FOLLOWING MEANS OF COMMUNICATION Amazon has risen to dominate the GPS locators, payment methods and workplace doesn’t seem to be working that a co-working space with spare
Importantly too, the human factor WITH COLLEAGUES OR YOUR FIRM’S CLIENTS? world, not because they embrace more to make getting from A to B as when it comes to supporting workers, capacity was just a short distance
will remain a core component of any every technological novelty going simple, cost effective and pleasant optimising space effectively and provid- dream of interacting with away? At least they could decide to still
common gripe levelled by messaging and collaboration solu- business’ success in the future. Email and use it to create efficiency, as possible for the customer. The ing technology that enhances positive workplace technology have a Skype call instead. The technol-
A the older generation against tions that can be easily integrated “There’s no question that digi- but because they carefully decide profits will take care of themselves. experiences for employees. that offers personalised ogy would update the other attendees
young people is that they into the workplace. It’s a worldwide tal communication has become a which ones improve the experi- In short, the technology itself Without sensible, work-enabling experiences, similar to the and book everything for them.
t messaging
spend too much time on their smart- market that IDC estimates will be huge part of the workplace, but Instan ence of their customers. doesn’t matter, the experience does; technology, workplaces merely create likes of Uber or Google For chief executives and facilities
phones, immersed in messaging apps worth more than $22 billion by 2021. despite that, the demand Every day The company strives more and and the best role of the former is to friction; what McKinsey & Company call managers, this is actually good news.
nference
ne/co
or browsing social media. Whether However, the tech firms argue for communication, more for same-day delivery of any- improve the latter. That is where the “organisational drag”. With one-size- With the type of technology infrastruc-
cal
the complaint is fair or not, it’s hardly they are not abandoning voice, but soft skills, teamwork, Ph o l thing to anyone. It already knows value of technology lies. fits-all workplaces simply no longer ture Cloudbooking provide, includ-
a surprise that young adults between offering customers the opportunity empathy, listening, nferenc exactly what a customer is going possible, workspaces increasingly staff dream of interacting with work- ing tech that monitors where people
e o co in g
the ages of 18 to 21 use text and chat to use whichever communications persuasion are even V id to order, before the customer need technology that enriches rather place technology that offers the same go, which spaces are occupied, how
more than any other generation, and best suits their needs. “What these greater than ever,” Most days does. This might sound vaguely than enrages. sort of personalised experience they often and by how many, decisions can
they rate chat almost as favourably as collaboration tools offer is choice,” says Josh Bersin, 100% Orwellian, but it’s this that has McKinsey says the average com- already get in their personal lives from be made more strategically using data.
an in-person meeting, according to a says Howard Lewis, surface busi- founder of Bersin allowed it to continue to shorten pany loses 25 per cent of its produc- the likes of Google or Uber. We believe this means employers have
2018 survey by Microsoft. ness group lead at Microsoft UK. by Deloitte, a delivery times. tive capacity simply by putting people The reality for a significant 59 per the opportunity to create even better
But with the imminent arrival of “Choice about how we communicate research and Those of us building the work- together in one place, dealing with all cent is that technology is not working as experiences, with staff feeling they’re
75% 25% Sometimes
this Generation Z into the workforce, and the tools that will best suit the advisory firm places of the future need to learn the inefficient policies and processes they expect and actually prevents them being set free by technology, rather
what effect will that have on how project and the team in question.” focused on from this mindset and adopt sim- this entails, technology deficiencies doing their jobs properly. If only they than it being their master.
organisations communicate? Could Amrit Chaudhuri, senior vice management, ilar ambitions. It’s possible, but included. Not only this, its research finds had bespoke technology-enabled expe-
50% that with each additional 10 per cent riences at work; this is what 61 per cent
we see the desk phone, or even voice president of product marketing at leadership and only when technology is posi-
itself, become redundant within unified communications vendor human resources Rarely tioned right. There is, however, a increase in staff headcount, firms lose 2 agreed would make them happier about
a few years? Moreover, is it wise to RingCentral, also maintains voice technology. cautionary tale in every supermar- per cent in productivity. coming to work each day. For more information please visit
shun legacy systems such as the desk will always remain a critical part of Mr Bersin points ket in the UK. This all creates a strong case to create While this may not be a huge sur- cloudbooking.com
phone just to accommodate the pref- business communications, pointing to a 2018 study by Self-service checkouts have personalised working experiences for prise, the extent to which there is such
erences of future generations? out: “Think about how many people Bloomberg that found become ubiquitous across the the workforce, designed to support indi- high expectation about technology
Unified communications compa- join video meetings with their cam- 45 per cent of HR leaders Never country in recent years, but while Chris Moriarty vidual as well as provide the best envi- making working life easier possibly is.
nies – tech firms that combine voice, era turned off.” believe the biggest drawback shops will insist they make cus- Director of insight and engagement ronment for everyone. But it makes sense. At Cloudbooking we
video and messaging platforms for He also notes there are circum- with new graduates is they lack tomers’ lives easier, we all know Institute of Workplace and Facilities In the latest Cloudbooking report, we believe “Experience” is what employees
businesses – are already investing in stances when messaging simply soft skills, if not technical expertise. The Economist 2018
the truth. Self-service checkouts Management found more than half (52 per cent) of crave and good experiences at that. Most
06 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 07
Commercial feature
OFFICE DESIGN

Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio


Gazing at the future of workplace design Delivering food for
Architects, designers
thought and happiness

Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio


and developers tell
business leaders Providing staff with tasty, nourishing food is not only good for
how they can create employees’ wellbeing and engagement, it also feeds the bottom line
office environments
that make staff
happier, better E
at, work, sleep. Sometimes it
can feel like that’s all many of
motivated and us do on any given day, and
increasingly not in equal measures.
more productive Kensington These will lead to an elevated With an ever-lengthening working
Olympia streetscape that visitors walk week, people in the UK now toil on aver-
across, mirroring a ground-level age for 42.3 hours, the most in Europe.
Architectural firms SPPARC and environment while giving them a The workplace is fast becoming a space
Heatherwick Studio will soon skyline view of London. where instead of getting the most from
begin renovating Olympia London The hybrid building will cater staff, it curtails creativity and drives
Sarah Dawood in West Kensington, a 150-year for employees at London Olympia stress levels to new heights. More than
old exhibition hall, events space and the local community, creating this, it reduces the time to eat to a
and conference centre. Due to a cultural hub that gives an snatched 20 minutes here or there.
one are the days of employ- open in 2023, the refurbishment “unappealing part of London a With the decline of staff canteens only
G ees trapped in isolated will see new offices alongside new lease of life”, says Mr Postma, exacerbating this – only 6 per cent of
booths, heads down with restaurants, hotels, theatres, while making work more enjoyable firms with fewer than 50 employees have
little social interaction. For many music venues and gyms. for employees by offering them one, according to the 2015 Workplace
businesses, gone still is the ubiqui- The offices will be based on the lunchtime and after-work activities. Report – time away from desks, or the
tous open-plan style that followed. ground floor and connected to The venues will be modular ability to access healthy food, is for
Instead, office design has shifted 01 Olympia London’s exhibition halls, and adaptable, to accommodate many becoming a thing of the past. Food
towards flexible working, with while an elevated public space changing trends in leisure. seems to have lost its role in helping us
spaces to suit different needs, such will feature on the building’s “We are creating flexible rest, relax, collaborate and enjoy our-
as co-working and collaboration, and extroverts, and offices need to roof, says Eliot Postma, partner infrastructure because things selves at work.
socialising and private research. THERE IS A CLEAR APPETITE FROM EMPLOYEES accommodate both.” 03 at Heatherwick Studio. This will could change over the next four But the workplace needn’t, and
According to a survey from FOR A DIGITAL WORKPL ACE Despite the need for quiet spaces, include a square and garden, and years,” he says. “The ability to be shouldn’t, be such a culinary desert. For
the Association of Accounting both agree that integrating a sense cultural, food and fitness venues. agile is really important.” centuries people have come together, Not only is sampling a variety of great for staff to chat, collaborate, and learn.
socialised and made connections spe- cuisines the perfect way of bringing They also provide healthy breakfast and
64% if new workplace technology isn't integrated
Technicians, flexible working makes believe their organisation risks falling behind of community will remain impor-
employees less stressed and more tant to the future workplace, espe- cifically around eating great food. Value people from different cultures and meeting snacks to maintain employee
productive. But as the trend for vari- cially as advancements in tech- is seen in having shared experiences, backgrounds together, it also gener- health throughout the day.
ation continues, what will the future nology encourage people to work developing friendships and connect- ates happiness, as well as full stom- And it goes without saying that the over
workplace look like?
Andy Heath, design director for
71% think the workplace of the future
should be fully automated
remotely and become more isolated.
Mr Postma is working on Google’s new
Also, says Mr Allford, there will
be a shift towards multi-purpose
materials for furnishings, as well as
investigate which synthetic prod-
ing intellectually. And as workplaces
shift to become places for collabo-
achs. Workplace experts increasingly
link happiness to staff engagement
10,000 businesses (and growing) that use
Deliveroo for Business excite their staff
Europe, Middle East and Africa Mountain View campus in California, buildings that cater for a whole com- ucts, such as paint and plastics, emit ration, idea-sharing and creation of and engagement to productivity. A by giving them access to the best food

72% think
at WeWork, predicts we will move the future workplace should which rather than traditional floors munity, rather than only the peo- chemicals and how this impacts micro-communities, it seems incongru- Social Market Foundation study found our cities have to offer; Japanese food,
away from open plan completely automatically update and adjust itself features individual plates with ramps ple who work there. “There will be people’s health. ous for food to be left out of the picture. that happy employees are 20 per cent sushi, ramen and noodle dishes are the
and towards “cellularisation” of in-between that slope downwards from a move against trapping employees “Not only do businesses have a more productive than unhappy ones, favourites among tech client businesses.

42.3hrs
various different-sized spaces that the centre of the building, splitting a in buildings,” he says. “In the future, moral obligation for staff ’s health, while the Harvard Business Review Manchester-based employees have a
can be reconfigured. Eliot Postma,
partner at Heatherwick Studio,
61% want virtual and augmented reality
to play a stronger role
floor across 20 levels so everyone can
see out of windows and up the entire
offices might have a school on the
roof with a playground and apart-
but addressing this helps them
make money,” she says. “If staff are
recently reported close work friend-
ships boost employee satisfaction by
penchant for mezze platters; employ-
ees in Leeds prefer chicken tikka spice
agrees. “It was previously thought “vertical façade” of the space. Up to 100 they are more comfortable if they says buildings should be perma- ments below. Buildings will become more creative and productive, it’s up to 50 per cent. bowls.
that full collaboration was best,” Aruba Networks 2018 employees are sat on one plate. The roof have the opportunity to change their nent, with the ability to change a microcosm of the city.” better for the bottom line.” But there are more reasons why ena- “It’s our aim to be the number-one
he says. “But there are introverts is made of a series of fabric canopies environment, even if they’ve actu- interiors. AHMM designed Google’s Architects recognise a need to be WeWork’s Mr Heath believes data a week worked on average by UK bling staff to eat well improves the provider of amazing food experience,
that allow light and air in. ally made it worse for themselves.” 6 Pancras Square, London office, close to nature will dominate offices will increasingly be used to cre- employees is the most in Europe company bottom line. At a time when for everyone from startups to big global

6%
01 “It strikes a balance between every- Mr Postma also predicts that more which opened in 2016, and created in future. This includes providing ate offices tailored to individuals. employers are increasingly waking up corporates. And that’s because we see
An artist’s one working on one level, but not being buildings will be designed without a a modular meeting room concept more opportunities for employees to Currently, WeWork looks at the cul- to the very serious implications of poor food differently”, says Juan Diego Farah,
impression of
Google’s Mountain
lost in an anonymous sea of white sad- set user in mind, creating a versatile known as Project Jack. The ply- see outside through features such as ture of different countries to define employee wellbeing – stress, anxiety global head of Deliveroo for Business.
View campus, ness,” he says. “The plates provide shell that could be filled with modu- wood pod can be mass-produced staircases around the periphery and its office design. Its Swedish work- and mental issues have now overtaken Not only do they see it as an integral
currently under people with their own space and team lar fit-outs to suit different brands and and constructed by office staff into segmented floor panels that let light spaces have large communal lunch traditional musculoskeletal problems part of ensuring good personal health
construction
ownership, while giving them access fashions, which is why ex-industrial different sized spaces with varying in, as well as introducing natural or tables, while those in the UK have as the number-one cause of employee and wellbeing, they also believe food is
02 to outside views and daylight.” buildings continue to be popular. levels of privacy. biophilic elements into office design smaller breakout spaces as people of firms with fewer than 50 absence – there’s no doubting the well- key to building great teams in a 21st-cen-
Mountain View in As technology gets smarter, archi- “There’s an ongoing trend for Mr Fisher predicts there will itself, says Mr Postma. Introducing tend to eat in isolation more. employees have a staff canteen ness contribution that food breaks and tury workplace.
California tects need to focus on creating social industrial aesthetic,” he says. “The be a shift to hybridisation in soundscapes, such as of running “Offices will become far more cus- socialising has. And, at a time when creating great
Workplace Report 2015

03
spaces, Mr Postma adds. He foresees scrappiness gives soul and allows office design, where outdoor and water, and using fabrics with textures tomisable based on people’s data,” Not only does eating well fuel people experiences for employees is everything,

20%
An interior of the the removal of reception desks and users to feel like they can change the indoor areas merge, and previ- inspired by nature are two examples. he says. “An office will track my properly, avoiding traditional dips in and not just for millennials, workplaces
future Google HQ gated barriers, where employees space. It doesn’t feel polished and ously closed and private areas are “The trend goes way beyond green location and adjust preferences to sugar levels, concentration and produc- need to offer something different to pull
scan their passes, as facial recogni- perfect, giving people autonomy to used, such as basements turned walls and potted plants,” he says. suit me. After lunch, the tempera- tivity, it also enables staff to tackle what people in and retain top talent. Delivering
tion software advances. “People will make a workspace theirs.” into “maker spaces” and back “People want a strong understand- ture where I am sat might drop by they need to do with verve. In addition, it on this can come from getting everyone
always want social interaction,” he Simon Allford, director at Allford entrances revitalised with ramps ing of the time of day, seasons and a degree and the blinds may go up serves as valuable time out to reset busy around the table to enjoy amazing food
says. “We should prioritise spaces Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM), and cycle parking. weather; it’s the opposite of the slightly to wake me up, creating my minds. together.
for them to come together.” casino model.” optimum work environment.” more productivity from When Deliveroo for Business first When people eat well, they work well
Peter Fisher, director at Bennetts Helen Causer, senior projects While offices continue to evolve, happy employees launched three-and-a-half years ago, it and they sleep well, and they’re more
Associates, says that giving employees director of asset management at the future workplace will see inter- was all about servicing companies with likely to be happy too. What’s not to like
Social Market Foundation
choice makes them feel more in con- Argent, says a focus on health and esting advancements beyond mod- a culture of long hours and late nights. about this?

10k+
trol. He thinks we will see office design wellbeing will also see indoor envi- ular meeting rooms, from person- They provided hard-pressed staff with
with rooms that have different ceiling ronments monitored. alised environments to furniture amazing food within 30 minutes, to help
heights, paint tones and lighting, air Businesses will assess air quality, that is better for our health. We fuel their evenings at the office.
conditioning and temperature levels. Research shows that people believe they carbon-dioxide levels and temper- could further see a push towards But as mindsets around what healthy
workspaces that value the wellbe- work is have changed, so have they.
02
“The need for people to have per-
ceived control is important,” he says.
are more comfortable if they have the ature, and analyse them alongside
staff happiness and productivity. ing of staff on equal measure with businesses use Deliveroo They now offer companies healthy team
“Research shows that people believe opportunity to change their environment They will source more sustainable their productivity. for Business lunches that are amazing opportunities
06 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 07
Commercial feature
OFFICE DESIGN

Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio


Gazing at the future of workplace design Delivering food for
Architects, designers
thought and happiness

Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio


and developers tell
business leaders Providing staff with tasty, nourishing food is not only good for
how they can create employees’ wellbeing and engagement, it also feeds the bottom line
office environments
that make staff
happier, better E
at, work, sleep. Sometimes it
can feel like that’s all many of
motivated and us do on any given day, and
increasingly not in equal measures.
more productive Kensington These will lead to an elevated With an ever-lengthening working
Olympia streetscape that visitors walk week, people in the UK now toil on aver-
across, mirroring a ground-level age for 42.3 hours, the most in Europe.
Architectural firms SPPARC and environment while giving them a The workplace is fast becoming a space
Heatherwick Studio will soon skyline view of London. where instead of getting the most from
begin renovating Olympia London The hybrid building will cater staff, it curtails creativity and drives
Sarah Dawood in West Kensington, a 150-year for employees at London Olympia stress levels to new heights. More than
old exhibition hall, events space and the local community, creating this, it reduces the time to eat to a
and conference centre. Due to a cultural hub that gives an snatched 20 minutes here or there.
one are the days of employ- open in 2023, the refurbishment “unappealing part of London a With the decline of staff canteens only
G ees trapped in isolated will see new offices alongside new lease of life”, says Mr Postma, exacerbating this – only 6 per cent of
booths, heads down with restaurants, hotels, theatres, while making work more enjoyable firms with fewer than 50 employees have
little social interaction. For many music venues and gyms. for employees by offering them one, according to the 2015 Workplace
businesses, gone still is the ubiqui- The offices will be based on the lunchtime and after-work activities. Report – time away from desks, or the
tous open-plan style that followed. ground floor and connected to The venues will be modular ability to access healthy food, is for
Instead, office design has shifted 01 Olympia London’s exhibition halls, and adaptable, to accommodate many becoming a thing of the past. Food
towards flexible working, with while an elevated public space changing trends in leisure. seems to have lost its role in helping us
spaces to suit different needs, such will feature on the building’s “We are creating flexible rest, relax, collaborate and enjoy our-
as co-working and collaboration, and extroverts, and offices need to roof, says Eliot Postma, partner infrastructure because things selves at work.
socialising and private research. THERE IS A CLEAR APPETITE FROM EMPLOYEES accommodate both.” 03 at Heatherwick Studio. This will could change over the next four But the workplace needn’t, and
According to a survey from FOR A DIGITAL WORKPL ACE Despite the need for quiet spaces, include a square and garden, and years,” he says. “The ability to be shouldn’t, be such a culinary desert. For
the Association of Accounting both agree that integrating a sense cultural, food and fitness venues. agile is really important.” centuries people have come together, Not only is sampling a variety of great for staff to chat, collaborate, and learn.
socialised and made connections spe- cuisines the perfect way of bringing They also provide healthy breakfast and
64% if new workplace technology isn't integrated
Technicians, flexible working makes believe their organisation risks falling behind of community will remain impor-
employees less stressed and more tant to the future workplace, espe- cifically around eating great food. Value people from different cultures and meeting snacks to maintain employee
productive. But as the trend for vari- cially as advancements in tech- is seen in having shared experiences, backgrounds together, it also gener- health throughout the day.
ation continues, what will the future nology encourage people to work developing friendships and connect- ates happiness, as well as full stom- And it goes without saying that the over
workplace look like?
Andy Heath, design director for
71% think the workplace of the future
should be fully automated
remotely and become more isolated.
Mr Postma is working on Google’s new
Also, says Mr Allford, there will
be a shift towards multi-purpose
materials for furnishings, as well as
investigate which synthetic prod-
ing intellectually. And as workplaces
shift to become places for collabo-
achs. Workplace experts increasingly
link happiness to staff engagement
10,000 businesses (and growing) that use
Deliveroo for Business excite their staff
Europe, Middle East and Africa Mountain View campus in California, buildings that cater for a whole com- ucts, such as paint and plastics, emit ration, idea-sharing and creation of and engagement to productivity. A by giving them access to the best food

72% think
at WeWork, predicts we will move the future workplace should which rather than traditional floors munity, rather than only the peo- chemicals and how this impacts micro-communities, it seems incongru- Social Market Foundation study found our cities have to offer; Japanese food,
away from open plan completely automatically update and adjust itself features individual plates with ramps ple who work there. “There will be people’s health. ous for food to be left out of the picture. that happy employees are 20 per cent sushi, ramen and noodle dishes are the
and towards “cellularisation” of in-between that slope downwards from a move against trapping employees “Not only do businesses have a more productive than unhappy ones, favourites among tech client businesses.

42.3hrs
various different-sized spaces that the centre of the building, splitting a in buildings,” he says. “In the future, moral obligation for staff ’s health, while the Harvard Business Review Manchester-based employees have a
can be reconfigured. Eliot Postma,
partner at Heatherwick Studio,
61% want virtual and augmented reality
to play a stronger role
floor across 20 levels so everyone can
see out of windows and up the entire
offices might have a school on the
roof with a playground and apart-
but addressing this helps them
make money,” she says. “If staff are
recently reported close work friend-
ships boost employee satisfaction by
penchant for mezze platters; employ-
ees in Leeds prefer chicken tikka spice
agrees. “It was previously thought “vertical façade” of the space. Up to 100 they are more comfortable if they says buildings should be perma- ments below. Buildings will become more creative and productive, it’s up to 50 per cent. bowls.
that full collaboration was best,” Aruba Networks 2018 employees are sat on one plate. The roof have the opportunity to change their nent, with the ability to change a microcosm of the city.” better for the bottom line.” But there are more reasons why ena- “It’s our aim to be the number-one
he says. “But there are introverts is made of a series of fabric canopies environment, even if they’ve actu- interiors. AHMM designed Google’s Architects recognise a need to be WeWork’s Mr Heath believes data a week worked on average by UK bling staff to eat well improves the provider of amazing food experience,
that allow light and air in. ally made it worse for themselves.” 6 Pancras Square, London office, close to nature will dominate offices will increasingly be used to cre- employees is the most in Europe company bottom line. At a time when for everyone from startups to big global

6%
01 “It strikes a balance between every- Mr Postma also predicts that more which opened in 2016, and created in future. This includes providing ate offices tailored to individuals. employers are increasingly waking up corporates. And that’s because we see
An artist’s one working on one level, but not being buildings will be designed without a a modular meeting room concept more opportunities for employees to Currently, WeWork looks at the cul- to the very serious implications of poor food differently”, says Juan Diego Farah,
impression of
Google’s Mountain
lost in an anonymous sea of white sad- set user in mind, creating a versatile known as Project Jack. The ply- see outside through features such as ture of different countries to define employee wellbeing – stress, anxiety global head of Deliveroo for Business.
View campus, ness,” he says. “The plates provide shell that could be filled with modu- wood pod can be mass-produced staircases around the periphery and its office design. Its Swedish work- and mental issues have now overtaken Not only do they see it as an integral
currently under people with their own space and team lar fit-outs to suit different brands and and constructed by office staff into segmented floor panels that let light spaces have large communal lunch traditional musculoskeletal problems part of ensuring good personal health
construction
ownership, while giving them access fashions, which is why ex-industrial different sized spaces with varying in, as well as introducing natural or tables, while those in the UK have as the number-one cause of employee and wellbeing, they also believe food is
02 to outside views and daylight.” buildings continue to be popular. levels of privacy. biophilic elements into office design smaller breakout spaces as people of firms with fewer than 50 absence – there’s no doubting the well- key to building great teams in a 21st-cen-
Mountain View in As technology gets smarter, archi- “There’s an ongoing trend for Mr Fisher predicts there will itself, says Mr Postma. Introducing tend to eat in isolation more. employees have a staff canteen ness contribution that food breaks and tury workplace.
California tects need to focus on creating social industrial aesthetic,” he says. “The be a shift to hybridisation in soundscapes, such as of running “Offices will become far more cus- socialising has. And, at a time when creating great
Workplace Report 2015

03
spaces, Mr Postma adds. He foresees scrappiness gives soul and allows office design, where outdoor and water, and using fabrics with textures tomisable based on people’s data,” Not only does eating well fuel people experiences for employees is everything,

20%
An interior of the the removal of reception desks and users to feel like they can change the indoor areas merge, and previ- inspired by nature are two examples. he says. “An office will track my properly, avoiding traditional dips in and not just for millennials, workplaces
future Google HQ gated barriers, where employees space. It doesn’t feel polished and ously closed and private areas are “The trend goes way beyond green location and adjust preferences to sugar levels, concentration and produc- need to offer something different to pull
scan their passes, as facial recogni- perfect, giving people autonomy to used, such as basements turned walls and potted plants,” he says. suit me. After lunch, the tempera- tivity, it also enables staff to tackle what people in and retain top talent. Delivering
tion software advances. “People will make a workspace theirs.” into “maker spaces” and back “People want a strong understand- ture where I am sat might drop by they need to do with verve. In addition, it on this can come from getting everyone
always want social interaction,” he Simon Allford, director at Allford entrances revitalised with ramps ing of the time of day, seasons and a degree and the blinds may go up serves as valuable time out to reset busy around the table to enjoy amazing food
says. “We should prioritise spaces Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM), and cycle parking. weather; it’s the opposite of the slightly to wake me up, creating my minds. together.
for them to come together.” casino model.” optimum work environment.” more productivity from When Deliveroo for Business first When people eat well, they work well
Peter Fisher, director at Bennetts Helen Causer, senior projects While offices continue to evolve, happy employees launched three-and-a-half years ago, it and they sleep well, and they’re more
Associates, says that giving employees director of asset management at the future workplace will see inter- was all about servicing companies with likely to be happy too. What’s not to like
Social Market Foundation
choice makes them feel more in con- Argent, says a focus on health and esting advancements beyond mod- a culture of long hours and late nights. about this?

10k+
trol. He thinks we will see office design wellbeing will also see indoor envi- ular meeting rooms, from person- They provided hard-pressed staff with
with rooms that have different ceiling ronments monitored. alised environments to furniture amazing food within 30 minutes, to help
heights, paint tones and lighting, air Businesses will assess air quality, that is better for our health. We fuel their evenings at the office.
conditioning and temperature levels. Research shows that people believe they carbon-dioxide levels and temper- could further see a push towards But as mindsets around what healthy
workspaces that value the wellbe- work is have changed, so have they.
02
“The need for people to have per-
ceived control is important,” he says.
are more comfortable if they have the ature, and analyse them alongside
staff happiness and productivity. ing of staff on equal measure with businesses use Deliveroo They now offer companies healthy team
“Research shows that people believe opportunity to change their environment They will source more sustainable their productivity. for Business lunches that are amazing opportunities
08 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 09

Productivity
Natural light plays a surprisingly
important role in terms of enhancing
employee productivity as it boosts
BIOPHILIC DESIGN the creation of melatonin. This hor-
mone regulates people’s sleep-wake

Naturally, it’s so good


cycles and, therefore, makes a mate-
rial difference to their energy levels.
For those workspaces in which
natural light is not the dominant

for office workers


source though, circadian light-
ing systems, which undertake col-
our temperature and illumination
changes during the day, can also be
used to ensure staff feel more awake
and energised.
Biophilic design incorporates elements from nature, Another useful approach to help introduced at behavioural planning
improve productivity rates is to open agency Total Media.
such as plants, water features and natural lighting, into up workspaces and create separate “We designed an open-plan, smart
zones that can be used for different working space that used furniture,
the workplace. Although this approach has yet to hit the purposes. Such spaces include com- bookcases and clear glazing to create

mainstream, many experts believe the business benefits munal areas for socialising as well
as quiet spots, where employees can
different zones and meeting spaces
without the need for fixed walls,” he
mean it will become widespread. Here are five benefits work undisturbed. says. “This allows everyone to vis-
Steve Taylor, project director at ually connect and enables natural
office design consultancy Peldon light to flood across the office; all cru-
Rose, provides an example of cial in helping enhance productivity
how this technique worked when and collaboration.”
Cath Everett
But biophilic design can also
engender a sense of belonging, par-
Mental wellbeing
ticularly in activity-based work-
It is estimated that most people in places, where employees tend not to
the developed world spend as much have assigned seating. This means
as 90 per cent of their time inside they lose the ability to personalise a
buildings and cars. But according desk or workstation, which can make
to UK mental health charity Mind, the workspace feel anonymous.
being out in green spaces or bring- Mr Pare at Gensler explains: “If done
ing nature into everyday life can well, biophilic design can help make up
help reduce feelings of stress or for some of the challenges that come
anger, making people feel calmer, with more impersonal spaces. Some
while also improving their confi- offices can feel quite stark and ster-
dence and self-esteem. ile, but if you add other layers, such as
Gensler’s Mr Pare explains: “Quite a plants, it feels more human and more
few studies show how a proximity to relatable to at a primal, sensory level.”
nature, or even a visual image, helps Lloyd Coldrick, managing direc-
foster a more positive outlook. If you tor of interior design consultancy
ask someone to give you an image of
Staff retention Cobus, says although such reactions
something inspiring, nine out of ten A recent survey by Peldon Rose indi- are generally unconscious, they
people will show you a landscape, so cated that maintaining and improv- create a powerful draw. “An office
there’s something innate in nature ing the office environment boosts feel- design has the power to change your
that equals happiness.” ings of loyalty in 53 per cent of workers state of mind,” he says. “We are all
This means that incorporating of all generations, rising to two-thirds highly sensitive to the behavioural
natural elements, such as an indoor among millennials. This is because cues embedded in our environments
water feature and wooden furniture, doing so demonstrates that their and unthinkingly adjust our man-
or providing people with access to employer cares about their working nerisms, mood and body language as
natural light and beautiful views, conditions and, by extension, them. we adapt to our surroundings.”
can help to create a more positive and
harmonious workplace ambience.
This is important because, as
John Williams, managing direc- Branding
tor of interior design consultancy According to a study by the US
SpaceInvader, points out: “The Association for Psychological Science,
boundaries between work and per- it takes just one tenth of a second for
sonal life are becoming more and someone to form an impression of
more blurred, so the idea of wellness a stranger and the same principal
and how to optimise it are becoming applies to potential new employees
But plants also help to put water increasingly important.” or customers assessing an organisa-
Physical health
vapour back into the air, which inside tion’s offices for the first time.
By introducing plants, either in pots offices is naturally dry. This is benefi- Mr Coldrick at Cobus says: “It’s
or in the form of living green walls, cial as breathing in dry air can irritate important that a company’s charac-
into the office environment, it is sensitive membranes in the nose and ter and personality match exactly
possible to improve air quality sig- throat, making staff more susceptible what they want them to feel, and the
nificantly as the vegetation absorbs to viruses and allergens as well as res- health and aesthetically pleasing ele-
pollutants, toxins and airborne piratory ailments, such as asthma. ments of biophilic design mean brand
microbes, such as mould spores In fact, according to research by the awareness is bolstered.” destinations in which the luxury
and bacteria. US Joint Commission, 40 per cent of This is particularly true for pur- travel provider operates, in a bid to
For example, research by Norway’s all sickness absence is down to indoor pose-driven companies that are reflect its brand image.
Agricultural University in Oslo indi- air pollution or poor air quality. keen to demonstrate a sustainable The idea was that the plants comple-
cates that plants remove harmful As Philippe Pare, design director approach, not only to staff wellbeing, mented the cork and sisal details of the
volatile organic compounds, such as at architecture and design consul- but also towards the environment by fixtures and fittings, and gave workers
formaldehyde and benzene, found tancy Gensler, says: “Improved air using natural, recyclable items. “the sense of being in a tropical para-
in the paint, carpet and furniture quality has to be up there as one To illustrate the point, when Peldon dise”, says Peldon Rose’s Mr Taylor. It
of most buildings. As a result, their of the biggest benefits of biophilic Rose revamped the offices of Jacada also made the space “peaceful, restora-
presence reduces the symptoms of design as it plays an important role Travel, the design consultancy intro- tive and an inspiring place to walk into
so-called sick building syndrome by in reducing absenteeism, which is a duced more than 200 exotic plants every day, allowing for creative and
a quarter. huge business cost.” as a reference to the international inspired work to take place”, he adds.
08 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 09

Productivity
Natural light plays a surprisingly
important role in terms of enhancing
employee productivity as it boosts
BIOPHILIC DESIGN the creation of melatonin. This hor-
mone regulates people’s sleep-wake

Naturally, it’s so good


cycles and, therefore, makes a mate-
rial difference to their energy levels.
For those workspaces in which
natural light is not the dominant

for office workers


source though, circadian light-
ing systems, which undertake col-
our temperature and illumination
changes during the day, can also be
used to ensure staff feel more awake
and energised.
Biophilic design incorporates elements from nature, Another useful approach to help introduced at behavioural planning
improve productivity rates is to open agency Total Media.
such as plants, water features and natural lighting, into up workspaces and create separate “We designed an open-plan, smart
zones that can be used for different working space that used furniture,
the workplace. Although this approach has yet to hit the purposes. Such spaces include com- bookcases and clear glazing to create

mainstream, many experts believe the business benefits munal areas for socialising as well
as quiet spots, where employees can
different zones and meeting spaces
without the need for fixed walls,” he
mean it will become widespread. Here are five benefits work undisturbed. says. “This allows everyone to vis-
Steve Taylor, project director at ually connect and enables natural
office design consultancy Peldon light to flood across the office; all cru-
Rose, provides an example of cial in helping enhance productivity
how this technique worked when and collaboration.”
Cath Everett
But biophilic design can also
engender a sense of belonging, par-
Mental wellbeing
ticularly in activity-based work-
It is estimated that most people in places, where employees tend not to
the developed world spend as much have assigned seating. This means
as 90 per cent of their time inside they lose the ability to personalise a
buildings and cars. But according desk or workstation, which can make
to UK mental health charity Mind, the workspace feel anonymous.
being out in green spaces or bring- Mr Pare at Gensler explains: “If done
ing nature into everyday life can well, biophilic design can help make up
help reduce feelings of stress or for some of the challenges that come
anger, making people feel calmer, with more impersonal spaces. Some
while also improving their confi- offices can feel quite stark and ster-
dence and self-esteem. ile, but if you add other layers, such as
Gensler’s Mr Pare explains: “Quite a plants, it feels more human and more
few studies show how a proximity to relatable to at a primal, sensory level.”
nature, or even a visual image, helps Lloyd Coldrick, managing direc-
foster a more positive outlook. If you tor of interior design consultancy
ask someone to give you an image of
Staff retention Cobus, says although such reactions
something inspiring, nine out of ten A recent survey by Peldon Rose indi- are generally unconscious, they
people will show you a landscape, so cated that maintaining and improv- create a powerful draw. “An office
there’s something innate in nature ing the office environment boosts feel- design has the power to change your
that equals happiness.” ings of loyalty in 53 per cent of workers state of mind,” he says. “We are all
This means that incorporating of all generations, rising to two-thirds highly sensitive to the behavioural
natural elements, such as an indoor among millennials. This is because cues embedded in our environments
water feature and wooden furniture, doing so demonstrates that their and unthinkingly adjust our man-
or providing people with access to employer cares about their working nerisms, mood and body language as
natural light and beautiful views, conditions and, by extension, them. we adapt to our surroundings.”
can help to create a more positive and
harmonious workplace ambience.
This is important because, as
John Williams, managing direc- Branding
tor of interior design consultancy According to a study by the US
SpaceInvader, points out: “The Association for Psychological Science,
boundaries between work and per- it takes just one tenth of a second for
sonal life are becoming more and someone to form an impression of
more blurred, so the idea of wellness a stranger and the same principal
and how to optimise it are becoming applies to potential new employees
But plants also help to put water increasingly important.” or customers assessing an organisa-
Physical health
vapour back into the air, which inside tion’s offices for the first time.
By introducing plants, either in pots offices is naturally dry. This is benefi- Mr Coldrick at Cobus says: “It’s
or in the form of living green walls, cial as breathing in dry air can irritate important that a company’s charac-
into the office environment, it is sensitive membranes in the nose and ter and personality match exactly
possible to improve air quality sig- throat, making staff more susceptible what they want them to feel, and the
nificantly as the vegetation absorbs to viruses and allergens as well as res- health and aesthetically pleasing ele-
pollutants, toxins and airborne piratory ailments, such as asthma. ments of biophilic design mean brand
microbes, such as mould spores In fact, according to research by the awareness is bolstered.” destinations in which the luxury
and bacteria. US Joint Commission, 40 per cent of This is particularly true for pur- travel provider operates, in a bid to
For example, research by Norway’s all sickness absence is down to indoor pose-driven companies that are reflect its brand image.
Agricultural University in Oslo indi- air pollution or poor air quality. keen to demonstrate a sustainable The idea was that the plants comple-
cates that plants remove harmful As Philippe Pare, design director approach, not only to staff wellbeing, mented the cork and sisal details of the
volatile organic compounds, such as at architecture and design consul- but also towards the environment by fixtures and fittings, and gave workers
formaldehyde and benzene, found tancy Gensler, says: “Improved air using natural, recyclable items. “the sense of being in a tropical para-
in the paint, carpet and furniture quality has to be up there as one To illustrate the point, when Peldon dise”, says Peldon Rose’s Mr Taylor. It
of most buildings. As a result, their of the biggest benefits of biophilic Rose revamped the offices of Jacada also made the space “peaceful, restora-
presence reduces the symptoms of design as it plays an important role Travel, the design consultancy intro- tive and an inspiring place to walk into
so-called sick building syndrome by in reducing absenteeism, which is a duced more than 200 exotic plants every day, allowing for creative and
a quarter. huge business cost.” as a reference to the international inspired work to take place”, he adds.
10 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 11

TOP CHALLENGES IN MANAGING A MULTI- HOW DIFFERENT GENERATIONS COMMUNICATE IN THE WORKPLACE TOP WORK MOTIVATORS FOR DIFFERENT GENERATIONS
GENERATIONAL WORKFORCE
Amount of time different generations spend with the following communications at work Percentage of different generations who said the following were important
Survey of HR decision-makers

100%
Baby boomers: 1946 – 1964 70%
Baby boomers
40%
Generation X: 1965 – 1980

Generation Y: 1981–1996
60%
Generation Z: 1997–present

%
90
30% Generation X

10
%
Expectations of in-office work/flexible working

50%
Diverse, preferred management styles
Balancing needs for new ideas against
Differences in communication styles

20% Generation
Y
40%
maintaining the status quo

Company culture clashes


for speedy promotions
Managing expectations

Negative generational

10%
Generatio
nZ 30%
stereotypes

0% 20%

Job challenges/excitement

Job challenges/excitement
80% 20%
Eurostat/Office for National Statistics 2017

Ability to pursue passion

Ability to pursue passion


Health insurance

A boss I respect

Allegis Group 2018


GENERATIONS OF THE UK WORKFORCE 10%

Job security

Job security
Proportion of UK adults by generation combined

Salary

Salary

Salary

Salary
In-person meetings Mobile text
100%
0%
Emails Screen sharing Baby boomers Generation X Generation Y Generation Z
80% 0
Mobile calls Video conferencing

Badenoch + Clark 2018


Pre-war
60% Landline calls Co-authoring services
1
Chat
40%
Generation Z

Baby boomers
2
20%

Generation X Generation Y
0% 30%
70%
1983 2016 3
Eurostat/Office for National Statistics 2017

4
We are living longer and retiring later, which means that up to five
generations of employees now have to learn how to work together
under one roof. In most workplaces, this is realistically limited to four 5
generations, with people born shortly after the Second World War having
to adapt to the working styles of their digitally savvy colleagues, and those
younger employees having to respect the experience and traditional ways 6

of working of older peers. But how do working patterns of these very distinct
generations differ and how are businesses adapting to this new norm?

GENERATIONAL
7

40
%
60

%
8

WORKING MULTI-GENERATIONAL LOYALT Y


50%

How long the following generations on average would like to spend at a


Microsoft 2018 company in any one role (years) combined
10 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 11

TOP CHALLENGES IN MANAGING A MULTI- HOW DIFFERENT GENERATIONS COMMUNICATE IN THE WORKPLACE TOP WORK MOTIVATORS FOR DIFFERENT GENERATIONS
GENERATIONAL WORKFORCE
Amount of time different generations spend with the following communications at work Percentage of different generations who said the following were important
Survey of HR decision-makers

100%
Baby boomers: 1946 – 1964 70%
Baby boomers
40%
Generation X: 1965 – 1980

Generation Y: 1981–1996
60%
Generation Z: 1997–present

%
90
30% Generation X

10
%
Expectations of in-office work/flexible working

50%
Diverse, preferred management styles
Balancing needs for new ideas against
Differences in communication styles

20% Generation
Y
40%
maintaining the status quo

Company culture clashes


for speedy promotions
Managing expectations

Negative generational

10%
Generatio
nZ 30%
stereotypes

0% 20%

Job challenges/excitement

Job challenges/excitement
80% 20%
Eurostat/Office for National Statistics 2017

Ability to pursue passion

Ability to pursue passion


Health insurance

A boss I respect

Allegis Group 2018


GENERATIONS OF THE UK WORKFORCE 10%

Job security

Job security
Proportion of UK adults by generation combined

Salary

Salary

Salary

Salary
In-person meetings Mobile text
100%
0%
Emails Screen sharing Baby boomers Generation X Generation Y Generation Z
80% 0
Mobile calls Video conferencing

Badenoch + Clark 2018


Pre-war
60% Landline calls Co-authoring services
1
Chat
40%
Generation Z

Baby boomers
2
20%

Generation X Generation Y
0% 30%
70%
1983 2016 3
Eurostat/Office for National Statistics 2017

4
We are living longer and retiring later, which means that up to five
generations of employees now have to learn how to work together
under one roof. In most workplaces, this is realistically limited to four 5
generations, with people born shortly after the Second World War having
to adapt to the working styles of their digitally savvy colleagues, and those
younger employees having to respect the experience and traditional ways 6

of working of older peers. But how do working patterns of these very distinct
generations differ and how are businesses adapting to this new norm?

GENERATIONAL
7

40
%
60

%
8

WORKING MULTI-GENERATIONAL LOYALT Y


50%

How long the following generations on average would like to spend at a


Microsoft 2018 company in any one role (years) combined
12 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 13
Commercial feature

Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Geography Photos/UIG via Getty Images


Rethinking workspace to
connect space and people Cambridge Science Park's
One Zero One building
WeWork is no longer only for co-working and startups. As people increasingly demand
flexibility and enterprises crave more simplicity and agility on a global scale, large Silicon Fen Life science and tech
companies benefit from a
companies are embracing shared-space solutions that enable them to grow faster Cambridge, the fenland city, 45 culture of collaboration with
minutes north of London is going its world-class university. “At
great guns as a high-performing Cambridge Science Park, for
hub and part of the “golden example, a gaming company
ttitudes towards workplaces so WeWork designs workspace that triangle” with London and Oxford. is working closely with a large
A and office environments have encourages collaboration and interac- The data speaks for itself, with pharmaceutical firm to create
changed drastically in recent tion through innovation. Its technol- productivity 50 per cent higher technology that children can use
years as employees have demanded ogy powers its network and provides than the UK average, more than to help them remember to take
more flexible ways of working. Work-life insight on space utilisation to evolve 24,500 companies, £43-billion their insulin,” says Saul Western
integration is now a crucial quality that their spaces and drive more opportu- turnover and 223,000 employed of property consultants Bidwells.
people look for in employers, so offering nities for connection. Members are able in the area, according to the Growing a strong talent pool has
a workspace that enables this is impor- to turn everyday frustrations, like book- Cambridge Cluster Map. helped as has creating a critical
tant to attracting and retaining talent. ing conference rooms and checking in “The city is a hotbed of ideas mass of companies, although
Millennials, in particular, expect more guests, into delightfully seamless expe- with more startups as a proportion success comes at a price.
from their work environment. According riences, creating a smarter and more of the population than London. “Some people don’t want it to
to a study by KPMG, 69 per cent of mil- effective workspace. Cambridge is also well connected grow,” says Mr Cowley. “It’s now
lennials would trade other benefits for These benefits have previously been by transport links,” says Peter expensive. A two-bedroom flat
a better workspace. With this demo- mostly utilised by small businesses, Cowley, serial entrepreneur and for over half a million pounds is a
graphic set to make up half the UK work- which have led the evolution of work- angel investor, based in the city. lot of money.”
force next year, it’s clear businesses space for many years. In the digital age,
must listen to them if they want to retain opportunities for real connection are
their employees and attract fresh talent. rare and a growing number of workers
Employees perform at their best when are in satellite offices feeling increasingly Silicon Roundabout: and a hub can take on a life of its of the national average,” says Saul
East London Tech City
they’re engaged and have the oppor- disconnected with the world. They crave own, especially as they fund incu- Western, partner at property con-
tunity to connect on a human level, a working environment that prevents bators looking for the next unicorn sultants Bidwells.
loneliness and allows them to connect CLUSTERS companies. “This select group of Developing new hubs could be an
with like-minded individuals. tech giants act as magnets and can answer to the UK’s low-productivity

400+ Location, location, location


As the largest physical social network redefine an area or create a whole crisis. Tech Nation’s research also
in the world, with more than 400,000 new cluster with a new wave of affil- shows higher productivity corre-
members globally, WeWork has become iated businesses,” says Michael Da- lates to greater levels of clustering.
a home for these people and compa- vis, head of JLL Unlimited. “Certainly, hubs are becoming more

can boost your business


nies. By mixing real-life connection There is also increasing recogni- important as the knowledge-based
locations in... with technology that keeps employ- tion that clustered businesses ben- economy grows in dominance,” says

100
ees engaged, productive and open to efit from cross-pollination across Colin Wright, partner at UHY Hack-
opportunity, its workspaces enable sectors and scales. “A hub focusing er Young chartered accountants.
businesses to grow and keeps them on high-tech automotive manufac- More than a century ago, a
motivated. In the last year, the average turing may produce precision com- mentor to John Maynard Keynes
cities, with a global growth rate across WeWork member
delivering the best value to customers specialised, flexible working practices
Flying in the face of cyberspace and virtual connectivity, physical clusters ponents for F1, but also parts for thought industrial hubs were good.
network of... companies in London was 31 per cent, medical devices. As a result, their Maybe it’s time to breathe new life

400k+
compared with 2 per cent for all com- and shareholders. are needed to keep up with the latest of like-minded businesses can energise and accelerate enterprise reach and their supply chains are into the idea.
panies in the capital. WeWork’s members range from large technological advances. larger than a single sector cluster,”
However, large organisations are
Workspaces will continue to enterprise companies, such as banks, The repetitive tasks that are in many explains Mr Baird.
catching on to this crucial trend too. In to artists, designers, writers, app devel- cases done by people, such as booking Nick Easen panies, matters. “As one CEO said to Yet the hub model can become
members and member
a rapidly evolving business landscape, evolve as the way people, opers and more. They all benefit from space for a meeting, will increasingly us, ‘If the vibe isn’t right, then people a victim of its own success; ask
Cambridge Life
companies connected
through WeWork
speed is now one of the major curren-
cies for commercial success. Enterprise
space and technology work being part of the WeWork community,
and their employees are happier and
become automated and jobs still consid-
ered only possible for people to do, such he UK’s startup culture of insights at Tech Nation. “Aside
will leave’,” says Peter Otto, director
of product strategy at Condeco.
those on America’s West Coast. Buy
a house next to the garage where
Sciences Cluster
companies are realising that speed can’t together transforms more motivated as a result, with access as writing a news article, will be com- T is doing very well thank from bringing people together, It’s all about knowledge-trading, Hewlett-Packard started in Palo Alto Development Economics 2018

be enabled in traditional office solutions to discounted health insurance and gym pleted by machine-learning and artificial

54%
you. Despite the Brexit which can accelerate innovation networking, job opportunities and and you’re talking a price tag in the
which take around 12 months to select, memberships, special events and an intelligence tools. Rather than replacing psycho-drama, a dizzying record and growth, it also creates a diverse ongoing careers. Don’t forget cap- millions of dollars. “Silicon Valley is
negotiate, permit, agree contracts, internal social network for professional employees, these types of technologies of 663,272 businesses were started mixing pot of ideas and opinions.” ital and customers too, after all starting to reach unsustainable lev- Home to...

430+
design, build and move in. WeWork’s These changes are shifting percep- A WeWork location development. will augment the jobs human employees in 2018, according to the Centre for With employees placing a growing humans are social creatures. “To- els; they are the test case,” says Rob
standard move-in process is 30 days. tions of WeWork from a small co-working with its atrium A third of the Fortune 500 are now are doing. Entrepreneurs. Some say it’s second importance on where they work, as day, if you want to be a £100-mil- Moffat, partner at Balderton Capital.
transformed into a
Flexible spaces are increasingly attrac- company to a global provider of shared WeWork members and 46 per cent of In this new world, the future of work will only to Silicon Valley. much as what they do, the buzz of lion-plus business, you need to have Gentrification of popular spots
collaborative shared
of members credit WeWork tive to enterprises because they provide space offering office solutions for com- space, designed enterprise members globally say it has be measured by how people feel. It will A nation of so-called shopkeep- Manchester, Silicon Fen or Emerald a presence in one of the key growth causes a steep rise in prices, which
the agility required to scale their work- panies of all sizes. With a suite of prod- helped them enter new markets. With be flexible, distributed and built around companies
with accelerating their to encourage ers has reinvented itself as a nation Valley, with a critical mass of com- hubs,” says Matus Maar, managing stifles young, bright and less-well-
company’s growth globally forces seamlessly when they need to and ucts available to suit businesses of all interaction between WeWork’s Global Access membership, community. WeWork provides a ready- of startups. Almost a third are in partner of Talis Capital. off talent or those wanting to branch
members.
without worrying about moving offices. sizes, WeWork creates entire headquar- companies are given unlimited access made portfolio of high-profile locations, London. But why? It turns out hubs Despite the evolution of the in- out on their own. The cost of hous- Creating...

15.5k
According to PwC, six in ten executives ters for companies as well as providing to WeWork’s entire network of offices allowing companies easily to flex their make a difference. ternet and virtual connectivity, ing and commercial office space is
Enterprise companies are unable to predict labour costs three custom build-outs through a unique around the world, ensuring consist- space. The opportunity is there to have You are more likely to be success- physical clusters are thriving es- an issue. Higher rents are pushing
now represent...

32%
years ahead. Locking into a long-term suite, a specialised floor or a private, ent workforce productivity wherever their own identity and culture without ful if you’re on Silicon Roundabout, pecially round top UK universi- chief executives to keep office costs
lease is no longer an option. optimised layout. people are. the stress of managing offices, using the biggest tech community in Eu- ties and research hubs. This is down by renting flexible spaces in
The process involved in creating an Large companies still want their own Workspaces will continue to evolve WeWork’s technology and community to rope, than operating down a coun- where startup explosions can be the short-term and making staff mo- jobs
engaging, activated and well-utilised space with their own brand, identity as the way people, space and technol- grow their business. try lane in Devon. East London observed. “In Oxford a third of all bility a priority.
work environment can also be costly and culture, but they also want to sim- ogy work together transforms. Work Tech City, as it’s officially called, Aside from bringing people businesses have been set up in just Entrepreneurs surveyed by Tech
and complex. It’s more difficult than plify their office management. They will be distributed into three catego- even surpasses San Francisco in together, which can accelerate the last three years, making it a Nation in its latest State of the Union Generating...

£2.9bn
ever to bring a building to life without a don’t want to spend time on real estate ries: human workforce, intelligent auto- For more information please visit terms of fi ntech startups, according real startup global tech city,” says report found cost of living was a top
of our total membership
base and we help more than large, dedicated team and there is now processes and logistics, or wonder mation and augmented intelligence. we.co/scale2019 to research from Accenture. innovation and growth, it also Peter Baird, associate at architects challenge. “In the last nine years,
a third of the Global Fortune a greater need for vertical integration.
Integration solutions, therefore, remove
why the cleaner hasn’t shown up or
whether the printer ink is low. Instead
People will always be needed to per-
form tasks that require human judg-
“Clusters are important for entre-
creates a diverse mixing pot of Perkins and Will.
Stick in a few anchor companies,
Oxford has seen house price growth
of 67 per cent and Cambridge 73 per
500 deliver a great workplace preneurs and the businesses they
experience to employees the stress for businesses. they want to focus all their energies on ment, but as their jobs become more lead,” says Dr George Windsor, head ideas and opinions such as Google, Amazon or Apple, cent, which is over 20 per cent ahead annually for the UK economy
12 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 13
Commercial feature

Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Geography Photos/UIG via Getty Images


Rethinking workspace to
connect space and people Cambridge Science Park's
One Zero One building
WeWork is no longer only for co-working and startups. As people increasingly demand
flexibility and enterprises crave more simplicity and agility on a global scale, large Silicon Fen Life science and tech
companies benefit from a
companies are embracing shared-space solutions that enable them to grow faster Cambridge, the fenland city, 45 culture of collaboration with
minutes north of London is going its world-class university. “At
great guns as a high-performing Cambridge Science Park, for
hub and part of the “golden example, a gaming company
ttitudes towards workplaces so WeWork designs workspace that triangle” with London and Oxford. is working closely with a large
A and office environments have encourages collaboration and interac- The data speaks for itself, with pharmaceutical firm to create
changed drastically in recent tion through innovation. Its technol- productivity 50 per cent higher technology that children can use
years as employees have demanded ogy powers its network and provides than the UK average, more than to help them remember to take
more flexible ways of working. Work-life insight on space utilisation to evolve 24,500 companies, £43-billion their insulin,” says Saul Western
integration is now a crucial quality that their spaces and drive more opportu- turnover and 223,000 employed of property consultants Bidwells.
people look for in employers, so offering nities for connection. Members are able in the area, according to the Growing a strong talent pool has
a workspace that enables this is impor- to turn everyday frustrations, like book- Cambridge Cluster Map. helped as has creating a critical
tant to attracting and retaining talent. ing conference rooms and checking in “The city is a hotbed of ideas mass of companies, although
Millennials, in particular, expect more guests, into delightfully seamless expe- with more startups as a proportion success comes at a price.
from their work environment. According riences, creating a smarter and more of the population than London. “Some people don’t want it to
to a study by KPMG, 69 per cent of mil- effective workspace. Cambridge is also well connected grow,” says Mr Cowley. “It’s now
lennials would trade other benefits for These benefits have previously been by transport links,” says Peter expensive. A two-bedroom flat
a better workspace. With this demo- mostly utilised by small businesses, Cowley, serial entrepreneur and for over half a million pounds is a
graphic set to make up half the UK work- which have led the evolution of work- angel investor, based in the city. lot of money.”
force next year, it’s clear businesses space for many years. In the digital age,
must listen to them if they want to retain opportunities for real connection are
their employees and attract fresh talent. rare and a growing number of workers
Employees perform at their best when are in satellite offices feeling increasingly Silicon Roundabout: and a hub can take on a life of its of the national average,” says Saul
East London Tech City
they’re engaged and have the oppor- disconnected with the world. They crave own, especially as they fund incu- Western, partner at property con-
tunity to connect on a human level, a working environment that prevents bators looking for the next unicorn sultants Bidwells.
loneliness and allows them to connect CLUSTERS companies. “This select group of Developing new hubs could be an
with like-minded individuals. tech giants act as magnets and can answer to the UK’s low-productivity

400+ Location, location, location


As the largest physical social network redefine an area or create a whole crisis. Tech Nation’s research also
in the world, with more than 400,000 new cluster with a new wave of affil- shows higher productivity corre-
members globally, WeWork has become iated businesses,” says Michael Da- lates to greater levels of clustering.
a home for these people and compa- vis, head of JLL Unlimited. “Certainly, hubs are becoming more

can boost your business


nies. By mixing real-life connection There is also increasing recogni- important as the knowledge-based
locations in... with technology that keeps employ- tion that clustered businesses ben- economy grows in dominance,” says

100
ees engaged, productive and open to efit from cross-pollination across Colin Wright, partner at UHY Hack-
opportunity, its workspaces enable sectors and scales. “A hub focusing er Young chartered accountants.
businesses to grow and keeps them on high-tech automotive manufac- More than a century ago, a
motivated. In the last year, the average turing may produce precision com- mentor to John Maynard Keynes
cities, with a global growth rate across WeWork member
delivering the best value to customers specialised, flexible working practices
Flying in the face of cyberspace and virtual connectivity, physical clusters ponents for F1, but also parts for thought industrial hubs were good.
network of... companies in London was 31 per cent, medical devices. As a result, their Maybe it’s time to breathe new life

400k+
compared with 2 per cent for all com- and shareholders. are needed to keep up with the latest of like-minded businesses can energise and accelerate enterprise reach and their supply chains are into the idea.
panies in the capital. WeWork’s members range from large technological advances. larger than a single sector cluster,”
However, large organisations are
Workspaces will continue to enterprise companies, such as banks, The repetitive tasks that are in many explains Mr Baird.
catching on to this crucial trend too. In to artists, designers, writers, app devel- cases done by people, such as booking Nick Easen panies, matters. “As one CEO said to Yet the hub model can become
members and member
a rapidly evolving business landscape, evolve as the way people, opers and more. They all benefit from space for a meeting, will increasingly us, ‘If the vibe isn’t right, then people a victim of its own success; ask
Cambridge Life
companies connected
through WeWork
speed is now one of the major curren-
cies for commercial success. Enterprise
space and technology work being part of the WeWork community,
and their employees are happier and
become automated and jobs still consid-
ered only possible for people to do, such he UK’s startup culture of insights at Tech Nation. “Aside
will leave’,” says Peter Otto, director
of product strategy at Condeco.
those on America’s West Coast. Buy
a house next to the garage where
Sciences Cluster
companies are realising that speed can’t together transforms more motivated as a result, with access as writing a news article, will be com- T is doing very well thank from bringing people together, It’s all about knowledge-trading, Hewlett-Packard started in Palo Alto Development Economics 2018

be enabled in traditional office solutions to discounted health insurance and gym pleted by machine-learning and artificial

54%
you. Despite the Brexit which can accelerate innovation networking, job opportunities and and you’re talking a price tag in the
which take around 12 months to select, memberships, special events and an intelligence tools. Rather than replacing psycho-drama, a dizzying record and growth, it also creates a diverse ongoing careers. Don’t forget cap- millions of dollars. “Silicon Valley is
negotiate, permit, agree contracts, internal social network for professional employees, these types of technologies of 663,272 businesses were started mixing pot of ideas and opinions.” ital and customers too, after all starting to reach unsustainable lev- Home to...

430+
design, build and move in. WeWork’s These changes are shifting percep- A WeWork location development. will augment the jobs human employees in 2018, according to the Centre for With employees placing a growing humans are social creatures. “To- els; they are the test case,” says Rob
standard move-in process is 30 days. tions of WeWork from a small co-working with its atrium A third of the Fortune 500 are now are doing. Entrepreneurs. Some say it’s second importance on where they work, as day, if you want to be a £100-mil- Moffat, partner at Balderton Capital.
transformed into a
Flexible spaces are increasingly attrac- company to a global provider of shared WeWork members and 46 per cent of In this new world, the future of work will only to Silicon Valley. much as what they do, the buzz of lion-plus business, you need to have Gentrification of popular spots
collaborative shared
of members credit WeWork tive to enterprises because they provide space offering office solutions for com- space, designed enterprise members globally say it has be measured by how people feel. It will A nation of so-called shopkeep- Manchester, Silicon Fen or Emerald a presence in one of the key growth causes a steep rise in prices, which
the agility required to scale their work- panies of all sizes. With a suite of prod- helped them enter new markets. With be flexible, distributed and built around companies
with accelerating their to encourage ers has reinvented itself as a nation Valley, with a critical mass of com- hubs,” says Matus Maar, managing stifles young, bright and less-well-
company’s growth globally forces seamlessly when they need to and ucts available to suit businesses of all interaction between WeWork’s Global Access membership, community. WeWork provides a ready- of startups. Almost a third are in partner of Talis Capital. off talent or those wanting to branch
members.
without worrying about moving offices. sizes, WeWork creates entire headquar- companies are given unlimited access made portfolio of high-profile locations, London. But why? It turns out hubs Despite the evolution of the in- out on their own. The cost of hous- Creating...

15.5k
According to PwC, six in ten executives ters for companies as well as providing to WeWork’s entire network of offices allowing companies easily to flex their make a difference. ternet and virtual connectivity, ing and commercial office space is
Enterprise companies are unable to predict labour costs three custom build-outs through a unique around the world, ensuring consist- space. The opportunity is there to have You are more likely to be success- physical clusters are thriving es- an issue. Higher rents are pushing
now represent...

32%
years ahead. Locking into a long-term suite, a specialised floor or a private, ent workforce productivity wherever their own identity and culture without ful if you’re on Silicon Roundabout, pecially round top UK universi- chief executives to keep office costs
lease is no longer an option. optimised layout. people are. the stress of managing offices, using the biggest tech community in Eu- ties and research hubs. This is down by renting flexible spaces in
The process involved in creating an Large companies still want their own Workspaces will continue to evolve WeWork’s technology and community to rope, than operating down a coun- where startup explosions can be the short-term and making staff mo- jobs
engaging, activated and well-utilised space with their own brand, identity as the way people, space and technol- grow their business. try lane in Devon. East London observed. “In Oxford a third of all bility a priority.
work environment can also be costly and culture, but they also want to sim- ogy work together transforms. Work Tech City, as it’s officially called, Aside from bringing people businesses have been set up in just Entrepreneurs surveyed by Tech
and complex. It’s more difficult than plify their office management. They will be distributed into three catego- even surpasses San Francisco in together, which can accelerate the last three years, making it a Nation in its latest State of the Union Generating...

£2.9bn
ever to bring a building to life without a don’t want to spend time on real estate ries: human workforce, intelligent auto- For more information please visit terms of fi ntech startups, according real startup global tech city,” says report found cost of living was a top
of our total membership
base and we help more than large, dedicated team and there is now processes and logistics, or wonder mation and augmented intelligence. we.co/scale2019 to research from Accenture. innovation and growth, it also Peter Baird, associate at architects challenge. “In the last nine years,
a third of the Global Fortune a greater need for vertical integration.
Integration solutions, therefore, remove
why the cleaner hasn’t shown up or
whether the printer ink is low. Instead
People will always be needed to per-
form tasks that require human judg-
“Clusters are important for entre-
creates a diverse mixing pot of Perkins and Will.
Stick in a few anchor companies,
Oxford has seen house price growth
of 67 per cent and Cambridge 73 per
500 deliver a great workplace preneurs and the businesses they
experience to employees the stress for businesses. they want to focus all their energies on ment, but as their jobs become more lead,” says Dr George Windsor, head ideas and opinions such as Google, Amazon or Apple, cent, which is over 20 per cent ahead annually for the UK economy
14 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 15
Commercial feature
than in any other office or business

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury
I have worked in or for. I guess you
could say we all work alone together.”
Finding a way to combat loneli-
ness is more than a productivity
issue, it's also a pressing mental
health concern. Matthew Knight,
independent strategist who works
on freelancer mental health cam-
paigns, says: "While those who
switch to a freelance life gener-
ally report they are happier, it's

Rise of
the unique set of challenges a free-
lancer faces that put independent
workers more at risk of dropping
into poor mental health."

business
Mr Knight says that there are Growth of co-working spaces
many small things which free-
lancers can do that will not only As a larger percentage of the local community, rather than
help combat loneliness, but also country's workforce turns to a place to commute to," says

hospitality
keep their mental health in shape. freelancing as a long-term Shazia Mustafa, co-founder of
These include joining a commu- career plan, what will become of Third Door. "This will help create
nity, but also maintaining a sched- the traditional office? a sense of belonging, where you
ule that works for the individual, "The traditional office model can share experiences, knowing
looking after physical health and is out of date," says Chantal you are surrounded by people of
talking to clients about the stresses Robinson, operations director similar values and mindset."
of freelancing. at LABS. "Working in cubicles Working in a non-traditional
"From reducing your payment or even in the more modern style will also extend beyond
terms or just letting you work from
their space, there are plenty of
idea of open plan have been
demonstrated to damage health
freelancers and permeate
wider office culture. Tushar
Despite the trend for workspaces that look like coffee shops,
things which those we work with and decrease productivity." Agarwal, chief executive many businesses are demanding a return to more professional
can do to support us," he says. LABS’ growth co-working space and co-founder of Hubble,
Many sole traders and individ- with five London locations is a platform for finding office working environments. Landmark explains how it is harnessing
ual freelancers, however, don't find open 24/7 to meet the demands space, envisages a future in
co-working spaces work for them. of non-traditional workers. which offices act more like the fundamentals of design and service to bring professional
In fact, according to research from
IPSE, 76 per cent of freelancers have
While the first generation of
co-working spaces was born
headquarters, with staff
working remotely. "We will see
hospitality into the flexible workspace industry
FREEL ANCE WORKSPACES never used a co-working space. The out of Silicon Valley, in recent offices served more as 'central
freelancers who want to recapture association believes this is an issue years niche spaces that cater meeting points' and 'nerve

Working ‘alone together'


the support and camaraderie of an for government to address. to the needs of specific types centres' which will be reflected
office environment. “There are still nowhere near of freelancers have emerged. in the design," he says. rom meetings in coffee require. In a recent poll, we found that 70 and informal catch-ups, as well as pro-
“Co-working spaces are also a enough places for co-working and These include industry-specific The office of the future will not F shops to laptops in hotel lob- per cent of our small and medium-sized viding a place to relax and take breaks
great opportunity for the fruitful government must work to open more spaces such as EdSpace for become redundant, however, bies or typing from a sofa in customers want their workspace to feel between tasks.

solves freelance isolation


collaborations that fuel the dyna- up," says IPSE’s Ms Jepps. “The gov- the education sector, female- says Mr Agarwal, because he a co-working space, the line between professional, while just 51 per cent would
mism and creativity of the flexible ernment should extend rate relief only ventures such as AllBright increasingly sees "how much hospitality, residential and business prefer a creative environment. This gives People and service
economy," she says. to co-working spaces and publicise and Third Door, a co-working team members value being environments has become increasingly a clear indication of where priorities lie. Delivering the right level and style of ser-
Caroline McShane, independent unused buildings where co-working space with an onsite Ofsted- part of a bigger movement and blurred. Driven by the rise of startup A bustling, noisy workspace might be vice is also fundamental to creating a
social media consultant and mem- spaces could be created.” registered nursery. how company culture is best and freelance culture, these new hybrid suitable for informal meetings and catch- working environment with a professional
ber of Growth Hub in Cirencester, Many freelancers instead gravi- "In the future, co-working fostered while being part of a office environments encourage an infor- ups, but isn’t appropriate for important look and feel. We understand that our
says: “We all support each other by tate towards virtual spaces to inter- places will be more tied to the physical structure”. mal and laid-back style of working that client meetings, quiet contemplation people are the face of our clients’ busi-
A regular Raconteur Anna Codrea-Rado acting as sounding boards or offering act with one another. Mr Knight has now become the norm across the or taking sensitive phone calls. That’s nesses; they’re the first thing guests see
business world. why Landmark has built its approach when they walk through the door. That
contributor tells hen I first went freelance, set of challenges independent work-
advice when asked. I would go as far
as to say there are more experts here
started a Slack group called Leapers
to "support anyone who wants to But despite its prevalence, some busi- around professional working, aimed at means the service has to be spot on.
of her experience W I was determined to go it ers face need to be addressed, start- nesses are starting to question this new businesses that want to embrace new, We think of our customer service
alone. In the beginning, ing with freelancer isolation. work differently”. Members of the hybrid approach to the workplace. Is flexible and more open work styles, but approach as a “handshake culture”
as a self-employed this was empowering; I set my own I'm not alone in feeling alone as a WHAT'S THE BIGGEST STRUGGLE WITH WORKING REMOTELY? community celebrate each other's it really the best way of instilling a pro- do so while maintaining that important because it retains that respect for tra-
hours, worked only with clients I self-employed worker; a 2018 sur- wins, and offer help and advice to fessional culture and supporting how air of professionalism at all times. We’ve ditional business values and expec-
freelance journalist wanted to and generally had more vey by Epson found that nearly half one another.
I notice that I'll start people like to work? embedded this approach into our work- tations. We train all our people to an
At Landmark we believe that, despite spaces through a combination of design exceptionally high standard and we’re
and asks experts professional satisfaction than I had
in office jobs. The very sharp dou-
(48 per cent) found it lonely. So I
spoke to other self-employed work-
Loneliness 21% I moderate a Facebook group for
UK-based freelance journalists, to feel miserable if I've the trend for coffee shop style work and service. currently working towards becoming the

how to regain ble-edged sword of working for your-


self, however, is dealing with some-
ers and industry experts to fi nd out
how freelancers can solve loneli- Collaborating/communicating 21%
which acts as a peer-to-peer sup-
port group. It was through that
been working from spaces, this new laid-back approach
doesn’t provide the professionalism, Zoned design
first flexible office space provider to be
recognised by the Institute of Customer
the support and thing else that comes with working ness and isolation. group that freelance journalist home for a while or the variety of working environments, Having analysed the activities and tasks Service. Our client feedback speaks for
on your own: loneliness. “Freelancing is a liberating and flex- Distractions at home 16% Abby Young-Powell started holding many businesses and their people that people spend their time on while itself. In our most recent survey, all our
camaraderie lost The self-employed sector now ible way to work, but it’s not without its regular meet-ups for London-based at work, we’ve planned all our spaces to staff received a consistent nine out of
incorporate four distinct zones to suit ten rating for presentation, attitude,
by working alone accounts for nearly 15 per cent of the challenges," says Chloé Jepps, deputy
Staying motivated 14%
freelancers to work together two

80%
UK's workforce. As this group con- head of research at the Association of days a week. these diverse requirements. Our work- responsiveness and efficiency.
tinues to grow at an increasing pace Independent Professionals and the "What I miss most about being doing interesting work, but also spaces are also designed to give a dis- With 20 years of providing flexible
– the number of self-employed work- Self-Employed (IPSE). Time-zone challenges 13% in an office is being sociable," says going through the same struggles," tinctly professional rather than residen- workspaces, we’ve seen the market
ers over the age of 65 has nearly tri- According to Ms Jepps, co-work- Ms Young-Powell. "Going for after- she says. tial feel, without sacrificing any of the and client demands evolve enormously
pled since the recession – the unique ing spaces can be a solution for Buffer 2018 work drinks and having someone Ms Young-Powell's tight-knit pro- comfort and facilities that clients expect. during that time. Yet, while we’ve always
to bounce ideas around with. I fessional community speaks to my Every centre has a private working evolved as a business in response to new
notice that I'll start to feel misera- own personal favourite aspect of zone, where clients can go when they ways of working, we’ve also been careful
ble if I've been working from home being self-employed: picking your of clients renew with us need to focus and concentrate on tasks to retain a more traditional approach to
for a while." own colleagues. I have a couple of such as drafting important emails, think- professionalism and service. We like to

+46
After posting on the Facebook group "work wives", close friends whom ing about big problems or digesting think we’ve created the ideal hybrid of
asking if anyone wanted to meet, she I turn to for professional advice. reports and data. Meanwhile, the collab- old and new styles, so our clients can
found a group of freelancers who were They are all female friends who orative working zone is far more inter- enjoy the best of both.
keen to work together in venues such are in the same industry as me; we active, enabling small teams to come
as the British Library and Barbican celebrate each other's successes Net Promoter Score together to talk about ideas, brainstorm
that allow free use of their space together and counsel one another solutions and collaborate on tasks. For more information please visit

94%
where individuals can work. on any tricky situations. For more formal meetings and pres- landmarkspace.co.uk
Members of the community, Whether it’s through on or offline entations, we offer a selection of options
which now also has a WhatsApp communities, developing profes- to suit a range of different situations and
group of 27 participants, continues sional relationships with people needs, depending on a client’s particular
to meet twice a week to work and you've chosen to work alongside can requirements on a given day. And finally,
socialise. "It's inspiring to have a make the isolating business of work- a social zone provides the buzzy, café-
core group of people who are all ing for yourself feel less lonely. satisfaction with our people style environment that suits networking
14 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 15
Commercial feature
than in any other office or business

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury
I have worked in or for. I guess you
could say we all work alone together.”
Finding a way to combat loneli-
ness is more than a productivity
issue, it's also a pressing mental
health concern. Matthew Knight,
independent strategist who works
on freelancer mental health cam-
paigns, says: "While those who
switch to a freelance life gener-
ally report they are happier, it's

Rise of
the unique set of challenges a free-
lancer faces that put independent
workers more at risk of dropping
into poor mental health."

business
Mr Knight says that there are Growth of co-working spaces
many small things which free-
lancers can do that will not only As a larger percentage of the local community, rather than
help combat loneliness, but also country's workforce turns to a place to commute to," says

hospitality
keep their mental health in shape. freelancing as a long-term Shazia Mustafa, co-founder of
These include joining a commu- career plan, what will become of Third Door. "This will help create
nity, but also maintaining a sched- the traditional office? a sense of belonging, where you
ule that works for the individual, "The traditional office model can share experiences, knowing
looking after physical health and is out of date," says Chantal you are surrounded by people of
talking to clients about the stresses Robinson, operations director similar values and mindset."
of freelancing. at LABS. "Working in cubicles Working in a non-traditional
"From reducing your payment or even in the more modern style will also extend beyond
terms or just letting you work from
their space, there are plenty of
idea of open plan have been
demonstrated to damage health
freelancers and permeate
wider office culture. Tushar
Despite the trend for workspaces that look like coffee shops,
things which those we work with and decrease productivity." Agarwal, chief executive many businesses are demanding a return to more professional
can do to support us," he says. LABS’ growth co-working space and co-founder of Hubble,
Many sole traders and individ- with five London locations is a platform for finding office working environments. Landmark explains how it is harnessing
ual freelancers, however, don't find open 24/7 to meet the demands space, envisages a future in
co-working spaces work for them. of non-traditional workers. which offices act more like the fundamentals of design and service to bring professional
In fact, according to research from
IPSE, 76 per cent of freelancers have
While the first generation of
co-working spaces was born
headquarters, with staff
working remotely. "We will see
hospitality into the flexible workspace industry
FREEL ANCE WORKSPACES never used a co-working space. The out of Silicon Valley, in recent offices served more as 'central
freelancers who want to recapture association believes this is an issue years niche spaces that cater meeting points' and 'nerve

Working ‘alone together'


the support and camaraderie of an for government to address. to the needs of specific types centres' which will be reflected
office environment. “There are still nowhere near of freelancers have emerged. in the design," he says. rom meetings in coffee require. In a recent poll, we found that 70 and informal catch-ups, as well as pro-
“Co-working spaces are also a enough places for co-working and These include industry-specific The office of the future will not F shops to laptops in hotel lob- per cent of our small and medium-sized viding a place to relax and take breaks
great opportunity for the fruitful government must work to open more spaces such as EdSpace for become redundant, however, bies or typing from a sofa in customers want their workspace to feel between tasks.

solves freelance isolation


collaborations that fuel the dyna- up," says IPSE’s Ms Jepps. “The gov- the education sector, female- says Mr Agarwal, because he a co-working space, the line between professional, while just 51 per cent would
mism and creativity of the flexible ernment should extend rate relief only ventures such as AllBright increasingly sees "how much hospitality, residential and business prefer a creative environment. This gives People and service
economy," she says. to co-working spaces and publicise and Third Door, a co-working team members value being environments has become increasingly a clear indication of where priorities lie. Delivering the right level and style of ser-
Caroline McShane, independent unused buildings where co-working space with an onsite Ofsted- part of a bigger movement and blurred. Driven by the rise of startup A bustling, noisy workspace might be vice is also fundamental to creating a
social media consultant and mem- spaces could be created.” registered nursery. how company culture is best and freelance culture, these new hybrid suitable for informal meetings and catch- working environment with a professional
ber of Growth Hub in Cirencester, Many freelancers instead gravi- "In the future, co-working fostered while being part of a office environments encourage an infor- ups, but isn’t appropriate for important look and feel. We understand that our
says: “We all support each other by tate towards virtual spaces to inter- places will be more tied to the physical structure”. mal and laid-back style of working that client meetings, quiet contemplation people are the face of our clients’ busi-
A regular Raconteur Anna Codrea-Rado acting as sounding boards or offering act with one another. Mr Knight has now become the norm across the or taking sensitive phone calls. That’s nesses; they’re the first thing guests see
business world. why Landmark has built its approach when they walk through the door. That
contributor tells hen I first went freelance, set of challenges independent work-
advice when asked. I would go as far
as to say there are more experts here
started a Slack group called Leapers
to "support anyone who wants to But despite its prevalence, some busi- around professional working, aimed at means the service has to be spot on.
of her experience W I was determined to go it ers face need to be addressed, start- nesses are starting to question this new businesses that want to embrace new, We think of our customer service
alone. In the beginning, ing with freelancer isolation. work differently”. Members of the hybrid approach to the workplace. Is flexible and more open work styles, but approach as a “handshake culture”
as a self-employed this was empowering; I set my own I'm not alone in feeling alone as a WHAT'S THE BIGGEST STRUGGLE WITH WORKING REMOTELY? community celebrate each other's it really the best way of instilling a pro- do so while maintaining that important because it retains that respect for tra-
hours, worked only with clients I self-employed worker; a 2018 sur- wins, and offer help and advice to fessional culture and supporting how air of professionalism at all times. We’ve ditional business values and expec-
freelance journalist wanted to and generally had more vey by Epson found that nearly half one another.
I notice that I'll start people like to work? embedded this approach into our work- tations. We train all our people to an
At Landmark we believe that, despite spaces through a combination of design exceptionally high standard and we’re
and asks experts professional satisfaction than I had
in office jobs. The very sharp dou-
(48 per cent) found it lonely. So I
spoke to other self-employed work-
Loneliness 21% I moderate a Facebook group for
UK-based freelance journalists, to feel miserable if I've the trend for coffee shop style work and service. currently working towards becoming the

how to regain ble-edged sword of working for your-


self, however, is dealing with some-
ers and industry experts to fi nd out
how freelancers can solve loneli- Collaborating/communicating 21%
which acts as a peer-to-peer sup-
port group. It was through that
been working from spaces, this new laid-back approach
doesn’t provide the professionalism, Zoned design
first flexible office space provider to be
recognised by the Institute of Customer
the support and thing else that comes with working ness and isolation. group that freelance journalist home for a while or the variety of working environments, Having analysed the activities and tasks Service. Our client feedback speaks for
on your own: loneliness. “Freelancing is a liberating and flex- Distractions at home 16% Abby Young-Powell started holding many businesses and their people that people spend their time on while itself. In our most recent survey, all our
camaraderie lost The self-employed sector now ible way to work, but it’s not without its regular meet-ups for London-based at work, we’ve planned all our spaces to staff received a consistent nine out of
incorporate four distinct zones to suit ten rating for presentation, attitude,
by working alone accounts for nearly 15 per cent of the challenges," says Chloé Jepps, deputy
Staying motivated 14%
freelancers to work together two

80%
UK's workforce. As this group con- head of research at the Association of days a week. these diverse requirements. Our work- responsiveness and efficiency.
tinues to grow at an increasing pace Independent Professionals and the "What I miss most about being doing interesting work, but also spaces are also designed to give a dis- With 20 years of providing flexible
– the number of self-employed work- Self-Employed (IPSE). Time-zone challenges 13% in an office is being sociable," says going through the same struggles," tinctly professional rather than residen- workspaces, we’ve seen the market
ers over the age of 65 has nearly tri- According to Ms Jepps, co-work- Ms Young-Powell. "Going for after- she says. tial feel, without sacrificing any of the and client demands evolve enormously
pled since the recession – the unique ing spaces can be a solution for Buffer 2018 work drinks and having someone Ms Young-Powell's tight-knit pro- comfort and facilities that clients expect. during that time. Yet, while we’ve always
to bounce ideas around with. I fessional community speaks to my Every centre has a private working evolved as a business in response to new
notice that I'll start to feel misera- own personal favourite aspect of zone, where clients can go when they ways of working, we’ve also been careful
ble if I've been working from home being self-employed: picking your of clients renew with us need to focus and concentrate on tasks to retain a more traditional approach to
for a while." own colleagues. I have a couple of such as drafting important emails, think- professionalism and service. We like to

+46
After posting on the Facebook group "work wives", close friends whom ing about big problems or digesting think we’ve created the ideal hybrid of
asking if anyone wanted to meet, she I turn to for professional advice. reports and data. Meanwhile, the collab- old and new styles, so our clients can
found a group of freelancers who were They are all female friends who orative working zone is far more inter- enjoy the best of both.
keen to work together in venues such are in the same industry as me; we active, enabling small teams to come
as the British Library and Barbican celebrate each other's successes Net Promoter Score together to talk about ideas, brainstorm
that allow free use of their space together and counsel one another solutions and collaborate on tasks. For more information please visit

94%
where individuals can work. on any tricky situations. For more formal meetings and pres- landmarkspace.co.uk
Members of the community, Whether it’s through on or offline entations, we offer a selection of options
which now also has a WhatsApp communities, developing profes- to suit a range of different situations and
group of 27 participants, continues sional relationships with people needs, depending on a client’s particular
to meet twice a week to work and you've chosen to work alongside can requirements on a given day. And finally,
socialise. "It's inspiring to have a make the isolating business of work- a social zone provides the buzzy, café-
core group of people who are all ing for yourself feel less lonely. satisfaction with our people style environment that suits networking
16 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 17
Commercial feature
OPINION

Without interconnecting the different


types of intelligent features and services,
‘It all starts and
It’s the workplace,
but smart
including heating and lighting, smart
buildings won’t be truly smart
ends with a genuine
As organisations look to maximise employee engagement and
is accustomed to interacting,” he “Sensors can gather data on peo-
focus on technology productivity, building owners must move with the times, by making
improving the lives of
says. “The most successful devel- ple’s movements or analyse energy
opments will be those which recog- use to improve efficiency. But if you life as comfortable and frictionless as possible. Now, thanks to Smart
nise this generational shift, and that combined weather data
Spaces, a new app from London-based D2 Interactive, developed in
the workforce’
their expectations and habits will with this, then you could
3,331
change how smart workplaces will be
designed, occupied and operated.”
make a building react to
weather conditions. Or by
partnership with Great Portland Estates plc, workspaces can become
While various amenities and fea- incorporating up-to-date more interconnected to allow businesses and their employees
tures will be able to be controlled by transport information, you
smartphones, and even voice activa- could predict when work- unprecedented control over their environment – and work-life
tion, this doesn’t necessarily mean ers will arrive and then or the past ten years, as your desk. They are far less likely
a building should be fitted with the make adjustments,” says Mr F the workspace has been to enjoy heading off to a building
technology. For example, a smart Stone. “There are a few plat- undergoing a quiet rev- where the last one out has to turn reating an inspiring and pro-
SMART BUILDINGS vending machine is nice to have forms where you can bring olution. There was a time when the lights off. C ductive workplace isn’t just
in an office, but it doesn’t add any this information together the humble office was temporary, It shouldn’t be underestimated about investing in the latest

Building on tech to
value or have a meaningful impact to enable richer analysis. nine-to-five accommodation for how smart buildings can have an furniture and fit-out. Today, businesses
on the building’s sustainability. Generally, though, there is a the workforce and things like ons- impact on wellbeing. We’re just expect more from their office space.
“The key is to focus on what peo- lack of interconnectedness.” ite catering and bike racks were starting to understand how pow- Modern workplace providers must not
ple will need from a building to be Mike Coons, head of about as good as perks could get. erful mental health can be, both only provide the ultimate in comfort

get even smarter


productive and successful in their workplace design at flexi- We now live in an age of one-up- when things aren’t right, but also and ergonomics, but also help to boost
use of it,” says Rick Robinson, dig- ble office provider Knotel, manship. Every week there’s a new when they are. Wellbeing can make efficiency, productivity and employee
ital property and cities leader thinks “we’re nowhere near workspace featuring playground an truly positive difference to busi- engagement for their occupiers. And
at Arup. “How will connectivity peak smart”, as real estate slides, tree houses or gondola car- ness performance. that means taking an altogether smarter
improve productivity, engagement has been one of the worst riages. The office has now become a An organisation whose build- approach.
and wellbeing?” offenders when it comes to badge of honour for what an organ- ing provides light, space, healthy Smart Spaces enables building owners
With the potential for so many willingness to adopt tech- isation stands for. But it’s not this catering and areas of the work- to add an extra dimension to their ser-
Just how smart are commercial buildings connected services, from the toi- nological innovation. that will drive the adoption of tech- space not necessarily dedicated vices via its internet of things cloud-
lets to water dispensers, it could be “I estimate that the per- nology in commercial property. to facilitating work is more likely based platform and smartphone app,
and can they get any smarter? argued that there will come a point centage of buildings in Over that same period, our expec- to be seen as one that cares for its giving clients 360-degree engagement
when buildings become too smart New York, for instance, tations as a society have shifted. people. And this breeds commit- with and control of their office environ-
for their own good. with any kind of inte- The information age has allowed ment and dedication from them. ment. From a secure automated entry Control over the environment for their occupiers. They can source the
Tim Stone, a partner at the inter- grated control systems is a range of disrupters to change Technology can have a huge impact system, to control of lighting and heat- Choice and autonomy over the work best local restaurants, hotels and gyms
Rich McEachran net of things investor Breed Reply in the single digits,” he the way we do everything, from on this important area too. Better ing, and connecting with the office con- environment is one of the biggest fac- to help new employees settle in and vis-
doesn’t agree. However, he does says. “There is plenty of ordering food to owning music to engineering can provide buildings cierge, the technology is revolutionising tors in employee performance and itors to get their bearings as quickly as
mart buildings might be One aspect of smart buildings and directed via bluetooth beacons believe that without interconnect- room to grow in managing our finances to meeting with cleaner, fresher air and inter- the role of the traditional building owner Smart Spaces takes this to a new level. possible. There is the option to include
S the sustainable saviours that technology is expected to to areas of the building where lifts ing the different types of intelligent terms of build- 1,319 the love of our life. It is all under- nal temperatures that react to users and what it means to come to work. Through integrating with a building’s local offers, partnerships and set up
of the skyline, but apply- transform is how easily office work- will be waiting for them. features and services, including ing performance pinned by technology. and the overall environment. systems, the app enables occupiers to a loyalty scheme, all redeemed from
ing advancing technology that adds ers are able to move around them. “Not only will this keep people mov- heating and lighting, smart build- and technology In a lot of respects, the com- From an asset perspective, if Building a community control various elements of their envi- within the app.
value and interconnectivity is key if Busy workplaces can get pretty ing around smoothly, without them ings won’t be truly smart. integration. mercial property sector still lags facilities managers, landlords and With the rise of co-working, organisa- ronment, including intensity, colour and
they are to become more “intelligent”. congested, especially at peak peri- experiencing congestion, but it’ll behind, but even here the impact boards start to show a commitment tions and their employees increasingly rhythms of lighting, temperature levels Easy to implement and manage
By definition, a building is smart ods such as lunchtime. With hun- also reduce travelling times and cut has been felt from startups offering to these areas, there are inevitable want to work somewhere with a sense and even the music in their vicinity. It might sound futuristic, but Great
when its various components, dreds of buildings at least 20 floors energy consumption,” says Mr Mellor. 967 flexible, tech-smart office space. benefits which come with mak- of community, and this is at the core Employees can choose the ambience Portland Estates plc, a FTSE 250 prop-
PROJECTED INTERNET OF THINGS
including the air conditioning and high set to be built in London alone Amenities and features that Building owners and operators ing a multi-million-pound prop- of what Smart Spaces helps to deliver. in which they are most comfortable erty investment and development com-
DEVICES IN SMART COMMERCIAL
security alarms, are connected and between now and 2030, there’s are linked to smartphones will can no longer ignore technology as erty produce the kind of data that In fact, when you first login to the app, and productive, while also saving time pany, is already rolling out the Smart
BUILDINGS, BY T YPE
controlled by an operating system. A clearly demand for more efficient increasingly become a major com- a major factor in their forward plan- would make the likes of Google sit it looks much like a social media plat- and energy they would otherwise spend Spaces technology across its central
survey by Nielsen Thailand and The mechanisms for transporting office ponent of the smart building infra- ning and should be increasingly up and take notice. form, with a social wall where occu- liaising with building management. London office portfolio. And it’s actually
Parq, published in January, found workers, according to Nick Mellor, structure. But this should come as Total devices mindful that having a connected Improving energy management pants can post, like and share content surprisingly straightforward. As long as a
globally (millions) 595
that smart features in commercial managing director of the Lift and no surprise. Workplaces are being building is becoming a hygiene and space efficiency are two out- with others in the building. Users can Increased efficiency and productivity building’s systems have been updated in
buildings can be just as important Escalator Industry Association. occupied by a generation of dig- factor for the latest generation of comes that are hard to avoid once also learn about and connect with their By automating and streamlining various the last ten years, no additional hardware
2017 2022
as food courts and gyms. Mr Mellor envisages smart ital natives, who curate and live 409 workers. Before, we were happy you understand exactly how your neighbours via an occupier directory or points of friction that exist in traditional is required, so you can have all the tech
The survey of more 400 workers buildings in the future being pro- their lives through technology, with quick. Now we want instant. building is being used. But it all consult the events wall to register for office buildings, Smart Spaces comes functionality of a new building, without
under the age of 45, living in Bangkok, grammed to group people by says Layth Madi, managing direc- Instruction manuals are a thing of starts and ends with a genuine upcoming seminars, presentations and with huge benefits for efficiency and the expense of moving to one.
found that 62 per cent ranked a smart assigning them to specific lifts. tor of Drees & Sommer UK, a lead- 222 the past and everything should work focus on technology improving the networking opportunities. productivity. For example, the system The platform is totally customisable
security system as the most important Using artificial intelligence, an ele- ing consultancy that has delivered 149 from the phone in our pocket. lives of the workforce. automatically recognises employees as to the needs of each workspace and its

88%
feature, while 50 per cent said smart vator system will be able to predict smart workplace projects for FTSE 72 The benefits of getting this right they arrive, opening doors, calling the occupiers, while access controls mean
energy management was important to which floors people want to go to 100 companies. are huge. And they are matched in lift, and setting the temperature and that employees and building manage-
them. Smart parking was a feature sup- based on past behaviour. Workers “Future smart buildings will mirror Hospitality Banking Retail Office scale by the risks of sitting still. lighting to their preferred settings. The ment can be assigned varying levels of
ported by 47 per cent of respondents. will be alerted by push notification the way in which an entire generation and securities Memoori 2018 Some high street retailers are ease of entry also extends to guests, who permissions and functionality, depend-
bemoaning not investing more are automatically sent a QR code ahead ing on their position.
heavily in ecommerce all those of their visit, with instructions of where How we work is changing. Organisations

yes!
years ago. In the same way, com- of executives believe smart building to go and what to do when they arrive. and their employees are looking beyond
mercial real estate professionals solutions can directly benefit Visitors can use their own devices to the traditional nine to five, to build a more
We understand that your office space could regret failing to adopt tech- employee satisfaction and similarly navigate unmanned receptions and still fluid, flexible and sustainable approach.
nology ten years from now. impact productivity. attend meetings on time. And workspace providers must evolve
requirement might not be straight Once people get a taste of technol- along with them, by giving their custom-
forward. That’s why we’re re-defining
Global Research Study, JLL

75%
ogy as an enabler in the workplace, Supporting wellbeing and work-life ers the environment and tools they need
it’s hard for them to consider down- balance to work in better, smarter ways. It’s the
flexibility one “yes” at a time. Just ask. grading and therefore they are less And it isn’t all about the bottom line. workplace, but smart. And it’s happening
likely to switch employers. Staff in a With the boundary between work and right now.
smart building are used to meeting personal lives becoming increasingly
rooms with localised air condition- blurred, Smart Spaces seamlessly spans For more information please visit
ing controls, access control passes the two. For example, building owners smartspaces.app
reduction in lighting energy can choose to incorporate their own
that also allow you to buy lunch or Chris Edwards
earn rewards and a building where Event director Smart Building Reduced Utility & concierge into the app to organise lunch
you can work as easily from the café Facilities Show Maintenance Analysis, WSP bookings, taxis and other local services
halkin.com | 020 3196 5777 |
16 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 17
Commercial feature
OPINION

Without interconnecting the different


types of intelligent features and services,
‘It all starts and
It’s the workplace,
but smart
including heating and lighting, smart
buildings won’t be truly smart
ends with a genuine
As organisations look to maximise employee engagement and
is accustomed to interacting,” he “Sensors can gather data on peo-
focus on technology productivity, building owners must move with the times, by making
improving the lives of
says. “The most successful devel- ple’s movements or analyse energy
opments will be those which recog- use to improve efficiency. But if you life as comfortable and frictionless as possible. Now, thanks to Smart
nise this generational shift, and that combined weather data
Spaces, a new app from London-based D2 Interactive, developed in
the workforce’
their expectations and habits will with this, then you could
3,331
change how smart workplaces will be
designed, occupied and operated.”
make a building react to
weather conditions. Or by
partnership with Great Portland Estates plc, workspaces can become
While various amenities and fea- incorporating up-to-date more interconnected to allow businesses and their employees
tures will be able to be controlled by transport information, you
smartphones, and even voice activa- could predict when work- unprecedented control over their environment – and work-life
tion, this doesn’t necessarily mean ers will arrive and then or the past ten years, as your desk. They are far less likely
a building should be fitted with the make adjustments,” says Mr F the workspace has been to enjoy heading off to a building
technology. For example, a smart Stone. “There are a few plat- undergoing a quiet rev- where the last one out has to turn reating an inspiring and pro-
SMART BUILDINGS vending machine is nice to have forms where you can bring olution. There was a time when the lights off. C ductive workplace isn’t just
in an office, but it doesn’t add any this information together the humble office was temporary, It shouldn’t be underestimated about investing in the latest

Building on tech to
value or have a meaningful impact to enable richer analysis. nine-to-five accommodation for how smart buildings can have an furniture and fit-out. Today, businesses
on the building’s sustainability. Generally, though, there is a the workforce and things like ons- impact on wellbeing. We’re just expect more from their office space.
“The key is to focus on what peo- lack of interconnectedness.” ite catering and bike racks were starting to understand how pow- Modern workplace providers must not
ple will need from a building to be Mike Coons, head of about as good as perks could get. erful mental health can be, both only provide the ultimate in comfort

get even smarter


productive and successful in their workplace design at flexi- We now live in an age of one-up- when things aren’t right, but also and ergonomics, but also help to boost
use of it,” says Rick Robinson, dig- ble office provider Knotel, manship. Every week there’s a new when they are. Wellbeing can make efficiency, productivity and employee
ital property and cities leader thinks “we’re nowhere near workspace featuring playground an truly positive difference to busi- engagement for their occupiers. And
at Arup. “How will connectivity peak smart”, as real estate slides, tree houses or gondola car- ness performance. that means taking an altogether smarter
improve productivity, engagement has been one of the worst riages. The office has now become a An organisation whose build- approach.
and wellbeing?” offenders when it comes to badge of honour for what an organ- ing provides light, space, healthy Smart Spaces enables building owners
With the potential for so many willingness to adopt tech- isation stands for. But it’s not this catering and areas of the work- to add an extra dimension to their ser-
Just how smart are commercial buildings connected services, from the toi- nological innovation. that will drive the adoption of tech- space not necessarily dedicated vices via its internet of things cloud-
lets to water dispensers, it could be “I estimate that the per- nology in commercial property. to facilitating work is more likely based platform and smartphone app,
and can they get any smarter? argued that there will come a point centage of buildings in Over that same period, our expec- to be seen as one that cares for its giving clients 360-degree engagement
when buildings become too smart New York, for instance, tations as a society have shifted. people. And this breeds commit- with and control of their office environ-
for their own good. with any kind of inte- The information age has allowed ment and dedication from them. ment. From a secure automated entry Control over the environment for their occupiers. They can source the
Tim Stone, a partner at the inter- grated control systems is a range of disrupters to change Technology can have a huge impact system, to control of lighting and heat- Choice and autonomy over the work best local restaurants, hotels and gyms
Rich McEachran net of things investor Breed Reply in the single digits,” he the way we do everything, from on this important area too. Better ing, and connecting with the office con- environment is one of the biggest fac- to help new employees settle in and vis-
doesn’t agree. However, he does says. “There is plenty of ordering food to owning music to engineering can provide buildings cierge, the technology is revolutionising tors in employee performance and itors to get their bearings as quickly as
mart buildings might be One aspect of smart buildings and directed via bluetooth beacons believe that without interconnect- room to grow in managing our finances to meeting with cleaner, fresher air and inter- the role of the traditional building owner Smart Spaces takes this to a new level. possible. There is the option to include
S the sustainable saviours that technology is expected to to areas of the building where lifts ing the different types of intelligent terms of build- 1,319 the love of our life. It is all under- nal temperatures that react to users and what it means to come to work. Through integrating with a building’s local offers, partnerships and set up
of the skyline, but apply- transform is how easily office work- will be waiting for them. features and services, including ing performance pinned by technology. and the overall environment. systems, the app enables occupiers to a loyalty scheme, all redeemed from
ing advancing technology that adds ers are able to move around them. “Not only will this keep people mov- heating and lighting, smart build- and technology In a lot of respects, the com- From an asset perspective, if Building a community control various elements of their envi- within the app.
value and interconnectivity is key if Busy workplaces can get pretty ing around smoothly, without them ings won’t be truly smart. integration. mercial property sector still lags facilities managers, landlords and With the rise of co-working, organisa- ronment, including intensity, colour and
they are to become more “intelligent”. congested, especially at peak peri- experiencing congestion, but it’ll behind, but even here the impact boards start to show a commitment tions and their employees increasingly rhythms of lighting, temperature levels Easy to implement and manage
By definition, a building is smart ods such as lunchtime. With hun- also reduce travelling times and cut has been felt from startups offering to these areas, there are inevitable want to work somewhere with a sense and even the music in their vicinity. It might sound futuristic, but Great
when its various components, dreds of buildings at least 20 floors energy consumption,” says Mr Mellor. 967 flexible, tech-smart office space. benefits which come with mak- of community, and this is at the core Employees can choose the ambience Portland Estates plc, a FTSE 250 prop-
PROJECTED INTERNET OF THINGS
including the air conditioning and high set to be built in London alone Amenities and features that Building owners and operators ing a multi-million-pound prop- of what Smart Spaces helps to deliver. in which they are most comfortable erty investment and development com-
DEVICES IN SMART COMMERCIAL
security alarms, are connected and between now and 2030, there’s are linked to smartphones will can no longer ignore technology as erty produce the kind of data that In fact, when you first login to the app, and productive, while also saving time pany, is already rolling out the Smart
BUILDINGS, BY T YPE
controlled by an operating system. A clearly demand for more efficient increasingly become a major com- a major factor in their forward plan- would make the likes of Google sit it looks much like a social media plat- and energy they would otherwise spend Spaces technology across its central
survey by Nielsen Thailand and The mechanisms for transporting office ponent of the smart building infra- ning and should be increasingly up and take notice. form, with a social wall where occu- liaising with building management. London office portfolio. And it’s actually
Parq, published in January, found workers, according to Nick Mellor, structure. But this should come as Total devices mindful that having a connected Improving energy management pants can post, like and share content surprisingly straightforward. As long as a
globally (millions) 595
that smart features in commercial managing director of the Lift and no surprise. Workplaces are being building is becoming a hygiene and space efficiency are two out- with others in the building. Users can Increased efficiency and productivity building’s systems have been updated in
buildings can be just as important Escalator Industry Association. occupied by a generation of dig- factor for the latest generation of comes that are hard to avoid once also learn about and connect with their By automating and streamlining various the last ten years, no additional hardware
2017 2022
as food courts and gyms. Mr Mellor envisages smart ital natives, who curate and live 409 workers. Before, we were happy you understand exactly how your neighbours via an occupier directory or points of friction that exist in traditional is required, so you can have all the tech
The survey of more 400 workers buildings in the future being pro- their lives through technology, with quick. Now we want instant. building is being used. But it all consult the events wall to register for office buildings, Smart Spaces comes functionality of a new building, without
under the age of 45, living in Bangkok, grammed to group people by says Layth Madi, managing direc- Instruction manuals are a thing of starts and ends with a genuine upcoming seminars, presentations and with huge benefits for efficiency and the expense of moving to one.
found that 62 per cent ranked a smart assigning them to specific lifts. tor of Drees & Sommer UK, a lead- 222 the past and everything should work focus on technology improving the networking opportunities. productivity. For example, the system The platform is totally customisable
security system as the most important Using artificial intelligence, an ele- ing consultancy that has delivered 149 from the phone in our pocket. lives of the workforce. automatically recognises employees as to the needs of each workspace and its

88%
feature, while 50 per cent said smart vator system will be able to predict smart workplace projects for FTSE 72 The benefits of getting this right they arrive, opening doors, calling the occupiers, while access controls mean
energy management was important to which floors people want to go to 100 companies. are huge. And they are matched in lift, and setting the temperature and that employees and building manage-
them. Smart parking was a feature sup- based on past behaviour. Workers “Future smart buildings will mirror Hospitality Banking Retail Office scale by the risks of sitting still. lighting to their preferred settings. The ment can be assigned varying levels of
ported by 47 per cent of respondents. will be alerted by push notification the way in which an entire generation and securities Memoori 2018 Some high street retailers are ease of entry also extends to guests, who permissions and functionality, depend-
bemoaning not investing more are automatically sent a QR code ahead ing on their position.
heavily in ecommerce all those of their visit, with instructions of where How we work is changing. Organisations

yes!
years ago. In the same way, com- of executives believe smart building to go and what to do when they arrive. and their employees are looking beyond
mercial real estate professionals solutions can directly benefit Visitors can use their own devices to the traditional nine to five, to build a more
We understand that your office space could regret failing to adopt tech- employee satisfaction and similarly navigate unmanned receptions and still fluid, flexible and sustainable approach.
nology ten years from now. impact productivity. attend meetings on time. And workspace providers must evolve
requirement might not be straight Once people get a taste of technol- along with them, by giving their custom-
forward. That’s why we’re re-defining
Global Research Study, JLL

75%
ogy as an enabler in the workplace, Supporting wellbeing and work-life ers the environment and tools they need
it’s hard for them to consider down- balance to work in better, smarter ways. It’s the
flexibility one “yes” at a time. Just ask. grading and therefore they are less And it isn’t all about the bottom line. workplace, but smart. And it’s happening
likely to switch employers. Staff in a With the boundary between work and right now.
smart building are used to meeting personal lives becoming increasingly
rooms with localised air condition- blurred, Smart Spaces seamlessly spans For more information please visit
ing controls, access control passes the two. For example, building owners smartspaces.app
reduction in lighting energy can choose to incorporate their own
that also allow you to buy lunch or Chris Edwards
earn rewards and a building where Event director Smart Building Reduced Utility & concierge into the app to organise lunch
you can work as easily from the café Facilities Show Maintenance Analysis, WSP bookings, taxis and other local services
halkin.com | 020 3196 5777 |
18 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 19

not to have either,” he says. “The


NEED FOR RESKILLING
library is only used as a place to go
and read; the Thunderdome prob-

35%
TR AINING SPACES ably gets used twice a month, but
that’s not the point. It’s all about us

Space to learn
exhibiting our ethos through our

81% of Talent Will Decline a


workspace, which is caring about
are expected to require
clarity of thought and everybody additional training of

54%
adding value.” up to six months

and develop 9%
Mr Kwiecinski is part of an emerg-

Position Due to Poor Workspace


ing band of business owners pull-
ing back on recent trends for work-
spaces to be designed to be as of all employees will

at work
multi-purpose as possible; areas equire significant will require reskilling
that are meeting rooms one min- reskilling or upskilling lasting six to twelve months

Design
by 2022

10%
ute, brainstorming spaces the next,
social areas another. It’s almost a
return to when offices had distinct
classrooms; spaces purely for ongo-
Business leaders are wrestling with ing training and development. But will require additional
how to integrate formal and informal can’t workspaces operate like class- skills training of more

learning spaces at work to nurture a


rooms too?
“While classrooms in the tradi- World Economic Forum 2018
than a year
What talent have you missed? Who’s about to leave?
tional sense feel outdated, the notion
necessary upskilling culture there should be permanently des-
ignated space for learning or one- Not only does incorporating dis- according to Ben Farmer, head of

Peter Crush
to-many experiences has increas-
ing relevancy,” says Robin Hoyle,
tinct learning areas into workspaces
visibly demonstrate learning is val-
human resources at Amazon UK,
creating workspaces that can be
97% of workers consider their workplace a symbol of how
head of learning and development at ued, it gives offices additional pur- classrooms too is simply about being

n Cal Newport’s influen- which also doubles as its book club.


Huthwaite International.
Atul Bansal, co-founder of interior
pose at a time when staff have more
choice about where they decide to
in tune with the existing culture.
“The way we think about space
valued they are. If you’re not providing for your most valuable
I tial management tome These are monthly get-togethers office design firm Sheila Bird Group, work. More than this, many argue and culture is linked,” he says. “But
asset, you can’t be surprised if they work somewhere else.
Deep Work: Rules for when staff discuss a business title adds: “Most CEOs haven’t yet made true learning only happens if mis- for us, we believe learning is best
Focused Success in a Distracted and reflect on how its ideas can be the connection between space and takes can be made and that at-desk achieved through real-time collab-
World, the central tenet is true incorporated into their enterprise. learning. But they should. Today learning simply doesn’t allow this. oration and on-the-job learning.”
learning, growth and reflection “To us it’s obvious that you can’t if you want to encourage contin- Adrienne Gormley, head of Dropbox As such Amazon’s style isn’t having
can best happen at work in a ded- hope to think differently if you’re sit- ual upskilling, you don’t ‘teach’; Business in Europe, Middle East and closed-off areas, but lots of group
icated quiet space. ting in the same spot you always do,” you just need space at work to share Africa, says: “We have the whole floor- pods, so-called flex rooms, and a
For Matt Kwiecinski, co-founder says Mr Kwiecinski, who has also information. The problem with fad- to-ceiling scribble walls, space for variety of other communal spaces,
and chief executive of Leeds-based created a space staff have dubbed based office design though is that video conference learning and so on, all present at its new London head-
digital marketing agency Journey the Thunderdome, an “amphithea- often space lacks permanency. Staff but we think it’s important to take quarters in Shoreditch.
Further, it’s such a powerful mes- tre” used for group learning. still need to know what a space is people to specific and, what we call, “Our philosophy is if we have a
Amazon UK's
sage that the book takes pride of “If you were designing our office for, and ideally it should try and headquarters in ‘safe’ training destinations. By this variety of spaces, people gravitate to
place in the agency’s office library, from scratch, it might be tempting stay the same.” Shoreditch, London we mean areas of privacy where peo- whichever suits them. We’ve tried to
ple can feel empowered to challenge
ideas without fear of onlookers.
“When people don’t feel safe, they
Maskot/Getty Images

contribute ideas that are middle of


the road. For learning to happen,
you need to be somewhere bounda-
ries can be pushed.”
With studies showing open-plan
For learning to
offices can actually reduce collab- happen, you need
oration – at one firm studied by
Harvard University, human inter- to be somewhere
action fell 72 per cent, while 56 per boundaries can
cent more emails were sent when
a business moved from a private be pushed
to open-plan arrangement – more
human resources leaders are warm-
ing to the idea of trying to under-
Download the whitepaper
stand how to integrate formal and
informal learning space to encour-
age an always-learning culture.
design our workplace to uphold one
of our values of being curious.”
It’s a shared sentiment. “If cul-
to learn how to provide
Some, like the manufacturer
Worcester Bosch, are leaning
towards looser learning spaces. “We
tural expectation is met with space
or technology, learning becomes
less about having a certain work-
spaces that retain your talent,
and empower their genius.
took a big management leap of faith place layout and more about much
recently,” says chief executive Carl broader issues, including how man-
Arntzen, “to have two living-room agement supports employees and
Staff of Leeds-
based agency
sized coffee areas built to encourage dedicating time for development,”
Journey Further in people to move away from their desks says Karen Hebert-Maccaro, chief

spacestor.com/talent/whitepaper
the Thunderdome, and talk and learn from each other.” learning experience officer at learn-
a space used for Others are upping the ante with ing provider O’Reilly Media.
group learning
much more formal space, which is Recent City & Guilds Group
often beautifully designed. Retail research finds that 34 per cent of UK
agency Geometry recently opened
The Flagship, a space designed by
BDG Architecture and Design, com-
employees say they work in overly
controlled workplaces. Some 32
per cent want better space for more
Call +44 (0)20 8991 6075
prising a totally immersive 3D floor- innovation and creativity.
to-ceiling projection area that allows Jane Duncan, vice president and
brands and retailers to prototype, head of people and organisation at
test and trial technology, which aims Capgemini, concludes: “As employee
to influence shoppers’ behaviour and expectation continues to grow, pres-
purchasing decisions. sure is on organisations to rethink
With two such different their approach to learning. This makes
approaches, identifying which understanding the evolution of the
works best may be tricky. But workspace a strategic imperative.”
18 FUTURE WORKPLACE RACONTEUR.NET 19

not to have either,” he says. “The


NEED FOR RESKILLING
library is only used as a place to go
and read; the Thunderdome prob-

35%
TR AINING SPACES ably gets used twice a month, but
that’s not the point. It’s all about us

Space to learn
exhibiting our ethos through our

81% of Talent Will Decline a


workspace, which is caring about
are expected to require
clarity of thought and everybody additional training of

54%
adding value.” up to six months

and develop 9%
Mr Kwiecinski is part of an emerg-

Position Due to Poor Workspace


ing band of business owners pull-
ing back on recent trends for work-
spaces to be designed to be as of all employees will

at work
multi-purpose as possible; areas equire significant will require reskilling
that are meeting rooms one min- reskilling or upskilling lasting six to twelve months

Design
by 2022

10%
ute, brainstorming spaces the next,
social areas another. It’s almost a
return to when offices had distinct
classrooms; spaces purely for ongo-
Business leaders are wrestling with ing training and development. But will require additional
how to integrate formal and informal can’t workspaces operate like class- skills training of more

learning spaces at work to nurture a


rooms too?
“While classrooms in the tradi- World Economic Forum 2018
than a year
What talent have you missed? Who’s about to leave?
tional sense feel outdated, the notion
necessary upskilling culture there should be permanently des-
ignated space for learning or one- Not only does incorporating dis- according to Ben Farmer, head of

Peter Crush
to-many experiences has increas-
ing relevancy,” says Robin Hoyle,
tinct learning areas into workspaces
visibly demonstrate learning is val-
human resources at Amazon UK,
creating workspaces that can be
97% of workers consider their workplace a symbol of how
head of learning and development at ued, it gives offices additional pur- classrooms too is simply about being

n Cal Newport’s influen- which also doubles as its book club.


Huthwaite International.
Atul Bansal, co-founder of interior
pose at a time when staff have more
choice about where they decide to
in tune with the existing culture.
“The way we think about space
valued they are. If you’re not providing for your most valuable
I tial management tome These are monthly get-togethers office design firm Sheila Bird Group, work. More than this, many argue and culture is linked,” he says. “But
asset, you can’t be surprised if they work somewhere else.
Deep Work: Rules for when staff discuss a business title adds: “Most CEOs haven’t yet made true learning only happens if mis- for us, we believe learning is best
Focused Success in a Distracted and reflect on how its ideas can be the connection between space and takes can be made and that at-desk achieved through real-time collab-
World, the central tenet is true incorporated into their enterprise. learning. But they should. Today learning simply doesn’t allow this. oration and on-the-job learning.”
learning, growth and reflection “To us it’s obvious that you can’t if you want to encourage contin- Adrienne Gormley, head of Dropbox As such Amazon’s style isn’t having
can best happen at work in a ded- hope to think differently if you’re sit- ual upskilling, you don’t ‘teach’; Business in Europe, Middle East and closed-off areas, but lots of group
icated quiet space. ting in the same spot you always do,” you just need space at work to share Africa, says: “We have the whole floor- pods, so-called flex rooms, and a
For Matt Kwiecinski, co-founder says Mr Kwiecinski, who has also information. The problem with fad- to-ceiling scribble walls, space for variety of other communal spaces,
and chief executive of Leeds-based created a space staff have dubbed based office design though is that video conference learning and so on, all present at its new London head-
digital marketing agency Journey the Thunderdome, an “amphithea- often space lacks permanency. Staff but we think it’s important to take quarters in Shoreditch.
Further, it’s such a powerful mes- tre” used for group learning. still need to know what a space is people to specific and, what we call, “Our philosophy is if we have a
Amazon UK's
sage that the book takes pride of “If you were designing our office for, and ideally it should try and headquarters in ‘safe’ training destinations. By this variety of spaces, people gravitate to
place in the agency’s office library, from scratch, it might be tempting stay the same.” Shoreditch, London we mean areas of privacy where peo- whichever suits them. We’ve tried to
ple can feel empowered to challenge
ideas without fear of onlookers.
“When people don’t feel safe, they
Maskot/Getty Images

contribute ideas that are middle of


the road. For learning to happen,
you need to be somewhere bounda-
ries can be pushed.”
With studies showing open-plan
For learning to
offices can actually reduce collab- happen, you need
oration – at one firm studied by
Harvard University, human inter- to be somewhere
action fell 72 per cent, while 56 per boundaries can
cent more emails were sent when
a business moved from a private be pushed
to open-plan arrangement – more
human resources leaders are warm-
ing to the idea of trying to under-
Download the whitepaper
stand how to integrate formal and
informal learning space to encour-
age an always-learning culture.
design our workplace to uphold one
of our values of being curious.”
It’s a shared sentiment. “If cul-
to learn how to provide
Some, like the manufacturer
Worcester Bosch, are leaning
towards looser learning spaces. “We
tural expectation is met with space
or technology, learning becomes
less about having a certain work-
spaces that retain your talent,
and empower their genius.
took a big management leap of faith place layout and more about much
recently,” says chief executive Carl broader issues, including how man-
Arntzen, “to have two living-room agement supports employees and
Staff of Leeds-
based agency
sized coffee areas built to encourage dedicating time for development,”
Journey Further in people to move away from their desks says Karen Hebert-Maccaro, chief

spacestor.com/talent/whitepaper
the Thunderdome, and talk and learn from each other.” learning experience officer at learn-
a space used for Others are upping the ante with ing provider O’Reilly Media.
group learning
much more formal space, which is Recent City & Guilds Group
often beautifully designed. Retail research finds that 34 per cent of UK
agency Geometry recently opened
The Flagship, a space designed by
BDG Architecture and Design, com-
employees say they work in overly
controlled workplaces. Some 32
per cent want better space for more
Call +44 (0)20 8991 6075
prising a totally immersive 3D floor- innovation and creativity.
to-ceiling projection area that allows Jane Duncan, vice president and
brands and retailers to prototype, head of people and organisation at
test and trial technology, which aims Capgemini, concludes: “As employee
to influence shoppers’ behaviour and expectation continues to grow, pres-
purchasing decisions. sure is on organisations to rethink
With two such different their approach to learning. This makes
approaches, identifying which understanding the evolution of the
works best may be tricky. But workspace a strategic imperative.”
20 FUTURE WORKPLACE

The power of connecting


space and people
54% of members credit WeWork with
their company’s growth globally.*
Discover workspace by WeWork at 
we.co/scale2019

*Findings from the WeWork


Global Impact Report 2019