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Monday, noveMber 22, 2010
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Bieber wins 4 AMAs, including
artist of year, p8A

Johnson grabs fifth NASCAR title,
p6A
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-7A
Announcements 8A
World news 9-10A
Classifieds 2B
TV 3B
Index
Chance of morn-
ing showers
Tuesday giving
way to sunshine
with high in
upper 40s. See page 2.
Library offers
‘Toy Story 3’
The Delphos Public
Library is looking for
children in need of some-
thing to do on Friday.
The movie “Toy Story
3” will be shown on the big
screen from 2:30-4 p.m.
The movie is rated ‘G’
and is 86 minutes long.
Sign-up is not required
to attend. Kids 6 years
and younger should be
accompanied by a care-
giver. Those attending are
welcome to bring a snack.
Parents are responsible for
reviewing the content of the
movie before attending.
Exchange club
offers annual
Holiday Lights
The Van Wert 4-H
Exchange Club will
again offer Holiday
Lights at the Van Wert
County Fairgrounds.
The drive-through holi-
day light display will be
open from 6-9 p.m. Friday,
Saturday and Sunday
beginning Friday and run-
ning through Dec. 26.
Santa will be avail-
able on Saturday and
Dec. 4, 11 and 18.
Carriage rides through
the lights will be offered
on Dec. 3 and 4, 10 and
11 for a small upcharge.
Viewers should use
the S.R. 127 and Fox
Road entrance at Gate
5 on Fox Road.
Mary M. Grothause photos
Approximately 90 people enjoyed a Thanksgiving dinner and fellowship provided by
the Delphos Ministerial Association Sunday evening at the K of C Hall.
BY MARY M.
GROTHAUSE
The Delphos Herald
DELPHOS — The Delphos
Ministerial Associated hosted
its fourth annual Thanksgiving
meal Sunday evening at the
Knights of Columbus hall.
According to the Rev.
Dave Howell from Trinity
United Methodist Church,
approximately 90 people
showed up for the usual
turkey and gravy, mashed
potatoes, dressing and
green bean casserole.
Attendees and members
from the various local
churches provided side
dishes and desserts.
Those attending had vari-
ous reasons for partaking in
the traditional dinner. For
Heather Doner, who attended
with her husband, Mike, and
their 2-year-old son, Alaric, it
was a chance to get together
with her parents, John and
Deb Wade.
For Dee Smith, it was
a chance for a good home-
cooked meal and the fellow-
ship with others.
“I live alone and it’s silly
to cook a meal for just me
and I don’t really like left-
overs,” she explained.
After dinner, devotional
singing was given by Jay
Wannemacher, followed by
a short sermon by Pastor Dan
Eaton of First Assembly of
God.
Pastor Harry Tolhurst from
the First United Presbyterian
Church announced the
Ministerial Christmas service
will be at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 6
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church.
Mike Doner started off with macaroni and cheese for his 2-year-old son, Alaric Doner,
which was his first choice for his Thanksgiving meal at the K of C hall.
Jays announce semifinal
ticket sales
St. John’s will sell pre-
sale tickets for Friday’s
Division VI state semifi-
nal game versus Sidney
Lehman (7:30 p.m. kickoff)
at Wapakoneta’s Harmon
Field at the following times
in the high school office:
1-3:30 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.
Tuesday; 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. Wednesday; and 9
a.m., to noon Friday.
St. John’s will receive
a percentage of all tickets
purchased at the school.
All tickets are $8 pre-
sale and $10 at the gate.
Children 6 years old and
older must have a ticket.
Community breaks
bread, gives thanks
Area counties form
regional economic
development group
BY KIRK DOUGAL
Herald correspondent
VAN WERT — Eight area
counties which have collabo-
rated for economic develop-
ment in the past are making
that association more formal.
On Wednesday, representa-
tives from Van Wert, Mercer,
Auglaize, Allen, Hardin,
Hancock and Putnam counties
met in Lima to participate in the
first of four planned meetings
to produce a regional econom-
ic development plan through
Stronger Economies Together
(SET). Paulding County is part
of the group but was unable to
have a representative present.
The SET program is
adopted from the Economic
Development Administration.
It works with rural areas to
develop their own economic
and strategic plans. The gen-
eral goals are finding common
assets to promote, determin-
ing the area’s cluster industries,
choosing target industries and
developing plans to bring a
region together to accomplish
the objectives. Individually,
counties have not been able to
achieve these goals because of
limited resources, according to
Van Wert County Economic
Development Director Nancy
Bowen.
“In the past, the Economic
Development Administration
has required (entities) to do
what is a called an Overall
Economic Development Plan
in order to get any funding
through them,” she told the
Times Bulletin. “With them
you can get $3-$5 million
grants for a project. This pro-
gram allows regions to put
together a plan to be used for
USDA or EDA grants.”
Bowen said the group’s goal
is to cover all of the modules of
the SET program and emerge
with the required economic plan
by July. Also, a goal of those
meetings is to make a more
formal structure between the
eight counties which are com-
prised of the Ohio Department
of Development’s Region 3.
They have worked together in
the past as a loose association
and have accomplished some
important items. These include
grant funding for the Van Wert
Supersite, the Ohio Skills Bank
web site and the Grand Lake
St. Marys Restoration Project.
The thought is those successes
will be made easier to reach as
a formal group with branding,
coordination and marketing.
Delphos Safety Service
Director Greg Berquist also
attended the meeting.
“This initiative to form
regional economic develop-
ment makes sense,” Berquist
said. “When an industry is
looking at your city, they also
look regionally for utilities, etc.
The city’s role is then to sup-
port not only their own inter-
ests, but the region’s as well.”
The group will also form its
own Business Retention and
Expansion program. The Van
Wert Economic Development
office and some of the other
counties already have their own
BRE but the regional group
will enhance that effort.
“When we are out visit-
ing companies, we are learn-
ing information about what
their needs are,” Bowen said.
“We want to be able to pull
that information together as a
region. What kind of training
programs do they need? How
are we going to retain these
businesses over the long term?
If we can put that informa-
tion together and go to our
legislators as a region, we can
say ‘Here are the dominant
issues’.”
Bowen pointed out it was
a significant accomplishment
just to be included in the SET
program. The local group is
one of only two regions chosen
in Ohio and only 22 nation-
wide to participate. She said
they needed to apply with the
USDA and it was a very com-
petitive process.
The first meeting covered
the SET program and some of
the major economic and indus-
try trends around the country.
Looking forward, upcoming
meetings will cover specific
goals of the region, listing
assets and identifying barriers
for new businesses and finally,
putting in place means to mea-
sure whether the plan is work-
ing or needs to be amended.
Bowen acknowledged the
group still has a lot of work in
front of them but also under-
stands how vital the SET pro-
gram’s success will be to a
growing regional economy.
“It is all about the leverage
as a region that we will have
versus what we can do as indi-
vidual counties,” she said. “We
really feel that collectively we
will be able to bring in those
projects. We are a lot more apt
to land something as a region
than we would be as individual
counties. Working together is
important.”
Scientist: NKorea secretly, quickly builds new nuclear facility
By FOSTER KLUG
The Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea
— North Korea has secret-
ly and quickly built a new,
highly sophisticated facility
to enrich uranium, accord-
ing to an American nuclear
scientist, raising fears that
the North is ramping up its
atomic program despite inter-
national pressure.
The scientist, Siegfried
Hecker, said in a report
posted Saturday that he was
taken during a recent trip to
the North’s main Yongbyon
atomic complex to a facility
with a small industrial-scale
uranium enrichment facility.
The facility had 2,000 recent-
ly completed centrifuges, he
said, and the North told him it
was producing low-enriched
uranium meant for a new
reactor.
Hecker, a former direc-
tor of the U.S. Los Alamos
Nuclear Laboratory who is
regularly given rare glimps-
es of the North’s secretive
nuclear program, acknowl-
edged that it was not clear
what North Korea stood to
gain by showing him the for-
merly secret area.
The revelation could be
designed to strengthen the
North Korean government
as it looks to transfer power
from leader Kim Jong Il to
a young, unproven son. As
the North’s economy suffers
and Washington and others
tighten sanctions, unveiling
the centrifuges could also be
an attempt by Pyongyang to
force a resumption of stalled
international nuclear disar-
mament-for-aid talks.
Whatever the reason,
the new centrifuges provide
a fresh set of worries for
the Obama administration,
which has shunned negotia-
tions with the North follow-
ing Pyongyang’s nuclear and
missile tests last year and
in the wake of an interna-
tional finding that a North
Korean torpedo sank a South
Korean warship in March,
killing 46 sailors. The U.S.
State Department announced
that the Obama administra-
tion’s special envoy on North
Korea planned to visit South
Korea, Japan and China,
starting Sunday.
Hecker wrote that his first
glimpse of the new centri-
fuges was “stunning.”
“Instead of seeing a few
small cascades of centrifuges,
which I believed to exist in
North Korea, we saw a mod-
ern, clean centrifuge plant of
more than a thousand centri-
fuges, all neatly aligned and
plumbed below us,” Hecker,
a Stanford University profes-
sor, wrote.
Hecker described the con-
trol room as “astonishingly
modern,” writing that, unlike
other North Korean facilities,
it “would fit into any modern
See NUCLEAR, page 2A
2
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944 E. Fifth St. 419-692-2202
Soup Supreme
SOUPS
Just heat and serve
• Chicken Noodle • Vegetable Beef
• Cream of Broccoli • Chicken Dumplings
• Cream of Potato • Beef Stew
formerly sold at Delphos Food Locker
Monday Special
50
¢
WINGS
BBQ • Hot ’n Spicy • Plain
Boneless wings also available
Wings available everyday at regular price
Chocolate covered peanuts,
Chocolate covered peanut brittle,
Chocolate covered pretzels,
Vanilla, maple, carmel clusters
Tuesday
Special
Large
Taco
Salad
$4.75
Taco Salad
available
everyday at
regular price
Thursday Special
Large Chef
Salad $4.75
Chef Salad available
Everyday at regular price
SUEVER’S TOWN HOUSE
15”
$
10
5
pizza up to
of your choice
items
It Doesn’t Get Any Better Than This!
Open
Thanksgiving
Day!
Fresh arrangements,
Holiday decor
and gift items.
Flowers
on Fifth
940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
(419) 692-6856
flowersonfifth@woh.rr.com
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Madison
Stump.
Congratulations
Madison!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Carter
Mox.
Congratulations
Carter!
Scholars of the Day
2A – The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 137
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl, general manager/
Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
April 10, 1920-
Nov. 21, 2010
Ambrose B. “Abe”
Giesken, 90, of Delphos,
died at 4:50 a.m. Sunday at
Vancrest Health Care Center.
He was born April 10, 1920,
in Louisiana to John and Rosa
(Schlagbaum) Giesken, who
preceded him in death.
Survivors include broth-
ers Julius Giesken of Landeck
and John Giesken of Delphos.
He was preceded in death
by six brothers and four sis-
ters.
Mr. Giesken was a U.S.
Army veteran of World War II
who was retired from Hagen
Insulation. He graduated from
Ottoville High School in 1938.
He was a member of St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church in
Landeck and the Veterans of
Foreign Wars post in Delphos.
He enjoyed sports, especially
basketball, golf and softball.
Mass of Christian
Burial will begin at 11 a.m.
Wednesday at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church, the
Rev. Jacob Gordon offici-
ating. Burial will be in the
church cemetery with military
rites by the Delphos Veterans
Council.
Friends may call from 2-4
and 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church or to
donor’s choice.
Sept. 13, 1926-
Nov. 20, 2010
Melvin Diller, 84, of Elida,
died at 1:35 p.m. Saturday at
his residence.
He was born Sept. 13,
1926, in Elida to Samuel and
Elsie (Huber) Diller.
On Sept. 18, 1955, he mar-
ried Phyllis Schultz, who died
Sept. 22, 2008.
Survivors include sons
Gary (Connie) Diller of
Elida and Keith (Bobby
Daniels) Diller of Troy;
grandson Eric (Jill) Diller;
step grandchildren Eric
(Jamie) Good and Melanie
(Good) Lehman; and six
great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by several brothers and sis-
ters.
Mr. Diller was a World
War II veteran who retired
from Ford after 35 years.
He was a member of Ridge
United Methodist Church and
United Auto Workers Local
#1219. He enjoyed working
in his yard and on his cars.
He also enjoyed trips with the
retirees’ group of Ford.
Services will begin at 2
p.m. Wednesday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home, the
Rev. Jane Brown will offici-
ate. Burial will be in Memorial
Park Cemetery in Lima with
military rites by Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post #1275 of
Lima.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Tuesday.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Petite Paws
Rescue or to Ridge United
Methodist Church.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $34
million
Midday 3
2-6-0
Midday 4
4-8-1-0
Pick 3
1-2-9
Pick 4
5-4-7-9
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $64
million
Rolling Cash 5
04-05-17-22-24
Estimated jackpot:
$130,000
Ten OH
01-04-06-07-08-11-13-18-
22-23-26-27-29-36-38-39-42-
48-57-78
Ten OH Midday
02-06-13-17-28-29-31-35-
36-38-42-45-46-53-54-61-66-
68-70-77
By JUSTIN PRITCHARD
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES —
Drinking glasses depicting
comic book and movie charac-
ters such as Superman, Wonder
Woman and the Tin Man from
“The Wizard of Oz” exceed
federal limits for lead in chil-
dren’s products by up to 1,000
times, according to laboratory
testing commissioned by The
Associated Press.
The decorative enamel on
the superhero and Oz sets —
made in China and purchased
at a Warner Brothers Studios
store in Burbank — contained
between 16 percent and 30.2
percent lead. The federal limit
on children’s products is 0.03
percent.
The same glasses also con-
tained relatively high levels of
the even-more-dangerous cad-
mium, though there are no fed-
eral limits on that toxic metal in
design surfaces.
In separate testing to rec-
reate regular handling, other
glasses shed small but notable
amounts of lead or cadmi-
um from their decorations.
Federal regulators have wor-
ried that toxic metals rubbing
onto children’s hands can get
into their mouths. Among the
brands on those glasses: Coca-
Cola, Walt Disney, Burger
King and McDonald’s.
The Coca-Cola Co., which
had been given AP’s test results
last week, announced Sunday
evening that after retesting
it was voluntarily recalling
88,000 glasses over concerns
regarding the mainly red glass
in a four-glass set.
The AP testing was part of
the news organization’s ongo-
ing investigation into dangerous
metals in children’s products
and was conducted in response
to a recall by McDonald’s of
12 million glasses this sum-
mer because cadmium escaped
from designs depicting four
characters in the latest “Shrek”
movie.
The New Jersey manufac-
turer of those glasses said in
June that the products were
made according to standard
industry practices, which
includes the routine use of
cadmium to create red and
similar colors. That same
company, French-owned Arc
International, made the glasses
that Coca-Cola said it was
pulling.
To assess potential problems
with glass collectibles beyond
the “Shrek” set, AP bought and
analyzed new glasses off the
shelf, and old ones from online
auctions, thrift shops and a flea
market. The buys were ran-
dom.
(Continued from page 1A)
American processing facility.”
The facilities appeared
to be primarily for civil-
ian nuclear power, not for
North Korea’s nuclear arse-
nal, Hecker said. He said he
saw no evidence of contin-
ued plutonium production at
Yongbyon. But, he said, the
uranium enrichment facilities
“could be readily converted
to produce highly enriched
uranium bomb fuel.”
Uranium enrichment would
give the North a second way
to make atomic bombs, in
addition to its known plu-
tonium-based program. At
low levels, uranium can be
used in power reactors, but
at higher levels it can be used
in nuclear bombs. Hecker’s
findings were first reported in
The New York Times.
U.S. nuclear envoy
Stephen Bosworth’s trip
to Asia for talks on North
Korea comes as new satel-
lite images show construction
under way at North Korea’s
main atomic complex. That,
combined with reports from
Hecker and another American
expert who recently traveled
to Yongbyon, appear to show
that Pyongyang is keeping
its pledge to build a nuclear
power reactor.
North Korea vowed
in March to build a light-
water reactor using its own
nuclear fuel. Hecker, and
Jack Pritchard, a former U.S.
envoy for negotiations with
North Korea, have said that
construction has begun.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: A chance of
showers in the evening then
showers with isolated thunder-
storms after midnight. Lows
in the upper 40s. Southwest
winds 15 to 20 mph with gusts
up to 30 mph. Chance of rain
100 percent.
TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of showers
in the morning then mostly
sunny in the afternoon. Highs
in the upper 40s. Northwest
winds 10 to 15 mph with gusts
up to 25 mph. Chance of rain
50 percent.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the mid
20s. Northwest winds 5 to
10 mph becoming north after
midnight.
Corn: $5.04
Wheat: $5.43
Beans: $11.70
The first CD pressed in the
United States was Bruce
Springsteen’s “Born in the
USA” in 1984.
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 62 degrees,
low was 35. Rainfall was
recorded at .25 inch by 8 a.m.
today. High a year ago today
was 57, low was 33. Record
high for today is 70, set in
1971. Record low is 10, set
in 1964.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Nov. 19 to
Michael and Angela Ricker of
Fort Jennings.
Cadmium, lead found
in drinking glasses
Ambrose B. “Abe”
Giesken
Melvin Diller
Delphos weather
Nuclear
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HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Enter The Delphos Herald’s
HEY KIDS!
Get your coloring book in the Nov. 23rd
Delphos Herald, at Santa’s House on Main St.
or at any merchant in the coloring book.
4 AGE CATEGORIES:
0-3, 4-6, 7-9, 10-12
Winner in each category:
1st Prize - $20 2nd Prize - $10
• 1 Entry per individual for each participating merchant
• Must be brought to the merchant of the page that you colored
• Entries will be judged by the Delphos Herald staff
• No help from older children or parents (please)
Deadline for entries is Dec. 14th
Winners will be announced in
The Delphos Herald Dec. 17th.
Monday, November 22, 2010 The Herald –3A
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
Quidditch catches on at
Ohio college campuses
By KEVIN JOY
The Col umbus
Dispatch
COLUMBUS — As
Ohio State students tossed
Frisbees or lounged on the
grass nearby, a dozen oth-
ers ran around toting balls
and brooms — dodging and
weaving, throwing and div-
ing, engrossed in an offbeat
game that attracted gawk-
ers and giggles.
Their amusement: a pas-
time once confined to the
pages of a fantasy-book
series.
Nowadays, though, the
pursuit of the mythical quid-
ditch thrives well beyond
Harry Potter’s Hogwarts
School of Witchcraft and
Wizardry.
And mere “muggles”
(nonmagical people) can
even partake.
“It’s kind of the best-
kept secret on campus,”
said Carly Kestler, 22, a
senior who founded the
OSU Quidditch League in
2008.
The high-flying game
conceived by British author
J.K. Rowling in her Harry
Potter books has placed a
growing number of real-
life college players under
its spell — albeit in modi-
fied form. The one-time
courtyard lark among some
New England undergradu-
ates is now engaging more
than 800 teams worldwide,
fueled by open-minded ath-
letes with a deep emotional
connection to the popular
novels.
“People are imme-
diately curious,” said
Alicia Bradford, commu-
nication director for the
International Quidditch
Association, a New York
nonprofit group that regu-
lates the game and helps
coordinate matches.
“Exposure is a big
part of what’s driving our
growth.”
The association hosted
the fourth annual Quidditch
World Cup in New York,
where 46 teams, including
those from Ohio State and
Miami universities, have
signed up to compete.
In previous years, the
annual tournament was
staged at Vermont’s bucolic
Middlebury College, where
Alex Benape adapted the
game in 2007. The inau-
gural cup drew just two
teams.
Quidditch has since
found plenty of traction in
Ohio, said Peter Chen, a
Purdue University sopho-
more and Midwest repre-
sentative for the region’s
200 squads.
In the spring, more than
200 students at Denison
University joined a quid-
ditch interest group on
Facebook. An information-
al meeting in October at the
University of Cincinnati
attracted 45 people.
Ohio State President E.
Gordon Gee, who last year
bragged to Time magazine
about the “Nimbus 2000”
broomstick replica kept in
his office, is so taken with
the Columbus club that he
has invited its 50 members
to a private screening next
Saturday of the upcoming
movie “Harry Potter and
the Deathly Hallows: Part
1.”
At Miami University,
where the game was
awarded club-sport sta-
tus this fall, participation
has grown from 20 stu-
dents to 120 — now com-
prising nine teams plus
a traveling squad — and
gained enough spectator
momentum to pack the
sidelines during quidditch
face-offs, said Matthew
Perrine, the group’s vice
president.
“It’s a little nerdy, but
it’s a cool nerdy,” said
Perrine, 19, whose dormi-
tory today will host a party
where fans can view a live
webcast from the New York
games. “There are so many
Harry Potter fans who are
intrigued.”
Many present-day col-
lege students were in ele-
mentary school when the
first Potter novel made its
U.S. debut in 1998. They
grew up with the char-
acters of Harry, Ron and
Hermione.
Collegiate quidditch is
played on an oval-shaped
pitch — absent airborne
players, of course, but
including familiar, full-
contact hallmarks found in
the fictional competition.
“It’s kind of like rugby
and team handball or dodge
ball,” said Jen Nygren, 20,
co-founder of the Denison
Death Eaters.
In other words: It’s not
for the fainthearted.
“You are running every
second,” said Alexis
Moody, 20, founder of
the Marauders at Bowling
Green State University.
“It’s a rough sport.”
Participants often acces-
sorize with scarves and
capes but don’t wear pad-
ding. Some do, however,
opt for protective lacrosse
goggles.
“This past weekend, I
almost broke my nose,” said
Dan Miller, 19, president of
the OSU team and a soccer
player from Newark. “We’ve
had someone break their
pinkie finger. Somebody
broke their ankle. You have
to be wary.”
Enthusiasm has grown so
fervent that a few schools
are petitioning to secure
NCAA status (50 universi-
ties would need to sign on
to warrant consideration),
but many players frown on
the idea.
“Quidditch has always
been coed, even in the
books,” Moody said. “If it
became NCAA-affiliated,
it would completely ruin
what the sport is.”
“This past
weekend, I almost
broke my nose.
We’ve had
someone break
their pinkie finger.
Somebody broke
their ankle. You
have to be wary.”
— Dan Miller, 19,
president of the OSU team
Soccer player crochet hats for needy
COLUMBUS (AP) — He
often zooms up on a skate-
board or bike. They arrive
slowly, sometimes with help
from a cane or walker.
Once seated in their usual
Monday-afternoon spots, the
24-year-old soccer pro and
the ladies of the Westminster-
Thurber Community, average
age north of 80, proceed to
bond — over crochet hooks.
“I do feel like I have like
20 grandmothers,” Steven
Lenhart says as he checks the
stitches in his purple beanie-
to-be.
Donna Chapman looks up
from her yarn and smiles.
“Steven was raised right,”
she says.
The unlikely friendship
among the Columbus Crew
player, a couple of his pals
and more than a dozen resi-
dents of a retirement com-
munity is an intergenerational
delight, all agree. They get
together every week to cro-
chet hats for the needy and
homeless.
“Isn’t this something?”
said resident Urma Mains.
“Who would have ever
thought — old women and
soccer players.”
Mains is a devoted news-
paper reader but acknowl-
edges that she used to throw
away the sports section. Now,
she and many in the crochet
club scour it for news about
Lenhart. “Steven is a striker,
or a forward,” Mains said. “I
like striker better.”
The women gasped when
they read this summer that
the 6-foot-4 California native
had suffered a broken nose.
And they noticed right away
when he buzzed his trade-
mark blond, bushy hair.
“Oh, you should hear
them,” said Sabrina Bobrow,
activities coordinator at the
retirement home. “When I
come in to work, I get, ’Steven
got a haircut! Steven broke
his nose! Steven got ejected!
We’ve got to get a card!”’
Lenhart, a free spirit known
for his charity work, said the
club just makes sense. He met
Bobrow in a park this year,
and they talked about Homiez
Hatz, his project to make
beanies and raise money for
needy men, women and kids.
Bobrow knew how to help.
“I said, ’You know, I’ve got a
whole tower full of women
who know how to crochet.”’
The beanies, in a rain-
bow of colors, are piling up.
Dozens soon will be deliv-
ered to a YWCA Family
Center, which is helping a
record number of homeless
families this year.
“These ladies definitely
feel useful,” Bobrow said.
3-year-old
giraffe at Cinci
zoo found dead
CINCINNATI (AP) —
Cincinnati zoo officials are
waiting to find out what
caused the weekend death of
a 3-year-old giraffe.
Keepers found the female
Massai giraffe named Akilah
on Saturday evening sitting in
the back of an outdoor exhibit.
She apparently was feeding on
the grass inside an enclosed
island in the exhibit when her
horns became caught in the
netting surrounding the trees.
A necropsy was being per-
formed Sunday to find out
what caused the giraffe’s
death. Officials say results
could take days, if not weeks.
Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical
Garden staff planned to
remove the netting around the
trees before the zoo’s other
two giraffes go on exhibit.
Twelve-foot-tall Akilah
was born in 2006 at the
Toledo Zoo. She has been at
the Cincinnati zoo since June
2008.
Ohioans react to
pope’s comments
on condoms
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Parishioners at Roman
Catholic churches around the
world are drawing hope from
Pope Benedict XVI’s recent
comments on condoms.
The Holy See told a
German journalist that con-
doms are not a moral solution
for stopping AIDS. But in
some cases, such as for male
prostitutes, he said their use
could represent a first step in
assuming moral responsibility
in trying to reduce the risk of
infection.
After Sunday morning
Mass at Saint Michael Catholic
Church in a leafy Columbus
suburb, several parishioners
praised the pope’s remarks.
Jennifer Griffin, a 38-year-
old physical therapist, says it
was a responsible move by
the pontiff because condoms
curb the spread of sexually
transmitted diseases.
But others say if taken out
of context, the pope’s words
could renew the debate over
the morality of birth control.
For all the news that matters,
subscribe to The Delphos Herald,
419-695-0015
4A — The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
POLITICS
“Nothing great will ever be achieved without great men, and men are great
only if they are determined to be so.”
— Charles de Gaulle (born this date in 1890, died 1970)
www.delphosherald.com
IT WAS NEWS THEN
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
One Year Ago
• The Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce and local busi-
ness planned to bring the annual Home Christmas to downtown
on Dec. 4. Three local figures have thrown their hats in the
ring to be named grand marshal for the Santa parade. Delphos
Mayor Mike Gallmeier, Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fittro and
Delphos Herald Editor Nancy Spencer have collection jars at
various chamber businesses.
25 Years Ago — 1985
• The Music Center, which was located at 516 W. Fifth St.
has been relocated to Main Street in the building that formerly
housed Four Season Craft Shop, 305 N. Main St., according
to Don Alt, co-owner for the Music Center and Tru-Value
Western Auto Store. The Music Center is adjacent to the
Western Auto Store and entrance is through that store.
• Delphos Helms Swingers Square Club met at St. Peter
Lutheran Church. Joy Teagle of Hartford City, Ind., called
to 27 couples and Carol Zender of Celina, cued the rounds.
Door prizes were won by Glen and Joyce Baker of Van Wert
Traveling Squares, Dick and Marilyn Glossett of Van Wert
Traveling Squares and Wayne and June Black of Paulding.
• Delphos FFA chapter recently received a national award
at the state convention. Receiving this award were Kevin
Meeker and Jason Clevenger. They received the National
Bronze Emblem which honors the top national chapters.
Terry Pohlman, Dave Kroeger and Roger Gerdeman recently
received a first-place trophy for soil judging in county com-
petition.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• The regular monthly meeting of Cub Scout Pack 42
was held Nov. 20 in the Little Theater of St. John’s School.
Cubmaster Al Honigford, assisted by Mrs. Robert Bendele and
Richard Grone, led the acceptance ceremonies into the “Bob
Cats” for the following boys: Gary Sheeter, Daniel Haehn,
Bill Metcalfe, Tom Beining, Frank Garza, Bob Hesseling,
Bill Miller, Francis Noonan, Bill Kaverman, David Osting,
Dan Grubenhoff, James Meyer, Robert Wurst, Tom Brickner,
Mark Miller, Tim Grothouse, James Carder, Gordon Fuerst,
Fred Johnson, Phil Miller and John Warnecke. At this meet-
ing a very special “thank you” was given to Al Honingford,
Cubmaster, and to Ben Niemeyer, assistant cubmaster, who
are retiring. Also to M. S. “Slim” Kroeger, Howard Ditto, Bill
Wiesenberg and Frank Spieles for their excellent work as com-
mitteemen during the past year. Mrs. Margaret Honingford,
Helen Meyers, Betty Wiesenberg and Kay Dannhausen were
given a vote of thanks as retiring Den Mothers as well as the
two remaining, Margaret Geise and Betty Friemoth. New Den
Mothers, Mrs. Richard Kelly and Delores Sheeter were wel-
comed to the Pack.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• A “pep” session is scheduled to be held at Jefferson High
School next Wednesday afternoon in preparation for the open-
ing cage games of the season. The new cheerleaders of the
high school, Jim Buchholtz, David Griffith, Arnold Hammons
and Clark Thompson, will be in charge of the cheering on this
occasion.
• Members of the St. Elizabeth’s Benevolent Society met
at the Knights of Columbus rooms for their annual session
Wednesday afternoon. Election of officers was the main item
of business at the meeting. All officers were re-elected. They
are as follows: President, Mrs. Frank Kaverman; vice presi-
dent, Mrs. John Metzner; secretary, Mrs. Jos. Auer and trea-
surer, Mrs. Anna Krieft.
• Mrs. Gay Luke was hostess to the members of the United
Brethren Aid Society and three guests at her home on South
Jefferson Street Wednesday evening. Her guests were Mrs.
John Tegenkamp, Mrs. Beck and Mrs. Allen. The date for the
chicken supper and bazaar has been changed from Dec. 4 to
Dec. 11. In two weeks the society will meet at the home of
Lillie Harpster, South Pierce Street.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The maker of the painkiller
Darvon is pulling the drug off
the market at the request of
public health officials who say
the more than 50-year-old pill
causes potentially deadly heart
rhythms.
The Food and Drug
Administration said Friday that
Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals had
agreed to halt all U.S. market-
ing of Darvon and the related
brand Darvocet, which have
been subject to safety concerns
for decades. The Kentucky
company confirmed the move
in its own statement.
The FDA also ordered
generic drugmakers to stop
making and selling low-cost
drugs containing the active
ingredient in Darvon, called
propoxyphene.
Britain and the European
Union decided to ban Darvon
in 2005 and 2009, respectively,
due to a long trend of suicides
and accidental overdoses.
FDA officials said they
decided to take action based on
a recent study showing Darvon
interferes with the electrical
activity of the heart, causing
irregular heart rhythms that
can be fatal. Xanodyne con-
ducted the study last year at
the government’s request.
“This last study, the cardiac
study, was sort of the final piece
of the puzzle that told us what
the complete picture was,” said
Dr. Gerald Dal Pan, director
of FDA’s office of surveillance
and epidemiology.
Dal Pan said patients should
continue taking the medication
until their doctor prescribes
a replacement therapy. Other
commonly prescribed drugs in
the same class are oxycodone
and codeine.
But public safety advocates
said the agency should have
acted much sooner to pull a
drug with limited benefits and
a long history of safety prob-
lems.
By KIMBERLY DOZIER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Al-Qaida of the Arabian
Peninsula is promising more
small-scale attacks like its
attempts to bomb two U.S.-
bound cargo planes, which it
likens to bleeding its enemy to
death by a thousand cuts, in a
special edition of the Yemeni-
based group’s English on-line
magazine, Inspire.
The editors boast that
what they call Operation
Hemorrhage was cheap, and
easy, using common items
that together with shipping,
cost only $4,200 to carry out.
The group says it’s part
of a new strategy to replace
spectacular attacks in favor
of smaller attacks to hit the
U.S. economy, according to
the English-language maga-
zine, as posted by both Ben
Venske’s IntelCenter, and the
Site Intelligence Group.
“To bring down America
we do not need to strike big,”
the editors write. With the
“security phobia that is sweep-
ing America, it is more fea-
sible to stage smaller attacks
that involve less players and
less time to launch” thereby
circuventing U.S. security,
they conclude.
In the magazine, an author
identified as the group’s head
of foreign operations says the
package attacks were intend-
ed to cause economic harm,
not casualties. “We knew that
cargo planes are staffed by
only a pilot and a co-pilot,”
the author writes, “so our
objective was not to cause
maximum casualties but to
cause maximum losses to the
American economy,” by strik-
ing at the multi-billion dollar
U.S. freight industry.
The al-Qaida offshoot
insists it also brought down a
UPS cargo plane in Dubai in
September, in addition to the
Oct. 29th attempts to bring
down a FedEx plane, and a
UPS plane bound for the U.S.
But U.S. officials insist the
Dubai crash was an accident
caused by a battery fire, not
terrorism.
The editors’ boast that
they chose printer cartridges
in which to hide the explosive
because toner is carbon-based,
with a molecular composition
“close to that of PETN,” so it
would not be detected. “We
emptied the toner cartridge
from its contents and filled
it with 340 grams of PETN,”
the writers say.
In another article, the edi-
tors boast of how economi-
cally this was carried out,
listing the cost of the items,
including two Nokia mobiles,
at $150 each, two HP printers,
at $300 each, plus shipping,
transportation and other mis-
cellaneous expenses add up to
a total bill of $4,200.”
Those who monitor Jihadist
sites say the post is a radical
departure from the shadowy
claims of responsibility com-
mon to most al-Qaida groups.
“We have never seen a jihad-
ist group in the al-Qaida orbit
ever release, let alone only
a few weeks after, such a
detailed accounting of the phi-
losophy, operational details,
intent and next steps follow-
ing a major attack,” says the
IntelCenter’s Venske.
The fact that the group is
“able to pump out this pro-
paganda” shows al-Qaida
is still able to operate with
relative freedom, says the
Carnegie Endowment for
Peace’s Christopher Boucek,
despite U.S. officials’ repeat-
ed requests that Yemen step
up its counterterrorist opera-
tions, and share more intel-
ligence with U.S. officials
helping them on the ground
in Yemen.
By BRADLEY KLAPPER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama took
aim Saturday at Republican
senators standing in the way of
a nuclear arms reduction pact
with Russia, saying they were
abandoning Ronald Reagan’s
lesson of nuclear diplomacy:
“Trust but verify.”
The Senate’s GOP leader
accused his Democratic coun-
terparts of wasting Congress’
lame-duck session on issues
from gays in the military to
environment regulations. Sen.
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.,
didn’t mention Obama’s push
to ratify the new START
weapons treaty with Russia,
but said extending expiring
Bush-era tax cuts needed to
be the top priority.
Obama, speaking from a
NATO summit in Portugal,
used his weekly radio and
Internet address to focus on
international affairs at a time
of increased political gridlock
at home as the GOP prepares
to take control of the House in
the new Congress next year.
Describing his nuclear
efforts as part of a five-admin-
istration continuum, Obama
said the treaty to cut the per-
mitted number of U.S. and
Russian long-range nuclear
warheads by a third was
“fundamental to America’s
national security.”
The president went to great
length listing the prominent
Republicans from previous
administrations who back the
deal, including former secre-
taries of state Colin Powell,
George Shultz, Jim Baker and
Henry Kissinger. He cited
GOP Sen. Dick Lugar’s sup-
port, but suggested that other
Republican senators were
playing politics with national
security.
“Some make no argument
against the treaty — they just
ask for more time,” Obama
said. “If the Senate doesn’t act
this year — after six months,
18 hearings, and nearly a
thousand questions answered
— it would have to start over
from scratch in January.”
And it would face tough-
er odds as the Democratic
majority loses six seats.
Without ratification,
Russia may be less coopera-
tive in enforcing strong sanc-
tions on Iran, securing loose
nuclear material from terror-
ists or helping the U.S. equip
troops in Afghanistan, Obama
said. He said no agreement
with Russia meant no U.S.
inspectors watching over one
of the world’s biggest nuclear
arsenals.
“Those who would block
this treaty are breaking
President Reagan’s rule —
they want to trust, but not
verify,” Obama said.
At the NATO meeting,
officials from Denmark,
Lithuania, Latvia, Hungary,
Norway and Bulgaria told
reporters Saturday that failing
to ratify the treaty would set
back European security.
McConnell, in the GOP
radio and Internet address,
focused on the stubbornly
high unemployment rate and
Democrats’ failure to alle-
viate joblessness. He said
Democrats had exploded the
national debt with the stimu-
lus and other spending pro-
grams, and were now asking
Americans for more money.
He said it was imperative
that the Bush-era tax cuts that
expire this year be extended.
“Americans don’t think we
should be raising taxes on any-
body, especially in the middle
of a recession,” McConnell
said. “But instead of giving
Americans what they want,
Democratic leaders plan to
use the last few days that
lawmakers expect to spend in
Washington this year focus-
ing on everything except pre-
venting this tax hike, which
will cost us even more jobs:
immigration; a repeal of the
’don’t ask, don’t tell’; a reor-
ganization of the FDA; more
environmental regulations.”
NEW YORK -- In the
accelerating debate about air-
port pat-downs that feel like
a clumsy third date and body
scans that border on Peeping
Tom shows, it’s hard to find a
sane place to land.
Is this really for our
own good? Or are we trad-
ing what’s left of our human
dignity by participating in a
Kafkaesque farce that more
closely resembles a college
fraternity psychology experi-
ment devised around a keg:
“OK, here’s the plan.
Americans are terrified of an
airplane bomber, right? So
let’s see what how much we
can get them to do if we
promise them safety.”
“Like what?”
“I dunno, like let us touch
their genitals and use scan-
ners that show them naked,
stuff like that.”
“No WAY!”
In the three weeks since
the Transportation Security
Administration began its new
scanner/pat-down procedures,
hundreds of people in fact have
protested. Some have reported
to consumer agencies and the
American Civil Liberties Union
that they’ve been touched
aggressively in the genital area.
Others have reported inappro-
priate commentary about their
physiques.
Fair question: Is all this
worth it? What price in dig-
nity and privacy are we will-
ing to pay for the illusion of
safety? It’s not as though fly-
ing is a delightful experience
without sexual harassment.
This Thanksgiving Eve,
some number of unhappy
travelers are planning to dem-
onstrate their opposition to
TSA’s expanded powers by
protesting at security check-in
or by boycotting travel alto-
gether. Reassurances from
TSA, meanwhile, are less
than edifying.
Even though, yes, the scans
essentially reveal your jock
and bra size, inspectors are
sitting elsewhere and don’t
know the human identity of
the exposed corpus.
Nor, we can guess, do they
care. The absence of nudist air-
ports isn’t on many lists of soci-
ety’s regrettable oversights.
Those who wish not to
submit to the body scan,
whether out of modesty or
concerns about radiation
exposure, can submit instead
to intimate frisking. Children
under 12 are given modified
pat-downs, though this isn’t
much comfort. Touching a
13-year-old boy or girl, pos-
sibly the most sensitive crea-
ture on the planet, is supposed
to be just hunky-dory?
In calculating my own
travel plans, I’ve determined
that flying home round trip
for Thanksgiving, I will be
scanned or handled going and
coming. My predisposition at
this writing: I’m just not that
into turkey.
This isn’t merely a matter
of modesty, though that is a
consideration. I don’t like the
idea of some stranger examin-
ing my concessions to grav-
ity without my permission.
Surrendering to rule shouldn’t
be confused with granting
permission. One is submis-
sion; the other an invitation to
mutual consent.
As to the alternative,
no thank you. The idea of
a stranger, even one of the
same sex, foraging around
my private principalities is
simply unacceptable. Forget
the creepiness factor, which is
sufficient; consider the prin-
ciple — quickly! — before
you get used to the notion that
government has the right to
do Whatever Is Necessary To
Protect You.
From what, if not this?
It isn’t at all clear, mean-
while, that such searches
will ensure greater safety.
Theoretically the idea is to
protect us from future would-
be “Christmas bombers.” You
recall the chap who tried to
blow up a plane by igniting
explosive material concealed
in his undies. So now none
of us is entitled to pantaloon
protection.
Heaven forbid the next
inept, would-be terrorist con-
ceals his flammables in his
nether region. Shall soon our
interior caves and corridors
require exploration to ensure
that the system works?
It is further reassuring
to recall that the Christmas
bomber was foiled in his mis-
sion when a fellow passen-
ger tackled him. Whereupon,
Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano announced
that the tackling was evidence
that “the system” works. Ah.
And what happens to these
glorious images of dehuman-
ized Americans once their
bodies are scanned? How
long before we see a montage
of the digitally denuded on
some Web site?
Notwithstanding govern-
ment promises to the contrary,
they may be preserved. Earlier
this year, the U.S. Marshals
Service conceded that some
35,000 images from a scanner
at a security checkpoint at a
Florida courthouse had been
saved.
The TSA insists that
though storage is possible, the
storing feature isn’t activated
when devices are installed at
airports. Small comfort.
But more alarming than the
apparatuses is our willingness
to go lowing into the night.
Incrementally, we adapt to
the stripping of civil liberties
until, with the passage of time
and the blinkering of genera-
tional memory, we no longer
remember when things were
otherwise.

Katheen Parker’s e-mail address
is kathleenparker@washpost.com.
Moderately confused
Al-Quaida promises
more small-scale attacks
Obama to GOP: Don’t hold up treaty
A scan too far
FDA pulls
Darvon over
safety risks
1
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November 22, 2010 The Herald – 5A
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Franklin Elementary
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Nov. 23
Dan Hermiller
Nick Mills
Delaney Deuel
Amanda Bohrer
TODAY
7 p.m. — Ottoville village
council meets at the municipal
building.
Marion Township Trustees
meet at the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Eagles Aerie 471 meets at the
Eagles Lodge.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Area
Simply Quilters meets at the
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce, 306 N. Main St.
Delphos City Council
meets at the municipal build-
ing, 608 N. Canal St.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
Optimists welcome guests, honor member
Above: Dan Maciejewski, left, and Kelly Jenkins of Swartz Contracting were the
guest speakers at a recent Optimist meeting. Maciejewski is an IICRC professional
certified restoration and remodeling contractor. His talk was on the importance of
having flood, storm, fire, etc., damage repaired properly to prevent illness and injury.
Optimist Club President Michael Friedrich, center, thanks them for coming.
Left: Optimist member
Sarah Pohlman was
presented the “Optimist
of the Year” award by
past club president Jay
Metzner. Pohlman designs
and prints T-shirts for
the club’s volleyball and
basketball tournaments.
Photos submitted
Allen County
Museum sets
annual Christmas
Tree Festival
The 38th annual Christmas
Tree Festival will be held at
the Allen County Museum
Dec. 1-5. The theme for this
year’s event is “Christmas
Joy.”
Dozens of decorated
Christmas Trees from com-
munity organizations will
deck the halls of the muse-
um.
The Christmas Tree
Festival was founded in 1972
by the late Helen Mack for the
purpose of providing a tradi-
tional holiday event for all
members of the community.
The event is co-sponsored by
the Church Women United,
YWCA, and the Allen County
Historical Society.
This year’s Christmas Tree
Festival will feature:
• “Evergreen” the talking
Christmas Tree
• Gifts from the Earth
• Instant Photos
• Holiday Boutique
• Pioneer Christmas in the
Log House
• “Christmas in Italy” in
the Children’s Discovery
Center
• Live entertainment sched-
uled throughout each day
• “Finger Print” plaques
for kids
• The Bake Shoppe
• Decorated Victorian
MacDonell House
• Refreshments
• Helen Mack’s Festival
Salt
The festival hours are 10
am. to 5 p.m. Dec. 1, 2 and 4;
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Dec. 3; and
1-5 p.m. Dec. 5., including
the MacDonell House and the
Pioneer Log House.
For more information, call
419-222-9426.
2
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6A – The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By JENNA FRYER
The Associated Press
HOMESTEAD, Fla. —
Denny Hamlin and Kevin
Harvick sat side-by-side in
silence, watching yet another
Jimmie Johnson celebration
play out on television.
One had dominated
the regular season, the
other took charge of the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
Championship.
But in the end, with the
title on the line, neither could
wrest the Sprint Cup from
Johnson’s ironclad grasp.
Johnson withstood the
most serious challenges yet
to his reign atop NASCAR
on Sunday, winning his fifth
consecutive championship in
perhaps the most impressive
fashion. He was challenged
for the first time in years and
had to deliver in the finale at
Homestead-Miami Speedway,
a track that had played host to
four previous coronations for
the best driver of this decade.
“I’m sure Denny is disap-
pointed and Kevin, as well.
Those guys put up a great
fight and when it’s this close,
it’s got to stink,” Johnson
said.
Johnson became the first
driver in the 7-year history
of the Chase to overcome a
points deficit in the season
finale, finishing second to
race winner Carl Edwards. It
made him only the third driver
to overcome a points deficit
in the season’s final race and
win the championship since
1975.
The final margin was 39
points over Hamlin and 41
over Harvick, who finished
third in the race.
So despite all the wins —
53 of them over nine seasons
— and all the celebrations,
this one at Homestead-Miami
Speedway was obviously very
different. Usually so calm
and workmanlike behind the
wheel, Johnson was exuberant
as he crossed the finish line,
pumping his fists in the car
while screaming “this is unbe-
lievable!” over and over.
“I’ve always told you the
first championship, the first
win, that stuff has meant the
most to me. This one, I think
this takes the lead,” Johnson
said. “It’s not that the other
Chases weren’t competitive.
We were stronger in the previ-
ous two Chases, at least, but
this one, I am just so proud.”
Maybe because for the first
time since his reign began in
2006, Johnson and the No. 48
Hendrick Motorsports team
seemed vulnerable. Harvick
was the most consistent
driver of the 26-race “regu-
lar season” and Hamlin, with
a series-best eight wins this
year, was the popular pick to
dethrone Johnson.
Hamlin carried a 15-point
lead into the finale but strug-
gled the entire race and turned
Sunday into a battle of which
driver would make the fewest
mistakes.
It ultimately was Johnson,
who overcame a few slow pit
stops by a team that’s been
in the spotlight since crew
chief Chad Knaus benched
his team in the middle of a
race at Texas three weeks ago.
The next day, the crews for
Johnson and teammate Jeff
Gordon were swapped for the
final two races of the year.
The No. 48 team rose above
all the drama, even after a
mid-race stop cost Johnson
five spots.
“I think this year we
showed what this team
is made of,” he said. “At
times this season we didn’t
have the most speed but we
had the most heart.”
Hamlin and his Joe Gibbs
Racing team felt otherwise,
especially as they outperformed
Johnson during the Chase. But
poor fuel mileage last week in
Phoenix kept it tight headed
into Sunday and he had a ter-
rible race when he needed only
a clean run.
Contact with Greg Biffle
very early in the race sent
Hamlin into a spin and dam-
aged the front of his car. He
dropped to 37th by the restart
and had to work all day to fin-
ish 14th.
“We had a great year, we
won the most races that we
ever won, we contended like
we’ve never contended before
and just circumstances took us
out of this one,” Hamlin said.
Harvick, meanwhile, took
the lead on a round of pit
stops with 80 laps to go but
was flagged for speeding as
he entered pit road. It dropped
him to 29th and he was still
upset with the call after the
race.
“I don’t think that penalty
will ever settle in my stom-
ach,” Harvick said, insisting
that “only a handful of peo-
ple” get to see the pit road
speeds. “I won’t ever settle
for that.”
But he wasn’t devastated by
the defeat, pointing to all the
gains made this year by Richard
Childress Racing. A year after
failing to put any cars into the
Chase, RCR had three in the
field and Harvick, winner of
two races, led the points for
most of the regular season.
“It’s a 180 for us,” Harvick
said.
While Harvick could find
the bright spots, Hamlin, sit-
ting next to him at the podi-
um, had a harder time finding
much to be happy about. With
a vacant look and muffled
answers, he vowed to be back
stronger next season.
“My job is to work in the
offseason to do everything I
can to be better and, you know,
I know every year that I am in
the Cup series, I’m going to
be better than I was the previ-
ous year,” Hamlin said. “We’re
going to keep working and go
get them next year.”
As both drivers discussed
their day, Johnson’s champi-
onship celebration was shown
overhead and both drivers
watched portions of the pre-
sentation.
Who could blame them? It
was history.
The fifth title moved
Johnson past Hendrick
Motorsports teammate
Gordon for most titles among
active drivers. He now ranks
third on the career list behind
7-time champions and Hall-
of-Famers Richard Petty and
Dale Earnhardt.
“Finally, finally, after
being able to pull this off,
he’ll get the respect and the
rewards that he deserves,”
Knaus added.
Jimmie Johnson wins 5th
NASCAR title in a row
By LARRY LAGE
The Associated Press
ANN ARBOR, Mich. —
Michigan hopes to spoil Ohio
State’s plans to win a seventh
straight game in the rivalry
known as The Game,
and at least a share
of a record-tying sixth
straight Big Ten title.
“It would be great,”
linebacker Obi Ezeh
said. “It would be
awesome.”
It’s probably unlikely.
The Wolverines will be
overmatched Saturday, espe-
cially on defense, against a
powerhouse program on the
road.
Soon after the Buckeyes ral-
lied from a seven-point deficit
in the fourth quarter to win at
Iowa on Saturday, their atten-
tion shifted to Michigan.
“Everybody in the lock-
er room after the game was
amped,” Ohio State tight end
Reid Fragel said. “We could
have played another
game right after this, it
felt like.
“It’s a positive in
every way and we’re
looking forward to
beating Michigan.”
Coach Jim Tressel has
made beating Michigan his
primary focus since he was
hired and he’s lost only one
of nine matchups — in 2003
against former Michigan coach
Lloyd Carr.
After the emotional win
over the Hawkeyes, Tressel
hoped his players could cel-
ebrate it longer.
“I wish they had time to
enjoy it but they don’t because
we got the biggest game of
all,” Tressel said.
The stakes are not as high for
Michigan (7-4, 3-4) as they are
for the Buckeyes (10-1, 6-1),
who are in a first-place tie in
the conference with Michigan
State and Wisconsin.
The Wolverines are relegat-
ed to playing the role of spoiler
against the Buckeyes. Again.
Unlike the first two years
under Rich Rodriguez, though,
Michigan is bowl-eligible and
has a chance to improve its
postseason positioning if it
can pull off one of the bigger
upsets of the storied series.
“You always say all the
games mean the same but this
one means a little bit more,”
Wolverines tight end Kevin
Koger said.
Michigan’s last game — the
home finale for its seniors —
had significance but it didn’t
seem to make a difference for
a team that dug a 24-0 hole in
the first half against Wisconsin
and lost 48-28.
Rodriguez is relying on a
lot of freshman on defense
but insisted that doesn’t make
the upcoming task in the
Horseshoe more daunting.
“It’s a challenge anyway;
that’s a talented team at a
tough place to play,” he added.
“We’re going to have to have
a few more guys grow up in
a hurry.”
BUCKEYES BUZZ: With
three teams still tied for first place in
the Big Ten, the subject of the confer-
ence’s tie-breaker is understandably a
hot topic these days. Here’s a revised
look at a recent Periscope note.
Michigan State, Ohio State and
Wisconsin are all tied with identical
records of 10-1 overall and 6-1 in
conference play. The Spartans play at
Penn State (7-4, 4-3), Ohio State hosts
Michigan (7-4, 3-4) and Wisconsin
hosts Northwestern (7-4, 3-4).
It’s important to point out that
every team that ends the year atop
the Big Ten standings is still consid-
ered a champ. But the conference’s
automatic representative to the Bowl
Championship Series is determined
by a tie-breaker.
Here are the points to consider:
— Unless playing in the BCS title
game, the conference champion will
play in the Rose Bowl.
— If three teams tie and if one
team defeated the others, then it is
the representative. (Since Michigan
State and Ohio State did not meet in
the Big Ten’s revolving schedule, this
does not apply.) If two of the teams
defeated the third, then that third team
is eliminated and the representative
is determined based on the 2-team
tie-breaker. (Again, does not apply.)
If the 3-team stalemate is still not
broken, then the best overall winning
percentage decides it, followed by the
highest BCS ranking. This final point
favors Wisconsin, followed by Ohio
State and then Michigan State.
— Should one of the co-leaders
lose this week, then we’ve got two
champions. In case of a 2-way tie for
the Big Ten title, the winner of the
game between the teams is the confer-
ence representative to the BCS bowl.
For the record, MSU beat Wisconsin
and didn’t play Ohio State, while the
Buckeyes lost to Wisconsin.
— After that, it comes down to
whichever team has the better win-
ning percentage in all games (but that
doesn’t apply since any tied teams
would have the same records over-
all). The final tie-breaker is that the
representative will be the highest-
ranked Big Ten team in the final
BCS standings. Again, that favors
Wisconsin, followed by Ohio State
and then Michigan State.
— There is no provision for the
old way of breaking the tie based on
which team has most recently been to
the Rose Bowl (or any other bowl).
QUOTE OF THE DAY: Coach
Jim Tressel, on QB Terrelle Pryor’s
play at Kinnick Stadium Saturday in
Ohio State’s 20-17 win over Iowa:
“The score wasn’t wonderful there
for a moment. So he had a lot of
adversity. To handle all of that is key
to playing that position. You have to
put it behind you. If you threw it to
the wrong place or he broke to the
wrong place or whatever, that’s over.
What are we gonna do to get ready? I
thought that was great experience for
him and all of us.”
SPEWING MUSIC AND
POISON: It’s not rivalry week
around the state without another
appearance by a band that is forgot-
ten the other 51 weeks of the year,
those hatemongers of rock, the Dead
Schembechlers. They’ll headline the
annual “Hate Michigan Rally” on
Friday at Skully’s Music-Diner in
Columbus. Doors open at 7 p.m. Cost
is $12 or $15 the day of the show.
Bring your ear plugs, suckers.
Ohio State aims for 7th straight win over Michigan
Racer men win, Lady Racers fall
The University of Northwestern
Ohio men’s basketball team grabbed
an 84-78 victory over Miami
University-Middletown at Timken
Gymnasium in Wooster Saturday.
The Lady Racers lost a 6-point
halftime lead and dropped a
76-71 decision at “The Garage”
to 20th-ranked Indiana University-
Southeast.
The Racer men (1-3) took the
lead for good at the 15:44 mark
of the first half on a layup by
Todd Watkins (assist to Ottoville’s
Brandon Miller; 6 assists, 10 boards)
and began to steadily build their
lead. When D.J. Quarles (10 points)
hit a 3-pointer with 8:44 left in the
half, UNOH had its biggest spread
of the half at 31-13 before settling
for a 38-24 halftime margin.
It was more of the same in
the second half as the Racers held
a double-digit lead most the way,
with the largest being 46-24 on a
layup by Wes Gelhaus (11 boards)
— again assisted by Miller. A late
run by Miami (2-4) got them within
78-72 on two free throws by Don
Houser (15 markers) with 43 sec-
onds to go, as well as a last-second
3-ball by Dexter Robinson (15
markers, 3 assists).
UNOH shot 29-of-60 from the
floor (9-20 on 3s) for 48.3 percent
and 17-of-22 at the line (77.3%).
Jake Bolyard led the scoring with
23 markers, while Kyle Gillette
added 14 and Spencerville’s Isaac
Bowers netted 10 (4 assists). They
outrebounded Miami 41-36 (11-14
offensive); had 19 assists (13 for
Miami); 17 turnovers to 15 for the
visiting team on the scoreboard (with
7 steals vs. 11 for Miami); commit-
ted 17 fouls (19 for their foe); and
four blocks (2 for Miami).
Jack Jackson (7 boards) and
Quentin Cooper tacked on 12 points
each and Alex Arthur 10 for Miami,
who canned 29-of-71 from the floor
(6-22 on treys) for 40.8 percent and
14-of-17 at the line (82.4%).
In Lima, the Lady Racers built
up as much as a 14-point lead —
28-14 on a jumper by Amanda
Henry with 6:47 to go in the half
— before IU whittled that down to
32-27 by the end of the half.
Southeast kept up that run in the
second half and finally took the lead
for good 54-52 on a 3-pointer by
Alden Krausse with 12:08 left. They
then built up a lead of as much as
76-60 on a jumper by Lauren Brim
(12 counters, 3 steals) with 2:40 to
go before a late UNOH run got it
down to the final margin.
Lady Racer Amanda Francis
(20 markers, 3 assists) scored her
1,000th point with 5 seconds left in
the game. She is the first ever Lady
Racer to reach the club.
IU canned 28-of-60 shots (7-16
downtown) for 46.7 percent and
13-of-16 singles (81.3%). Ashmere
Woods led the scoring with 19,
Whitney Duncan 15 (5 assists) and
Megan Murphy 13 (4 assists). They
grabbed 30 boards (9 offensive) as
Murphy had six. They totaled 15
miscues, 14 fouls, 9 steals and one
block in improving to 3-3.
For UNOH (3-4), they counted
27-of-59 shots (7-20 triples) for
45.8 percent and 10-of-16 at the
stripe (62.5%). Tara Olberding also
scored 20 markers. They grabbed
39 caroms (16 offensive) as Molly
French had eight (3 steals). They
piled up 16 assists, eight steals, five
blocks, 12 fouls and 21 turnovers.
MEN
VISITORS: Miami Univ.
Middletown 2-4
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Don Houser 5-13 2-8 3-4 15, Alex
Arthur 5-14 1-7 1-1 12, Lamar Mallory
3-6 0-0 0-0 6, Dexter Robinson 5-11 2-3
3-4 15, Anthony Hillsman 0-1 0-0 2-2 2,
Stephen Brown 0-0 0-0 0-0 0, William
Rippley 1-3 0-0 0-0 2, Quentin Cooper
4-5 0-0 4-4 12, Shawn Robinson 1-7
0-3 0-0 2, Aaron Montgomery 0-0 0-0
0-0 0, Jack Jackson 5-11 1-1 1-2 12.
Totals 29-71 6-22 14-17 78.
HOME TEAM: U. of Northwestern
Ohio 1-3
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Isaac Bowers 4-9 2-5 0-0 10, Wes
Gelhaus 3-5 0-0 3-4 9, Jake Bolyard
7-17 4-10 5-6 23, Brandon Miller 1-3 0-0
1-2 3, Kyle Gillette 5-9 0-0 4-4 14, Dustin
Guthrie 2-4 1-1 2-2 7, D.J. Quarles 4-6
2-3 0-0 10, Darko Bucan 2-4 0-1 2-2
6, Todd Watkins 1-2 0-0 0-2 2, Nate
Holloway 0-1 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-60
9-20 17-22 84. Attendance: 455
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Miami Univ.
Middletown........ 24 54 - 78
U. of Northwestern
Ohio....... 38 46 - 84
WOMEN
VISITORS: IU-Southeast 3-3
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Whitney Duncan 6-11 0-1 3-4 15,
Ashmere Woods 7-15 3-3 2-2 19, Alden
Krausse 4-6 1-1 0-0 9, Nicole Holman
1-3 0-1 2-2 4, Megan Murphy 3-8 3-7
4-5 13, Robin Deckard 0-0 0-0 0-0 0,
Kylee Anthony 1-1 0-0 0-0 2, Morgan
Hunsaker 0-2 0-1 0-0 0, Brianne Miles
1-5 0-2 0-0 2, Lauren Brim 5-6 0-0 2-3
12, Kortney Woods 0-3 0-0 0-0 0, Molly
McDaniel 0-0 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 28-60
7-16 13-16 76.
HOME TEAM: Northwestern
Ohio 3-4
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Kelly Warris 0-3 0-2 0-0 0, Molly
French 3-8 0-4 0-0 6, Alexa Kennedy
2-5 1-3 0-1 5, Deonica Jones 2-3 0-0
0-0 4, Amanda Francis 7-15 1-3 5-8 20,
Shaye Warman 0-1 0-1 1-2 1, Amanda
Henry 3-8 0-0 2-2 8, Tara Olberding
7-9 4-6 2-2 20, Ashley Rothney 2-5
0-0 0-1 4, Jenna Blackburn 0-0 0-0 0-0
0, 30 Rebecca Puckett 1-2 1-1 0-0 3.
Totals 27-59 7-20 10-16 71.
Officials: Jay Marcotullio, Delonda
Little, Mike Dunlap. Attendance: 96
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
IU-Southeast........... 30 46 - 76
Northwestern Ohio. 36 35 - 71
-----
Lady Beavers even
mark on late 3
BLUFFTON — The Bluffton
University women’s basketball
team knocked off Albion College
on Saturday in the consolation game
of the 2010 Tip-Off Tournament
thanks to a last-second 3-pointer from
Brittany Stegmaier (Garfield/Trinity)
which broke the tie. Stegmaier’s
35-footer off the glass helped the
Beavers improve to 1-1 while the
Britons dropped to 0-3.
Junior Brittany Lewis (Springfield/
Shawnee) sparked the Bluffton offense
with a layin just 17 seconds into the
game. A Stegmaier triple put the
Beavers up 5-0 before the Britons
could respond. At the 14:39 mark, a
pair of Albion freebies put the visitors
up by one.
However, Bluffton reacted with
force as senior Kim Miller (Delphos/
St. John’s) found an open Rachel
Daman (Defiance/Tinora) for the
jumper. A trey from Daman and a
Miller layin quickly gave the Beavers
a cushion for the rest of the half.
Junior guard Alicia Amis (Woodstock/
Mechanicsburg) drained a triple, giv-
ing Bluffton an eight-point advantage
at half time (47-39).
Stegmaier opened the second half
with a layin to increase the Beavers’
advantage to 10 and Bluffton remained
in control through most of the second
half. At the 3:02 mark, Albion’s Brett
de Bear hit a jumper to bring the
Britons within two, but Stegmaier con-
nected from behind the arc to squelch
the quick transition.
With seven seconds left on the
clock, Albion made a free throw to pull
the visitors within one. On the second
free throw, a Briton offensive board
and Bluffton foul allowed Autumn
Haggadone to go to the charity stripe
where she tied the game 68-68.
Following a Haggadone miss on her
chance to give Albion the lead, Miller
found an open Brittany Stegmaier at
half court. Stegmaier dribbled three
times and banked the shot from down-
town, giving the Beavers their first
victory, 71-68, of the 2010-11 season
over Albion College.
Miller, who was named to the
Bluffton Tip-Off All-Tournament
Team for her efforts over the weekend,
led the Beavers with 19 points, eight
rebounds, seven assists, three steals
and a block. She finished the tourney
with 38 points, 14 boards, 11 assists
and seven steals. Stegmaier, Daman,
and Amis all bucketed 14 points in the
contest with Stegmaier collecting four
caroms and dishing out three assists.
Daman added three assists and picked
up four steals for the Beavers.
Melissa Shaw paced the Britons
with 21 points, seven boards, four
steals and three assists. For her
efforts, Shaw was named to the All-
Tournament Team. Center Patty Rewa
produced 18 points and eight rebounds
while teammate Kelsey Effner chipped
in 10 markers for Albion.
From the field, Albion hit 25-of-50
for 50 percent while Bluffton made
24-of-52 (46.2 percent). The Beavers
were 10-of-19 (52.6 percent) from
behind the arc, compared to 6-of-16
(37.5 percent) for the visitors. Albion
outshot the home team at the charity
stripe with 85.7 percent accuracy (12-
of-14), while Bluffton hit only 13-of-
21 (61.9 percent). The Beavers had
16 turnovers while forcing 23 miscues
from the visitors.
Brescia held off Kenyon in the
finals by a 57-53 count, claiming
the 2010 Bluffton University Tip-Off
Tournament Championship. Standout
guard Brittany Bird claimed MVP hon-
ors while teammate Clarissa Houston
joined her on the All-Tournament
Team. Bird scored 26 points, dished
out seven assists and hauled in six
boards while knocking down 8-of-9
at the stripe in the title game. Kenyon
forwards Kayla Ernst and Morgan
Korinek were also named to the All-
Tournament Team.
The Bluffton University women’s
basketball team will travel to Oberlin
on Wednesday. The game is slated to
start at 7 p.m.
Bluffton men claim
Holiday Inn Tip-Off title
NAPERVILLE, Illinois — The
Bluffton University men’s basketball
team placed four players in double dig-
its during its 87-72 win over Valley City
State College in the Holiday Inn Select
Tip-Off Tournament championship at
North Central College on Saturday,
November 20, 2010. The Beavers
needed just one weekend to equal their
victory total from a year ago as Bluffton
stands 2-0 following their Tip-Off title
at North Central. Valley City State, a
Division II NAIA school from Valley
City, North Dakota, dipped to 3-5 after
going 20-10 and winning the Dakota
Athletic Conference a year ago.
Bluffton fell behind 11-3 at the
13:24 mark before junior captain
Mychal Hill (Plain City/Jonathan
Alder) buried a trey to cut the deficit
to five. Three points from freshman
Dustin Kinn (Alvada/New Riegel) and
a Tyler Neal (Bluffton) triple made it a
one-point game three minutes later.
Valley City State pushed the mar-
gin back to six, but four points from
Kinn and a deep ball by Josh Fisher
(Rockford/Parkway) made the score
23-21 with five minutes to play in the
opening half. Hill and Nate Heckelman
(Norwalk) both converted a pair of
freebies to trim the deficit to a point
and following a Valley City deuce,
Hill and Kinn added chip shots for a
29-28 Bluffton lead with less than two
minutes to play in the period.
Following a Kinn hoop and harm,
the Vikings tallied four points to end
the half with a slim 34-32 lead over
the Beavers. 24 points off the bench
in the first 20 minutes kept Bluffton
in the game as the Beavers scored 12
second chance points and 11 points off
turnovers.
Valley City pushed their advantage
to seven early in the second stanza, but
the Beavers did not wilt under pressure
as Bluffton used a 20-7 run to take
the 52-46 lead at the 13:02 mark. The
Beavers drained four treys during the
spurt, including two by junior guard
Nick Lee (Vanlue/Vanlue).
The Bluffton lead hovered between
two and six points until an old-fashioned
three-point play by freshman Will Pope
(Somerville/Preble Shawnee) made the
score 70-61 at the five-minute mark. Six
Brent Farley (Lima/Shawnee) markers
pushed the lead to 15 (80-65) with 2:41
to play as the Beavers put the game
on ice. Hill and Fisher went 6-of-6 at
the stripe down the stretch to secure
Bluffton’s 87-72 win over the Vikings.
Nine Beavers made their way into
the scoring column, led by Mychal Hill
who hit 12-of-14 at the line en route
to 20 points. Brent Farley, who was
named the Holiday Inn Tournament
Most Valuable Player, finished with
18 points and 14 boards for his sixth
career double-double. He hit 5-of-10
from the field and 8-of-11 at the line
while dishing out two assists. Fisher
tallied 15 points on 3-of-9 shooting
from outside the arc and Dustin Kinn
added 12 points on a perfect 4-of-4
night from the field. Will Pope, who
just missed his first double-double with
eight points and nine rebounds, and
Mychal Hill were also selected to the
All-Tournament Team.
The Beavers hit 23-of-60 from the
field for 38.3 percent, including 8-of-
20 (40 percent) from distance. Bluffton
had a marked advantage at the foul line,
converting on 33-of-43 attempts (76.7
percent), compared to 17-of-20 for the
Vikings. The Beavers wiped the glass
to the tune of a 50-29 white-washing on
the boards, but they turned it over five
more times (12-7) than their opponent.
Bluffton returns to action on
Wednesday when they travel to Hiram
College. The matchup with the Terriers
is slated for 6 p.m.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
1
THE PROFESSIONALS
WINDOWS • ROOFING • SIDING • FENCING
• Garage Doors & Operators • Entrance & Storm Doors
• Wood • Steel • Painting Available • Insulation • Aluminum Railing
• Awnings • Rubber Roofing • Decks • Fence
1034 Westwood Dr.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: (419) 238-9795
Fax: (419) 238-9893
Toll Free: (800) 216-0041
YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE
419-238-9795
S
i
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c
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9
6
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The Quality Door Place
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
YEAR END CLEARANCE!!
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26 HP
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2,499
2
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23 HP
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22 HP
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3,899
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control on all terrain
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deck
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H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
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Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
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2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
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H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
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KOHLER
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COURAGE™ V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
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$
2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
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H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
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26 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COURAGE™ V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
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$
2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
You Bag the Savings
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
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26 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COURAGE™ V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
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$
2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
You Bag the Savings
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
SAVE $100.00
SAVE $200.00
SAVE $100.00
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
hgviolet@bright.net
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COURAGE™ V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
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$
2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
You Bag the Savings
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
SAVE $100.00
SAVE $200.00
SAVE $100.00
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26 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COURAGE™ V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
2,499
2
• 54” heavy-duty twin blade cutting deck
• 12” turning radius
• Welded steel frame
23 HP
1
KOHLER
®
COMMAND
®
V-TWIN OHV ENGINE
Sale Price Only
$
4,199
2
• 54” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck
• Powerful direct-drive shaft
• Heavy-duty cast-iron w/dual grease
fittings
22 HP
1
KAWASAKI
®
FR SERIES V-TWIN
Sale Price Only
$
3,899
2
• Easy-to-use steering wheel with four-wheel steering
• Revolutionary Snychro Steer™ technology gives total
control on all terrain
• 48” heavy-duty triple-blade sloped nose fabricated
deck
We Cut the Prices
You Bag the Savings
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and
handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET LAWN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR
CUB CADET 2010 ZERO-TURN HEAVY-DUTY RIDER
SLTX 1054
GT 2554
Z-Force
®
S 48
SAVE $100.00
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SAVE $100.00
Monday, November 22, 2010 The Herald — 7A
www.delphosherald.com
2010 OHSAA Football Tournaments
- State Semifinal Pairings
Division I - All Games at 7 p.m.
Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted
Region 1 vs. Region 2: 3
Lakewood St. Edward (13-0) vs. 3
Toledo Whitmer (12-1), Massillon Paul
Brown Tiger Stadium
Region 3 vs. Region 4: 2 Hilliard
Davidson (13-0) vs. 8 Huber Heights
Wayne (10-3), Dayton Welcome
Stadium
Division II - All Games at 7:30
p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise
Noted
Region 5 vs. Region 6: 2 Mentor
Lake Catholic (12-1) vs. 5 Maple
Heights (13-0), Solon Stewart Field
Region 7 vs. Region 8: 3
Uniontown Lake (10-3) vs. 4 Trotwood-
Madison (11-2) , Wilbur C Strait Field
at Gahanna Lincoln Stadium
Division III - All Games at 7 p.m.
Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted
Region 9 vs. Region 11: 4 Akron
Buchtel (10-3) vs. 1 Alliance Marlington
(13-0), Canton Fawcett Stadium
Region 10 vs. Region 12: 1
Columbus Bishop Watterson (11-1) vs.
2 Cincinnati Archbishop McNicholas
(11-2), Northmont Good Samaritan
Stadium
Division IV - All Games at 7:30
p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise
Noted
Region 14 vs. Region 13: 3 Orrville
(10-3) vs. 2 Chagrin Falls (12-1),
Medina Ken Dukes Stadium
Region 16 vs. Region 15: 6
Kettering Archbishop Alter (11-2) vs.
3 Columbus Bishop Hartley (11-2),
Piqua Alexander Stadium
Division V - All Games at 7 p.m.
Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted
Region 17 vs. Region 18: 1
Youngstown Ursuline (13-0) vs.
4 Lima Central Catholic (12-1),
Ashland Community Stadium
Region 19 vs. Region 20: 2
Fredericktown (13-0) vs. 5 Coldwater
(10-3), Columbus St. Francis DeSales
Alumni Stadium
Division VI - All Games at 7:30
p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise
Noted
Region 23 vs. Region 21: 1
Shadyside (12-1) vs. 2 Mogadore (13-
0), Steubenville Hardin Stadium
Region 24 vs. Region 22: 2 Sidney
Lehman Catholic (12-1) vs. 1 Delphos
St. John’s (13-0), Wapakoneta
Harmon Field
STATE SEMIFINALS
Nov. 21, 2010
Harris USA Today Computer BCS
Rk Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct Rk Pct Avg Pv
1. Oregon 1 2793 .9800 1 1459 .9892 2 .960 .9764 1
2. Auburn 2 2727 .9568 2 1398 .9478 1 1.000 .9682 2
3. TCU 4 2557 .8972 4 1300 .8814 3 .920 .8995 3
4. Boise St. 3 2619 .9189 3 1341 .9092 5 .830 .8860 4
5. LSU 6 2227 .7814 6 1175 .7966 4 .880 .8193 5
6. Stanford 7 2209 .7751 8 1112 .7539 6 .800 .7763 6
7. Wisconsin 5 2295 .8053 5 1211 .8210 8 .680 .7688 7
8. Ohio St. 8 2131 .7477 7 1116 .7566 9 .640 .7148 9
9. Okla. St. 9 1805 .6333 9 990 .6712 7 .740 .6815 10
10. Michigan St. 10 1797 .6305 10 927 .6285 t12 .560 .6063 12
11. Alabama 11 1783 .6256 11 885 .6000 11 .580 .6019 11
12. Arkansas 12 1589 .5575 12 784 .5315 10 .620 .5697 13
13. Oklahoma 13 1412 .4954 13 733 .4969 14 .520 .5041 14
14. Missouri 16 1176 .4126 16 585 .3966 t12 .560 .4564 15
15. Nebraska 15 1199 .4207 15 614 .4163 15 .490 .4423 8
16. Virg. Tech 14 1322 .4639 14 723 .4902 18 .310 .4213 16
17. Texas A&M 18 936 .3284 18 492 .3336 16 .420 .3607 19
18. So.Carolina 17 1037 .3639 17 577 .3912 17 .320 .3583 17
19. Nevada 19 894 .3137 19 456 .3092 t19 .260 .2943 18
20. Utah 20 495 .1737 22 228 .1546 t19 .260 .1961 23
21. Arizona 21 471 .1653 20 279 .1892 21 .200 .1848 22
22. Florida St. 22 439 .1540 21 243 .1647 24 .070 .1296 25
23. N.C. State 23 330 .1158 23 208 .1410 25 .020 .0923 NR
24. Iowa 24 284 .0996 24 74 .0502 23 .120 .0899 20
25. Miss. St. 25 178 .0625 25 68 .0461 22 .150 .0862 19
———
AH RB CM KM JS PW
1. Oregon 2 2 5 2 2 2
2. Auburn 1 4 1 1 1 1
3. TCU 3 1 2 4 5 3
4. Boise St. 5 3 4 6 7 6
5. LSU 4 5 3 5 3 4
6. Stanford 10 9 6 3 4 5
7. Wisconsin 8 7 12 9 9 10
8. Ohio St. 6 10 10 15 11 9
9. Oklahoma St. 7 8 7 7 10 8
10. Michigan St. 9 11 11 16 15 11
11. Alabama 13 6 14 13 8 12
12. Arkansas 14 15 13 8 6 7
13. Oklahoma 11 14 9 12 16 15
14. Missouri 12 16 8 10 13 13
15. Nebraska 15 12 15 14 12 14
16. Virginia Tech 18 17 17 22 21 17
17. Texas A&M 16 19 16 11 14 16
18. South Carolina 17 18 19 17 18 20
19. Nevada 19 21 18 19 22 19
20. Utah 20 13 20 20 20 18
21. Arizona 24 20 23 18 19 22
22. Florida St. 21 0 21 0 0 24
23. N.C. State 0 25 22 0 0 25
24. Iowa 22 23 25 23 23 23
25. Mississippi St. 25 22 0 21 17 21
———
Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of
the Harris Interactive, USA Today Coaches and Computer polls. Team
percentages are derived by dividing a team’s actual voting points by a
maximum 2,850 possible points in the Harris Interactive Poll and 1,475
possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll.
Six computer rankings are used to determine the overall com-
puter component. The highest and lowest ranking for each team is
dropped and the remaining four are added and divided to produce a
Computer Rankings Percentage. The six computer ranking providers
are Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth
Massey, Jeff Sagarin and Peter Wolfe. Each computer ranking
accounts for schedule strength in its formula.
BCS STANDING LIST
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 9 4 .692 —
New York 6 8 .429 3 1/2
Toronto 5 9 .357 4 1/2
New Jersey 4 9 .308 5
Philadelphia 3 10 .231 6
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 9 3 .750 —
Atlanta 8 5 .615 1 1/2
Miami 8 5 .615 1 1/2
Charlotte 5 8 .385 4 1/2
Washington 4 8 .333 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 7 4 .636 —
Indiana 5 6 .455 2
Cleveland 5 7 .417 2 1/2
Detroit 5 8 .385 3
Milwaukee 5 8 .385 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
New Orleans 11 1 .917 —
San Antonio 11 1 .917 —
Dallas 8 4 .667 3
Memphis 5 9 .357 7
Houston 3 9 .250 8
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 9 4 .692 —
Utah 9 5 .643 1/2
Portland 8 6 .571 1 1/2
Denver 7 6 .538 2
Minnesota 4 10 .286 5 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 12 2 .857 —
Golden State 7 6 .538 4 1/2
Phoenix 6 7 .462 5 1/2
Sacramento 4 8 .333 7
L.A. Clippers 1 13 .071 11
———
Saturday’s Results
Charlotte 123, Phoenix 105
Orlando 90, Indiana 86
Memphis 97, Miami 95
Dallas 98, Atlanta 93
Oklahoma City 82, Milwaukee 81
San Antonio 116, Cleveland 92
Denver 107, New Jersey 103
Utah 103, Portland 94
New York 124, L.A. Clippers 115
Sunday’s Results
Toronto 102, Boston 101
New Orleans 75, Sacramento 71
Detroit 115, Washington 110, OT
L.A. Lakers 117, Golden State 89
Today’s Games
Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
NewOrleans at L.A.Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
NBA
The Associated Press
The Top 25 teams in The
Associated Press college football
poll, with first-place votes in paren-
theses, records through Nov. 20,
total points based on 25 points for
a first-place vote through one point
for a 25th-place vote, and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Oregon (37) 10-0 1,467 1
2. Auburn (13) 11-0 1,430 2
3. Boise St. (10) 10-0 1,394 3
4. TCU 11-0 1,340 4
5. Wisconsin 10-1 1,197 6
6. LSU 10-1 1,192 5
7. Stanford 10-1 1,181 7
8. Ohio St. 10-1 1,086 8
9. Alabama 9-2 972 10
10. Oklahoma St. 10-1 959 12
11. Michigan St. 10-1 929 11
12. Arkansas 9-2 860 13
13. Virginia Tech 9-2 722 14
14. Oklahoma 9-2 652 16
15. Missouri 9-2 638 15
16. Nebraska 9-2 611 9
17. Texas A&M 8-3 575 18
18. So. Carolina 8-3 560 17
19. Nevada 10-1 440 19
20. Arizona 7-3 270 23
21. N.C. State 8-3 240 —
22. Florida St. 8-3 233 —
23. Utah 9-2 213 25
24. Iowa 7-4 101 21
25. Mississippi St. 7-4 95 22
Others receiving votes: N. Illinois
72, West Virginia 26, Tulsa 12,
Hawaii 7, Navy 7, Florida 4, Miami
4, UCF 4, Southern Miss. 3, Penn St.
2, Ohio 1, Oregon St. 1.
AP TOP 25
The Associated Press
The Saints are rolling, yet
making little progress in the
powerful NFC South.
New Orleans won its third
straight game Sunday, beating
Seattle 34-16 as Drew Brees
became the Saints’
all-time completions
leader, throwing for
four touchdowns.
The victory lifted
the defending Super
Bowl champions to
7-3.
All that’s worth is a tie for
the runner-up spot in the divi-
sion with Tampa Bay, which
handed the 49ers their first
home shutout since 1977.
Both teams trail Atlanta
(8-2), which won its fourth in
a row, 34-17 at St. Louis.
Elsewhere Sunday, the
Patriots and Jets remained on
top of the AFC East as New
England edged Indianapolis
31-28 and New York ral-
lied to beat Houston 30-27;
Philadelphia beat the New
York Giants 27-17 for the
NFC East lead; Pittsburgh
and Baltimore still share the
AFC North lead after the
Steelers routed Oakland 35-3
and the Ravens did the same
to Carolina, 37-13; Green
Bay moved back into a tie
with Chicago atop the NFC
North by romping over Brett
Favre and Minnesota 31-3;
Kansas City broke a tie with
Oakland for the AFC West
lead by beating Arizona,
31-13; Jacksonville lifted
itself even with Indianapolis
in the AFC South at 6-4 with
a 24-20 win over Cleveland;
Seattle remained in the NFC
West lead despite the loss
at New Orleans; Washington
beat Tennessee 19-16 in over-
time; Dallas handed Detroit
its 26th straight road loss,
35-19; and Buffalo rallied
past Cincinnati 49-31.
The Bears blanked Miami
16-0 to open the weekend on
Thursday night.
San Diego (4-5) hosts
Denver (3-6) tonight.
Saints 34, Seahawks 16
At New Orleans, Brees
was 29-of-42 for 382 yards
and completed his 1,850th
pass as a Saint to break
a record held by Archie
Manning since 1982. Brees
hit Marques Colston and
Robert Meachem twice each
for TDs.
Matt Hasselbeck was
32-of-44 for 366 yards, the
most yards allowed by New
Orleans’ top-ranked pass-
ing defense this season. But
Seattle (5-5) lost two fumbles
and had four drives end with
field goals.
Falcons 34, Rams 17
At St. Louis, Matt Ryan
threw two touchdown passes
and directed an offense so
dominant that three St. Louis
defenders left with cramps.
Sam Bradford also had
a pair of touchdown passes
and set an NFL rookie record
with 169 consecutive pass-
es without an interception
before William Moore picked
off a shovel pass to end the
Rams’ 4-game home winning
streak. The Rams fell to 4-6.
Buccaneers 21, 49ers 0
Josh Freeman threw for
two touchdowns as Tampa
Bay got its first win at
Candlestick Park since 1980
and only second ever, break-
ing an 8-game losing streak
in San Francisco and drop-
ping the Niners to 3-7.
Ronde Barber made his
40th career interception in
the fourth quarter, most in
Tampa Bay franchise histo-
ry. He also became the first
player in NFL history with 40
interceptions and 25 sacks in
a career.
Patriots 31, Colts 28
The teams met for the
eighth straight season and
Tom Brady guided the
Patriots to a 31-14
lead before 4-time
MVP Manning led
a spirited come-
back. But Manning
was intercepted in
the final moments
for the third time,
by James Sanders
at the New England 6.
Brady not only beat
Manning, the only other quar-
terback of the last decade in
his class, but tied another QB
icon for an NFL mark. Brady
has won 25 straight regular-
season home starts, equaling
Brett Favre’s record when he
was with Green Bay.
While Brady threw only six
incompletions in 25 attempts,
Manning had three intercep-
tions along with four TDs and
396 yards through the air.
Jets 30, Texans 27
Santonio Holmes caught
a 6-yard touchdown pass
from Mark Sanchez with
10 seconds left. After New
York blew a 16-point lead in
the fourth quarter, the Jets
trailed 27-23 with less than
a minute left. But Sanchez
completed two passes to
LaDainian Tomlinson and
then had a pretty 42-yard
pass to Braylon Edwards
with 16 seconds remaining.
On the next play, Sanchez
found Holmes streaking into
the left corner of the end
zone for the winning score.
Holmes’ 37-yard touchdown
catch won it in overtime at
Cleveland last week.
It was another heart-
breaking loss for the Texans
(4-6), who fell last week on
a desperation heave as time
expired at Jacksonville.
Eagles 27, Giants 17
At Philadelphia, LeSean
McCoy ran 50 yards for the
go-ahead score on a fourth-
and-1 late in the fourth quar-
ter.
Michael Vick looked a
little more ordinary after a
spectacular performance in a
59-28 win over Washington
but he led the Eagles (7-3) to
a comeback win.
Eli Manning threw a pair
of touchdown passes to bring
New York (6-4) back from
a 16-3 deficit. But he lost a
fumble after running for a
first down on fourth-and-6
with 2:51 left and the Eagles
recovered. Manning scram-
bled 16 yards and dived
headfirst but the ball came
loose when he hit the ground
untouched and Darryl Tapp
recovered.
Steelers 35, Raiders 3
At Pittsburgh, James
Harrison caused two turn-
overs that Ben Roethlisberger
turned into touchdown pass-
es. Harrison led a defense
that drove Raiders quarter-
back Jason Campbell from
the game and finished with
five tackles, two sacks, an
interception and a forced
fumble. Roethlisberger fin-
ished with three TD passes
and also ran for one.
The Steelers (7-3)
bounced back after being
rolled over by New England
39-26 at Heinz Field last
week. Oakland fell to 5-5
and Raiders defensive end
Richard Seymour was eject-
ed for an openhanded punch
to Roethlisberger’s face as
the Steelers quarterback was
celebrating a TD pass.
Ravens 37, Panthers 13
Joe Flacco threw for 301
yards and a touchdown and
Baltimore’s defense returned
consecutive interceptions for
TDs in the fourth quarter.
The Ravens (7-3) rattled
Carolina’s new quarterback,
Brian St. Pierre, to break
open a surprisingly close
game. With Baltimore lead-
ing 23-13, Ed Reed picked
off St. Pierre, then pitched it
to Dawan Landry for a touch-
down.
On the next play, St.
Pierre was intercepted by
Ray Lewis, who rumbled 24
yards for a score.
St. Pierre, signed by
Carolina (1-9) a little over a
week ago, threw an 88-yard
TD pass to David Gettis to
get the Panthers within a
touchdown.
Packers 31, Vikings 3
At Minneapolis, the Brett
Favre vs. his old team saga
apparently ended — do
we ever know with Favre?
Aaron Rodgers threw for 301
yards, with three of his four
touchdown passes to Greg
Jennings.
The Packers (7-3) kept
pace with the Bears and
ruined any realistic hope
the Vikings (3-7) had left to
give Favre another shot at
a playoff run in his 20th NFL
season.
Chiefs 31, Cardinals 13
At Kansas City, Dwayne
Bowe caught two touchdown
passes, giving him a team-
record six straight games
with at least one score, and
Kansas City (6-4) remained
unbeaten at home. In his
last six games, Bowe has
563 yards receiving and 10
touchdown catches. Thomas
Jones also had two touch-
downs.
The fifth straight loss for
the Cardinals (3-7) dropped
the 2-time defending NFC
West champions 2 1/2 games
behind Seattle.
Jaguars 24, Browns 20
At Jacksonville, Maurice
Jones-Drew followed a
75-yard reception with a
1-yard touchdown dive with
1:16 left as the Jaguars over-
came six turnovers. Jones-
Drew broke four tackles on
a screen pass from David
Garrard and weaved his
way toward the end zone.
Rookie Joe Haden made a
touchdown-saving tackle that
ended up taking precious
seconds off the clock.
Jones-Drew scored two
plays later, giving both teams
dramatic finishes for the sec-
ond time in as many games.
Cleveland (3-7) had a final
chance to win this one but
Sean Considine tipped Colt
McCoy’s pass to Mike Bell
at the goal line. The pass
bounced off Bell’s chest and
landed in Considine’s arms.
Redskins 19, Titans 16 OT
Graham Gano kicked a
48-yard field goal with 8:17
left in overtime at Nashville.
Titans quarterback Vince
Young left the game with an
injured thumb on his throw-
ing hand and was replaced
by rookie Rusty Smith. The
Titans (5-5) lost their third
straight game.
Washington (5-5) snapped
a 2-game skid on a day when
at least seven Redskins went
to the sideline with injuries,
including Clinton Portis with
a re-injured groin.
Gano’s winner was his
fourth field goal of the game.
He also missed two — a
51-yarder to end the first half
and a 47-yard attempt at the
end of regulation that fell
short.
Donovan McNabb was
30-of-50 for 376 yards with
a 5-yard touchdown pass to
Santana Moss.
Cowboys 35, Lions 19
Bryan McCann grabbed
a batted-down punt and
returned it 97 yards for a
touchdown, Miles Austin had
two short touchdown catches
and 38-year-old Jon Kitna
had a career-best 29-yard
TD run for Dallas (3-7).
Cowboys interim coach
Jason Garrett won his home
debut and improved to 2-0
since taking over for Wade
Phillips. It’s the first time all
season Dallas won at home,
having lost the first four.
The Lions (2-8) lost their
26th straight on the road,
extending a woeful NFL
record that began in 2007,
when Kitna was their quar-
terback.
Bills 49, Bengals 31
At Cincinnati, Ryan
Fitzpatrick matched his
career high with four touch-
down passes during Buffalo’s
biggest comeback in 13 years
as the Bills (2-8) won their
second straight game.
Steve Johnson caught
three of the touchdown pass-
es, including an 11-yarder
that put Buffalo ahead 35-31
early in the fourth quarter.
Johnson finished with eight
catches for 137 yards.
The Bengals (2-8)
appeared to be in control
after Johnathan Joseph’s
interception return put them
ahead 28-7 in the second
quarter. The Bengals’ small-
est crowd since 2003 saw a
vintage collapse.
NFC South: the power division
2
ALLEN COUNTY
VETERANS
CENSUS
Dear Allen County Veteran:
The 2010 Federal Census did not ask the person com-
pleting the census if they were a military veteran.
The Allen County Veteran Service Commission would
like to make sure that every veteran living in ALLEN
COUNTY is counted.
WE NEED YOUR HELP
It is important to have an accurate count of all veterans
living in Allen County. This is so we can provide ade-
quate and high quality services to our veterans and their
families.
Please take a moment to complete the following
questionnaire.
RETURN THE FORM or e-mail acvso@allencountyohio.com
TO THE
ALLEN COUNTY VETERANS SERVICE COMMISSION
MIKE NOLTE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
PO BOX 1243
LIMA, OHIO 45802
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.
YOUR ANSWERS ARE CONFIDENTIAL: Please print
Name
Address
Date of birth
Date of service (start)
Date of service (end)
8A – The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
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Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Zenz
Maria Jane Steinemann and Kory Steven Zenz were
united in marriage on Sept. 4 at St. Augustine’s Catholic
Church in Minster, Deacon Hal Belcher officiating.
The bride’s parents are Jim and Jane Steinemann of
Minster. The groom’s parents are Dennis and Patricia Fuge
of Spencerville and Laura Krolak of Delphos.
Nuptial music was provided by vocalist David Barga,
brother-in-law of the bride; and organist/pianist Amy
Noykos.
Maid of Honor was Michelle Barga of Bloomington, Ill.,
sister of the bride.
Bridesmaids were Samantha Schumann, friend of the
bride; Erika Fuge, sister of the groom; Tricia Fuge, sister of
the groom; Jenna Fuge, sister of the groom; Amy Kremer,
friend of the bride; Tara Peters, friend of the bride; and
Allyson Hoops, friend of the bride.
Best man was Peter Jackel of Monroe, Mich., friend of
the groom.
Groomsmen were Jeff Peters, Justin McPheron and Josh
Swift, friends of the groom; John Steinemann, brother of
the bride; and Brian Vorst, Matt Slavin and Derek Coker,
friend of the groom.
The bride’s grandparents are Ed and Marilyn Ahrns and
Charles and Charlene Steinemann, both of Minster. The
groom’s grandparents are Avonelle Burgei of Elida, Harold
and Ineka Fuge of Troy and Alice Ventura of Bloomer.
A reception was held at St. Michael’s Hall in Fort
Loramie following the ceremony. Following a honeymoon
to Chicago, the couple now lives in Findlay.
The bride is a 2005 graduate of Minster High School and
received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in physical
therapy from the University of Findlay. She is employed
by Northwest Ohio Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in
Findlay.
The groom is a 2001 graduate of Spencerville High
School in Spencerville and received his bachelor’s degree
in education from the University of Findlay. He is currently
employed as a seventh-grade intervention specialist at
Jefferson Middle School.
Engagement
Moskal/Wittler
Lt. Col. John and Tammy Moskal of Carmel, Ind.,
announce the engagement of their daughter, Martha Ann,
to Gregory N. Wittler, son of Leroy and Jane Wittler of
Fort Jennings.
The couple will exchange vows on Dec. 18 at St.
Sebastian Catholic Church, Akron.
The bride-elect is a graduate of Purdue University.
Her fiance is a graduate of Bowling Green State
University.
By NEKESA MUMBI
MOODY
The Associated Press
Usher was in tears after
losing two awards at the
American Music Awards to
Justin Bieber, including favor-
ite entertainer of the year, the
top AMA honor.
But Usher wasn’t upset
about his loss — far from it.
Instead, he was welling with
pride over the success of his
young protege, Justin Bieber,
who was the night’s biggest
winner with four awards and
the youngest performer ever
to capture the entertainer
award.
“To see Justin take the
award — having received that
award before — it was like
an out of body experience,
you understand?” Usher said
backstage. “It was emotional.
I don’t cry that often, but I
did. Hopefully it gives an
indication of how hard we
worked to build a career that
hopefully will flourish and
blossom over the years.”
Bieber, who is signed to
Usher’s label, had a perfect
debut at the American Music
Awards, winning all four
awards he was nominated
for: entertainer of the year,
breakthrough artist of the
year, favorite pop/rock male
and favorite pop/rock album
for “My World 2.0.”
Bieber’s debut album is
one of the year’s top-sellers,
with almost two million sold,
and he’s got a new CD, “My
Worlds Acoustic.” His ascen-
sion marks a phenomenal rise
since first garnering atten-
tion via homemade videos on
YouTube about three years
ago.
“This means the world to
me,” said Bieber after win-
ning breakthrough artist. “I
come from the smallest town
in the world, of like 30,000
people; I never thought this
was possible.”
Bieber bested mentor
Usher and Eminem for two
of his wins. Eminem, whose
“Recovery” was a critical
and commercial triumph, was
nominated for five awards on
the evening, tying him with
Lady Antebellum, who also
had a breakthrough year with
their near triple-platinum
album “Need You Now.”
Neither were the night’s
big winners, but they came
away from the night with
something: Eminem got two
awards, while the country trio
won favorite country band,
duo or group.
Other winners included
Black Eyed Peas and Taylor
Swift. But Sunday’s ceremo-
ny at the Nokia Theatre in
Los Angeles was as much a
showcase for acts with new
albums as it was a celebra-
tion of the biggest achievers
of 2010. While some of the
night’s winners will likely be
nominees when next week’s
Grammys are announced,
the American Music Awards
aren’t so much a predictor of
the Grammys is it is a party
for the industry’s mainstream
acts.
Rihanna, with her hair
dyed a ruby red, gave the
show a colorful and sexy
start, performing a medley of
songs from her just released
album “Loud,” including the
No. 1 hit “What’s My Name,”
wearing a bustier and what
seemed like a scarf wrapped
around her backside.
“This is amazing!” said
an exuberant Rihanna, who
danced onstage later to
receive her award — favorite
soul/R&B female.
The Black Eyed Peas,
winners for favorite pop/rock
band, gave a levitating per-
formance, singing from boxes
atop the stage during part of
their performance of their
new single, “The Time.” Kid
Rock gave a stirring, acous-
tic performance of “Times
Like These,” his song lifting
up his hometown of Detroit
during its recent economic
struggles, from his new CD,
“Born Free.”
A pregnant Pink was
among the evening’s per-
formance highlights. Unlike
recent performances marked
by a high-wire act, she stayed
close to the ground to per-
form her latest song, “Raise
Your Glass,” with a tightly
choreographed, high-energy
dance number.
Swift, last year’s artist of
the year, took home favor-
ite country female. Sporting
sleek blonde hair instead of
her usual cascading curls,
Swift said simply: “I just
want to thank the fans.”
Bieber wins
4 AMAs,
including
artist of year
BY DAVID GERMAIN
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — Harry
Potter has cast his biggest
box-office spell yet with a
franchise record $125.1 mil-
lion domestically over open-
ing weekend, according to
studio estimates Sunday.
“Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 1”
also added $205 million in 54
overseas countries, bringing
the film’s worldwide total to
$330.1 million.
In terms of domestic rev-
enue, “Deathly Hallows:
Part 1” came in ahead of the
series’ best previous debut
of $102.7 million for 2005’s
“Harry Potter and the Goblet
of Fire.”
But factoring in today’s
higher admission prices, the
latest movie had roughly the
same size audience as the
franchise’s best previous
draws — “Goblet of Fire”
and 2001’s “Harry Potter and
the Sorcerer’s Stone,” which
launched the series. “Deathly
Hallows” and those two ear-
lier movies each sold around
16 million tickets in their first
weekend.
Overseas markets for
“Deathly Hallows” were led
by a $28 million opening in
Great Britain, $21.8 million
in Germany, $14.8 million
in Australia, $14 million in
Japan and $12.3 million in
Russia.
The movie audience
has grown up along with
young wizard Harry (Daniel
Radcliffe) and his friends
Hermione (Emma Watson)
and Ron (Rupert Grint).
Distributor Warner Bros.
reported that 25 percent of the
audience for the new movie
was between 18 and 34, com-
pared with only 10 percent
for “Sorcerer’s Stone” nine
years ago.
“When we started ‘Harry
Potter,’ basically, the audi-
ence was driven to theaters
by their parents. Today, those
same kids are driving to the
midnight shows themselves,”
said Dan Fellman, head of
distribution for Warner Bros.
DreamWorks Animation’s
“Megamind,” the No. 1 movie
the previous two weekends,
fell to second-place with $16.2
million, raising its three-week
total to $109.5 million.
Russell Crowe’s thriller
“The Next Three Days,” the
weekend’s only other new
wide release, debuted weakly
at No. 5 with $6.8 million.
Crowe plays a college instruc-
tor who plots a jail break
to free his wife (Elizabeth
Banks) after she’s convicted
of murder.
Playing in 4,125 the-
aters domestically, “Deathly
Hallows: Part 1” averaged an
enormous $30,332 a cinema.
That compared with a $2,633
average in 2,564 theaters for
“The Next Three Days.”
The huge opening bodes
well for next July’s “Deathly
Hallows: Part 2,” the eighth
and final movie based on
J.K. Rowling’s seven “Harry
Potter” novels. The franchise
so far has taken in more than
$5.5 billion worldwide.
Warner Bros. plans to
release “Deathly Hallows:
Part 2” in 3-D, which should
give it a big box-office boost,
since theaters charge a few
dollars more to see movies
projected in 3-D compared
with 2-D.
Hollywood poised for big
business over Thanksgiving
‘Harry Potter’ leaps to
$125.1M debut weekend
Revenues should remain
strong for “Harry Potter,”
while studios are delivering a
broad range of newcomers with
Disney’s animated musical
“Tangled,” featuring the voice
of Mandy Moore; Sony’s song-
and-dance tale “Burlesque,”
starring Christina Aguilera
and Cher; 20th Century Fox’s
romance “Love & Other
Drugs,” with Jake Gyllenhaal
and Anne Hathaway: and CBS
Films’ action thriller “Faster,”
featuring Dwayne Johnson.
Estimated ticket sales for
Friday through Sunday at U.S.
and Canadian theaters, accord-
ing to Hollywood.com.
Final figures will be released
today.
1. “Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 1,”
$125.1 million.
2. “Megamind,” $16.2 mil-
lion.
3. “Unstoppable,” $13.1
million.
4. “Due Date,” $9.2 mil-
lion.
5. “The Next Three Days,”
$6.8 million.
6. “Morning Glory,” $5.2
million.
7. “Skyline,” $3.4 million.
8. “Red,” $2.5 million.
9. “For Colored Girls,” $2.4
million.
10. “Fair Game,” $1.5 mil-
lion.
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By RANDOLPH
E. SCHMID
The Associate Press
WASHINGTON — Think
you know it all when it comes
to sex?
Well, a majority of the
baby boomers think they’ve
learned just about all there
is to know on the subject
— and more women than
men are confident of their
knowledge — according
to a new Associated Press-
LifeGoesStrong.com poll.
Among people aged 45
to 65, 59 percent of women
think they know all about sex,
while just 48 percent of men
share that confidence level.
“I don’t think a single per-
son in the whole world knows
all there is about sex,” com-
mented Debby Herbenick
of the Center for Sexual
Health Promotion at Indiana
University.
“Women historically have
more resources,” to learn
about sex, noted Jennifer
Bass, director of commu-
nications at the Kinsey
Institute for Sex, Gender and
Reproduction.
Herbenick agreed that
women use their friends to
talk about sex more than men
do and are more likely to see
a counselor or therapist.
Finding sexual pleasure
can be more of a learning
process for women, she said,
“women are just more like-
ly to discuss sex in a real
way with friends and other
women.”
But, Herbenick added, the
response also raises questions
about why people think they
know all they need to.
“Does it mean sex is not
as interesting as it used to be,
is it a lack of interest,” she
asked, “have they lost opti-
mism about the future of their
sex lives?”
The new poll also found
that among those aged 45 to
55, nearly half the men — 48
percent — complained that
their partners don’t want to
have sex as often as they
do, while just 13 percent of
women in that age group say
the same.
“Men certainly do tend
to have higher sex drives,
as a whole,” Herbenick said,
though she noted that some
women also have quite high
sex drives.‘
At that age, she pointed
out, women tend to be going
into menopause, which can
have marked impacts on their
sex lives, having hot flashes
and feeling tired.
There’s less disagreement
between the sexes between
55 and 65, with majorities of
both men and women saying
couples can have a strong
relationship without sexual
activity. Some 59 percent of
men at that age, and 69 per-
cent of women, agreed with
that.
The AP-LifeGoesStrong
poll also found that overall,
28 percent of men and 21
percent of women in the baby
boom generation are dissat-
isfied with their sex lives.
That is similar to the findings
of other surveys, Herbenick
said.
Other findings of the poll
include:
— Among age groups,
baby boomers are the unhap-
piest with their sex lives.
Some 24 percent say they’re
dissatisfied, compared with
12 percent of 18-29 year olds,
20 percent of 30-44 year olds
and 17 percent of those over
65.
— A majority of female
boomers — 56 percent — say
their sex drive has decreased
as they have gotten older,
compared with 46 percent of
men.
— Seventy-two percent of
men aged 45-65 have fanta-
sized about having sex with
someone other than their
sexual partner at the time,
compared with 48 percent of
women.
— Among married boom-
ers, 62 percent said they had
had sex for the first time
with a partner other than their
first spouse, while 35 percent
said their first spouse was
also their first sexual partner.
Fourteen percent said they
had sex for the first time with
their first spouse, but not until
after they were married.
— More baby boom men,
73 percent, than women, 54
percent, said their first sexual
partner was someone other
than their first spouse. Just 15
percent of women over age
65 said they had sex for the
first time with someone other
than their first spouse, while
54 percent of men over 65
said their first partner wasn’t
their first spouse.
The AP-LifeGoesStrong.
com Poll of the boomer gen-
eration about sex and rela-
tionships was conducted Oct.
1-10, by Knowledge Networks
of Menlo Park, Calif. It
involved online interviews
with 945 adults between the
ages of 45 and 65, as well as
companion interviews with
an additional 587 adults of
other age groups, ages 18-44
and over 65 years of age. The
survey has a margin of sam-
pling error of plus or minus
3.5 percentage points for all
adults, 3.9 percentage points
for adults ages 45-65.
The survey was conducted
using KnowledgePanel, which
uses a probability-based
design. Respondents to the
survey were first selected ran-
domly for KnowledgePanel
using phone or mail sur-
vey methods and were later
interviewed for this survey
online. People selected for
KnowledgePanel who didn’t
otherwise have access to
the Internet were provided
with the ability to access the
Internet at no cost to them.
AP Poll: Baby boomers
are sexually-confident
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
The morgue is about the last
place you would think of to
go shopping, so it’s perhaps
unsurprising that sales at Los
Angeles County’s coroner gift
store are next to dead.
Tucked as unobtrusively as
possible in a closed-door room
off the coroner’s lobby, the
store is jam-packed with mor-
tality-mocking merchandise:
Water bottles marked “bodily
fluids,” boxer shorts dubbed
“undertakers,” toe tags, crime-
scene tape and beach towels
bearing the county coroner’s
trademarked symbol of a body
outline.
Trouble is, few people
know about the tongue-in-
cheek store and its related
website, “Skeletons in a
Closet.” The shop’s biggest
customers? No shock here —
homicide detectives.
“Most people know it
through word-of-mouth,” said
Craig Harvey, the depart-
ment’s chief of operations.
“But we are mentioned in
guidebooks and we get tour-
ists.”
County auditors, however,
say given the unique nature of
the trinkets — the department
is believed to be the nation’s
only coroner with a trade-
marked merchandise line —
the 17-year-old business could
be a moneymaker if infused
with marketing lifeblood.
They recommend the coro-
ner hire an outside firm with
an eye to marketing the mer-
chandise in high-traffic tour-
ist areas, such as Hollywood
Boulevard and Los Angeles
International Airport.
Harvey is first to admit the
merchandise has potential. It
just hasn’t been a priority for a
department that prides itself as
one of the top forensic science
units in the country, as well as
the busiest.
“There is a mystique about
the LA County coroner, some-
thing people identify with.
People want to know what we
do and how we do it,” Harvey
said. “We can do government
services very well, but busi-
ness is another thing.”
A management audit
released earlier this year
found the store’s losses totaled
$270,000 from 2003 to 2008,
and was in effect being sub-
sidized through surplus funds
from a drunken driving edu-
cational program.
Noting that retailing is not
part of a coroner’s mission,
Harvey said the department is
open to expanding the opera-
tion but is awaiting a forth-
coming fiscal review from the
county controller-auditor to
develop a plan.
At one point, the depart-
ment contracted a company
to market the items in Japan,
but the project was dead soon
after arrival — with little con-
sumer interest, Harvey said.
The department hasn’t sought
new ventures since.
Still, marketing opportu-
nity is clearly there, given the
department’s unrivaled profile
in a largely unheralded field.
Over the decades, some of
the world’s most captivating
morbid mysteries have played
out under the prying scalpels
of Los Angeles pathologists.
There are the deaths of
the famous such as Michael
Jackson, Marilyn Monroe and
James Dean; killings that led
to charges against the famous
such as O.J. Simpson, Robert
Blake and Phil Spector; and
the victims whose killers
became famous such as the
Menendez brothers, Charles
Manson, and the victim her-
self, the Black Dahlia.
Numerous TV shows have
added to the cachet, includ-
ing the long-running 1976-
83 drama “Quincy M.E.,” in
which Jack Klugman played a
curmudgeonly crime-solving
coroner, and the more recent
documentary-style “North
Mission Road,” named for the
department’s street location.
“There’s a definite interest
in this,” said Scott Michaels,
who owns Dearly Departed
Tours, which offers tours of
LA’s celebrated death land-
marks. “Every other store
along Hollywood Boulevard
has LAPD and LAFD T-shirts.
The LA coroner would be a
natural.”
The store has always been
somewhat of a barebones oper-
ation. It evolved from a few
coffee mugs and T-shirts the
department had printed up to
use as giveaways at conferenc-
es. Then people started request-
ing them and the department
opened a small shop in a supply
closet in 1993.
A following developed for
the items that poke fun at
death — there’s nothing gory
or bloody — and it landed in
tourist guidebooks as a stop
for unique souvenirs.
Tour buses stop there
and tourists do seek it out.
However, the shop’s success
has been limited by its loca-
tion on the eastside of down-
town Los Angeles amid a
grimy strip of auto-glass busi-
nesses. The shop lacks a sign
outside the coroner’s office, a
red-brick, century-old former
hospital.
Morgue’s gift shop sales near death
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10 A– The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
Superman’s biological mother was Lara Lor-Van. She
was a librarian on the planet Krypton.
A tiny listening device was found hidden beneath
the beak of the bald eagle in a carving of the Great Seal
of the United States that had been hanging on the wall
behind the American ambassador’s desk at his residence
in Moscow since 1945. The carving was presented as a
token of friendship by a group of Soviet children.
Today’s questions:
James Joyce wrote “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young
Man; who wrote “Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man?”
What was the average life expectancy of Americans
born in 1935, the year Social Security was established?
Answers in Tuesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Aleatory: pertaining to or relying on chance
Roral: dewy
Pilots get OK to skip
stepped-up airport screening
By DAVID KOENIG and JOAN LOWY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Pilots are getting a break from enduring
the stepped-up and intrusive screening of airline passengers that’s
causing a public outcry.
Days before the Thanksgiving holiday travel period,
Transportation Security Administration chief John Pistole offered
little hope of a similar reprieve for regular passengers.
The agency agreed on Friday to let uniformed airline pilots
skip the body scans and aggressive pat-downs. Pilots must pass
through a metal detector at airport checkpoints and present photo
IDs that prove their identity.
The change followed a 2-year lobbying campaign by union
leaders, their efforts boosted by hero pilot Chesley Sullenberger,
who said pilots should be treated as “trusted partners” in the fight
against terrorism.
Complaints from Sullenberger, who landed a passenger jet in
the Hudson River in January 2009, and others gave weight to the
movement to roll back the new measures.
Some activists are urging travelers to refuse to go through full-
body scanners, which produce a virtually naked image.
If a loosely organized Internet campaign succeeds, security
lines at airports could be snarled. Those who refuse a body scan
can be forced to undergo time-consuming fingertip examinations,
which include clothed genital areas and breasts, by inspectors of
the same sex as the traveler.
American Airlines pilot Sam Mayer said such screening for
pilots makes little sense.
A pilot intent on terrorism could simply crash the plane. No
amount of imaging at the security checkpoint could stop that.
Besides, under another government program to make them the
last line of defense against terrorists, pilots are allowed to have
guns in the cockpit.
The changes promised by TSA are “basically what we’ve
been after,” Mayer said. “Pilots are not the threat here; we’re the
target.”
Mayer’s union, the Allied Pilots Association, helped foment
the backlash against the security measures two weeks ago. Its
president, Dave Bates, urged pilots to skip the imaging machines
because of concern about frequent radiation exposure. The gov-
ernment and an independent group of experts say radiation is
safe, as long as radiation doses are kept within the low limits set
for the scanners.
Bates recommended that pilots instead accept a pat-down —
preferably where passengers couldn’t see them.
John Prater, president of the Air Line Pilots Association, which
represents pilots at several major airlines, said the unions have
been negotiating the changes with TSA for two years. He said
changes were in the works, but were speeded up by the backlash
against the new imaging machines and searching techniques.
The TSA offered few details — and no specific timeline — for
changes in screening of pilots, which expand a program tested at
airports in Baltimore, Pittsburgh and Charlotte, N.C.
The TSA said that beginning Friday, pilots traveling in uni-
form or on airline business could pass security by presenting two
photo IDs, one from their company and one from the govern-
ment, to be checked against a secure flight crew database. Their
unions said pilots could skip the pat-downs immediately.
Pistole said pilots ensure the safety of millions of passengers
every day, and that putting them through a faster screening pro-
cess would be a more efficient use of the agency’s resources. But
he has defended the more invasive inspections of passengers, say-
ing they were a response to intelligence about potential terrorist
attacks and plots to evade airport security.
Homeland security officials were alarmed last Christmas
when a terrorist with a bomb in his underwear got on a flight to
Detroit. He failed to detonate the explosives. Last month, terror-
ists tried mailing bombs hidden in ink cartridges and shipping
them on planes as cargo.
Some lawmakers who are feeling heat from voters have called
for a review of the TSA procedures.
The government could ease concerns through different tech-
nology. The TSA is testing a new body scanner that produces
stick-figure images instead of pictures of the traveler’s naked
body.
By MARY CLARE JALONICK
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — African-American farmers and Native
Americans who say the United States discriminated against
them and took their money for decades are a step closer to
winning long-awaited government settlements.
Under legislation passed by the Senate on Friday, African-
American farmers who claim discrimination at the hands of
the Agriculture Department would receive almost $1.2 billion.
American Indians who say they were swindled out of royalties
by the Interior Department would split $3.4 billion. Both cases
have languished for more than a decade, and plaintiffs say
beneficiaries are dying off.
“The Senate finally did the right thing,” said John Boyd,
head of the National Black Farmers Association. “They stepped
up and told the world civil rights still matter in America.”
The legislation was approved in the Senate by voice vote
Friday and sent to the House. The money had been held up
for months in the chamber as Democrats and Republicans
squabbled over how to pay for it.
President Barack Obama praised the Senate for finally pass-
ing the bill and urged the House to move forward on it. He said
his administration is also working to resolve separate lawsuits
filed against the department by Hispanic and female farmers.
“While these legislative achievements reflect important
progress, they also serve to remind us that much work remains
to be done,” he said.
Elouise Cobell, a member of the Blackfeet Tribe from
Browning, Mont. and the lead plaintiff in the Indian case, said
two people who would have been beneficiaries had died on her
reservation this week. “It’s 17 below and the Blackfeet nation
is feeling warm,” she said. “I don’t know if people understand
or believe the agony you go through when one of the benefi-
ciaries passes away without justice.”
Lawmakers from both parties have said they support resolv-
ing the claims of discrimination and mistreatment by federal
agencies. But the money has been caught up in a fight over
spending and deficits. Republicans repeatedly objected to
the settlements when they were added on to larger pieces of
legislation. But Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.,
satisfied conservative complaints by finding spending offsets
to cover the cost.
African-American farmers, Native
Americans closer to settlements
with US government
1
GIFT CERTIFICATES TOO!
$5.00 off purchases of
$25.00 or more with this ad.
CELEBRATING OUR 25TH YEAR!
LOCATIONS IN DECATUR, DEFIANCE & VAN WERT
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Check out IN-STORE specials, too!!
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Proud winner of the 2010 Van Wert
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1190 Westwood Drive, Van Wert, OH
419-238-1654
1001 Havemann Rd., Celina, OH
419-586-1085
502 Touring Drive, Auburn, IN
260-925-3741
FILL THEIR
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Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Closed: Thanksgiving,
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5 Washes for the Price of 4
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36
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44
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Singles: Price per any wash
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11
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119 S. Main
Bluffton, OH 419-358-1141
GIVE THE GIFT OF ENTERTAINMENT
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11 MOVIE PASSES
Nov. 26-Dec. 24 ONLY
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4129 Elida Rd.
(across from Tracy’s)
419-223-3200
M-F 10-6
Sat. 10-4
Now offering
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more stability
FREE DELIVERY within 50 miles!
www.lehmannsfurniture.com
Lehmann’s
FURNITURE, CARPETING AND
CHIROPRACTIC MATTRESS
130 N. Main, Delphos 419-692-0861
SAVE NOW!
Lehmann’s
HOLIDAY CELEBRATION!
THREE DAYS ONLY!
Nov. 26
th
, 27
th
and 28
th
La-Z-Boys: Leather/Vinyl Recliner
Was $599.00 NOW
$
399
00
Ask sales person
FREE $10.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE
TO FIRST 5 CUSTOMERS EACH DAY!
Our Gift to you: A Free “Christmas
Ornament” for everyone.
Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sunday 12-4
John Odenweller’s
Lion
Clothing
Formalwear Headquarters
Phone 419-692-9981
206 N. Main St.
30
%

OFF
25
%

OFF
FOR YOUNG AND OLD
•CARDIGANS•QUARTER-ZIPS
•VESTS • PULLOVERS
25
%

OFF
SWEATERS
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25
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OFF
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$
35
95
HAGGAR SLACKS
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SPORT
COATS
• STRIPES • PLAIDS •
WRINKLE FREE BANDED
BOTTOMS
ENTIRE STOCK
Reg.
$70
Aries
Since 1984
Style Salon and
Tanning Center
11 South Main Street
1
/
2

O
F
F
College Night Special!
November 17th & December 15th 5pm to 9pm
A
ll S
e
rv
ic
e
s
775-0982
NOW
OPEN!
GRAND OPENING
Friday, November 19th
FREE Food Samples &
Entertainment
55 East College Street, Suite 1
www.cafesprouts.com
Downtown Oberlin – Across from Lorain National Bank
775-RAWW
7 2 9 9
from 6-9PM while supplies last
Mon-Sat: 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. • Sun: 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
We start every meal Fresh,
so you can start every day Fresh!
51 South Main Street • 440-774-2841
www.freshstartdiner.com
Student
HAPPY HOUR
1/2 price
appetizers and
soft drinks
3pm to 5pm.
Monday Thru Friday.
LG
enV3
20 E. College St. • Oberlin • 440-774-1200
10% Discount
for Oberlin College Employees
and Students with Valid ID.
Expires 12/31/10
Cellular Central / Premium Retailer
231 N. Elida Road •Delphos • 419-692-2009
Come see us for
Smartphones,
Accessories,
Business Rates
and
Wireless
Internet.
Motorola Citrus
TM
with new 2-year activation & data package
Monday, November 22, 2010 The Herald — 1B
www.delphosherald.com
Holiday Shopping Kick-Off
2B – The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
950 Miscellaneous
Life Tastes
Good Again
Eating Gluten Free
New Product Line
Elida Health Foods
101 W. Main Street
Elida, Ohio 45807
419-339-2771
M-F 10:30-5:30 PM, Sat. 10:00-1 PM
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
HERRON
CONSTRUCTION
419-692-2329
Kitchen and Bath- •
room Remodeling
Roofing •
Siding •
Replacement •
Windows
Garages •
Plumbing and •
Electrical Service
for both new and
existing homes
Drywall •
Give Us A Call Year Round For
All Of Your Home Improvement
Needs Both Large And Small
FREE ESTIMATE
Chris Herron
950 Electricians
RETIRED LICENSED
ELECTRICIAN NEEDS
TO STAY BUSY
RESIDENTAL &
COMMERCIAL
WIRING
WELDING
ED PAXTON
419-692-5193
950 Home Improvement
419-692-4526
TOLL FREE
888-94-PATIO
3 & 4 Season
Sun Rooms
205 S. PIERCE STREET
DELPHOS, OH
Replacement
Windows
Retractable
& Aluminum
Awnings
30%
REBATE on
WINDOWS
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
950 Lawn Care
NOW OFFERING
LEAF
CLEAN-UPS
(419) 235-3708
ElwerLawnCare.com
950 Transmission
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Advertise Your
Business
DAILY
For a low, low
price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
Service
AT YOUR
Place Your Ad Today
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina M. Fox
419-236-4134
I’ve got GIFTS for *ALL* on your
list including *Stocking Stuffers*
Call Black Friday, spend $100,
get $25 in FREE products!
Part-time Driver
Our Noble Pork facility, located near Van
Wert, OH, has an immediate opening to
transport swine to grower facilities (3) days
per week. Desired candidate will possess a
GED/HS diploma, clean driving record and
stable work history. Prefer candidates with a
Class B CDL and farm background.
For consideration please call:
(419) 968-2238
Monday-Friday
9AM to 4PM
Thanksgiving Day
AUCTION
THURSDAY, NOV. 25 AT 3PM
Large Variety of Items
Holiday Items-Toys-Tools-Gift Items
bicycles, many misc. items
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60 Grover Hill, OH
(419) 587-3511
Auction every Sat.
at 4pm!
(New Early Time)
Start
your
Christmas
Shopping
the Easy
Way!
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
Schrader
realty llc
“Put your dreams in our hands”
www.schraderrealty.net
VIEW ALL LISTINGS AND PICTURES ON OUR WEBSITE:
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
14100 St Rt 709 Country 4BR,
pole building, 2 small buildings, 1.6
acres, priced to sell! Call Krista
735 Moening St. 3BR, bsmt, 2 car
garage. Call Krista
202 E. 7th St. 3BR, 2BA, 2 car
garage, many new updates, only
$60’s, won’t last long! Call Krista
135 E. Cleveland St. Investment,
3BR, needs some TLC, only $30’s.
Make offer! Call Amie
22451 Spieles Road, Delphos
Remodeled brick country home
w/3BR, 2BA, 3 car heated & insulated
garage, pond, woodburning stoves,
fam rm, den & more! Only $132,900!
180 Max St., Ottoville 3 BR, 2
BA, vinyl ranch. All appliances stay.
3 city lots. Immediate possession.
Call Janet.
806 N. Jefferson Street
4BR, 2BA, fnished bsmt, 2 car att
garage, spacious custom kitchen,
large 1st foor laundry, A must see
inside! Call Krista.
11595 Ridge Rd., Delphos
2 BR home just out of Delphos city
limits. Possible 3rd bedroom. Lots of
storage. All season room. Call Janet.
3660 Schooler Road, Lima
4BR, 2BA country home w/over 1
acre, 2 car garage plus large out-
building, Perry schools. Call Molly.
812 N. Jefferson Street Investment or
starter home close to park & pool,
bsmt, large lot, only $30’s. Call Ja-
net.
111 Steeple Chase, Elida schools
3BR, 2BA mobile home in Hunter’s Chase,
built in 1999. Call Jon.
605 E. Main Street, Ottoville Profit-
able commercial business w/restuar-
ant area, kitchen area, game room
area & more. Liquor license & many
updates. Call Molly
224 Buckingham, Elida 3BR, 2BA
manufactured spacious home w/dining
rm, fam rm. Call Krista
7510 ST Rt 66, Delphos Country ranch
w/3BR, 2BA, family rm, 2 car att garage,
Delphos schools. Call Krista
Krista Schrader .................419-233-3737
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ....419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ................419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger ...................419-236-7894
Stephanie Clemons.......419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ..........419-230-1983
Molly Aregood ...............419-605-5265
Jon Moorman ................419-234-8797
5359 Middle Point Wetzel Rd.
Affordable 4 BR, 1 acre, 2 car att
garage, convenient location to high-
ways. Call Krista.
504 E. Seventh Street, Delphos 3
BR, many improvements, neutral de-
cor, bsmt, 2 car garage w/bonus rm.
Call Krista.
509 W. Seventh Street, Delphos
Investment or starter home close to
park & Pool, 2 BR, possible 3rd BR,
bsmt, 1 car garage. Call Krista.
606 Euclid Street, Delphos Cute 2
BR, den, 1 car garage. Call Judy.
628 W. Wayne St., Delphos Ranch 3
BR, 1 1/2 BA, 2 car att. Garage, fam.
rm. Call Krista.
1006 Prospect, Van Wert Vinyl 2 BR,
possible 3rd BR, 2 car gar, fam. rm w/
fireplace. Call Ruth.
202 Holland Ave. #22, Delphos Af-
fordable mobile home, only $6500.
Call Ruth.
167 N. Canal Street, Ottoville Com-
mercial business includes restaurant,
bar w/liquor license, apartment and so
much more! Call Judy.
241 King St., Delphos Feels like
country! Over 1 acre! 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA,
finished basement. Call Krista.
10810 Ridge Rd., Delphos Vinyl &
Cedar sided ranch with 3 BR, 2 car
att. garage. Make offer. Call Krista.
Road 21 land, Ft. Jennings. 1.37
acres, Ft. Jennings schools. Call Krista.
233 N. West St. 3 BR Ranch, 2 car
gar. Call Ruth.
21494 Kimmet Rd Secluded 4 BR, bsmt,
Delphos schools, 1.8 acres. 2 car garage,
totally remodeled. Possible land contract
option. Call Krista.
403 E. 3rd St. 4 BR, 2 BA w/charac-
ter, partially finished bsmt, must see
inside. Call Krista.
630 Dewey St. Commercial property
w/many possibilities. Call Janet.
432 E. 2nd St Triplex with rental in-
come. Call Krista.
444 N. Main St, Spencerville Vinyl
1 story, 2 BR, 1 BA, 1 car detached
garage. Call Janet.
Bockey Rd/Lincoln Hwy Land 1.27
acres, Delphos schools. Call Krista.
SOLD
SALE PENDING
SALE PENDING
SOLD
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Schrader Realty is pleased
to announce Jon Moorman as the
newest realtor to our staff!
Jon can be reached
at 419-234-8797
He may also be contacted via
email at: moormanjon@yahoo.com
or thru our website at
www.schraderrealty.net.
19176 Venedocia-
Eastern Rd.,
Venedocia
0 down, warranty, free appliances,
Remodeled home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home in Lincolnview school district. Has new carpet, paint,
landscape, new central air, water heater, new lighting, updated plumbing
and electric, some new windows.
OPEN HOUSE
Dawn to dusk Fri., Sat. & Sun.
419-586-8220
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
LOCATION: Section # 3, Ridge Township; Van
Wert County, OH; 5 miles NE of Van Wert – 7344
Slane Road; sale to be held at the Middle Point
Community Building –
Farm to be sold in 4 parcels; #1) 66 acres – all
tillable land; Hoytville soils; slightly under ½ mile
frontage on Slane; recently cleaned outlet ditch
on the east side plus smaller one on west side;
access from Slane; #2) home site of approxi-
mately 1.5 acres having good 24’x 50’ garage
– new roof/ concrete plus 32’x 64’ pole build-
ing; some shade; #3) approximately 11 acres
of woods – good timber; report available; access
from Slane by 30’ owned lane approximately 300
feet long – south end of farm; great site; #4) 5
acre recreational woods/ heavy thicket; access
from Slane by 15’ owned lane – north end of
farm; reported to be some of the best deer hunt-
ing in the county; #5) multi-parcel(s) then offered
with bidders determining combination(s) of any
of the above – all parcels to be surveyed prior
to sale - see STRALEYREALTY.COM for plats-
survey-info or call -
TERMS: Ten (10) per cent deposit per parcel day
of sale w/balance within 25 days;
warranty deed/ equivalent deed(s) awarded with
all 2010 taxes paid; possession upon closing;
sale subject to minimum of 75% of appraisal of
$433,000.00; by order of the
Court of Common Pleas, Van Wert County, OH;
Case # CV-10-08-353
SELLERS: MEDFORD-AUCTUNG-
AGLER etal
AUCTIONEERS: William C. Straley, CAI;
Richard Miller
Apps: Phil Fleming; Jane Germann, Anne
Brecht, Chet Straley, Robbin Benner
419 W. Ervin Road
Van Wert, OH 45891
Office#: 419-238-9733
or 800-727-2021
Fax#: 419-238-5891
10:00 A.M. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2010 • 10:00 A.M.
PUBLIC AUCTION
82 ACRE FARM -
4 PARCELS
66 ACRES TILLABLE -
11 ACRE PRIVATE WOODS-
1.5 ACRE HOME SITE –
BUILDINGS
5 ACRE DEER WOODS –
RECREATIONAL-
EVERYTHING WE TOUCH -
TURNS TO SOLD
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
TRUCKS-VANS-SUVs
CARS
Stock No. NOW
6778 2009 MERCURY MARINER. ................Premier 4x4 V/6, full power, moonroof, leather $23,595
6744 2009 FORD EDGE. ...................................Limited AWD V/6, full power, leather ............. $26,995
6765 2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT ......................FWD, V/6, full power, moonroof, 24,000 mi. .. $18,495
6757 2008 FORD TAURUS X EDDIE BAUER FWD, leather, 13,000 mi. ............................. $23,995
6758 2008 FORD F150 S. CREW XLT. .......4x2, V/8, full power ........................................... $21,495
6745 2008 FORD F250 S. CAB 4x4. .........Lariat, leather, 6.4L diesel, full power ............ $33,595
6747 2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4x4. .....V/8, full power, moonroof, 3rd seat ................ $20,995
6715 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED ............... FWD, V6, full power, leather, 30,0000 miles. ..... $24,995
6716 2008 FORD EDGE SEL ......................... FWD V/6, full power, leather, 26,000 miles ........ $21,995
6775 2007 HONDA CRV LX AWD................4 cyl., full power, 61,000 miles ........................ $16,495
6704 2007 MERCURY MARINER LUXURY.FWD, full power, moonroof ............................. $14,995
6753 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT . .........Quad cab, 4x4, 5.7 hemi, 42,000 miles ........... $22,995
6750 2006 GMC ENVOY SLT 4x4................V/6, full power, leather moonroof, 59,000 mi. $16,795
6741A 2006 PONTIAC TORRENT. ....................4 dr., FWD, V/6, moonroof, 17,000 miles ........ $15,995
6773 2005 BUICK RENDEZVOUS CXL. .......AWD, V/6, full power ........................................ $11,495
6777A 2004 FORD FREESTAR LIMITED. .......V/6, full power, leather ......................................... $8,995
6659A 2004 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER .... Luxury AWD, V/8, full power ....................... $11,795
6770 2002 FORD E250 CARGO VAN ...... 6 cyl., AT, air ..................................................... $6,995
6712 2002 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD.......... V/6, full power, moonroof ................................ $5,995
6713A 2001 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4x4.............V/6, full power, moonroof, leather ...................... $6,995
6779 2000 CHRYSLER GRAND VOYAGER SE. V/6, full power ....................................................... $4,995
6772 2000 FORD RANGER S. CAB XLT. ....4x4, V/6, full power, 67,000 miles ....................... $9,995
6746 1999 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO. .......Ext. Cab 4x4, V/8, full power ............................... $7,985
6674A 1998 FORD EXPLORER SPORT..........2 dr., 4x4, V/6, full power ..................................... $4,495
Stock No. NOW
6759 2008 LINCOLN MKZ .......................FWD V/6, full power, leather ............................... $18,995
6754 2008 MERCURY MILAN ................FWD, 4 cyl., full power, moonroof ...................... $13,495
6752 2008 SUZUKI SX4 ...........................5 dr., AWD, 4 cyl, 5 sp, full power....................... $11,495
6743 2008 FORD FUSION SE ..................FWD, 4 dr., 4 cyl., full power, 25,000 mi. ............ $13,895
6668 2008 FORD MUSTANG ..................Shelby Coupe, V8 full power, 8,000 miles .......... $36,995
6737 2007 FORD FOCUS SES ..................4 Dr., 4 cyl., AT, air, SC, 46,000 miles ................. $10,895
6768 2006 MERCURY MONTEGO ........Luxury AWD, full power, leather, 56,000 miles ... $11,995
6760 2006 DODGE CHARGER RT .........V/8, Hemi, nav., full power .................................. $15,995
6740 2006 MERCURY MILAN ................FWD, 4 Dr., V/6, full power, 18,000 mi................. $13,785
6771 2006 BUICK LUCERNE CXL..........4 dr., V/6, full power, leather, 65,000 mi.............. $14,995
6774 2006 FORD TAURUS SE.................4 dr., v/6, full power, 60,000 miles ......................... $8,495
6730A 2003 LINCOLN TOWN CAR ..........Signature V/8, full power, leather .......................... $7,995
6705A 2003 CHEVY MALIBU ....................4 dr, 4cy, AT, air ..................................................... $4,695
6736 2002 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP .Coupe, moonroof, leather, 71,000 miles ................ $6,995
We BUY Used Cars!
Turn Yours into CASH Today!
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
Sales Department Hours: Mon. 8am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 8:00am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2:30pm
Service•Parts•Body Shop: Mon. 7:30am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 7:30am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2pm
www.raabeflm.com
11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH (419) 692-0055
John Bensman Kevin Lindeman Edward Ditmyer Dave Wilgus
NEW HOURS
Sales: Mon. 8:00-8; Tues.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 9-2:30
Service • Parts • Body Shop
Mon. 7:30-8 p.m.; Tues.-Fri. 7:30-6 p.m.; Sat. 9-2
SATURDAY SERVICE • NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED OIL CHANGES.
*As time allows per service hours*
John Roby
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
Expand your knowledge every day by reading the
newspaper. It’s reliably entertaining and informative
news coverage delivered straight to your door!
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St., Delphos
419-695-0015
010

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AFTER THANKSGIVING
SALE Flyer in
Wednesday's Herald.
OPEN 7am Friday
Bulk Candy
Sundays til Christmas
12-4
DELPHOS ACE
HARDWARE
LEHMANN’S CLEAR-
ANCE center is full again.
Hurry in for best selection.
114 N. Main, Delphos.
020

Notice
RADIO SHACK -Delphos,
902 Elida Ave., Closing
December 31, 2010. Eve-
rything must go!
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
DRIVERS: FLATBED.
Class A. 2yrs. Exp. Req.
$.38-.48cpm/exp based.
Trinity Logistics Group -
EEO/AA 800-533-7862
Ext.9
HEAVY EQUIPMENT Op-
erator W/CDL. Minimum 5
years experience. Send
resume to Alexander &
Bebout, Inc. 10098 Lincoln
Hwy., Van Wert, OH
45891. E.O.E
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
SCRAP/JUNK TO clean
up & haul away; small or
large jobs welcome. This
i s a FREE servi ce.
(419)795-3035.
300

Household Goods
NEW, QUEEN plush top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75.00. (260)220-1596.
501

Misc. for Sale
CENTRAL BOILER out-
door wood furnaces start-
ing at $4995.00. Up to
$1,000 Rebate, limited
time. (419)358-5342
HOHENBRINK TV
HAS GREAT BUYS ON
USED TV'S!
$15 to $200!!!!
11230 ELIDA RD
DELPHOS
419-695-1229
580

For Rent or Lease
DELPHOS SELF Storage
on Gressel Drive: Maxi-
mum security achieved in-
side our fenced facility
with access via your per-
sonal gate code. Why set-
tle for less? Phone any-
time 419-692-6336.
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM House for rent.
Across street from St.
John’s Church. $400 per
month. No Pets. Call
( 419) 692- 1742 or
419-695-3001
2 BDRM, 1 1/2 BA, At-
tached garage. Available
soon. 419-692-3951
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM Apt. 321 S. Ca-
nal St. Available Soon.
(419)695-2761
1 BR Triplex Apt. upstairs
with stove/refrigerator.
Qui et nei ghbor hood.
$250/mo. + $250 security
deposit. Utilities not in -
cl uded. No Pet s.
(419)234-2847.
2 BDRM Apt. 317 S. Ca-
nal St. (419)695-2761
Del phos spaci ous. 2
BDRM Apt. Frig., stove.
Off-street parking, W/D
hook-up, yard and porch.
419-203-2216
800

House For Sale
FULL REMODEL com-
pleted soon. Can custom-
ize to you. 607 W. 7th St.,
Delphos. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
chbsinc.com
FULL REMODEL com-
plete soon at 829 Moening
St. Delphos. Can custom-
ize to you. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
www.chbsinc.com
0 DOWN, warranty, free
appliances, Remodeled
home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home
in Lincolnview school dis-
trict. Has new carpet,
paint, landscape, new
cent r al ai r , wat er
heater, new lighting, up-
dated plumbing and elec-
t r i c , s ome new
windows, 19176 Venedo-
cia-Eastern Rd., Venedo-
cia. 419-586-8220.
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
Over 85
years
experience
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00
Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
BRAKE
SERVICE
GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
$
109
95
GET THE BRAKES
ENGINEERED
SPECIFICALLY FOR
YOUR VEHICLE
Install genuine Motorcraft® pre-
ferred Value pads of shoes on
most cars/light trucks. One axle.
Excludes machining rotors and
drums. Some vehicles slightly
higher. taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for details.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
2 BLACK KITTENS, 14
weeks old. People friendly
Litter trained. Must go to
g o o d h o m e .
(419)516-3376
BRRRR IT’S cold. Fluffy
kittens and cats need a
warm home. We are so
sweet. (419)642-3595
FREE PLATFORM
Rocker, light beige.
(419)692-9270
Visit www.delphosherald.com
Classifieds Sell!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
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BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
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Monday, November 22, 2010 The Herald – 3B
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Writer’s love
life diminishing
Dear Annie: I have been
married to an absolutely
amazing man for four years.
“Jeff” complements me in
every way. Where I am weak,
he is strong. We have a won-
derful baby boy who is the
light of our lives.
The problem is, the
romance has completely gone
out of our relationship. When
we were dating, Jeff would
constantly surprise me with
gifts, short trips and romantic
songs and letters. The prob-
lem began when I
was pregnant. We
went from having
an active sex life
to occasional at
best. He said he
was afraid of hurt-
ing the baby, but
he is a nurse and
knows better.
At the time, I let
things go, believ-
ing they would
get better after the
baby was born.
Our son is now 3 years old,
and our love life has gone
from bad to worse. We never
go anywhere together unless
I plan it, and we make love
twice a month if I’m lucky. I
have discussed this with Jeff
endlessly, and he insists he
is just tired. However, more
than once, I have caught him
masturbating to pornogra-
phy.
I admit I’m not as thin as
I was before the baby, but
I’m still in relatively good
shape. I have told Jeff that
his rejection makes me feel
horrible about myself, and it
breaks my heart that we no
longer have the relationship
we once did. Even on our
anniversary or my birthday,
he rarely brings me flowers
or gives me a card. I went
out of my way to shower him
with cards on his birthday,
and it changed nothing.
I adore my husband, but
his uncaring attitude is driv-
ing us apart. Can you help?
-- Hurt and Confused in
Kentucky
Dear Kentucky: Some
men have a problem seeing
their wives as sexual beings
once they become pregnant.
Instead, you become a moth-
er and are therefore untouch-
able. It’s also possible Jeff
simply wanted a child, and
now that he has one, he is no
longer interested in having a
wife. Whatever is going on
sounds like an issue that will
require professional help to
resolve. Please get some.
Dear Annie: Two years
ago, I dated “Anna,” a won-
derful woman. We spent
all our time together, and
eventually she moved in with
me. We shared a very spe-
cial relationship. About eight
months ago, Anna told me
she was worried that we were
moving apart. Even though I
still loved her, she left me.
I had emotional problems
for a while, but eventually
recovered and met “Zoey,”
with whom I now share a
relationship just as strong as
the one I had with Anna. Two
weeks ago, however, Zoey
and I had a big argument. I
could easily apologize and
be back in her good graces,
but Anna recently contacted
me, saying she was sorry for
her actions and wanted to get
together again.
I’d be lying if I said I
still didn’t have feelings for
Anna, but my friends say I
shouldn’t give her the time
of day. What should I do? --
Torn Between Two Women
Dear Torn:
If you go back to
Anna, things will
be great for a while
and then, we sus-
pect, not so great.
And it will be over.
By then, Zoey will
have moved on.
You are not ready
to commit to any-
one right now. We
strongly urge you
to take your time
and think about
what you truly want from a
relationship, and how much
emotional pain you are will-
ing to inflict to satisfy your
whims.
Dear Annie: I read the
letter from “Out of Concern,”
whose friend has body odor.
I had that problem. I could
not detect it, but others could.
My doctor was no help.
Finally, I tried a homeo-
pathic cure. I dabbed apple
cider vinegar under my arms
and everywhere else I per-
spired. Lo and behold, no
more body odor. And the
mosquitoes quit biting me,
too. -- Andalusia, Ala.
Dear Andalusia: Several
readers suggested apple cider
vinegar. If it works, we think
that’s wonderful. Thanks.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010
Endeavors that you always
thought to be beyond your scope will
occupy much of your time in future
months, and, to your surprise, will be
greatly successful. This new zone of
operation will bring all kinds of fresh
possibilities.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - If you carefully analyze a sticky
situation from every angle before
making a judgment call, you’ll make
the right choice. Indecisiveness on your
part would be counterproductive.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
- The moment you discover you aren’t
getting what you know you’re entitled
to, speak up and defend your position.
The oversight can then be quickly
corrected to your satisfaction.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) - It’s to your advantage to keep
everything on a friendly, sociable
level, even in your business-related
affairs. Convivial exchanges are
more likely to gain what being rough
won’t.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -
An interesting turnabout could be in
the offing when someone you feel
obligated to assist ends up being the
one who helps you out the most. Life
is funny that way.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -
Events might intervene when you least
expect it, and take care of a problem
you thought would be a nuisance to
deal with. It proves that keeping your
head pays off.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Something that has been working
against you might make an abrupt
change and start turning in your favor.
Chances are it will have something to
do with your job or career.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
Maintain whatever control you can
muster over an important arrangement
that you have with associates,
especially if someone in the group is
causing an unwelcome disruption.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Matters of a secret nature might be
the source of your discontent, when
someone tries to wrestle the goods out
of you. Don’t be tricked into saying
something you shouldn’t.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - It’s
important that you consistently
deal from your strengths instead of
weakening yourself by making a
concession. If that becomes necessary,
make sure you get its equivalence
back in return.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
You’ll be far more successful working
directly with authority figures than
you would with any of their lackeys.
Hold your ground when it comes to
demanding to see the boss.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
Know the difference between taking
a well-calculated risk and a foolish
gamble. If you can perceive the fine
line, you will have far greater chances
of coming out ahead of the game.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
An unexpected change that comes out
of nowhere is likely to be the source
of your chagrin. However, it you have
strong, positive thoughts, you’ll make
it turn out just fine.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
This area is for the MAX imprint ONLY and must remain white.
SEE US FIRST
FOR TIRES THAT LAST.
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you on the road mile after mile,
year after year. Driving longer
*

is another way the right tire
changes everything.
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2
5
4
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0
Best One Tire & Service of Delphos
502 N Main St (419) 695-1060
Hours of Operation
Mon-Fri 7:30 am - 5:30 pm Sat 8:00 am - Noon
Come in and see our manager
Dean Bowersock
Fully trained professionals you can trust
www.bestonetireusacom.
BUY WITH CONFIDENCE AT DELPHA!
ASK YOUR SALESPERSON ABOUT DELPHA’S POWER TRAIN & MAJOR COMPONENT
SYSTEMS PROTECTION INCLUDED ON MOST PRE-OWNED VEHICLES THAT QUALIFY.
PURCHASES MUST HAVE LESS THAN 130,000 MILES AND NEWER THAN 1995 MODEL YEAR.
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015
TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
CHEVROLET • BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
2010 Pontiac G6
$
16,400
CERTIFIED
Black,
sunroof
2008 Chev Impala 2002 Cadillac DeVille 2010 Buick Enclave 2010 Buick LaCrosse 2010 Buick Lucerne
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7,995
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Precision
red
beige Quicksilver Silver White
2007 Pontiac G6
$
13,450
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Only
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2010 Pontiac G6
2010 Chev Equinox
2009 Chev Tahoe
2010 Chev HHR
2008 Buick Enclave 2008 Chev Malibu
2008 Chev Cobalt 2007 Chev Colorado 2008 Chev Equinox 2008 Chev Impala 2008 Chev Impala
2010 Chev Impala 2010 Chev Impala 2010 Chev Malibu 2010 Chev Impala 2010 Chev HHR 2010 Chev Equinox
2008 Chev Suburban
2007 Chev Silverado 1500
2008 GMC Envoy 2008 Pontiac Gr Prix
2007 Chev TrailBlazer 2007 GMC Acadia 2006 Buick LaCrosse
2004 Olds Silhouette 2002 Buick LeSabre 2000 Buick LeSabre 1966 Buick 225 2001 Chev Monte Carlo
2006 Chev Equinox 2006 Chev HHR 2006 Chev Malibu
2007 Honda Civic Hybrid 2006 Dodge Ram 1500 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser
2006 Chev TrailBlazer
2007 Buick Lucerne 2007 Buick LaCrosse 2007 Buick Rendezvous 2007 Chev Impala
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2006 Chev Equinox 2004 Chev Silverado 1500
2007 Buick LaCrosse
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$
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19,900
$
11,795
$
12,795
$
10,600
$
16,500
$
12,500
CERTIFIED
Silver,
sunroof
Black
4 wheel drive
LTZ
Dark blue
Extra low
miles
silver ultra silver
Low, low
miles
Granite
Gray
Imperial
Blue
Local
trade
Silver Ice
Metallic
Cyber Gray
Metallic
Dk. blue
22 City, 30 Hwy.
Goldmist Black
Dark gray
White
4 WD
Dark
Blue
Red jewel
Silver
Black Red Jewel
Tint
Local
trade
Chrome
wheels, DVD
Blue, 1 owner,
local trade
Silver Electra Sunroof,
leather
Sunroof Red
Sunroof, leather
Silver
24 City, 32 Hwy.
Gray 2 WD
White
Maroon,
local trade
Gray/Silver
sunroof
leather
Sharkskin
Metallic
Slatestone
Metallic
Black Red
Gray Stone
Metallic
Gray White/
Gray leather
Gray
4B – The Herald Monday, November 22, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
50 Piece
Chicken
McNuggets
$
9
99
At participating locations. ©2010 McDonald’s
Jerry Lewis’
McDonald’s
Restaurants
Afghan police
learn to shoot,
patrol —
and read
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)
— When NATO troops train
Afghan police, their most inten-
sive class is not marksmanship,
checkpoint procedure or riot
control. It’s reading and writ-
ing.
Only 11 percent of enlisted
personnel and 35 percent of
noncommissioned officers in
Afghanistan’s army and police
are literate, according to NATO
trainers. That is undermining the
troops’ effectiveness as NATO
works to build up Afghan forc-
es at a time when NATO lead-
ers meeting in Lisbon, Portugal
over the weekend confirmed a
plan to hand over security pow-
ers to them by 2014.
There have been numerous
reports of illiterate Afghan secu-
rity forces getting into trouble.
An army unit calling an airstrike
down on itself in July because
they couldn’t read a map.
Officers who couldn’t read the
serial numbers on their weapons
or tell what size ammunition
they should use. A unit that
would set up a checkpoint, but
could not read the ID cards of
drivers passing through.
Often police can’t write
down witness statements or
look up a law. In some cases,
police chiefs were stealing their
subordinates’ salaries, and illit-
erate recruits could not detect
the theft.
“Illiteracy is like being
blind,” said Col. Mohammad
Hashim, the Afghan training
chief of the Central Training
Center for police. “None of
them could solve a problem.
None of them could apply the
law.”
The Lisbon summit agreed
to begin handing off security
responsibility to Afghan secu-
rity forces in early 2011, with
a full transition targeted for the
end of 2014. But the Afghan
forces have a long way to go
before then.
Creating an efficient and reli-
able security force is a crucial to
NATO’s effort to undercut the
Taliban, on the battlefield and
in the eyes of the Afghan peo-
ple, who do not trust the justice
system. The Taliban have long
used Afghanistan’s corruption
and lawlessness as a recruiting
tool, promising stability and the
rule of law through the use of
strict Islamic justice.
Before NATO took over the
training mission for the secu-
rity forces a year ago, many
Afghan police recruits were
simply issued uniforms and
guns and sent out to fight. They
had a casualty rate three times
the Afghan army’s, an annu-
al attrition rate of 24 percent,
and were widely criticized for
incompetence and corruption.
The police have grown from
95,000 to 120,500 in the past
10 months.
NATO hopes the new train-
ing courses, which spend more
time on teaching recruits how
to read than any other skill, will
slowly help turn things around.
About 74 percent of
Afghanistan’s population of
around 30 million is illiterate
— but the percentage is higher
in the security forces’ lower
ranks because few educated
Afghans sign up. Those that
do head into the officer corps,
where literacy is far higher, at
93 percent.
“Illiteracy is
like being blind.
None of them
could solve a
problem. None
of them could
apply the law.”
— Col. Mohammad
Hashim,
Afghan training
chief of the
Central Training
Center for police