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C 82/2 EN Official Journal of the European Communities 17. 3.

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− the Joint Action of 29 November 1996 concerning the creation and maintenance of a directory of specialized
competences, skills and expertise in the fight against international organized crime, in order to facilitate law
enforcement cooperation between the Member States of the European Union,
− the Joint Action of 29 November 1996 concerning the exchange of information on the chemical profiling of
drugs to facilitate improved cooperation between Member States in combating illicit drug trafficking,
− the Council Resolution of 29 November 1996 on the drawing up of police/customs agreements in the fight
against drugs,
− the Council Resolution of 29 November 1996 on measures to address the drug tourism problem within the
European Union,
− the Council Resolution of 16 Decmber 1996 on measures to combat and dismantle the illicit cultivation and
production of drugs within the European Union, and
− the Joint Action of 17 December 1996 concerning the approximation of the laws and practices of the
Member States of the European Union to combat drug addiction and to prevent and combat illegal drug
trafficking,
− the Joint Action of 20 December 1996 providing a common programme for the exchange and training of, and
cooperation between, law enforcement authorities (“Oisin”),
− the Council Resolution of 20 December 1996 on sentencing for serious illicit drug trafficking,
− The report of the High-level Group on Organised Crime, established at the Dublin European Council, which
was endorsed at the Amsterdam European Council.
− The Grotius Programme, providing for exchanges between magistrates, agreed during the Irish Presidency.
− The strengthening of the Council Secretariat, to allow it to carry out duties in relation to the coordination of
police and judicial cooperation, agreed during the Irish Presidency.

In addition there is a range of ongoing activities aiming at enhancing the fight against trafficking in drugs, eg. in
the field of developing the technique of controlled deliveries, and at combating money laundering.

(98/C 82/02) WRITTEN QUESTION E-0191/97


by Nikitas Kaklamanis (UPE) to the Council
(6 February 1997)

Subject: Preferential treatment of Spanish-speaking candidates in an announcement for a competition

Between April 1996 and the end of November of the same year, the General Secretariat of the Council of
Ministers announced two competitions for the recruitment of secretaries.

The announcement for general competition No C/374 for Spanish-speaking secretaries was published in the
Official Journal of the European Communities No C 110 A of 16 April 1996.

The announcement for general competition No C/370 for Portuguese-speaking secretaries was published in
Official Journal No C 332 A of 7 November 1996.

The announcement for general competition EURO/C/120 for Greek-speaking secretaries for the establishment of
a list of successful candidates for all the institutions of the European Union was published in Official Journal
No C 357 A of 26 November 1996.

The usual age limit for such competitions, 36 years of age, was set for candidates for Portuguese-speaking
secretaries (C/370) and for Greek-speaking secretaries (EURO/C/120).
17. 3. 98 EN Official Journal of the European Communities C 82/3

However, in the case of the competition for Spanish-speaking secretaries, candidates up to 50 years of age were
admitted.

This constitutes scandalous preferential treatment of Spanish-speaking candidates and is a departure from
normal practice.

Will the Council explain the reasons for this announcement in respect of Spanish-speaking secretaries?

Does it intend to reannounce the competitions in question, applying the same conditions to all citizens of the
European Union?

Answer
(16 October 1997)

The Honourable Member’s attention is drawn first of all to the provisions in Annex III to the Staff Regulations on
procedures for competitions, which clearly leave to the discretion of the appointing authority any question
relating to the age limit for the recruitment of officials, and to established case law on the subject, according to
which “the Appointing Authority has a broad discretion in drawing up the requirements of the competition.” (1)

Hence, in the case of the competition for the recruitment of Spanish-speaking secretaries to which the
Honourable Member refers in his question, the Appointing Authority considered it appropriate, after consulting
the relevant joint bodies, to set the age limit at 50.

The Council points out that, following requests from the Budget Authority, particularly during trialogue
discussions (1995), a report drawn up by the Group on the Rationalization of Administrative Expenditure
recommended that competitions be organized on an interinstitutional basis. Acting on that recommendation, the
General Secretariat of the Council and the other institutions put into effects arrangements for the joint
organization of competitions and harmonized access thereto, which included setting an age limit of 35 for access
to competitions for posts at starting grades (D4, D3, C5, B5, A8 and A7).

For access to intermediate grades (D1, C3, C1, B3, B1 and A5), the general age limit is 50.

In exceptional cases, however, each institution may vary the age limit in order to meet specific recruitment needs
or take account of the labour market in certain fields.

(1) See paragraph No 24 of the grounds of the judgment of 28.11.1991 in Case T-158/89, van Hecken v. ESC [1991] ECR II-1354.

(98/C 82/03) WRITTEN QUESTION E-0520/97


by Graham Watson (ELDR) to the Council
(19 February 1997)

Subject: Heroin trafficking from Turkey

Will the Council ask the police in Lower Saxony to publish the evidence referred to by Judge Rolf Schwalbe,
suggesting that two families in Istanbul control heroin smuggling to Germany and Belgium, under the protection
of the Turkish Foreign Minister Mrs Tansu Ciller? Does the Council have any other information about the alleged
links between the Turkish mafia and politicians which have been highlighted in the Turkish media?