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2010-2011 PROGRAM OF STUDIES

Welcome to Goffstown High School

Selecting classes is one of the important undertakings students and parents engage in during
the high school experience. The document before you shows the myriad of course offerings
available here at Goffstown High School. Please spend quality time selecting courses that
are both appropriately challenging and aligned with students’ future goals. Time spent during
this important process has proven to yield great long-term dividends.

Support and direction are critical to student success. Teachers, counselors, coaches, and
advisors all play a key role in the educational experience of students. I encourage you to use
these valuable resources to gather information about the classes offered at Goffstown High
School.

Please know that our master schedule is built upon student course requests. It is crucial that
students choose the most appropriate classes during this process to minimize the adverse
ripple effect future schedule changes create. We understand that life experiences and
student desires can change between the January selection of classes and September
beginning of classes. That being said, we strongly encourage and expect students to remain
committed to their initial choices and to work through challenges that can occur with the
beginning of any new slate of study. Requests for schedule changes should be the rare
exception, as each individual schedule is linked in some way to the 1,200 student schedules
that have been created.

I wish you well as you begin this important process. Please do not hesitate to reach out to
me, or members of my administrative team, if we can help in any way.

Sincerely,

Francis J. McBride
Principal

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS
Please contact Kimberly McCann, Assistant Principal 497-4841
kmccann@goffstown.k12.nh.us

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MISSION STATEMENT

Advancing Student Learning

Goffstown High School’s mission is to be a caring community of impassioned learners
who can thrive in an ever-changing world.

EXPECTATIONS

ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS:

• Read and listen critically.
• Write and speak effectively.
• Strategically apply problem-solving skills.
• Gather, interpret, and apply information using a variety of sources and
technologies.

SOCIAL EXPECTATIONS:

• Respect others’ opinions, beliefs and property.
• Contribute to a safe environment.
• Work effectively in groups.
• Assume responsibility for one’s behaviors.
• Make healthy choices.

CIVIC EXPECTATIONS:

• Participate.
• Respect the rights of others.
• Contribute to the school community.

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MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

4 English credits
3 Mathematics credits
• 1 credit must be in Algebra
3 Science credits
• 1 credit must be in a physical science
• 1 credit must be in a biological science
• ½ credit must be in earth science
• ½ credit must be in space science
3 Social studies credits
• 1 credit must be in U.S. history
• ½ credit must be in economics
• ½ credit must be in civics
• ½ credit must be in world history
1 Physical education credit
½ Fine arts credit (art classes, music classes, graphic arts, photography or creative
welding)
½ Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) credit
½ Health education credit
7 Elective credits

• 22.5 total credits is the minimum required to graduate
• Students can earn ½ credit in fine arts for participating in one of the following at the high
school: a musical theater production or a school play. Students must complete a “For
Credit Agreement Form” in order to be eligible for credit.
• Students can earn ½ credit in physical education for participating in a school sport.
Students must complete a “For Credit Agreement Form” in order to be eligible for credit.
• ICT credit may be earned through one of the following courses: Architectural Drafting and
Drawing, Audio Production, CADD I or II, CISCO Networking, Commercial Art and Design,
Control Tech I or II, Design Communication I or II, Fundamentals of Web Page Design,
Graphic Arts I or II, Graphic Design and Publishing I or II, Intro to Computer Repair, Intro
to Computer Programming, MS Office Applications, Photography I or II, School Service
Help Desk, and Video Production I or II.
• A senior must complete all graduation requirements to participate in graduation exercises
• Students can earn math and science credit with selected MST courses (course list pages
12-13)

ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS

Grade 9-11 students must be enrolled in at least 6 credit-bearing courses each semester.
Seniors, with at least 16.5 credits, may enroll in 5 credit-bearing courses if these courses will
fulfill all graduation requirements.

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PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS

In order for a student to qualify as a member of the indicated class, the minimum number of
credits must be acquired.

Grade 10 Sophomore 5.5 credits
Grade 11 Junior 11 credits
Grade 12 Senior 16.5 credits

In addition, in order to enter grade 11, students are expected to have passed English 9 and
10 and have two credits in each of the following: math, science and social studies. Students
who fall short of the minimum number of credits and/or courses must pursue the following
options: GAP Courses, Correspondence Courses (text or online), Summer School, or
Individualized Computer Instruction. Arrangements for these options can be made through
your guidance counselor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR EARLY GRADUATION

Information regarding early graduation requirements and process can be obtained through
the high school’s Student Services Office. Please speak directly with your guidance
counselor to answer any questions you may have.

GRADING SYSTEM

The interpretation of numerical grades is as follows:
100 - 90 = A
89 - 80 = B
79 - 70 = C
69 - 65 = D
64 & Below = Failure

CLASS RANKING
Class rank is determined using a weighted grade point average (GPA). GPA is calculated
using a value added system based on a 4.0 scale.
• Any grade in an AP level course leads to the addition of 1.0 to the scale. Example, a
3.5 becomes a 4.5
• Any grade in an Honors level course leads to the addition of .5 to the scale. Example,
a 3.5 becomes a 4.0
• Any grade in an open level course has no added value. Example, a 3.5 remains a 3.5
Further details, and a full listing of courses, may be obtained through the Student Services
Office. Grades earned in courses prior to September 2009 will not be retroactively weighted.

HONOR ROLL REQUIREMENTS
Students are recognized for high scholastic achievement each quarter by earning grades that
qualify.
• Principal's Honor Roll: No grade lower than 90
• General Honor Roll: No grade lower than 80

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ATTENDANCE POLICY: “12-Attendance Points RULE”
Students may not accumulate more than 12 attendance points per semester. These
attendance points should be the result of justifiable and unavoidable absences per semester.

Absences are not to be viewed as absences which students are entitled to take, but each
absence should be considered carefully and only used for personal illness, medical
appointments, family emergencies, etc. An absence that is judged to be "counting" will count
against the 12-attendance points limit per semester; an absence judged to be "non-counting"
would not count against the 12-attendance points limit per semester. (For details refer to the
Student Handbook.)

Missing a full block of a class is TWO attendance points. Missing half a block (45 minutes) is
ONE attendance point. A tardy constitutes .25 attendance points and every four tardies will
accumulate to one attendance point.

COURSE DROP/ADD PROCEDURES
A change request made within five (5) school days of the start of a semester will be considered
along with the following:
• Student’s original course requests
• Student course load
• Fulfillment of course prerequisites
• Class size; change must not affect class size negatively.
A formal request to add/drop a class, once initiated, must be decided upon and implemented
within three (3) school days.

Requests to change a student’s schedule should meet one or more of the following criteria:
• Not enough or too many classes scheduled
• Inappropriate placement in a class (the student has not met the prerequisite or is in the
wrong level)
• Placement in a class the student did not request
• The need to add courses to meet graduation requirements (students in grades 11 and
12)
Students cannot request a schedule change for the purpose of rearranging their schedule,
accommodating a late arrival or early release, or being in the same class as a peer.

Dropping a Class with Penalty: A student must seek administrative approval to drop a course
beyond the five (5) day drop/add period. Once the first progress report of the semester has
been issued, any drop will be considered only with a failure for the semester and the drop
with failure shall become part of the student’s permanent record.

NINTH GRADE REQUIREMENTS/OPTIONS

All ninth grade students must take academic requirements in English, pre-
algebra/algebra/algebra II, physical science and world history. It is recommended that ninth
grade students take either earth or space science. One team will work with a reading
specialist and the CCC computer lab to provide extra reading and math support for students
who need to strengthen skills in these areas. Assessment data, teacher recommendation
and administrative team approval will identify students for this team, as well as for honors
level courses in algebra, English, physical science, and world history. Ninth grade students
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in placement into honors level programs. History requirements. However. receive related services. Students who score 3 and above (out of 5) on the exam may receive college credit or have introductory college courses waived. Honors: These programs require a significant amount of self-directed independent work. Teacher recommendation and previous achievement are considered. fine arts. Students who select these courses should have demonstrated outstanding academic and analytical skills while being able to deal with abstract concepts. Successful completion of standard level programs provides the foundation needed for a successful post-secondary experience. economics and health education. family and consumer science and academic electives. See pages 12 & 13 for complete information. and administrative team approval will identify students for honors level courses in civics. 11TH AND 12TH GRADE REQUIREMENTS/OPTIONS All 11th and 12th grade students complete graduation requirements in required and elective areas according to their post secondary goals. biology. along with assessment data. This includes a required American Studies program for junior English and U. one team will work with a reading specialist and the CCC computer lab to provide additional literacy support for students. These courses require analysis. COURSE LEVEL DESIGNATIONS AP: Advanced Placement. and an English requirement at grade 12. algebra/geometry/geometry honors. and support as deemed appropriate by the student’s (IEP) Individual Educational Plan. Assessment data. technology education. world languages. It is recommended that tenth grade students take either earth or space science. civics. 6 . and geometry. biology. technology education. As in grade nine. critical thinking and a commitment to meet high academic standards. economics. Students may pursue technology programs at the Manchester School of Technology or at WHP Vocational Technical Center at Alvirne High School. pull out classes are designed to meet minimum graduation requirements. Please note that applied. Post-secondary institutions and employers expect success in standard level courses. fine arts. English. TENTH GRADE REQUIREMENTS/OPTIONS All tenth grade students must take academic requirements in English. computer education. computer education.may take elective courses in physical education. Students who take these advanced courses qualify to take the AP exam. family and consumer science and academic electives. world languages.S. these courses are not intended to be college preparatory and will not satisfy the NCAA Clearinghouse’s definition of “core courses” for athletic eligibility purposes. SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS Students who meet the criteria for special education can take courses. Tenth grade students may take elective courses in physical education. Standard: These programs provide students with a rigorous academic curriculum. teacher recommendation.

PSAT Workshops Grade 11: PSAT Workshops. Job Application Workshops. This is particularly true when applying to competitive colleges. most successful candidates for admission to the University of New Hampshire present with above average achievement and the successful completion of the following courses: • 4 English • 4 or more mathematics • 4 or more laboratory sciences • 3-4 social studies • 3 or more years in a single world language OR more than 1 year in 2 world language Sample 4-Year College: Preparation Grade 9 Grade 10 English 9 English 10 World History Civics/Economics Algebra I/Algebra II Geometry/Geometry Honors Physical Science Biology PE I/3-D Design World Language World Language Health/PE II Earth Science/Elective Space Science/Elective Study Study 7 . The program standards for career development guide the school-counseling program to provide the foundation for the acquisition of skills.504 STUDENTS Students who have a disability and qualify for a 504 accommodation can take courses. College Exploration/Planning Workshop. Internships Grade 12: College Application and Essay Writing Workshops. Online Career Planning Program (Self Awareness/Career Awareness) Grade 10: Personality Inventories and Career Focus Workshop (Career Exploration). Internships RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE PREPARATION Students planning to pursue a four-year baccalaureate degree after high school should take courses consistent with the requirements for acceptance and exceed the minimum requirements. Manchester School of Technology (MST) Orientation. Although the primary goal is to integrate career development into the academic programs. Begin Four-Year Planner. receive related services. Financial Aid Workshops. College Fairs. STUDENT SERVICES CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The SAU #19 Career. attitudes and knowledge that enable students to make a transition from school to post-secondary options that result in successful careers across their life span. the student services department delivers the following programs at each grade level in addition to individualized planning. Introduction Career Workshop. Career Directions Workshops (Goal Setting/Career Planning). Grade 9: High School Orientation Workshop. Guidance and Counseling Curriculum is based on the National School Counseling Standards and the State of NH Career Development Frameworks. For example. and support as deemed appropriate by the student’s 504 plan. Online Career Planning Program.

TECHNICAL AND TWO-YEAR COLLEGES Students who plan to enter a community. technical or other two-year college should follow an appropriate program. In certain technical areas. Students are urged to see their counselors for more specific information and personal planning. While most two-year schools do not require world language. Sample Preparation for Community/Technical and Two-Year Colleges Grade 9 Grade 10 English 9 English 10 World History Civics/Economics Algebra I Geometry Physical Science Biology PE I/Wood Engineering PE II/Health Earth Science/Elective Space Science/Elective Elective/Elective Elective/Elective Study Study Grade 11 Grade 12 English 11 English 12 US History Elective Algebra II Elective Elective (MST) Elective (MST) Elective/Elective Elective/Elective Study/Elective Elective/Study Elective/Study Study/Elective  Continuation of study in academic courses is recommended through grade 12  World language is recommended for students who want to keep options open for four- year college programs 8 . programs offered at the Manchester School of Technology and WHP Vocational Technical Center at Alvirne High School are sound preparation for two-year programs.Grade 11 Grade 12 English 11 English 12 US History Social Studies Elective Algebra II/Advanced Math Topics in Math Chemistry Physics World Language World Language Elective/Elective Elective/Elective Elective/Elective Elective/Elective Study Study RECOMMENDATIONS FOR COMMUNITY. strong preparation is expected in other academic subjects.

9 . Placement in a course always takes students’ individual differences and needs into account.FOUR-YEAR MINIMUM REQUIREMENT PLANNING WORKSHEET Classes Grade 9 Grade 10 1 English 9 English 10 2 World History Civics/Economics 3 Algebra I or II Geometry 4 Physical Science Biology 5 Earth Science/Elective Health/Space Science 6 ________________________ _________________________ 7 (optional)______________________ _____________________ 8 (optional)______________________ _____________________ Classes Grade 11 Grade 12 1 American Literature English 12 2 US History _________________________ 3 _______________________ _ _________________________ 4 ________________________ _________________________ 5 ________________________ _________________________ 6 ________________________ _________________________ 7 (optional) ______________________ _________________________ 8 (optional)______________________ _____________________ PREREQUISITES Prerequisites are guides for parents and students to choose courses.

$ Fee associated with course for college credit or AP Test. COURSE OFFERINGS Course offerings are subject to availability of resources and adequate funding. (Details page 47) ENGLISH English 9/Honors Creative Writing 9-12 English 10/Honors Journalism 9-12 English 11/American Literature Honors Composition 11-12 English 11/American Literature Writing Workshop 9-10 English 12/Human Behavior Honors Video Production 9-12 English 12/Humanities Honors Non-Western Literature 10-12 English 12/Self-Discovery Women’s Perspective 10-12 English 12/Myth and Imagination English 12/Advanced Placement $ SOCIAL STUDIES World History/Honors 9 History of Women 11-12 AP World History $ 9 America Since 1945 11-12 Civics/Honors 10 Psychology/Honors 10-12 Economics/Honors 10 Sociology/Honors 11-12 AP Government $ 10 Geography 10-12 US History/Honors 11 Great Decisions 12 AP US History $ 11 WORLD LANGUAGE French I 9-11 Italian 11-12 French II 9-12 Spanish I 9-11 French III 10-12 Spanish II 9-12 French IV-V 11-12 Spanish III 10-12 Latin I 9-11 Spanish IV 11-12 Latin II 10-12 AP Spanish $ 12 Latin III/IV: Cicero & Ovid 11-12 Latin III/IV: Virgil’s Aeneid 11-12 MUSIC Electronic Music/Piano Lab 9-12 Music Theory 10-12 Instrumental 9-12 Jazz Band 9-12 Guitar Lab 9-12 Select Choir 9-12 20th Century Music 10-12 Chorus 9-12 Audio Production 9-12 ART Visual Art 9-12 3-Dimensional Design 9-12 2-Dimensional Design 9-12 Jewelry & Ornamental Design 9-12 Crafts 9-12 Drawing and Painting 9-12 10 .

Sci. Fin. Mgmt. 11-12 Running Start Geology $ 10-12 Human Biology 11-12 Lab and Field Studies 10-12 AP Physics B $ 11-12 AP Physics C $ 12 Running Start A&P $ 11-12 College Chemistry 10-12 AP Biology $ 11-12 Chemistry 10-12 Earth Science/Honors 9-11 AP Chemistry $ 11-12 Environmental Science 11-12 HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Health 10 Physical Education I 9-12 Physical Education II 10-12 Fitness & Conditioning 10-12 PE Activities 10-12 BUSINESS EDUCATION Accounting I $ 10-12 Business Technologies 9-12 Accounting II Automated 11-12 Intro to Business 9-10 Principles of Marketing $ 10-12 Intro to Pers. Topics in Phys.Commercial Art & Design 9-12 Ceramics 9-12 Advanced Ceramics 10-12 Sculpture 9-12 Advanced Drawing 10-12 Studio 11-12 Advanced Painting 10-12 Interior Design 9-12 Art Honors 12 THEATRE Technical Production 9-12 Acting and Directing 9-12 MATHEMATICS Pre-Algebra 9 Algebra I Honors 9 Algebra I 9-12 Advanced Topics in Math 12 Geometry 9-11 AP Statistics $ 10-12 Geometry Honors 9-11 Math Investigations 11-12 Algebra II Honors 9-12 Pre-Calculus Honors 10-12 Algebra II 10-12 Calculus Honors 11-12 Pre-Calculus 10-12 AP Calculus $ 11-12 Advanced Algebra/Trig 10-12 Probability & Statistics 11-12 SCIENCE Physical Science/Honors 9 College Physics 11-12 Biology/Honors 10 Space Science/Honors 9-11 Adv. $ 11 -12 Principles of Management $ 11-12 TECHNOLOGY Introduction to CADD I 9-12 Control Technology I 9-12 CADD II 9-12 Control Technology II 9-12 Graphic Arts I 9-12 Graphic Arts II 9-12 Photography I 10-12 Photography II 11-12 Creative Welding 10-12 11 .

students must be willing to make a two-year commitment to the program. math. science. All MST courses are 2 credits and require 4 class periods. Students indicate interest in a particular program through a formal application process during the course selection period.COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND NETWORKING EDUCATION/CISCO ACADEMY CISCO Networking I & II $ 10-12 Fundamentals of Web Page Design $ 10-12 CISCO Networking III & IV $ 11-12 Intro to Computer Repair $ 10-12 Intro to Computer Programming $ 10-12 MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY Wood Engineering and Manufacturing I 9-12 Wood Engineering and Manufacturing II 9-12 CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Architectural Applications 9-12 Architectural Drafting & Drawing 9-12 FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE Creative Foods 9-12 Culinary Skills & Procedures 9-12 OTHER ELECTIVE OPTIONS Directed Study Specialized Programs Alternative Program Career Internship Community Service & Service Learning GAP Program Leadership MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY (MST) Students who are entering 11th grade have the opportunity to elect a two-year program at MST. Students in the program take English. and a copy of their current school year’s attendance record with their GHS course requests. Enrollment is based on registration requests (availability is not guaranteed) to students 16 or older in grades 11-12. Students are to submit an application. Designated courses will fulfill a *math or **science requirement. and social studies classes at GHS. 54 Academy of Finance I* 53 Academy of Finance II* 97 Applied Business Management I (offered Block 1) 99 Applied Business Management II (offered Block 1) 66 Automotive Systems Technology I 82 Automotive Systems Technology II 65 Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology I 81 Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology II 60 Cosmetology I 61 Cosmetology II 75 Culinary Arts I 89 Culinary Arts II 38 Design Communication I (offered Block 1) 40 Design Communication II (offered Block 1) 67 Early Childhood Education I 12 . Sophomores 16 years of age may elect MST if their schedule allows. a recent transcript.

and fiction—including The Odyssey and Romeo and Juliet—to enable self-realization through the understanding of others’ experiences. British. WHP VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL CENTER AT ALVIRNE HIGH SCHOOL Technology Programs (availability based on registration requests) 55 Veterinary Tech I 56 Veterinary Tech II 32 Forestry I 34 Diesel/Heavy Equipment Technology I 33 Forestry II 35 Diesel/Heavy Equipment Technology II 30 Floriculture I 36 Agriculture Production Technology I 31 Floriculture II 37 Agriculture Production Technology II HUMANITIES ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 400 English: 9th Grade 1 Credit th th All 9 grade students must take either this course or English: 9 Grade Honors Grade 9 English makes connections with world history with the study of Greek. Some MST students attend college and/or apprenticeship programs after graduation. Using the essential question of “Who am I?” students will investigate short stories. as a result. and the research process. poems. essay writing. MST also offers cooperative education to help qualified students earn credit and get ready for careers.83 Early Childhood Education II 71 Electrical Technology I – must be 16 by November 1st 95 Electrical Technology II – must be 16 by November 1st 80 Graphic Design and Publishing I 90 Graphic Design and Publishing II 76 Health Science Technology Education I** 91 Health Science Technology Education II** 77 Landscaping and Horticulture I – must be 16 by November 1st 92 Landscaping and Horticulture II – must be 16 by November 1st 44 Manufacturing Technology 57 Public Safety I (Law Enforcement emphasis) 58 Public Safety II (Law Enforcement emphasis) 68 Residential Carpentry I – must be 16 by November 1st 84 Residential Carpentry II – must be 16 by November 1st 79 Residential Plumbing I (offered Block 1) 94 Residential Plumbing II (offered Block 1) 848 Sports & Entertainment Marketing I 849 Sports & Entertainment Marketing II 62 Video Production I 96 Video Production II The Manchester School of Technology prepares students with job entry-level skills and. requires consistent attendance and a serious commitment. 13 . and multicultural literature while focusing on vocabulary.

Students will apply close reading skills to analyze and interpret readings. essential questions will ask students to look inside themselves: How do we make decisions? What are our values and beliefs? What are the risks of doing what we believe is right? Themes explored include coming of age. drafting. Students will use the writing process steps of prewriting. and listening skills developed in English 9. with an emphasis on analysis and interpretation. Students in English 9 will also improve their self-management. As selected literature is studied. 462__English: 10th Grade Honors 1 Credit All 10th grade students must take either this course or English: 10th Grade Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation This course is designed for independent. many of these texts being the same as those read in the open level classes but experienced in greater depth. Into Thin Air. Emphasis will be placed on reading comprehension and expository writing based on the needs and progress of the individual student. Lord of the Flies. peer editing.In addition to this literature. but experienced in greater depth. problem-solving. writing. and in writing—demonstrating a critical attitude and correctly using literary terms. decision- making. usage. decision-making. both in class discussion and presentation. and will give attention to sentence structure. and punctuation. 404 English: 10th Grade 1 Credit All 10th grade students must take either this course or English: 10th Grade Honors Grade 10 English builds on reading. revising. 461 English: 9th Grade Honors 1 Credit All 9th grade students must take either this course or English: 9th Grade Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation This course is designed for independent. and their own lives through response journals and literary analysis. Students will develop connections between literature. leadership qualities and the power of fear—using selections from the following texts to develop literary analysis skills: Ender’s Game. self-directed students who excelled in the ninth- grade language arts program (open or honors) and have demonstrated advanced reading and writing skills. 14 . Students will read and learn to comprehend many of the same texts as those read in the open level classes. and Macbeth. self-directed students who excelled in eighth grade language arts and have demonstrated proficient to advanced reading and writing skills. and will learn to research while honing their skills in both public speaking and media literacy. As they learn and apply literary terms. they will develop critical attitudes towards their reading. The use of technology will enhance these areas. will create portfolios of their writing. students will learn about and use the writing process. paragraph unity and coherence. To Kill a Mockingbird. speaking. writing. and communication skills while developing their ability to work with others and to use and synthesize information. Students will read and write out of class for discussion and application in class. Students will read and write outside of class for discussion and application in class. Students will read and learn to comprehend complex texts.

Every week our chronological study of literature expands to include philosophically related art.426 English: 11th Grade-American Literature/Writing 1 Credit All 11th grade students must take either American Literature/Writing or American Literature/Writing Honors This course is designed for students to continue refining their skills in reading. Students can expect to have options that will stretch and challenge them to achieve. What are the essential questions underlying the human relationships that people experience as individuals or in social groups? Students will study historical. Readings may be selected from this list. dance or 15 . Ideas and concepts discovered in literature will be developed and interdisciplinary connections to themes in U. ancient to modern. to prepare them for the college classroom or the world beyond high school. Oedipus Rex. write and present ideas demonstrating maturity of thought. exploration. course description outlined above. architecture. freedom. cultural and personal contexts in literature to reach a better understanding of human behavior. Hamlet. speaking and the use of technologies as they examine common themes of discovery.S. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. It is designed to provide an understanding of the development of American culture and values through the analysis of literature. They will be able to document and defend a well-reasoned opinion and develop and express an original idea. This course is quickly paced and requires a high degree of independence and self-direction. Man’s Search for Meaning. 412 English: 11th Grade– American Literature/Writing -Honors 1 Credit All 11th grade students must take either American Literature/Writing or American Literature/Writing Honors Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation American Literature/Writing is offered at an Honors level. English 12 Course Descriptions English 12 is a required full-year course with a specific content focus. biography and short stories. music. Ordinary People. 464 English: 12th Grade-Humanities Honors 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation This course will focus on questions like: What is beautiful and why? What constitutes art? Why do humans feel compelled to create? In the Humanities. History will be made. poetry. philosophy and sociology. Students will choose one of the following courses. independence and the human condition as viewed through the eyes of various American authors. The Things They Carried. literature introduces students to the ideas that characterize the times. Night. writing. Students in all English 12 courses will read. poets and artists. 463 English: 12th Grade-Human Behavior Honors 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation This course will focus on questions like: Why do human beings behave as they do? Students will focus on literature and writing with interdisciplinary links to psychology.

the reading consists of a comprehensive survey of works that will provide a solid base for analysis and discussion. Night. 418 English: 12th Grade . The course will culminate in a portfolio of work developed around a personal memoir. The Color Purple. The Hobbit. The Hero With a Thousand Faces. Readings will include mythology. Pygmalion. Pygmalion. They will analyze the patterns. The Heart of Darkness. students are expected to take the May exam. Hamlet. Man’s Search for Meaning and The Death of a Salesman. Frankenstein. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. The Odyssey. What mythical patterns are common to many cultures and historical periods and how do cultures differ as they offer answers to life’s essential questions? What is the value of story? We will explore interior and exterior journeys of self-discovery. 16 . 419 English: 12th Grade – Myth and Imagination 1 Credit This course will explore the human need to find meaning and sense in life and to project beyond what is known. who have embarked on such journeys. philosophical and imaginative extensions. Students will describe and respond. and the people. Oedipus Rex. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The Picture of Dorian Gray. Readings will include a selection from the following: The Odyssey. Mythology and You. and assorted science fiction short stories. Senior year is an ideal time to examine life so far and to explore its possibilities. Readings may be selected from the following: Oedipus Rex. How can one not simply live. experimenting in new avenues of expression. Frankenstein. 420 Advanced Placement English 1 Credit Available to students in grade 12 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation This course is designed for seniors who have demonstrated excellence in English. Students will write weekly.Self Discovery 1 Credit This course will take full advantage of the students’ status as seniors to reflect on their unique position. Antigone. but thrive? Readings are selected to inspire a wide variety of writing products from the personal journal to literary analysis. Students are expected to take the May exam. The course will prepare students to take the AP English exam in Literature and Composition given by the College Board each year. fictional and historical. science fiction. attitudes and ideas in what they see and hear. Oedipus Rex. Finally. developing their skill in close reading and identification of textual support. Frankenstein. Black Like Me. poetry and mystical. Selections will be made from the following: A Midsummer Night’s Dream. utopian literature.film. Hamlet. they will develop their own creativity. Personal challenge is embedded in the course. In-class writing under timed conditions will help prepare students to compete with other talented students in college literature and writing courses. An appreciation and/or openness to poetry is an asset in this class. The Moon and Sixpence. Beginning with a summer assignment. Ishmael. Faust. In addition we will read a variety of short stories. articles and poetry. The Things They Carried and Dandelion Wine. Siddhartha.

424 Creative Writing ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is designed for students who want to improve and enrich their personal writing styles.ENGLISH ELECTIVES 429 Composition ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 This course is designed for students interested in advancing their writing skills. Peer and class evaluation of drafts and final copy will be part of the writing improvement technique. and persuasive argument. They will explore the issues surrounding freedom of the press. and analysis of poetry. create several short video products and participate in the cable casting of sporting and other school events. Students are required to maintain a daily writer’s notebook/journal for both quarters. writing. what makes something newsworthy as well as the complexities and difficulties surrounding producing and publishing a newspaper. personal profiles and interviews. controversy. The two major requirements are a love for writing and a willingness to share written works with the class. each student must complete with a minimum of twelve original poems and accompanying visuals will produce a culminating poetry “book”. reviews. Students will analyze their own writing strengths and weaknesses and set personal goals to advance their writing skills. coherence. Students will also have an opportunity to write a short research paper. editing. First quarter focuses on prose writing and producing one finished “work” a week. Students will investigate different types of writing in newspapers and magazines including articles. Students will produce a written reflection to analyze the completed work. 427 Journalism ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is designed for students who want to improve their writing skills and participate in producing a school newspaper. editorials. and organization. Each assignment will undergo editing by peers and teacher and will be revised several times before the final typed manuscript is completed. Second quarter focuses on the reading. At the end of the second quarter. comparison and contrast. The process for production will include a written proposal. Exercises to improve writing will focus on sentence variety. Students will participate in decision-making. layout and formatting of two to four student newspapers. cause and effect. administration and community. storyboard and script. Students will also be available as a technical resource to faculty. The course will be structured around major expository techniques such as description. unity. 17 . 425 Video Production ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is a hands-on production course where students will learn digital editing.

Carson McCullers. sisterhood. or AP World History This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation of humankind’s past and of its role in creating modern civilization. and Natalia Ginzbert. Fried Green Tomatoes. which will be explored. drafting. and alienation. Short Stories by: Willa Cather. 454 Non-Western Literature ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is designed to expose students to non-Western cultures and literature. developments and conflicts that have shaped our modern world society so that they are better able to understand and respond to those that occur in their lifetimes. A goal will be to broaden understanding of these cultures and peoples through reading and writing about them. reading will also be a part of the course. 18 . The overall goal of the course is to provide students with a solid understanding of the problems. Students can expect to use the writing process-prewriting. world wars. both in class and at home. and to allow for reflection on cultural values and beliefs through answering essential questions such as these: Are the requirements for being a good citizen universal? Where does miscommunication and misunderstanding between cultures begin? 430 Writing Workshop ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-10 This course will focus on various styles and types of writing. Sarah Orne Jewett. including both political and industrial revolutions. both as an instructional tool and as models for various types of writing assignments. are: matriarchal society. Woman Warrior.452 Women’s Perspectives ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course explores the contributions of the many excellent women writers. Selected literature will be studied through a historical feminist/thematic approach. including imperialism. and revising-to improve varied assignments. industrial revolution. peer editing. the Suffrage movement. and the development of the current international landscape. The Color Purple. Kate Chopin. emotional. the age of revolutions. the renaissance. Following introductory units. Tillie Olsen. Students will read. self-confidence. World History Honors. Examples of the themes. the course will center on medieval times. Isak Dinesen. The workshop approach will allow students at any level of writing proficiency to set goals and work to improve their writing skills. It emphasizes physical. and the modern era. giving students hands-on practice in producing writing in many forms. artists. SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 1200 World History 1 Credit All 9th grade students must take World History. Africa. changes. Although the focus is on writing. The following literature will be examined: Novels: Herland. and South America. discuss. MFK Fisher. and thinkers of our time. and respond to literature written in and about Asia. and intellectual equality of the sexes.

and world affairs. or AP Government Prerequisite: The grade of A in World History or a passing grade in AP World History and Teacher Recommendation 19 . Civics builds on a foundation of history. structure. students should expect more of an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of historical and political events and primary source readings. and world affairs. be prepared to do background reading outside of class. and functions of government. Civics Honors. and economics to teach students to become responsible. 1239 Civics ½ Credit th All 10 grade students must take Civics. and functions of government. as well as comparisons among major societies. and be able to apply outside readings to class activities. 1240 Civics Honors ½ Credit th All 10 grade students must take Civics. Civics Honors. or AP Government Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation While this course will follow the same essential questions and topics of Civics. Students are expected to take the May exam. and economics to teach students to become responsible. 1243_AP World History 1 Credit All 9th grade students must take World History. the political process. or AP World History Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Students will develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts. the political process. committed to participation in public affairs. the rule of law. structure. students should expect more of an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of historical events and primary source readings. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. in interaction with different types of human societies. the rule of law. 1246 AP US Government and Politics 1 Credit th All 10 grade students must take Civics. Additionally. knowledgeable citizens. be participatory in class discussions.1237__World History Honors 1 Credit All 9th grade students must take World History. geography. above. or AP World History Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation While this course will follow the same essential questions and topics of World History. knowledgeable citizens. The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose. Civics builds on a foundation of history. students should expect to write critical essays. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. World History Honors. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. or AP Government The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences. Civics Honors. committed to participation in public affairs. geography. above. World History Honors.

cycles in the economy. Students are expected to take the May exam.S. concepts. cycles in the economy. financial institutions and government. students should expect more of an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of primary source readings. and know important facts. and as citizens. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts. public policy. including how goods and services are produced and distributed. History.S. The ideas and concepts explored and developed will have interdisciplinary connections to themes in American Literature. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts. bureaucracy. including how goods and services are produced and distributed. History 1 Credit All 11th grade students must take U. Students will write newspaper articles and reports from the perspective of different historical periods and will participate in simulations with emphasis on various pivotal points in American History. and data. Through economics. producers. interest groups. above. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers. and international economics and trade. This course is designed to be a survey of U. political parties. economics in history.S. investors. how economics affects and is affected by the individual. savers. political beliefs and behaviors. and relationships between formal and informal institutions in the United States. producers. students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. and as citizens. History since 1865.S. 20 . economics in history. A research paper/project will be required.This course will focus on the Constitution. financial institutions and government. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers.S. This course will prepare students for the responsibilities of citizenship including voting and positive participation in the local community. presidency. and international economics and trade. government and politics. U. how economics affects and is affected by the individual. investors. 1241_Economics ½ Credit All 10th grade students must take either Economics or Economics Honors Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants. savers. and the federal courts. powers. analyze the history and interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. History. Through economics. and civil rights and liberties. recognize typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences. and mass media.S. 1242_Economics Honors ½ Credit th All 10 grade students must take either Economics or Economics Honors Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation While this course will follow the same essential questions and topics of Economics. students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. the Congress. The course will focus on the economic. Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants. graphs. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. 1212 U. and theories pertaining to U. History Honors. or AP U. political and social changes that have shaped Americans as a people since the Civil War. examine the roles.

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES 1516 Great Decisions 1 Credit Prerequisite: Completion of US History Honors with a B or better This course is intended to be a culminating experience for the advanced social studies student. U. it is designed to encourage debate and discussion of the important global issues of our time. Students interested in expanding their knowledge of international relations. History Honors. above. social interaction. History. motivation and emotions. treating personality disturbances. be prepared to do background reading outside of class. be participatory in class discussions. developing their skill in close reading and identification of textual support. students will consider the development of personality. thinking.S.S. learning. and research in psychology.S. Primary sources will be an integral part of this course. or AP U.S. This course is recommended for those interested in behavioral science.S. History. and applying the skills gained through core social studies courses in grades 9-11 should take this class. The course will prepare students to succeed on the AP exam. History. and be able to apply outside readings to class activities. This course is quickly paced and requires a high degree of independence and self-direction.1216 U. 1221 Psychology ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course studies both the principles and applications of basic psychology. History Honors 1 Credit Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation All 11th grade students must take U. U. Beginning with the study of human development. Students are expected to take the May exam. History. Students will write weekly. History Honors. or AP U. careers in psychology. While this course will follow the same essential questions and topics of US History. students should expect to write critical essays. 1219 AP U.S. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions.S. students should expect more of an emphasis on analysis and interpretation of historical events and primary source readings. 21 . eight nationally studied topics are released each year. stress. History 1 Credit th All 11 grade students must take U. Prerequisite: an A in Civics and Economics and Teacher Recommendation This course is designed for students who have demonstrated excellence in Social Studies. History since 1865. This quickly paced in depth study of American History begins in The 15th Century and ends with The 21st Century. It is designed to be a survey of U. Additionally.S. engaging in active discussion of crucial global issues.S. Developed by the Foreign Policy Association in 1954.

culture. and research in psychology. learning. Emphasis is placed on the tools and methods of sociological research. socialization. development. and function of people in collective behavior. social institutions and social change. 1230 Geography ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is to give students an understanding of the geography of the modern world. 1231 America Since 1945 ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: students entering grade 12 need a passing grade in US History and students entering grade 11 need a grade of C or higher in Civics and Economics This course examines a period of American life that is both very recent and very rich historically. culture.1244 Psychology Honors ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course studies both the principles and applications of basic psychology. The five themes of geography will be used to understand each of the different regions. The purpose of this course is. through discussions. organization. 1224 Sociology ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 This course studies the origin. This course is recommended for those interested in behavioral science. to offer an introduction and a framework for understanding the United States since 1945. and an era in which the United States has probably changed more rapidly and more profoundly than during any other period in history. social interaction. 22 . social organization. 1245 Sociology Honors ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 This course studies the origin. social institutions and social change. This course is recommended for those interested in behavioral science. development. Students will study American social. This course is recommended for those interested in behavioral science. socialization. and function of people in collective behavior. and perhaps most importantly through independent research and writing. motivation and emotions. organization. The emphasis will be on the interrelation of physical. What once was routinely known as “the postwar era” is now a period of more than half a century. students will consider the development of personality. economic. thinking. Students will study American social. and economic geography by using a regional approach to the world. stress. cultural. social organizations. No single course could hope to provide a comprehensive picture of these complex and turbulent years. and political institutions and specific American social problems. rather. treating personality disturbances. and to give students an experience of exploring some aspects of those years for themselves – through readings. careers in psychology. economic. and political institutions and specific American social problems. Beginning with study of human development. Emphasis is placed on the tools and methods of sociological research.

as well as their achievements and places their stories within the broader context of our nation’s history. grade average of “C” or better is strongly recommended for any student who plans to continue study at the next level of any World Language. those students in grade 12 who would like to try a language may add a level I course through the drop/add period if there is space available after students in grades 9-11 have had the opportunity to fill seats. and then on the mythological poetry of Ovid’s Metamorphosis. To do so however. Students will continue learning about the life. Grammar and vocabulary are taught and reviewed in context. In addition students learn about Roman history and daily life and Rome’s lasting influence on western civilization.politics. 1500 Latin I 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This course introduces students to the language and culture of Ancient Rome. WORLD LANGUAGES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS A yearly. However. language and literature of the Romans and how their legacy is still around us today. accompanied by important shifts in women’s perception of their own potential. There is an emphasis on improving English vocabulary and grammar through learning Latin roots and forms. the labor force. 1529 Latin III/IV: Cicero and Ovid 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin II This course focuses first on the late Republic and the speeches of Cicero. 1501 Latin II 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Latin I This course reviews the vocabulary and grammatical principles of Latin I and develops new forms and syntax for more advanced reading and discussions. This new visibility sparked a reconsideration of the history they had been told. There has never been a better time for American women to claim the possibilities for full democratic participation in political and social life that their history reveals. popular culture. This course is offered in even years beginning in the 2010/2011 school year. Level I languages are open to students in grades 9-11. 23 .1232 History of Women in America ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: students entering grade 12 need a passing grade in US History and students entering grade 11 need a grade of C or higher in Civics and Economics This course will examine the fact that in the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in women’s visibility at every level of American life . requires a retelling of their history that explores women’s hardships.

and reading. discussions. 1503 French II 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: French I This course is designed to continue the development of the four language skills: listening comprehension. The course contains a review of the basic aspects of French grammar as well as an introduction to more complex structures. composition and dialogues. Students will research and present research on regions of the French speaking world. magazine and newspaper articles. and writing. 1502 French I 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This course is designed to develop four language skills progressively: listening comprehension. Students will develop an understanding of the culture and civilization of French speaking countries. The daily language instruction is interwoven with varied enrichment materials and audio visual aids. writing. The cultural focus is on the history and people of the early Empire. and selections on culture and language. one of the most famous of western epic poems. Culture and literature are studied through literary excerpts. intonation and fluency and student dialogues. Writing is expanded from writing sentences with grammatical accuracy to short guided paragraphs. composition and presentations. reading comprehension. This course is offered in odd years beginning in the 2011/2012 school year. The reading and writing skills are developed progressively. speaking. Vocabulary and grammatical patterns are introduced through listening and speaking. speaking. Reading comprehension is expanded through a variety of graded cultural readings integrated in the text. Continues the progressive development of a better pronunciation. Grammar and vocabulary are taught and reviewed in context. 1504 French III 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: French II This course is designed to continue the development of the four language skills: listening comprehension. speaking.1530 Latin III/IV: Virgil’s Aeneid 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin II This course focuses on selected books from the Aeneid. aural-oral drills. 24 . Readings contain a wide variety of materials for study. It aims to develop sensitivity to a value system and behavior pattern other than the student’s own. writing and reading comprehension.

read. strong emphasis will also be placed on the further development of spoken language skills. Students will speak. topics to be discussed are youth. French V students may elect to prepare for and take the AP French exam. Students are expected to work primarily in Spanish. or film. women.1506 French IV-V 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: French III This two-year revolving course is designed to increase proficiency in the language while introducing the student to a wide variety of literary and cultural experiences. 1507 Spanish I 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This course is designed to develop the four basic skills of language acquisition sequentially: listening comprehension. The other year of the two-year rotation. a film and one novel) and upper level grammar. and edit in French. present. Units are once again developed around everyday situations to further awareness and tolerance of cultural differences. and edit in French. present. The cultural aspects of the Hispanic world also become an integral part of the course. linking the units together at the appropriate linguistic level. is introduced in dialogues and written exercises. Vocabulary and grammatical patterns are introduced and reinforced through listening and speaking exercises. reading comprehension. 1508 Spanish II 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Spanish I This course is designed to continue developing the language acquisition skills begun in Spanish I. French literature since the Middle Ages (a selection of excerpts. listen. speaking. Reading comprehension and writing skills are stressed in short dialogues and written exercises. 1509 Spanish III 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Spanish II This course will focus primarily on an intensive acquisition of grammatical concepts. reading comprehension. If the numbers allow. Students will speak. etc. read. Grammar and literature are studied simultaneously with thematic vocabulary. 25 . and the writing process. drama. Grammatical material becomes more complex. social classes. listen. family. write. and along with vocabulary. Students will complete one major research project in the spring on an aspect of French art. a separate French IV and French V class will be run. In one of the two years. literature. some short pieces. Each unit covers a different aspect of everyday Spanish life to help students develop an awareness of cultural differences. and writing. the course has three major areas of study: current French issues (found in “le Journal Francais d’Amerique”). write.

art history. Course work combines readings in fiction and non-fiction from a wide variety of contemporary Latin American and Spanish sources. two and three. This course focuses on improved written communication. Hands-on work and projects will be emphasized. Students will also focus on the more advanced grammar concepts in the tenses they have learned and acquire more complex grammar rules. and an intensive review of language structures. 26 . repertoire and recording techniques. 1527 Italian Language and Culture 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better) of a Level III language This course is designed to develop basic communication in the Italian language. reading comprehension. speaking. and writing. geography. 1522 AP Spanish 1 Credit Available to students in grade 12 Prerequisite: Spanish IV This course is designed for advanced students interested in attaining fluency in Spanish. Students will be expected to work in Spanish. synthesizers. Individuals may explore any or all of the course content areas in depth according to their interest. Each unit will cover a rotating discipline. while exposing students to the four basic skills of language acquisition: listening comprehension. MUSIC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Any music class will meet the fine art requirement for graduation 900 Electronic Music/Piano Lab ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course will explore making and manipulating music using a MIDI keyboard.1510 Spanish IV 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Spanish III The course is structured to integrate more culture and more advanced literature. and sequencing software on a Macintosh computer. Grammar review and acquisition of new vocabulary will be done through varied spoken and written exercises that also relate to each new theme. The teacher will prepare the students to take the AP exam in the spring. The primary emphasis is on oral proficiency and overall communication in Spanish. economics and cultural differences to help students develop an awareness of the rich history and culture of Italy. Students will learn basic music theory. Previous keyboard experience or some musical background is helpful. including history. This course also focuses on spoken fluency as well as listening and reading comprehension of the Spanish language with a deeper cultural and historical understanding of Latin America. This course will focus on reviewing and mastering grammar and vocabulary covered in levels one. government. discussion of readings. Several different literary genres and literary themes will be read and discussed.

909 Chorus 1 Credit Available to students grades 9-12 This course will emphasize music fundamentals. and maintenance of the instrument. if unable to. including rock. and performance techniques. 952 Select Choir ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Pass/Fail Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission following an audition 27 . While any student may join instrumental. please contact the music teacher or the administrative staff. Several parades and concerts are scheduled throughout the year. This course may be taken more than once for credit. It is a retrospective on the birth and evolution of “Rock ‘n’ Roll” that begins with the early American art forms. Vietnam. care. The class focuses on the relationship between popular music and social issues of the time. No previous singing experience is required. 902 Jazz Band ½ Credit Available to students grades 9-12 Pass/Fail Prerequisite: Instructor’s Permission This course studies contemporary jazz and pop literature. women’s rights and racism are viewed through the eye of the musician. The jazz band appears in several concerts each year and represents the school at area festivals. it is recommended that most students will be continuing after middle school band and orchestra. This course charts movements from their birth. Race riots. Many musical styles will be studied. 907 20TH Century Popular Music ½ Credit Available to students grades 10-12 This course is designed to explore contemporary music. and classical. technique. with emphasis on individual abilities. Participation in periodic public performances is required. Ragtime and Blues. including vocal technique. This course also satisfies the fine arts requirement. folk. yet inspired others and eventually changed popular music. 905 Guitar Lab ½ Credit Available to students grades 9-12 This course will combine individualized and group instruction to teach theory. solfeggio. to expand student’s technical abilities on their respective instruments. Students are assigned based on ability and instrumentation. with emphasis upon the artists who may not be as well known. basic music theory. participation in area festivals is encouraged. Note: Students are expected to provide their own instruments. Smaller ensembles can be arranged if student need and interest is indicated.901 Instrumental 1 Credit Available to students grades 9-12 This course will use the study of contemporary literature for wind and string ensembles.

and their realization. pencil. They include. and enable students to record their own music or that of other live performers.This course is open to singers who have demonstrated advanced ability in the performance of vocal music from historical periods ranging from the Renaissance to the present. but will not be limited to. sculpture. It allows for in-depth exploration in a variety of mediums to include both two and three-dimensional work. Completion will allow students to continue in art elective offerings. Students will learn reading notes on the staff in treble and bass clefs. The knowledge base developed will prepare them for careers in audio production—either as an introduction to college programs in sound recording. 2-D and 3-D course content are included in this curriculum. Also included is art history and appreciation. the Select Ensemble performs throughout the Goffstown area. collage. or through direct entry to the workforce as a technician. It includes exploration of a variety of mediums and techniques. scales and triads. During the holiday season. Students may also serve the school and community by running audio equipment at assemblies and events. crafts. 201 2-Dimensional Design ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is an introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D design. Any art course meets the fine art requirement for graduation. and style. and paint. major and minor keys and their signatures. Creative thinking skills. 960 Music Theory ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is designed for the advanced music student with a core understanding of music fundamentals. The Select Ensemble is a performing group that participates in all music department concerts. Students considering an art/art-related career should take this course in grade 9. painting. problem solving and divergent idea development will be fostered. ART COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Students should take either Visual Art OR 2-Dimensional Design and/or 3-Dimensional design as a foundation course. printmaking and ceramics. 911 Audio Production ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of any other music class. students may not take 2-D or 3-D in addition to this course. colored pencil. reading rhythmic notation. Composition and design will be stressed and 28 . as well as festivals and competitions in New England. chord symbols. and the rudiments of composition. 200 Visual Art 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is an introduction to the basic mediums and techniques in the area of drawing. chord inversions. dynamics. Students in this class will learn production and recording techniques that will include hands- on applications in sound technology. reading and understanding terminology for tempo.

Discussions and demonstrations will include color and patterning applications. tinwork and faux stained glass. 205 Drawing & Painting ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art or 2-D Design This course reviews the basic skills learned in Visual Art or 2-D Design with a focus on drawing and painting. Advanced Crafts and Jewelry & Ornamental Design. Commercial Art & Design. cardboard. A study of art history with a 2-D emphasis will be explored. is explored. landscape. Basic presentation and display techniques along with career/business opportunities will be discussed. 202 3-Dimensional Design ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is an introduction to the elements and principles of 3-D design and explores a variety of mediums. Composition and design will be stressed and students will learn how to generate ideas as well as creatively solve problems. found objects. Students may not take this course if they have taken Visual Art. The origins of jewelry as a form of individual expression will be explored. but are not limited to. while focusing on high quality craftsmanship will be stressed. It covers a variety of craft areas such as basketry. This course will allow students to continue in the following areas: Drawing and Painting. Advanced Painting. mirrors. found objects and clay. This course of study allows students to continue in the following areas: Ceramics. They include. 204 Crafts ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Visual Arts. plaster. Course emphasis will be on the continuing development of composition while incorporating new techniques and mediums. fabric. folk art. Crafts. The process of translating a 2-D drawing into a 3-D form will be emphasized. The importance of handmade products in our society. Students may not take this course if they have taken Visual Art. 203 Jewelry & Ornamental Design ½ Credit Available to grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Visual Arts. and use of findings. such as. or 3-D Design This course is for the student who desires to design and create unique quality craft products. Advanced Drawing. Crafts. boxes. as well as the historical and cultural value of this craft. metals and beads. 2-D Design. paper. Working in a clean and safe environment. Advanced Crafts. still life and original 29 . 2-D Design. Students will learn to develop jewelry designs from sketch to finished products using simple tools and materials such as: paper. wire. Other crafts covered will be those related to the individual person. Sculpture and Jewelry & Ornamental Design. or 3-D Design This course introduces students to the fundamentals of jewelry design and ornamental crafts. Portrait. plastics. and picture frames. Art history with a 3-D emphasis will be explored. correct bonding methods and finishing techniques.students will learn how to generate ideas as well as creatively solve problems. polymer. methods of construction. in the past as well as in the present. Advanced Ceramics.

glazing and surface decorating. Students will work with traditional materials as well as innovative and experimental mediums. 211 Advanced Drawing ½ Credit Prerequisite: Drawing & Painting . sculpture. carving. a company logo.Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is for the student who would like to further develop their skills with the goal of cultivating a personal style. The techniques of casting. Functional/Non-functional pieces will be created. a sign and original tee-shirt graphics. 208 Advanced Ceramics ½ Credit Prerequisite: Ceramics . The history of ceramics and its role in art will be covered.Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is for students who have a defined interest in working with more advanced clay problems. problem solving. art works and styles will be discussed. or be confident in their drawing ability. Appropriate historical developments will be discussed. A sculpture history component will also be included.Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is for the student who wishes to explore a variety of three-dimensional topics. A historical component is incorporated into the course. digital cameras and computers will be used to generate original artwork. Selected artists. a business letterhead.imaginary scenes will be explored as subject matter. 207 Ceramics ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art or 3-D Design This course is open to any student who has successfully completed the prerequisite and who has developed a special interest in working with clay. Illustration and package design will also be explored. 206 Commercial Art and Design ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art or 2-D Design This course is aimed toward the student who enjoys drawing and painting mediums and has a desire to learn about art with a commercial application. and throwing. self-explanatory to thought provoking. Students are encouraged to take Drawing and Painting prior to this course. Scanners. Subject matter will range from realistic to abstract. 209 Sculpture ½ Credit Prerequisite: Visual Art or 3-D Design . Students will learn how to load and unload a kiln and assist in the firing. The course will focus on observation and self-reflection as well 30 . wheel throwing. Both Mac and PC platforms will be used. Students will review basic design skills and be introduced to new techniques in the areas of hand building. constructing and modeling will be covered. They will become proficient in creative hand building. Students will work on design and problem solving skills as well as decision-making. CD cover. Real-life problems will be encountered and may include a poster and playbill for a theater production.

Those students who feel that they may pursue an art related career should plan their schedule to take this course during their junior year. Weekly sketchbook assignments are required. students will learn how to apply the basic elements and principles of design to furniture selection. semi-independent studios in choice areas. lighting and design. Instruction will include color projects. accessories and interior space. An art educator volunteers to mentor the student outside their regular school schedule. pattern. Students who enjoy art but are not planning an art career should take this course during their senior year. The focus will be independent projects contracted with the instructor. 212 Studio ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art or 2 and 3-D Design and 3 or more elective art classes with instructor permission This course is for the student who has successfully completed the pre-requisites and has a desire to do in-depth. The number of students accepted into the program each year is based on the number of available mentors. in order to be able to prepare a portfolio for college admission.Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is for the student who would like to further develop their painting experiences.as personal media experimentation. view video or film. texture. various painting techniques and methods will be employed in order to enrich the students understanding of historical and contemporary styles. It is the innovative approach to the design of living and working places. Original idea development will be fostered. In addition. floor plans. as the works of past and current artists are explored. 215 Interior Design ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Visual Art or 2-D Design This course unites craft and technology. 213 Art Honors ½ or 1 Credit Available only to students in grade 12 Prerequisite: Five or more art courses with above average grades and department permission This course of study is designed for the student who has successfully completed a majority of the available art courses and is planning an art or art-related career. A weekly sketchbook assignment is required. participate in workshops or work with a visiting artist. furniture placement and 31 . and how people live and work. a student must be able to make a substantial time commitment. The student will be notified of the art department’s decision. The application process will be announced each year. Students will also engage in discussions. The course will focus on observation and self-reflection as well as personal experimentation. 220 Advanced Painting ½ Credit Prerequisite: Drawing & Painting . Since this program is conducted independently of the regular teaching schedule. This includes the physiological and psychological effects of color. The student must apply and interview with the art department teachers.

movement and voice exercises. operations on fractional and decimal expressions. and costume. students will explore main areas of theatre production. fractions. and geometric figures. Any theatre course meets the fine art requirement for graduation. For directing experience. operations on polynomial expressions. 467 Technical Production ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Technical theatre elements studied will include set. students will look into the history of theatre. Topics include operations on whole numbers and whole number expressions. These calculators are needed for course work both outside of and within the classroom. There is an emphasis on the translation of math symbols to English statements so students learn to understand the "language of mathematics. Students will examine the major forces that affect styles from past to present. Each semester will feature written work with hands-on projects as well as performance of a student-designed production. MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE Please note there are mathematics and science courses that require students to own various types of calculators depending on the level of the course. Using the textbook. students will do character. props. Students will be expected to analyze scripts. signed numbers. Theatre Course Descriptions Two semester courses are guided by the NH Frameworks for Art: Theatre. equation solving. graphing and statistics. An overview of career opportunities will be explored. Algebra is integrated with arithmetic so that students view algebra as a natural extension of arithmetic. ratio and proportion. light. as well as stage productions with distinctive design concepts. and create theatre designs. 32 . act scenes. The intent is to give students a foundation to build on with further coursework or stage work.room design. sound." Topics are spiraled throughout the year allowing students to build to more complex topics. 468 Acting & Directing ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 To study acting. Theatre: Art in Action. MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 700 Pre-Algebra 1 Credit Students selected by 9th grade Placement Committee This course is designed to be a bridge between arithmetic and algebra. Successful completion of Algebra I is a requirement for graduation. Individual class needs are identified within the course descriptions.

Students will develop problem-solving and mathematical reasoning skills through solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. functional operations and their graphs. polynomial factoring. and simplifying rational expressions. and quadratic equations. evaluations and factoring. It is recommended that students in this course own a graphing calculator. radicals.12 This course is an entry-level mathematics course for students who successfully completed grade 8 mathematics. absolute value equations. systems of linear equations and inequalities. systems of linear equations and inequalities. writing linear equations and lines of best fit. Access to a TI 83 or TI 84 calculator is strongly recommended. Students will extend their prior skills by applying them to real world problems. polynomial 33 . and polynomial factoring. and quadratic equations. The course will require a scientific calculator. 705 Algebra II . using tables and charts. in-depth algebra course for students who have completed grade 8 algebra. Students will develop problem-solving techniques by solving problems algebraically. Applications with computer programs and graphing calculators will be an integral part of this course.701 Algebra I 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9 . Topics of study will include families of graphs and their characteristics. graphically. or teacher recommendation.Honors 1 Credit Available to students in grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Completion of middle school Algebra I with a B or better or teacher recommendation. and logarithms. but have not been recommended for Algebra II Honors or who score in the 80th percentile or better on NWEA. exponential properties. use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely. Algebra I Honors with a B or better. Technology is integrated regularly with graphing calculators and computer software programs. perform number and polynomial operations. This course is designed and paced for students who have previously excelled in the study of mathematics. 710 Algebra II 1 Credit Available to grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I This course provides a variety of ways to analyze. model data using linear regression techniques to predict real-world outcomes. polynomial operations. writing linear equations and lines of best fit. Topics will include direct and inverse variation. absolute value equations. apply and adapt appropriate problem- solving strategies. Students will develop problem-solving and mathematical reasoning skills through solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. fast-paced. The course will require a scientific calculator. Applications with computer programs and graphing calculators will be an integral part of this course. functional operations and their graphs. families of graphs and their characteristics. perform number and polynomial operations. Completion of grade 9 Algebra I with an A. 703 Algebra I – Honors 1 Credit Available to students in grade 9 This course is a rigorous. inequalities.

symmetry. Proof (deductive reasoning) is de-emphasized in lieu of a more inductive approach. Dynamic computer applications will be used. probability and statistics. 711 Geometry 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I This course uses a discovery-based approach to investigate geometric shapes. graph theory. Geometry and Algebra II or teacher recommendation This course is an upper-level mathematics course designed to investigate advanced mathematical topics in applied contexts. radicals and exponential properties. congruence and similarity. 729 Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 2 years of Algebra This course is designed for the advanced math student who is looking to increase their algebra and trigonometry skills through advanced problem solving and reasoning. transformations. develop spatial sense. conic sections. logic. or teacher recommendation This course uses a deductive. and introductory trigonometry. families of graphs. and introductory trigonometry. The following will be studied: inductive reasoning. 719 Advanced Topics in Math 1 Credit Available to students in grade 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I. properties of geometric figures. properties of geometric figures. sequences and series. congruence and similarity. circles. area and volume. transformations. and probability and statistics. Access to TI 83+ graphing calculator technology is strongly recommended.operations. trigonometry. and logarithms. properties of right triangles (Pythagorean theorem). Dynamic geometry computer applications will be used. properties of right triangles (Pythagorean theorem). properties of parallel lines. SAT preparation. properties of parallel lines. 716 Geometry – Honors 1 Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I Honors. explore systems of measurement and explore basic trigonometry. or Algebra II Honors with B or better. area and volume. develop spatial sense. geometric constructions. proof-based approach to investigate geometric shapes. coordinate geometry. evaluations and factoring. coordinate geometry. trigonometry. but not be limited to. circles. Topics will include. symmetry. Students will learn about geometric properties and relationships through investigation and inquiry. set theory. geometric constructions. Topics include functions and their graphs. exponential and logarithmic functions. explore systems of measurement and explore basic trigonometry. 34 . Access to a TI 83 or TI 84 calculator is strongly recommended. The following will be studied: inductive reasoning.

35 . limits. trigonometry. polynomial functions. TI 83 or TI 84 calculators. Topics include a review of functions. logarithms. limits. It will cover most topics covered in college freshman calculus. Access to graphing technology. conic sections. integration. 717 Pre-Calculus Honors 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II Honors and Geometry With Proof with an average of B or better and Algebra II teacher recommendation. area under a curve. Only those students with the strongest performance in this course may be recommended for 722 Calculus Honors. exponentials. periodic functions and transformations. velocity and derivatives. are strongly recommended. exponential. and sequences and series. Topics include a review of functions and their graphs. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared for college calculus. differentials.721 Pre-Calculus 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or teacher recommendation. area under a curve and applications involving integration. rationales. velocity. Students enrolling in AP Calculus will be expected to take the national AP exam in the spring. trigonometry. exponentials. 723 Advanced Placement Calculus AB 1 Credit Available to students in grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus Honors with an average of B or better This course is designed to cover the topics that would be encountered in a first semester college freshman calculus course. trigonometric identities and equations. and logarithmic functions. trigonometric. differential equations. polynomial. Maxima and Minima problems. and applications of integration. quadratic. matrices. including trigonometric functions with graphs and inverses. complex numbers and conic sections. This course does not guarantee meeting the prerequisite for 722 Calculus Honors. Topics include: functions and their graphs. Test-taking skills are integrated throughout the content instruction to maximize the performance on the AP exam. graphs. integration. acceleration. derivatives. triangle trigonometry. continuity. This course is an advanced level mathematics elective. This course is an advanced level mathematics course designed for the student who intends to take calculus as a high school senior or college freshman. trigonometry and its applications. including linear. 731 Calculus Honors 1 Credit Available to students in grade 11-12 Prerequisite: Completion of Pre-Calculus Honors with an average of B or better This course is designed to be an introduction to a first year college calculus course. Topics include linear and quadratic functions. Also covered are the chain rule. optimization problems. logarithms. higher order derivatives.

728 Math Investigations 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11 or 12 Prerequisite: Algebra I and Additional Math Course This course is an elective course designed to provide students with an alternative to the traditional Algebra I/Algebra II sequence. Statistics and Data Collection. motion. Topics include data. Students will investigate force and work. 732 Probability and Statistics 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or teacher recommendation This course is an upper level course designed as an introduction to the principles of probability and statistical inference. and problem solving through application of the scientific method in in-class experiments. This course fulfills the physical science requirement for graduation. anticipating patterns in advance. 36 . This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of physical science with an emphasis on everyday applications of physical science laws. indices of central tendency and dispersion. sound. Problem Solving and Historic Connections. deciding what to measure and how to measure it. Algebraic Models including Consumer and Business Applications. Topics include Set Theory and Logic. Applied Trigonometry. Students are expected to take the national AP exam in the spring and this course is designed to prepare them for this experience. logical thinking. Number Theory. and chi-square tests. Access to a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is strongly recommended. design of experiments and hypothesis testing. and statistical inference. inferences from two samples (T-Tests). experimental and theoretical probability. correlation and regression. A superior grade on the AP exam (3 or better) earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. energy and fundamental chemistry. planning a study. Students will be instructed in the use of graphing calculators and computer programs to solve problems and complete projects. light. A major group project is required of all students. scatter plots. exposing students to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data. observing patterns and departures from patterns. introducing probability and simulation. SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 1100 Physical Science 1 Credit All ninth grade students must take Physical Science or Honors Physical Science. The course includes the nature and processes of science.725 Advanced Placement Statistics 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra II with an average of B or better or teacher recommendation This course is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. frequency distributions.

A scientific calculator is required. forces. It will be an in-depth exploration of mechanics. This course is open to students without a previous Physics course as well as those with a credit in College Physics. 1134 AP Physics B 2 Credits Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Physical Science. optics. describe. Students will investigate. 1105 College Physics 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Algebra II. momentum. Solving problems in this course will require a good working knowledge of algebra. It includes the study of motion. Students are expected to take the May exam. 1104 Advanced Topics in Physical Science 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Physical Science and Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II This course is recommended for anyone curious about the workings of the physical world. predict and interpret physical science phenomena through research. Solving physics problems in this course will require good math skills. Independence and well-developed skills in algebra I are recommended. Students should expect to design. thermodynamics and modern physics. 37 . electricity and magnetism. and lab reporting. science or engineering in college. It includes the study of motion.1131 Physical Science Honors 1 Credit All ninth grade students must take Physical Science or Honors Physical Science. Quantum theory and relativity will be discussed as time permits. momentum. forces. students must have excellent mathematical skills and/or be enrolled in Calculus. Physical Science or teacher recommendation This course is recommended for students planning to study math. energy. mathematical modeling. electricity. Since calculus techniques will be developed and used. perform and report on their own experiments to test their own hypotheses. Pre-Calculus This course is designed for seniors who have demonstrated excellence in science who are planning a science or engineering career or those who are seeking an extra challenge. A scientific calculator is required. A scientific calculator is required. This course fulfills the physical science requirement for graduation. waves light. Lab and project work support and extend the class work. energy. as students must be able to manipulate equations and utilize skills from algebra. trigonometry and analysis. electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I and Teacher recommendation This course treats the same fundamental concepts and topics as 1100 Physical Science with greater emphasis on scientific inquiry and mathematical problem solving. waves. experimentation. sound. Lab and project work support and extend the topics discussed. light. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. sound. magnetism.

1133_Earth Science ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This course is an introduction to general principles of Earth Science and includes laboratory and field study of the following topics: the atmosphere. and oscillations and gravitation. and evolution. This course fulfills the biological science requirement for graduation. 1132 Biology Honors 1 Credit All tenth grade students must take Biology or Honors Biology. Students should expect to design. A background in Physics and Calculus is necessary as this course is designed as a second-year Physics course. or College Physics. and presentation during the Marine Biology Floating Lab at Rye Harbor in the spring. mathematical modeling. projects and presentations are expectations for this course. conductors. energy and power. The course includes biological principles such as the scientific method and experimental techniques. systems of particles and linear momentum. Students will spend a minimum of 20 percent of instructional time engaged in hands-on laboratory work. interpretation. Each student will complete a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports. the cell as the structural and functional unit of life. and the Marine Biology Floating Lab. and lab reporting. experimentation. ecology. The course is structured in two strands: Mechanics. This course is an introduction to several major areas of biological sciences. diversity. journals. Newton’s laws of motion. circular motion and rotation. self-motivated students with advanced reading and writing skills. Experiments and lab reports. and Electricity and Magnetism. genetics. Topics learned in the Mechanics strand include kinematics. electric circuits. Their final project involves data collection. magnetic fields. This inquiry-based class emphasizes advanced knowledge of the principles and practice of the scientific method including research. energetics. plant and animal anatomy and physiology. The course is designed for independent. environmental 38 . perform and report on their own experiments to test their own hypotheses. outdoor fieldwork.1135 AP Physics C 2 Credits Available to students in grade 12 Prerequisite: Physics. climate and weather. This course fulfills the biological science requirement for graduation. capacitors and dielectrics. Electricity and magnetism topics include: electrostatics. analysis. Calculus This course is designed as an advanced option for seniors who are interested in further study after completing either AP Physics B. the microbiology of genetics and its interaction to evolution. unity within diversity of life. and electromagnetism. Students will participate in lab and field activities that include microscopy. 1107 Biology 1 Credit 10th grade students must take Biology or Honors Biology. critical thinking skills and scientific inquiry. Topics include cellular biology. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This rigorous course treats the same fundamental concepts and topics as 1107 Biology with an emphasis on research. The course will be taught using introductory differential and integral calculus throughout.

This course fulfills the Earth Science requirement for graduation and may be completed at any time in grades 9-11. 1136 Earth Science Honors ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This rigorous course is an introduction to same principles and concepts as 1133 Earth Science with greater emphasis on research. earth’s composition and factors and processes that continuously change the earth through time. sun. mathematical modeling. An individual and a team research project with presentations. stars. 1119 Space Science ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This course is designed to show integration and applications of physics. chemistry. critical thinking. stars. earthʼs composition and factors and processes that continuously change the earth through time. fossils and geologic time. instrumentation. reading. and writing. and biological sciences in a historical and astronomical context. fossils and geologic time. and lab reporting. An individual and a team research project with presentations. cosmic landscape-planets. exploration. mathematical modeling and lab reporting. This course fulfills the Space Science requirement for graduation and may be completed at any time in grades 9-11. climate and weather. environmental. as well as lab work with lab reports will be required. Students should expect to design. describe. 39 . This is a required course that can be completed at any time in grades 9-11 (beginning with the class of 2011). describe. and cosmology. self- motivated students with well-developed skills in Algebra I. This course is designed for independent. and atmospheric phenomena through research. chemistry. and scientific inquiry. mathematical modeling. sun. backyard astronomy. Students will investigate. The course is designed for independent. predict and interpret astronomical data through research. technology. This course will include the following topics: historical perspective. predict and interpret geologic. and biological sciences in a historical and astronomical context. This is a required course that can be completed at any time in grades 9-11 (beginning with the class of 2011). 1137 Space Science Honors ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-11 This rigorous course addresses the same principles and concepts as 1119 Space Science with greater emphasis on research. Students will investigate. It includes laboratory and field study of the following topics: the atmosphere. self-motivated students with advanced reading and writing skills. It is designed to show integration and applications of physics. and cosmology. galaxies. and mathematical modeling. perform and report on their own experiments to test their own hypotheses. cosmic landscape-planets. environmental change. technology. This course will include the following topics: historical perspective. galaxies.change. backyard astronomy. as well as lab work with lab reports will be required. exploration. instrumentation. experimentation.

1116 Chemistry 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science. A variety of projects involving problem- solving skills. evolutionary history and biological diversity. college-level biology elective designed for students interested in pursuing a career in the biological sciences. Laboratory sessions. Algebra I and Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II This course is designed to provide the student with a fundamental grounding in the concepts of atomic and molecular structure and behavior. This is an intensive. chemical symbols. and the relationship of the behavior of elements to the periodic table.1113 Human Biology 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Biology This course is an advanced continuation of the tenth grade biology requirement. lab research reports and an independent project will be an integral part of this course. tissues. laboratory activities. The course is taught at a college level pace. including the skin. two-period laboratory-based course that includes the mandatory 12 experiments necessary to successfully pass the AP exam. The curriculum is divided into eight comprehensive units that include the following: chemistry of life. 40 . Successful students will understand the following: gas laws. It is designed to build on biological concepts learned in the tenth grade through the study of human anatomy and physiology and is recommended for students entering specialized fields in the health sciences at the post secondary level. and lectures are included. genes. skeletal. cells. 1115 AP Biology 2 Credits Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisites: Biology. mechanics of evolution. Chemistry or permission of instructor This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body. types of chemical reactions. College Chemistry and Algebra II with a B or better This course is a challenging. and ecology. Students completing this course are eligible for college credit awarded by MCC. the study of fresh and preserved specimens. notation and nomenclature. conservation of energy/matter. Students enrolled are expected to take the May exam. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. and organ systems. the anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Laboratory work parallels lecture topics and includes exercises in microscopy. 1114 Running Start Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 Credit (MCC: BIO 110 4 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Biology. Accurate and current information is presented on the structure and function of human cells. muscular and nervous systems.

chemical kinetics. its structure. understanding the use of maps. enthalpy. equilibrium. lab research reports and an independent project will be an integral part of this course. the mole. its composition. The focus is on activities and laboratory investigations in which students must use critical thinking skills and problem solving skills in a practical manner within the framework of the scientific method. Students are encouraged and expected to take the AP exam in May. applications of aqueous equilibria. Students will investigate plate tectonics. A superior grade on the AP exam earns college credit and advanced placement in many institutions. conservation of energy/matter. structures. mountain building. the theory and structure of the atom to the subatomic level. and the forces that affect it. and the composition of the earth. outcrops study. Laboratory sessions. volcanic activity. 41 . or teacher recommendation This course is a college-level second year chemistry course designed for students interested in a higher-level chemistry class. Lab experience and field trips are designed around rock and mineral identification. reading maps. It is highly recommended that Algebra II be taken concurrently with this course. The course is taught at a college level pace. the role of water. earthquakes. and the relationship of the behavior of elements to the periodic table. and organic chemistry concepts. The course also includes the factors of soil genesis. 1118 AP Chemistry 2 Credits Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisites: Algebra I and II. inorganic and organic nutrients.1117 College Chemistry 1 Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science and Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II This course is designed to provide students possessing higher-level math skills with an in- depth theoretical and physical analysis of the fundamental concepts of chemistry. electron configuration notation. and laboratory investigations is offered. and weathering forces. Principle topics include bonding concepts. Advanced Placement level treatment of topics. spontaneity of reactions. planes and plateaus. physical properties of soils. and processes earth by identifying rocks and minerals. entropy. SCIENCE ELECTIVES 1138 Running Start Geology 1 Credit (WMCC: GEO 112) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Earth Science This course is a practical approach to the study of geology whereby students will take a comprehensive view of the nature of geologic materials. soil pit analysis and glacial geology. Students completing this course are eligible for college credit awarded by White Mountain Community College (WMCC). Chemistry or College Chemistry with an average of B or better. Successful students will understand the following: gas laws. electrochemistry. and some aspects of soil management. Students will undertake an in-depth study of the physical earth.

The course equips students to live healthy lives and to advocate healthy behavior in their communities. impact of human population on local habitat quality. It includes laboratory and field investigations in the following topics: human ecology. population ecology. self- motivated students with advanced science. and writing skills. Earth Science. conservation biology. and a research report support the topics to be investigated. The information and skills emphasized in this course are intended to empower students – both for their own sakes and as advocates within their families. 1139 Environmental Science 1 Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in Physical Science. Students will learn physical fitness interests and activities that are wellness based and can be pursued after students leave high school. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 600 Health ½ Credit Available to students in grade 10 This course provides factual health information and opportunities to understand the interrelationships of personal choices. and their skills make them assets in their communities. project work. observation. identity. evolutionary biology. reading. behavioral ecology. by investigation. Students will investigate. and hydrogeology. math. perform and report on their own experiments and observations. Students should expect to design. describe. the fundamentals of field and laboratory research. The course is designed for independent. Students must dress appropriately. Most of this course is designed for outside research. animal and plant identification. experimentation. animal and plant identification. environmental science.1121 Lab and Field Studies ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 This course is an application of biology and the study of nature. and lab reports. It is designed to let students learn. research. disease and injury prevention/treatment and holistic health. Biology. peer pressure. The Spring session will include the following topics: winter impact and adaptation by populations of plants and animals. Their knowledge secures their own health and provides them authority in addressing health concerns. peer groups and communities. and hydrologic phenomena through scientific inquiry. The course is research based. environmental. 42 . vernal ponds and their populations. predict and interpret ecological. impact and adaptation to the Fall weather by plants and animals. The Fall session will include the following topics: water quality. Labs. and Algebra II This rigorous course is an introduction to principles and concepts of the interrelations of the natural world. 1000 Physical Education I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 All students are required to take and pass two semesters of physical education to graduate. evolutionary. PE must be taken for a full semester at a time. human population's effect on local habitat quality. population models.

1001 Physical Education II ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Physical Education I The students will assess their current level of fitness and be able to create a plan for their individual fitness needs. Students begin analysis of financial reports from a management perspective. COMMERCE/ENTERPRISE & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Business Education 300 Accounting I 1 Credit (MCC: ACCT 113 . and adjust and close accounts at the end of a fiscal period. fitness and conditioning. and components of physical fitness as a way to achieve lifelong fitness. Accounting I provides a foundation for students expecting to pursue higher education in any business field. 1005 Fitness and Conditioning ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: One credit in Physical Education This course is designed for students who have completed their physical education requirement and who would like to develop their own individualized fitness program addressing the different components of physical fitness. 1006 PE Activities ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: One credit in Physical Education This course is designed for students who have completed their physical education requirement and who would like to learn and participate in a variety of individual and group lifetime fitness activities. In this semester course.3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. Additionally. individual sports. 306 Accounting II – Automated ½ credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Students must have earned a C or better in Accounting I to enroll in this class. prepare financial statements. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 This course emphasizes the general principles that are used in accounting systems of both service and merchandising businesses. The course will focus on team building and problem solving activities. The students will learn strategies for lifetime fitness. students will build upon Accounting I principles with the introduction of an accounting software program. students will explore the concepts in 43 . team games. Students learn to record and post transactions.

Simulations and project work will provide students with reinforcement of concepts. In addition to the concepts of price. This course may count for ½ year of math. students will examine the concepts of ethical marketing and social responsibility. 304 Introduction to Personal Financial Management ½ Credit (MCC: FINC 120 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 11-12 This course will cover checking account management. MS Publisher and MS Outlook) to complete various business technologies applications. and an introduction to payroll. 303 Principles of Management 1 Credit (MCC: BUS 114 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 11-12 This course will cover the principles and techniques underlying the successful organization and management of businesses. Significant project work and case studies supplement traditional classroom work. 44 . 310 Business Technologies ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course will utilize Microsoft Office 2007 (which includes MS Word. marketing. Assessments will include case studies. MS Excel. distribution. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 This course will explore the role of marketing within the firm and society.Managerial Accounting and special journals. students will be introduced to the management functions necessary to successfully run a small business. review of current trends. MS PowerPoint. and law. Units will reinforce concepts from economics with direct application to the business world of management. product. and the effect of personal debt (including credit history.including financing college and applying for loans. receivables/payables. finance/accounting. 302 Principles of Marketing 1 Credit (MCC: Mktg125 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. Students will create a variety of business related projects and demonstrate proficiency in the applications.) Students will have the opportunity to put their knowledge to use during discussions about real life . savings/investment strategies. and projects. and promotion. Using traditional analyses and extensive projects and case studies. 305 Introduction to Business ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-10 This course is designed as a survey of the general offerings in the business department.

and form components into their web pages and use text formatting. Through the use of different text editing applications students will learn how to construct web pages that conform to the industry standards. It gives students exposure to occupational areas combined with an opportunity to experience technical specialties. This course uses a web-based curriculum with online assessments. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Student must have a current Internet Access Form on file This course will focus on the web site development process using the XHTML standard. Note: Juniors and seniors interested in courses offered at MST should consider selecting the following courses. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I with a C or better or teacher recommendation Students must be comfortable working in Windows 95 or 98 This course presents an in-depth exposure to computer hardware and operating systems. install operating systems. 1402 Introduction to Computer Repair 1 Credit (GBCC: IST 113 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. constructing. It includes instruction and activities in designing. and 45 . tables. Through hands-on activities and laboratory exercises students learn how to assemble and configure a computer. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I with a C or better or teacher recommendation This course will introduce students to programming concepts and design by emphasizing. It teaches the safe use of tools. Students will focus on applying these skills while working with programs such as Alice and Scratch. and CSS for page layout and site design. Programming theory and logic will be presented with hands on practice in model environments. Each will have a component that will draw upon entrepreneurship. graphics. multimedia. 1401 Fundamentals of Web Page Design ½ Credit (MCC: CIS 124 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. Computer Programming and Networking Education/CISCO Academy 1428 Introduction to Computer Programming ½ Credit (MCC: CIS112 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. operating and evaluating systems. equipment. It provides students with an introduction to potential careers and their requirements. Data flow. and planning methods will be emphasized. Students will also learn how to incorporate text. manipulation.TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Technology Education in the Secondary School provides a study of the systems of industry and technology and their applications. Students learn the functionality of hardware components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. The knowledge and skills acquired through Technology Education will assist students in making informed decisions regarding further education and/or occupational choices. This course uses a web- based curriculum with online assessments. “systems thinking” as an approach to solving computer problems. materials and processes.

A major focus of this course is on switched networks including virtual LANs. COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY The study of the technical information systems. The material presented in this course is designed to prepare students for the industry recognized CCNA and CCENT certifications. composition. It is designed to acquaint students with typical computer-aided-design fundamentals. reception. transmission. careers and their requirements through constructive activities involving safe and proper involvement in processes relating to message ideation. for college credit available only to grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I with a C or better or teacher recommendation Students must be comfortable working in Windows 95 or 98 and must have a current Internet Access form on file. 1405 CISCO Networking III & IV 1 Credit (GBCC: IST-121 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: Completion of CISCO Networking II with a C or better. A major focus of this course is on routing and remote access. interpretation and reaction. It provides hands on instruction to networking and the Internet using tools and hardware commonly found in the home and small business environment. 1407 Introduction to CADD I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is the study of communications using computer graphics. 46 . This course uses a web-based curriculum with online assessments. and security. Successful students will learn basic commands and how to use these commands to produce manufacturing and engineering drawings and other useful graphics. The material presented in this course is designed to prepare students for the industry recognized CompTIA A+ certification. 1403 CISCO Networking I & II 1 Credit (GBCC: IST-118 – 3 Credits) See details on page 51 Available to students in grades 10-12. The material presented in this course is designed to prepare students for the industry recognized CCNA and CCENT certifications. and protocols installed in enterprise networks. This course uses a web-based curriculum with online assessments. IP Telephony. Student must have current Internet Access form on file This course familiarizes students with equipment. This course uses a web-based curriculum with online assessments. applications. The primary objective of this course is to provide the student with a general understanding of computer hardware and software.troubleshoot hardware and software problems. This course will introduce students to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. Advanced routing concepts are also introduced including the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) routing protocols.

Adobe Photoshop is used to advance student learning in computer graphics and to reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. These programs and projects are related directly to technology found in modern industry. mouse pads. students will have the opportunity to demonstrate individual expression through the production of custom images. 1409 Control Technology I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course provides an introduction to the interaction of computers and machines. screen-printing. Successful students will understand robotics. business cards. computer aided machining. and flyers. and screen-printed articles. 1411 Graphic Arts I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course introduces students to the fundamentals of media design. through the use of conventional printing and computer image editing techniques. and machine interfacing. Successful students will gain an in-depth knowledge of drafting fundamentals and 3-D and solid modeling concepts. 1412 Graphic Arts II ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Graphic Arts I This course is designed to build on the skills acquired in Graphic Arts I. 1410 Control Technology II ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Control Technology I This course emphasizes more complex and advanced computer controlled machine projects. CNC machining will be introduced at this level. Topics include Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator. As part of the learning process. pneumatics. students will develop individual and group projects emphasizing effective communication. 47 . Students also learn about traditional graphics techniques. relief printing. Students will do assignments that will result in the generation of usable finished products such as T-shirts. Students begin by constructing simple machines and advance to more complex computer controlled machines. posters. Students will work toward the actual construction of automated work fixtures and machines.1408 CADD II ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to CADD I This course is designed to improve student’s knowledge in CADD in order to produce more sophisticated computer graphics. and copyright issues and ethics. Students will work in groups on increasingly more complex machine programming.

film. Technical skills will be emphasized through hands on instruction and practice. It is a study of the camera. 1414 Photography II ½Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Photography I A 35mm SLR camera is required for this course. and the hot and cold working of steel. Students will learn how to read and create technical drawings. 48 . 1425 Creative Welding ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Minimum score of 90% on Safety Exam This course is an introduction to basic welding skills and metal working techniques used in the exploration of metal sculpture. oxyacetylene techniques. This course is advanced studio/seminar classes for students who wish to further explore the technical and creative aspects of photography. Lab time will be spent designing and creating prototype products for possible mass production and sales. Students will explore digital photography and computer enhancement using Adobe Photoshop Software. exposure. plasma arc cutting. use layout tools. weld design and finishing techniques. 1415 Wood Engineering and Manufacturing I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is an introduction to manufacturing technology using wood as a production medium. MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY Manufacturing technology is the study of the application of the technological system of production and material processing that efficiently utilizes resources to convert raw and recycled materials into industrial and consumer goods for sale in the marketplace. history of welding. All grades will be based on the collaborative success of the product. safely set up and operate power equipment. identification of metals. Students will work with shielded metal arc welding.1413 Photography I ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 A 35mm SLR manual camera is required for this course. This course covers instruction in safety procedures. There will be opportunity for creative expression and practical application. This course introduces students to basic black and white photography. Students will integrate traditional darkroom techniques and digital camera/computer technology to manipulate imagery. developing and printing as well as the history and aesthetics of photography.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Construction technology is the study of the effective use of materials. 1518 Culinary Skills and Procedures ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is designed to improve the knowledge regarding proper food handling skills. This course may be taken as preparation for the culinary arts course at the Manchester School of Technology. construction materials. This course is designed for students with career interest in architecture. FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Family and Consumer Science courses prepare male and female students for gainful employment after graduation by acting as a precursor to courses offered at MST and various Associate Degree and Bachelor Degree programs in related fields. equipment and management resources to produce a structure on a site. students will have the opportunity to prepare foods using multiple techniques. foundations. 1418 Architectural Drafting and Drawing ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is designed to introduce basic architecture and architectural CAD using Data CAD software. techniques and job opportunities in construction technology. A variety of drawing projects will help students explore and appreciate three dimensional architectural design and drawing. materials. Successful students will learn advanced woodworking processes. producing and marketing products.1416 Wood Engineering and Manufacturing II ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Prerequisite: Wood Engineering and Manufacturing I This course will further develop the topics presented in Wood Engineering and Manufacturing. Students will learn about the processes. In addition. proper healthy culinary preparation techniques. labor. Students will learn about blueprints. It also examines the interrelationship between management and production elements. 49 . systems. and framing techniques. 1417 Architectural Applications ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 This course is an introduction to construction technology. engineering or vocational construction. Students will form a company and be engaged in designing. and proper sanitation.

50 Leadership ½ Credit Available to students in grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Teacher interview – Limited availability This course in leadership has its major emphasis on developing personal leadership skills and an understanding of group processes in a democratic society. This course should be taken as preparation for the culinary arts course at the Manchester School of Technology. and projects. and presentation methods. and to prepare students to assume leadership roles in the school and community. CAREER INTERNSHIP 22 School-to-Career Internship ½ Credit Available to students in grades 11-12 Career Internship is a one semester work-based exploration that offers juniors and seniors a real work experience in conjunction with academic classes. evaluation. This course is for elective credit. Video presentations are used to demonstrate various food techniques used in professional kitchens. or all. OTHER ELECTIVES Directed Study ½ Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Required: Mentor teacher agreement Students may choose to study an academic topic of interest in-depth through this Directed Study option. The purpose of the course is to foster in students a better understanding of themselves and their capacity for leadership in society. Career field choice should be relevant to a particular career interest. Students will be exposed to all aspects of industry in a particular career field. but assistance may be provided to those in need (see list provided in Student Services). fads and fallacies. regional and international foods. and dieting. meal preparation. students are expected to arrange for the school- based mentor. establish objectives. nutrition. Successful students will learn to prepare and demonstrate recipes of their choice as well as understand current issues concerning health. weight control. A demonstration of learning is required at completion. Businesses will provide the work-based mentors. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor the student will develop a proposal. Students will work at a Department of Labor pre-approved work-site under the supervision of a work-site mentor. These work experiences may or may not be paid 50 . This course is graded Pass/Fail and not included in GPA. Students will also work with a school-based mentor who will coordinate the academic focus. Students are expected to secure their own work sites. however. The student and the teacher may design a service-learning component as part of the curriculum. components of the all aspects of the industry work experience.504 Creative Foods ½ Credit Prerequisite: Culinary Skills and Procedures Available to students in grades 10-12 This course examines complicated food preparation techniques. studying certain.

PROJECT RUNNING START The New Hampshire Running Start Program is a special higher education initiative for high school students to enroll in college courses offered by the New Hampshire Community College System. However. College courses are offered during the day at Goffstown High School at a significant reduction in tuition. writing. college credit is available only to students in grades 11 and 12 per our agreement with the NHCC System. This program can lead to a GHS diploma. and learning rates. Please note that classes at the Alternative Program are designed to meet minimum graduation requirements. Though some Running Start courses may be open to students in grades nine and ten for high school credit. THE ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM The Alternative Program offers classes in the major curricular areas. Science Faculty. Students or parents seeking more information should contact their guidance counselor. The Alternative Program is geared toward students who need to learn in a less structured. Offering a wide variety of skill levels. self-paced computer-learning environment. the CCC curriculum provides instruction and practice and assessment at the students' own levels. more integrated environment. Internship applications are available through Student Services. meeting high school and college requirements at the same time. Successful students earn dual credit. COMMUNITY SERVICE & SERVICE LEARNING Student Assistant Service Credit Available to students in grades 9-12 Office Assistant GTV Custodial Assistant Information Center Tech Help Desk Lab Assistant Students may receive service recognition on their transcript for performing basic clerical and office tasks under the supervision of the Information Center. Student Assistants are assigned on a semester basis. Custodial Staff. A fee of $100 is paid to NHCC for each course. these courses are not intended to be college preparatory and will not satisfy the NCAA Clearinghouse’s definition of “core courses” for athletic eligibility purposes. Students planning to enroll in this career exploration must have completed the approval process prior to submitting the request to the School-to-Career Supervisor. SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS CCC® COMPUTERIZED CURRICULUM LAB The CCC Computer lab offers students the opportunity to improve on reading.positions and will depend on the individual situation. or Technology Staff. THE GAP AT GHS – ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM The primary goal of the GAP at GHS is to facilitate adult student’s completion of their high school education by providing a flexible and supportive environment where the foundation is 51 . Office Secretaries. and mathematics skills in an individualized.

All previously earned high school credit is accepted.laid for success in either post-secondary education or the job market. 52 . Any student 16 years of age or older (no maximum age limit) can enter the GAP program and work toward their high school completion in either of two ways: Adult Diploma Program: Students must earn 20 credits to meet the graduation requirements of the Goffstown Adult Education Program. GED preparation classes are offered throughout the semester. The Adult Diploma Program also provides opportunity for those students who are day enrolled and working toward the traditional high school diploma to remediate failed credit and/or earn new credit toward their graduation requirements. Adult education classes are run in the evenings to allow working individuals better access to courses. Students are evaluated to determine areas of strength and weakness. There may be fees associated with this program. General Education Development Certificate (GED): Students achieve the required state standard scores on the GED test to earn a GED Certificate. contact the GAP director for more information. The GAP at GHS also offers community-learning opportunities for non-degree candidates. The Goffstown School Board and the State of New Hampshire recognize the diploma students receive. The GED is accepted in most branches of the military and at many colleges. Adults returning to college may elect to enroll in credit courses to freshen their math or writing skills. Students may also demonstrate life experience learning to receive additional credit toward graduation. enrichment classes are offered in a variety of areas offering community members access to and instruction on studio and equipment. GHS students seeking this alternative must have approval by their guidance counselor and the adult education director. instruction is individualized to assist self-motivated students successfully pass the exam.