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IH IN S I D E

GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
report from the
DR GORDON LGBT
NEUFELD BULLYING
WORKSHOP

LIVE
INTERVENTIONS
CYBER-
BULLYING

RACIAL
BULLYING EDPC 505
Crisis/Trauma Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
STOPPING
THE CYCLE

DEFINING
BULLYING

prepared by
Petra Hicks

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

DEFINING
BULLYING

exploring
prepared by
Petra Hicks
high school
bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

“A person is being
bullied when he or
she is exposed,
repeatedly and over
time, to negative
actions on the part of
one or more other
persons”.
Olweus,1991,1993 (as cited in Kaiser & Rasminsky, 2009, p, 280

w h a t i s
bullying?
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•Physical
•Verbal
•Relational
•Sexual harassment
•Cyberbullying
•Racial/Cultural
•LGBT Kaiser & Rasminsky (2009)

t y p e s o f
bullying
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•About 6% of students aged
12-19 report bullying on a
weekly basis
• About 8% report that they
are victims of bullying
weekly
•About 1% report that they
are both victimized and bully
others on a weekly basis

Public Safet Canada (2008)

C a n a d i a n
Statistics
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•10% to 15% of students
aged11-15 are involved in
physical bullying on a weekly
basis
•55%of 8-9 graders and 61%
of 10-11graders have reported
they have been physically
sexually harassed

Public Safety Canada (2008)

C a n a d i a n
Statistics
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•Bullying is about establishing
status, power and control
•Bullying increases in Grade 8
•More boys are involved in physical
bullying
• in the form of physical attacks
and aggressive behavior
•Boys use verbal aggression
•More boys sexually harass others
•More boys are bully-victims Kaiser & Rasminsky (2009)
Public Safety Canada (2008)
O’Neil (n.d)

BOYS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•More girls are involved in social
Bullying. It is about relational
goals concern with the making and
breaking of relationships
•Bullying increases in Grade 9
•More girls are pressured to go on
dates and to have sex
•Girls are bullied by both boys and
girls equally
•More girls are victims of sexual
harassment
Gruber & Fineran (2007)
Fineran & Bennett 1999 ( as cited in Gruber & Fineran 2007)
Dake, Price & Telljohanna (2003)
Prevnet (2007)
O’Neil (n.d.)

GIRLS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

•Absenteeism
•Suffer from psychiatric problems
•Suffer symptoms of depression
•Experience suicidal ideation or
even committing suicide
•Suffer from eating disorders
•Suffer feelings of loneliness
•Have problems with school
adjustment
Dake, Price & Telljohanna (2003, p.3)
O’Niel (n.d)

EFFECTS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

CYBER
BULLYING

prepared by
Diana Ashrafhosseini

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Cyberbullying
“Cyberbullying is any behavior performed
through electronic or digital media by
individuals or groups that repeatedly
communicates hostile or aggressive messages
intended to inflict harm or discomfort on
others.” Tokunaga (2010)

• One of the most recent types of bullying
-more than 97% of youth in Canada and US have access to Internet in some
way

• Usually starts at the schools and continues at
home

• 3 conditions: Behavior is repeated, involves
psychological harm & carried out with intent
– Cassidy, Jackson & Brown (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
The difference between
Cyberbullying and
Traditional Bullying
1.Students who would not otherwise engage in traditional bullying
behaviors do so online due to the anonymity offered through electronic
media.

2. The lack of supervision in electronic media from teachers, school
administrators or parents.

3. The accessibility to the target

4. Cyberbullying extends beyond school grounds and follows the
targets into their homes.

Tokunaga (2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Who is more likely to be a
victim of cyberbullying?
• Grades 7-8: more likely to be bullies and be
bullied

• Girls / boys: mixed results when looking at
different studies but in general boys are just as
likely as girls to be a victim of cyberbullying

• Minorities: based on race, culture, religion, sexual
orientation, etc.

• Students who show low self-esteem
Tokunaga (2010)
Cassidy, Jackson & Brown (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Outcomes of Cyberbullying
 

• Depends on the frequency, length and severity
of acts
• Related to:
– mental health problems
– social problems
– drop in academic
– quality of family relationships

– Tokunaga (2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Strategies for dealing with
Cyberbullying
• Active versus passive strategies

• Technological coping strategies

• Approx. 15-35% of youths confront cyberbulliers by telling
them to stop

• Why do they rarely report to adults?
– Necessary skills
– Perceived as childish
– May limit own freedom

Tokunaga (2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
To Witness Cyberbullying
• Reporting an incident to the police

• More likely to report to school
officials when they witness
cyberbullying

• In both cases, students are more
likely to tell friends than adults (70%
vs 18%) Cassidy, Jackson & Brown (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Solutions to cyberbullying
1. develop programs to teach students about cyberbullying and its
effects; ( 19%)
2. set up an anonymous phone-in line where students can report
cyberbullying; (18%)
3. make it known that the school does not tolerate cyberbullying;
4. punish students who participate in cyberbullying;
5. have a zero tolerance policy towards cyberbullying;
6. involve the police in cases of cyberbullying;
7. get parents, students and school staff together to talk about solutions;
8. develop a positive school culture where students learn to be kind to
each other;
9. offer lots of extra-curricular activities so students won’t have time to
cyberbully;
10. work on creating positive self-esteem in students.

Cassidy, Jackson & Brown (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

ETHNOCULTURALLY-
BASED BULLYING

prepared by
Cary Li

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Canadian Statistics
•20% of the Canadian population was
born in another country

• 19% of immigrant children are under
the age of 15

•Almost 70% of the children had no
knowledge of English when they came
to Canada

(Sta%s%cs  Canada,  2008)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Reasons why new immigrant students
are at high risk for victimization

• Unable to communicate
• Don’t understand cultural conventions
• Look different

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
What is Ethnoculturally-based
bullying?

• “Any physical or verbal behaviour used to
hurt another person because of his or her
ethnicity .” (culture, colour or religion)

(Public  safety  Canada,    2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
The prevalence of
Ethnoculturally-based bullying

• 40% of high school students from minority
groups reported being bullied because of
their ethnicity.

(Public  safety  Canada,    2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Which group, listed below, has
the highest risk for racial
victimization?

• African Canadian?
• Asian Canadian?
• European Canadian?
• Native-Canadian ?

(Public  safety  Canada,    2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Which group, listed below, has
the highest risk for racial
victimization?

• African Canadian
• Asian Canadian
• European Canadian?
• Native-Canadian ?

(Sta%s%cs  Canada,  2008  ;Anne-­‐
Claire  et  al,  2009)  

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Types of Racial bullying
Harassment

• Physical violence

• Verbal abuse
–Menacing forms, including racial slurs or name-
calling
--->Related to language or ethnicity,
Such as, imitating Chinese speech ; calling a
participant “nigger.”

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Types  of  Racial  bullying  

Stereotypes
• Girls  Academic  ability

• Boys    ABtude,  Physical  weakness
       E.g.  Chinese  males  are  “less  masculine”  or  “weaker”;
                   Double-­‐bind  phenomenon  (Belle  Liang  et  al,  2010)

Social  exclusion

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Other individual factors
•School size
•School climate & support
•Teacher & Parents’ racial attitudes
• Racial mixing and racial fairness

(Anne-Claire Larochette, 2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Those ethnoculturally-based bullying
experiences negatively affect youths’
mental health and well-being in the
long term.

(Belle Liang et al., 2007)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
hool   s uppor t  
r   div e r s it y   &   s c
Teache

Racial  Bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Consequences

– Shame of their race
– Lack of ethnic identity development
– Depressive symptoms
– Commit suicides
– Commit outrages on innocent one

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Long Term Consequences

– Shame of their race
– Lack of ethnic identity development
– Depressive symptoms
– Commit suicides
– Commit outrages on innocent one

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Interventions
– Recognize that racial bullying occurs in school
– Be prepared to host professional development workshops for
parents, students, and staff
– Authorize multicultural counselors to encourage students to
research their ethnic heritage
– Form groups for racial minority students to address the ethnic
identity exploration and development of students
– Help students manage the impact of others’ negative
perceptions.
– Use case scenarios depicting problems involving racism,
culture, religions as catalysts for discussion
– Encourage the development of self-acceptance by reminding
students of their inner as well as outer beauty and the
significant aspects of their cultural heritage

(Rose Merrell-James, 2006)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

LGBT
BULLYING

exploring
prepared by
Ashley Daniel Foot
high school
bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
F A C T

Since we started this class on September 7, nine
young men have committed suicide due to anti-
gay, homophobic bullying.

Dandes (2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
F A C T

Just three Fridays ago, Brandon Bittner threw
himself in front of a truck on busy highway in
Middleburg, PA.

(Purcell 2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

Seth Walsh

Asher Brown

Billy Lucas
(Voice of Ellen Degeneres)

L G B T B U L LY I N G
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

EPIDEMIC

STAT S
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

STAT S GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

89%
heard the word “gay” in a
negative way

84%
verbally harrased due to
sexual orientation

STAT S GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

52.9%
victim of cyberbullying
due to sexual orientation

58.1%
PHYSICALLY harassed
and assaulted because of
sexual orientation

STAT S GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

23.2%
chance that someone who
has been attacked or
harassed because of
sexual orientation or
perceived sexual
orientation will attempt
suicide.

STAT S GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

97%
of US teachers fail to
respond when they hear
anti-gay comments.

STAT S GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

So what happens to bullied
LGBTTTIQ students at
school?

❖ Truancy (skipping class)
❖ Fights at school
❖ 1.5 times more likely to have
carried a weapon at school.
❖ Suicide attempts
❖Suicide

CONSEQUENCES GLSEN (2009)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

AGENCY

INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

Resisting
Challenging
Interrogating
questioning

INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

Safer schools
legal mandates
supportive climate
queer youth
development
INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

No tokenism
curriculum
integration
Separate programs
Gay- straight
alliances
INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

INTERVENTIONS
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

THE ANSWER?
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

DR GORDON
NEUFELD
WORKSHOP

prepared by exploring
Patricia Ann
Wallace high school bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Dr. Gordon Neufeld
Workshop

Bullies: Their Making and
Unmaking

“We need to make sure we can send them
back out there safely, before we create a safe
place for them to be in.” Patricia

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Where does it come from?
• NOT Genetic
• NOT Behavioral
• Bullying is a developmental issue that
involves “wayward” or “aberrant”
instincts. It is not a learnt behavior so
it cannot be unlearnt.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
A Working definition
• Bullies assert dominance by exploiting
vulnerability of others. This is
accomplished through put downs and
through intimidation.
• Not all aggressive and mean behavior
is considered bullying.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Projection of Purpose
• This has led psychologists off on the wrong
track. Essentially the projection of purpose is
to come up with some idea as to why a bully
does what s/he does (bullying) then to project
that purpose unto the bully. Psychologists
formulate interventions based on what we
think the reason is, dealing with the situation
as if the purpose were valid. This could lead to
making situations worse.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Attachment Theory
• John Bowlby (1988)
• Attachment theory is a theory (or
group of theories) about the
psychological tendency to seek
closeness to another person, to feel
secure when that person is present,
and to feel anxious when that person
is absent.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Attachment Theory
Characteristics of Attachment
• Safe Haven: When the child feel threatened or afraid,
he or she can return to the caregiver for comfort and
soothing.
• Secure Base: The caregiver provides a secure and
dependable base for the child to explore the world.
• Proximity Maintenance: The child strives to stay
near the caregiver, thus keeping the child safe.
• Separation Distress: When separated from the
caregiver, the child will become upset and distressed.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Neufeld’s Theory
• Entrenched in the Attachment Theory and
Hierarchy
• Two essential components contributing to the
Bully Syndrome: Attachment - alpha instincts
(compelled to dominate) and Defended against
vulnerability (devoid of caring and
responsibility). Each alone does not make a
bully but the two together are necessary

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Traits of a bully
• Schools have become bully factories. It use to
be that you would know who the bullies were.
However, there are so many bullies in schools
that our children are now “walking amongst
the bullies” which is very different that what
we encountered as children.
• A bully has to get his/her own way, demands
deference, is sensitive to slight, full of foul
frustration and backs into attachment.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Interventions
• It is difficult to outline the interventions
without discussing the theories behind what
makes a bully.
• There are programs that work but we may not
understand why they are working. It is
important to look at the theories or
philosophies involved.
• One of the key components is the establishing
of a caring dominances. This involves many
steps but it is essential to “collect the alpha
child” and provide a “touch of proximity”

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Children aren’t responsible for each
other
• Adults are responsible to work with the bullies
and work with the victims. It is not the
responsibility of the victims to change bullies
• In order to keep children safe, both the bullies
and the victims need to be shielded by safe and
caring relationships

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Interventions
Programs which seem to be effective
are those such as “Knitting the
Generations” (pair of teens with
elders) and “Bring in the
Babies” (allowing teens experience
the dependency of an infant) address
the development issues of hierarchy
and attachment theory

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
INTERVIEWS WITH
ADMINISTRATION AND
BEHAVIOUR
TECHNICIANS

LIVE
INTERVENTIONS
@ CENTENNIAL HEIGHTS
REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

prepared by exploring
Maya Volpato high school bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Zero Tolerance Policy
• “We do not tolerate inappropriate
language or tone, insults,
harassment, bullying, or other
hurtful acts.”

• Applies on school property, school
buses or at school authorized events
or activities

Centennial Regional High School Governing Board, 2005.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Disciplinary Repercussions
1) Student’s parents/guardians are informed

2) Referral to student support centre for
consultation

3) Possible suspension or expulsion
depending
on severity
–Section 242 of the Education Act gives the
Board the power to expel students for “just and
sufficient cause”;
–“this Board believes…, acts of
intimidation, violence, or threat of violence
are deemed “just and sufficient cause.”
Centennial Regional High School Governing Board, 2005.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Behavioral Technicians report…

• Cyberbullying very prevalent
(threats, harassment, rumours, pictures)

–Facebook
–Text messaging
–MSN
–You Tube
–Teacher as victims

* Major grey area
-when is it a school problem?

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Gender Differences
• Social bullying prevalent in grade 8-9
girls (“the drama years”)
–Rejection
–Social isolation
–Ostracizing
–Verbal bullying, spreading rumours
–Possessiveness with friends (chose one
over another)
–“Frienemies”

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Con’t
• Girls are less overt than boys in
bullying styles
• Boys are usually proud to be bullies
and take on a more active role

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Who gets bullied?

• Anyone who is different can be a
target for bullying

• Importance in breaking trends
carried over from elementary school
to high school bullying

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Prevention
• Zero tolerance policy

• Administration, teachers and behavioural techs
meet feeder middle school staff annually to
discuss concerns;
– teens at risk for bullying
– current bullies
– intimidating cliques

• Sensitization
– inappropriate jokes & remarks
– talking about the issue, awareness

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Prevention con’t…

• Student Leadership committee
– empowering students to create change within their
environment

– promoting reporting

• Increase parascolastic activities
• Student support center
• Incident report forms
• Preach accountability
• Anti-bullying pledges
• Filtering software

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Interventions

“A big part of making successful
interventions is remembering how it
felt to be a teenager.”

(Segal, P. personal communication, November, 10, 2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Helping Victims
• Support center counseling
• Empowerment tools
• After school sports, clubs, activities
• Self defense tools
• Assertiveness training
• Buddy system with peer role model
• Boundary control activities
• Calling bully out on their behaviors
• 3-4 prong approach
• Role play training

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
• Teaching victims to stand up for
themselves is critical, because they
will face the same problem when the
next bully comes along.
• Ask victims how they want the
problem to be handled. Give them
control and power in what often feels
like a powerless situation.
• Teaching the idea that there will
always be a bully but you don’t always
have to be a victim. “It gets better”

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Helping Bullies
• State clearly school’s zero tolerance
• Support center counselling
• Remember a bully is often a victim
• Identify needs, motivation, underlying issue
• Teach empathy development →guilt, shame
• Importance of parental/DYP involvement
• Importance of external resources in creating
“real” change
• Disciplinary action
• In school bullying consequences as much as
possible

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
What's the message?
 Collaborative multi treatment approach

–Teachers
–Behavioral Technicians
–Guidance Counselors
–Administrators
–Coaches
–Student leaders
–Staff from feeder schools
–Parental involvement
–Community involvement

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
Helpful Links
• Bullying
A resource site that tries to combat bullying
www.bullying.org
• Cyberbullying
Information about cyberbullying
www.cyberbullying.ca
• Cyberbullying Prevention
Preventing and handling cyberbullying and harassment
http://netbullies.com
• Info Cyber Bullying
Website with information on cyberbullying, the laws and prevention tips
www.stopcyberbullying.org
• Kids Help Phone
Online site for kids being bullied
www.kidshelpphone.ca
• Media Awareness Network
Tools to protect your children from cyberbullying
www.media-awareness.ca
• Safe kids
Site about safe cell phone use and Internet safety
www.safekids.com
• Safe Teens
Internet safety information
www.safeteens.com
• The Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network
Provides assessment and intervention tools to promote policy related to bullying
www.prevnet.ca
• Bullying Canada
www.bullyingcanada.ca
• Stop/Report a Bully
www.stopabully.ca

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
D I S C U S S I O N

–How comfortable are you with dealing
with homophobic bullying? How will you
address the root cause?

–Statistics show that cyberbullying is
prominent in high schools. Most schools
use a filtering software to restrict access to
online social networks often used by
students. Do you think that denying access
to such websites in this manner is an
effective bullying prevention tool?

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
D I S C U S S I O N

–If bullying is a result of developmental
issues, as theorized by Dr. Neufeld, why
would methods such as battling against
"symptom behavior" not work? 

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E S O U R C E S

A Few Local Resources

CAVAC – Centre d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels
www.cavac.qc.ca

Montreal Centre
1030, Beaubien East, 4th floor
(514) 277-9860

East End Montreal
6070, Sherbrooke East, Suite 207
(514) 645-9333

West End Montreal
404, Décarie Blvd., Suite 306
(514) 744-5048
Provide assistance to person of any age victim of a crime – whether it be through a gesture, threat or omission –
committed in Quebec against his or her person or property. Crime may take the form of taxing, bullying at school,
threats, burglaries, harassment or assault.
Services:
-post-trauma
-psycho-judicial intervention
-information on rights and remedies
-technical assistance in proceedings
-referral to specialized services

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E S O U R C E S

Sun Youth
www.sunyouth.org


4251 St-Urbain
(514) 842-6822

Sun Youth’s Crime Prevention Department conducts social interventions and prevention programs geared
towards bullying and conflict resolution within Montreal schools.

La Maison de jeunes de la Côte-des-Neiges inc.
mdjcdn@videotron.ca


3220 Appleton St.
(514) 342-5235

Provides teenagers with a safe space community center offering resources, varied activities, prevention skills
and intervention services.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E S O U R C E S

Head and Hands
www.headandhands.ca


5833 Sherbrooke St. West
(514) 481-0277

Free counseling, legal services, interventions, drop-in for teens 12-17 years old.

Project 10
www.p10.qc.ca


2075 Plessis St., Suite 307
(514) 989-4585

Promotes personal, social, sexual and mental well being of LGBITTQ of youth ages 14-25 years old.
-Telephone line
-Drop in center
-Interventions
-Counselling
-Peer support
-Workshops

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E S O U R C E S

Tel-Jeunes
• (1-800) 263-2266
Aider, c’est branché! is a Tel-jeunes program that meets the needs of young people wishing to help peers.
Promotes the development and supports the formation of young peer counselling groups by:
1. Providing dynamic workshops on topics that affect youth;
2. Offering training to school personnel wishing to start a young peer counselling group at their school;
3. Organizing a provincial young peer counsellors congress.
4. Allowing school personnel to network via the website www.aidercestbranche.com.

Kid’s Help Phone
www.kidshelpphone.ca

• (1-800) 668-6868

Provides teenagers, victims or bystanders with information on bullying. Counsellors available by phone to
help. Specialized referrals for services.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
stopping
the cycle

nomorebul
lying.tumb
lr.com
pdf of the presentation
resources
raw data and more....

MINI SITE
Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E F E R E N C E S

Anonymous bullying (2007) Retrieved from http://www.montrealfamilies.ca/articles/sept_feature1.htm

Dake, J. A., Price, J. H., & Telljohann, S. K. (2003). The Nature and Extent of Bullying at School: Journal of
School Health, 73(5), 173-180.
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• Public Safety Canada
• Segal, Philip
• Vipond, Angela
• Lagodich, Elizabeth
Centennial Regional High School
Centennial Regional High School
Governing Board, 2005.

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• Anne-Claire Larochette, Ashley Nicole Murphy and Wendy M. Craig, (2010). Racial
Bullying and Victimization in Canadian School-Aged Children Individual and School Level
Effects: School Psychology International Copyright © 2010 SAGE Publications (Los
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in gender and race peer group contexts. Child Development 72, 174–86.
• Liang, Belle , Grossman, Jennifer M. and Deguchi, Makiko(2007) 'Chinese American
Middle School Youths' Experiences of Discrimination and Stereotyping', Qualitative
Research in Psychology, 4: 1, 187 — 205
• Rose Merrell-James (2006). Intra-racial bullying: An issue of multicultural counselling.
Persistently Safe Schools 2006: Collaborating with Students, Families, and Communities

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• hOp://psychology.about.com/od/loveandaOrac%on/a/aOachment01.htm  
• hOp://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=10105
• Neufeld,  G.,  Mate.  G.  (2004).    Hold  on  to  your  kids:    Why  parents  need  to  ma5er  more  than  
peers.    Toronto,  Ontario:    Vintage  Canada
• Neufeld,  G.    (2010).    Bullies:    Their  making  and  unmaking.    Presented  Saint-­‐Jean  Quebec.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
R E F E R E N C E S

Tuesday, November 23, 2010
IH IN S I D E
GH SCHOOL
BULLYING
DIANA ASHRAFHOSSESEINI CARI LI
MAYA VOLPATO
EDPC 505 ASHLEY DANIEL FOOT
PATRICIA ANN WALLACE
PETRA HICKS
Crisis/Trauma
Intervention

Tuesday, November 23, 2010