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C 303 E/156 Official Journal of the European Communities EN 24.10.

2000

The Institute of Nuclear Physics, which comes under the aegis of the Albanian Academy of Sciences, has
set up two inspection teams in the customs divisions of Durres and Tirana. Their duties involve dealing
with illegal trafficking in radioactive waste.

2. The Albanian authorities say that they are unaware of any such pollution in the Adriatic.

The negotiating directives for the future stabilisation and association agreement with the Former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) mention increased supervision and inspection of the transport of sensitive
products, including radioactive materials, as a potential area for cooperation.

(2000/C 303 E/172) WRITTEN QUESTION E-0188/00


by Richard Corbett (PSE) to the Commission

(31 January 2000)

Subject: Interpretation systems with over twenty languages

How far has the Commission progressed in evaluating the feasibility of providing interpretation into over
twenty languages at EU meetings after enlargement to include the Central and Eastern European applicant
countries? Can it confirm that a significant proportion of interpretation will have to take place through a
‘pivot’ language and relayed through a second interpretation into other languages?

If so, has consideration been given to using Esperanto as the pivot language, given that:

 it is neutral and would not thereby give preference to any linguistic group in the EU

 it is a structured and logical language ideally suited to this purpose

 the language can be learnt very quickly?

Answer given by Mr Kinnock on behalf of the Commission

(14 March 2000)

The Commission has since 1990 been organising regular selection tests for freelance interpreters with the
languages of the Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC). At present, a total of around 200
interpreters have been accredited for all CEEC languages. The Honourable Member is invited to refer to the
Commission’s answer to Written Question E-2064/99 by Mr Dupuis (1) of 22 December 1999.

Further investments in training have taken place in these countries and 120 bursaries have been provided
for students of these languages in 1999 and 2000.

This policy is consistent with the respect for cultural and linguistic diversity that is a key element of the
European construction.

As to interpretation, the Joint interpretation and conference service (JICS) endeavours to ensure that
interpretation is direct from one language into any other or, if this is not possible, by relay through not
more than one intermediate stage. This intermediate stage or ‘relay’ language varies according to the
composition of the team and the languages spoken.

Although the proportion of interpretation through the existing relay system will certainly increase, there is
no reason why this should evolve into a system with the same relay or ‘pivotal languages’ being used in all
meetings or indeed just a single relay language in any given meeting. Interpreters may be able to choose
between several ‘relay’ languages depending on cultural affinities or ‘natural relays’ based on languages
from the same language families.
24.10.2000 EN Official Journal of the European Communities C 303 E/157

As a result of various representations from Parliament, the Commission has asked the JICS to set up a
working party to examine the Neighbour and Relais projects that deal with the learning of Esperanto and
the degree to which its use as an intermediate language in interpretation would be feasible.

(1) OJ C 219, 1.8.2000, p. 81.

(2000/C 303 E/173) WRITTEN QUESTION E-0189/00

by Salvador Jové Peres (GUE/NGL)


and Pedro Marset Campos (GUE/NGL) to the Commission

(31 January 2000)

Subject: Tomato imports from Morocco

Because the ceilings on imports of tomatoes from Morocco have been exceeded, the provisions of the
Association Agreement with the Kingdom of Morocco have been applied requiring import certificates to
be provided.

According to reports in the press, the management committee for the fruit and vegetables sector is to meet
on 20 January 2000 to discuss a proposal to abolish the requirement for import certificates for Moroccan
tomatoes.

Is the Commission sure that there is an adequate legal basis for using a management committee procedure
to amend the provisions of the Association Agreement with Morocco?

(2000/C 303 E/174) WRITTEN QUESTION E-0190/00

by Salvador Jové Peres (GUE/NGL)


and Pedro Marset Campos (GUE/NGL) to the Commission

(31 January 2000)

Subject: Tomato imports from Morocco

Because the ceilings on imports of tomatoes from Morocco have been exceeded, the provisions of the
Association Agreement with the Kingdom of Morocco have been applied requiring import certificates to
be provided.

According to reports in the press, the management committee for the fruit and vegetables sector is to meet
on 20 January 2000 to discuss a proposal to abolish the requirement for import certificates for Moroccan
tomatoes.

According to media reports, the Commission has agreed to end the requirement for import certificates on
condition that Morocco undertakes to comply with the quotas laid down in the Association Agreement.

Does the Commission believe that promises need to be secured concerning compliance with the provisions
of international agreements? Does it believe that a promise to this effect is worth more and offers greater
guarantees than the actual signature of the Association Agreement by Morocco’s representatives?

In the absence of import certificates and bearing in mind the overrun of the quotas that has so far
occurred, what measures will the Commission take to control tomato imports from Morocco and ensure
compliance with the Association Agreement?