November 25

Aquaponi cs in schools

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A how to guide
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This report focuses on all aspects of setting up an Aquaponics program within a school. It contains information on Aquaponics, research relating to Aquaponics and how to apply for funding, purchasing, permits, building and running processes. This report is a guideline only based on events experienced and undertaken through planning, building and implementing Aquaponics at St Joseph’s College, Katherine.

Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Contents
Introduction – What is Aquaponics?............................................................................4 Desired Outcomes......................................................................................................5 Rationale....................................................................................................................6 Research....................................................................................................................8 Environmental Benefits...........................................................................................8 Economic Prospects................................................................................................9 Educational Opportunities.....................................................................................10 Cost Factors..............................................................................................................11 Funding Process.......................................................................................................12 Quotation and Purchasing Process...........................................................................13 Permit Process..........................................................................................................14 Building Process.......................................................................................................14 Operations Process...................................................................................................15 Expansion Possibilities..............................................................................................16 Future Evaluation.....................................................................................................16 Recommendations....................................................................................................16 Conclusion................................................................................................................17 Authors Note............................................................................................................17 References...............................................................................................................18 Attachments.............................................................................................................19 Attachment 1 – Survey Example...........................................................................19 Attachment 2 – Homestead Aquaponics System...................................................23 Attachment 3 – Simple Layout Example................................................................24 Attachment 3 – Simple Layout Example

2|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Figure 1 – Aquaponics Cycle.......................................................................................4 Figure 2 - Recycle, Shower, Power results..................................................................6 Figure 3 - Topics Students want to study...................................................................7 Table 1 - Litres of water per A$100 of Output - Eamus (2003)...................................9 Table 2 - Aquaponics Program Budget - Initial Setup...............................................11 Table 3 - Quotation and Purchasing Guide...............................................................13

Table 3 - Quotation and Purchasing Guide

3|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

What is Aquaponics?
This report focuses on all aspects of setting up an Aquaponics program within a school. It contains information on Aquaponics, research relating to Aquaponics and how to apply for funding, purchasing, permits, building and running processes. This report is a guideline only based on events experienced and undertaken through planning, building and implementing Aquaponics at St Joseph’s College, Katherine. Aquaponics can be described as a combination between Hydroponics and Aquaculture (aquaponics.com.au, 2010). An aquatic animal (not limited to but this report will refer to fish) is cultured in a large tank of water. As fish are fed and live in the environment they release nutrients into the water. This water is then circulated through growth beds for plants. The plant absorbs the nutrients and the clean water is then recirculated back to the fish. This is a constant cycle and is completely organic, as any introduced chemicals may have a detrimental effect on fish species (See Figure 1 for a visual interpretation). Fish and plants are then harvested and consumed or sold. Aquaponics is a completely natural, organic cycle as any chemicals added to the water would kill the fish.

4|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Figure 1 – Aquaponics Cycle

Desired Outcomes
There are many outcomes that are possible from having access to an Aquaponics kit for schools. St Joseph’s College desired outcomes are listed as follows: • To create an alternative learning environment where the St Joseph’s College community can view, experience, learn and contribute to environmental sustainability. To provide students a practical arena to apply, analyse and evaluate acquired theoretical knowledge. To eventually create a complete environmentally sustainable education program that creates and utilises its own power, stock and funding.

These outcomes are the three main areas of focus for the St Joseph’s College Aquaponics Program. As the program expands and evolves, outcomes may be added or amended based on school vision. 5|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Rationale
Undertaking such a project in a school can be a large undertaking and does need funding and teaching resources. However, with the current global issues such as climate change, water shortages, sustainable industry and global warming, schools need to have in place curriculum that supports, reinforces and engages students regarding environmental issues. To get an understanding of the current student population’s understanding, view and practices regarding the environment, a survey was developed for students to participate in (see Attachment 1). Students from each year level in the middle school participated in the survey and the results, while not surprising, were worrying indeed. The select study of middle school students who will be commencing school in 2011 has found that 84% of students surveyed at St Joseph’s College Katherine do not know what environmental sustainability is. The survey also found that 72% of students only recycle sometimes or never and 61% shower for more than ten minutes a day (that is over 150 litres of water per day just for showering). 65% of students also leave appliances on when not using them. However, over 70% of students believe issues such as global warming and recycling is important. Recycle, Shower, Power

Figure 2 - Recycle, Shower, Power results

It is important to note however that students seemed interested when it came to learning about these issues with the majority in favour of learning about the environment, fish, how things grow and food. These are all facets of an Aquaponics program and give students a chance to learn about these topics in a practical environment. The Aquaponics program also provides valuable demonstrations and examples of recycling, water saving and power saving benefits. Topics Students want to study

Figure 3 - Topics Students want to study

6|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

With this survey as support, St Joseph’s College needs to reassess their current use of environmental issues within the curriculum and take a whole school approach to improving student’s perceptions, understanding and behaviour towards the environment. An Aquaponics Program provides the opportunity to cater for a wide range of ages, key learning areas and abilities. As part of the St Joseph’s College Aquaponics Program review process this survey will be undertaken annually to chart progress within the school.

7|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Research
While Aquaponics is not a new technology, the environmental and economic benefits are seeing a re-birth of a technology that fosters sustainable growth (Justine, 2009). Few educational institutions worldwide researched Aquaponics during its re-emergence and instead left the majority of information gathering to numerous small businesses across the globe. While this is not ideal, most information and findings in Aquaponics have been discovered through trial and error. As this technology is developed, educational institutions and government departments are beginning to research the values and benefits of using Aquaponics. As large scale operations have high setup costs, the majority of research concerning Aquaponics has been scaled back to affordable systems. This section will highlight information that has been collected regarding environmental, private, commercial and economic benefits and how Aquaponics can be utilised in a K-12 educational setting.

Environmental Benefits
The environmental benefits of Aquaponics systems have a wide scope and are championed by many businesses and organisations that are involved with Aquaponics. With global environmental concerns becoming widespread, the general population is becoming more aware of issues such as global warming, rising sea levels and sustainable industry. Aquaponics provides an environmentally sustainable option for fish stocks and a wide range of green produce. Wilson (2005) claims that Hydroponics “uses less than a tenth of the water needed for fresh vegetable production than a field crop”. In another article Wilson (2005) reiterates that “Aquaponics technology for growing food plants in greenhouses is significantly superior to inorganic hydroponics” which was reported at the International Conference and Exhibition for Soilless Culture-2005 in Singapore from September 5 to 8. (Wilson, 2005).Wilson (2006) provides evidence of water saving by presenting Eamus’s (2003) table depicting litres of water used to produce $100 of output. While the table presents figures that are not able to be grown in an Aquaponics system, when comparing soil grown vegetables and fruit with Aquaponics the difference in water usage is monumental. In Australia, the driest inhabited continent in the world, this environmental benefit is significant to say the least.

8|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Litres of water per A$100 of output 470,000 L 160000 Cotton L 147000 Milk L 123900 Sugar L Beef cattle 81200L Vegetables and fruit (soil grown) 37900L Wheat 24500L Hydroponics – Lettuce 600L Estimates of the general water use for Australian Aquaponics in the tropics and sub-tropics: Aquaponics -- fish and lettuce 500L Aquaponics -- fish and Basil 173L Rice
Table 1 - Litres of water per A$100 of Output - Eamus (2003)

Economic Prospects
The economic prospects for Aquaponics look extremely positive based on research and discussion that has centred on the industry from a variety of sources. In a commercial and private setting, water savings from Aquaponics will be substantial when compared to a traditional method of farming. In large scale farming operations the availability and cost of water effectively decides the feasibility of the venture. By using a fraction of the amount of water and producing two products (fish and greens) makes the venture more viable from the beginning. The fact that less water is needed and used also makes the enterprise viable for more arid communities. With the rising cost of transport, a productive Aquaponics system can eliminate these factors and operate from the savings. This is also a benefit in the household setting with Hallam (2007) stating that “the homestead kit can produce between 800 – 1200 kgs of fish a year and over four tonnes of leafy vegetables”. 9|Page Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

The fact that Aquaponics produces completely organic produce also allows for a 10% - 30% increase on market price which has been proven in large markets (Wilson, 2005).

10 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Educational Opportunities
The educational opportunities for an Aquaponics system are only limited to the resources that are input in the program. With a growing awareness of environmental sustainability across all levels of society, an Aquaponics system is the perfect example of sustainability in action. Aquaponics can be integrated into the curriculum into all key learning areas such as English, Maths, Science, Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE) and Health and Physical Education (HPE). Listed below are examples of how to integrate Aquaponics into a curriculum. Science Students can monitor and record pH levels within the system and observe fish and plant health as the system fluctuates. Students can hypothesise on what the effect will be following research into water pH levels and how it affects living organisms. Mathematics Students can calculate the rate of growth of fish or plants by mapping the growth over an extended period. Students are then to calculate expected size of plant or fish after a certain time period. Students can study the current market for product that is being grown and through research and estimation can predict the market value of current stock. Students can put these projections to the test come market time. SOSE Students can study the cycle of Aquaponics and how the symbiotic relationship between fish and plants allows for both to thrive. Students can then find examples in the natural world and report back. Students can monitor the amount of water used over a period of time within the Aquaponics system and compare to traditional farming methods. A report can then be written about the importance of sustainable industry and the future of Australia. English The English curriculum can be linked to SOSE in the area of Writing. Students can deliver oral presentations on the benefits of an Aquaponics System within a school environment. HPE 11 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Students can study the health advantages of having organic produce compared when compared to eating processed or chemically enhanced foods.

12 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Cost Factors
Aquaponics has a variety of costs that need to be factored when considering how to begin an Aquaponics Program in a school. Aquaponics can be an expensive or relatively cheap exercise depending on location, current equipment, experience and facilities. At St Joseph’s College, the school elected to purchase a complete Aquaponics kit from www.aquaponics.net.au . The school also needed a place to house the building and purchased a carport kit shed to erect for the Aquaponics Program. Table 1 is a breakdown of costs involved in the initial set up of the St Joseph’s College Aquaponics Program.

Aquaponics Equipment Budget
Homestead Aquaponics Kit Shed Sub Total $ 7,415.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 9,915.00 Aquaponics.net.au Wide Span Sheds

Aquaponics Building Budget
Electricity Water Construction Perspex Roofing Permits & Inspections Sub Total $ 1,000.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 330.00 $ 880.00 $ 7,210.00 Benash Advanced Plumbing Peter Meyers Construction Bunnings Project Building Certifiers

Total Cost

$

17,125.00

Table 2 - Aquaponics Program Budget - Initial Setup

This total cost can be seen as imposing to some schools; however there are numerous avenues to setup and run a successful Aquaponics Program within a school. While St Joseph’s College purchased a readymade Aquaponics kit that only requires assembly it is possible to create your own kit or cut down on the cost with items such as bathtubs, PVC piping, water tanks or even fish tanks. Keeping in mind that Aquaponics kits need to be under cover to prevent rain and other unwanted items from entering the system, there will be a cost associated to 13 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

erect a building if one is not available. Costs such as permits and inspections are required in some areas and not in others. Listed below are some websites that provide information on how to setup affordable Aquaponics systems. • • • http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/ http://www.aquaponics.com.au/ http://www.aquaponicshq.com/

Funding Process
Funding for a project such as Aquaponics can be daunting to begin with when looking at the possible costs of such a program, however this is not unsurpassable. When sourcing funding for such programs a variety of sources should be sort as this prevents the whole program from relying excessively on one particular source. Taking this approach ensures that if funding is denied or discontinued from one source the program does not automatically fade with the funding. The benefits of an Aquaponics program give it such a broad scope to apply for funding from a wide range of sources. Benefits such as student engagement, environmental education and a wide focus range of Key learning area’s allows the program achieve many outcomes to appease funding criteria. Sources sought should range from but not be limited to Government Departments, School funding, private sponsorship, philanthropic organisations and nongovernment Organisations (NGO’s). Listed below are a number of sources and information links that are a good place to start when seeking funding. • • Family and Housing, Children Services and Indigenous Affairs (FAHCSIA) http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/grantsfunding Australian Solar Schools Program http://www.energymatters.com.au/renewable-energy/solar-power/gridconnected-systems/solar-for-schools.php The Smith Family – www.thesmithfamily.com.au Dare to Lead - http://www.daretolead.edu.au/ EnvironmeNT Grant http://www.nt.gov.au/nreta/environment/grants/overview.html Woolworths Community Grants http://www.woolworths.com.au/wps/wcm/connect/Website/Woolworths/FreshFood-Kids/Community-Grants/ 14 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

• • • •

Rio Tinto Aboriginal Fund – http://www.aboriginalfund.riotinto.com/apply.aspx?ID=6

Without funding a program within a school usually does not happen or cannot reach its full potential. One of the major benefits of an Aquaponics Program is that over time and if properly run, the program can generate its own income, stock, seeds and with further investment even its own power. This factor alone makes Aquaponics a unique program for schools across Australia.

15 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Quotation and Purchasing Process
Once funding has been gained quotation of any associated costs need to begin. Most funding bodies require a minimum of three quoted prices to show that the recipient has shopped around. If the Aquaponics Program requires a shelter this process will also include quotations for materials, permits and labour associated with erecting a shelter. As an Aquaponics system requires power and water, it is also advisable to consult with an electrician and a plumber to make sure that correct infrastructure is for the site that the system will be housed. Below is a table containing all materials, equipment, permits and skilled workers that will be required and possible suppliers. (Nb. Suppliers will only be listed if they are Australia wide and only kit material details will be provided. For further information on required equipment refer to Attachment 2)

Item/Trade
Aquaponics System

Reason

Supplier
www.aquaponics.net.au www.backyardaquaponic s.com www.nurseriesonline.co m.au www.widespanshed.com. au www.atlassheds.com.au www.tuffspan.com.au

Main Reason

If system requires shelter Kit Shed Building Certifier Builder Electrician Plumber Permit and Certification Process To Erect Shelter Install Power Install Water

Table 3 - Quotation and Purchasing Guide

16 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Permit Process
If a building needs to be erected to house an Aquaponics System, permission to develop and build needs to be obtained from the government. Usually a permit for a construction this size is not required in the Northern Territory bus as is being completed on school property it is essential to follow correct procedure. Refer to local governing bodies regarding this process such as the town council or state body of lands and planning or equivalent. Listed below are links to information on how to obtain Northern Territory Permit and Development Applications. • • http://www.nt.gov.au/lands/building/regulations/forms/index.shtml http://www.nt.gov.au/lands/planning/fees/index.shtml

The benefit of purchasing a kit shed is that all engineering plans and drawings are provided by the supplier. If designing, planning and constructing a custom shelter, these plans need to be obtained through licensed engineers and drafts people.

Building Process
A licensed builder/erector is required to install sheds, shelters or awnings that are purchased in kit form from the supplier. One consideration when purchasing a kit shed is that a Perspex roofing will be required for any area where plant growth beds will be situated as plants require sunlight. This can be purchased separately from a local hardware store. When purchasing separate roofing ensure that all material complies with local building regulations. Any builders/workers that are entering a school site will be required to complete relevant inductions and be cleared to work in an area where there may be contact with children.

17 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Operations Process
There are many ways to operate an Aquaponics system. Factors to consider include climate, water quality, fish species and plant species. As long as your system recirculates, the layout is completely up to the person operating the system. However, simple and easy to use layouts are recommended. Attachment 3 depicts a simple layout plan of a homestead Aquaponics system. It is important that any Aquaponics system is shielded from the weather as excess rain or other organic material may affect the balance of the system. Any staff that coordinate an Aquaponics program within a school should be interested in Aquaponics and understand the basics at a minimum. A science background is an additional benefit but the amount of information online will cater for anyone with an interest. When beginning an Aquaponics system, the main areas of focus within an Aquaponics system are: • • pH Levels. A balanced pH will ensure fish and plants maintain a healthy state Fish Food nutrients – nutrients that are fed to you fish will eventually reach your plants. Try and ensure that the nutrients are beneficial for you plant species Water levels – while the system should not leak, evaporation is a real threat in a warm climate. This can be managed through refilling when necessary or installing a float valve. General fish and plant health – A good guide to the effectiveness of you system is the health of your fish and plants. If one or both are struggling something is not right. Equipment – make sure periodic checks of all equipment are undertaken to prevent any malfunctions that my ruin the system (ie. Pump failure)

Following these processes will help to prevent any problems that may arise with an Aquaponics system. As time passes the system will self regulate itself to a certain degree. pH tests may not be required as often but should still be maintained weekly. It is important to be educated and stay up to date with latest innovations, findings and data concerning your system. Most Aquaponics sites have forums and blogs that contain helpful information, ideas and give users of Aquaponics a medium to 18 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

share their experiences. Diver’s (2006) article gives a comprehensive overview of how to begin a commercial Aquaponics project and what steps to take.

19 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Expansion Possibilities
Once an Aquaponics System has been run properly and to full potential the opportunity to expand is readily available. Growth beds are easily supplemented by old bath tubs and fish tanks can be made out of an old water tank. However, your pump needs to be capable of increasing the work load and supplying more water to a greater area. Most standard pumps can easily cater for a few more growth beds but pump capacity and output should always be considered before expansion. If there is ample room near the Aquaponics system a good side project is to create a food source for you fish. This can be achieved through a worm farm and further integrates sustainability and recycling into the school program. Expansion decisions should only be made after consultation with leadership, staff and students and only after a program is running successfully.

Future Evaluation
Programs such as this within schools should be subjected to regular evaluation processes. A yearly evaluation of the Aquaponics Program provides evidence for schools, systems and funding bodies that outcomes are being achieved. Evaluations can take part in the form of surveys, output data and student attendance and achievement. By using a variety of evidence, the results of the evaluation will ideally be as accurate as possible.

Recommendations
These recommendations are being suggested to assist any school that wishes to create an Aquaponics Program. These recommendations are based on experience with the process and not on statistical data that has been collected. The author recommends: • • • • Additional research be carried out and presented to the school community before committing to an Aquaponics project. A committee/working party be organised to plan, develop, implement and manage any Aquaponics Program within a school. Aquaponics System/s should be purchased after adequate shelter is provided. Ongoing evaluation must be completed on a periodical basis. 20 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Conclusion
In conclusion Aquaponics is a viable, sustainable and practical option for schools to create and enjoy within their learning environment. Aquaponics allows for alternative education methods and has a wide scope of use within many curriculums. The learning opportunities from an Aquaponics system of any size are immense, and when compared to other traditional methods of growing animals/plants in an educational setting is far more varied. The only limitation on how this program is integrated into a school’s curriculum is time. An Aquaponics program within a school is unique. In a place such as the Northern Territory, fresh food is a valuable commodity and Aquaponics provides the opportunity to grow crops that would struggle in traditional settings. Through good management the program can become completely self sustainable economically and over time even turn a profit. With such importance now being placed on renewable resources, environmental responsibility and climate change, Aquaponics will lead the way in providing sustainable alternative for producing food and developing an understanding and respect of the environment by all who participate.

Authors Note
This report has been created as a guideline to give schools the opportunity to investigate Aquaponics within their current programs. Through circulation it is hoped that this report will assist any interested parties to begin an Aquaponics Program. I firmly believe that the learning opportunities provided by Aquaponics will benefit schools and communities in many ways in the future. A personal goal with this program was to be able to create a working model that would encourage interest and possible investment in larger scale Aquaponics Projects in the Katherine region. The amount and type of food these systems provide would greatly enhance nutrition provide people from isolated area with valuable fresh organic produce. Through continued evaluation and reporting this document will be enhanced and updated periodically as St Joseph’s College continues to move forward with the Aquaponics program. 21 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

If you are interested in discussing this report further my contact details are listed below. Jesse King Email: jesse.king@nt.catholic.edu.au j_king_151@hotmail.com

22 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

References
Diver, S. (2006). Aquaponics—Integration of Hydroponics with Aquaculture. United States of America: ATTRA Eamus, D. (2003). Paper presented at Australian Hydroponic & Greenhouse Association Conference. Retrieved from http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/15359/sub046.pdf Justine. (2009, June 3). Aquaponics: The Answer to Sustainable Farming [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.socialearth.org/aquaponics-the-answer-tosustainable-farming Wilson, G. (2006, February). Submission on water use in aquaponics. Paper presented at Aquaponics Network Australia Conference. Retrieved from http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/15359/sub046.pdf Wilson, G. (2005). An aquaponic investment in ever small town – and shopping centre. Aquaponics Journal, 2.

23 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Attachments
Attachment 1 – Survey Example
Top of Form

1. Do you know what environmental sustainability is? Please give a brief description in box.
Do you know what environmental sustainability is? Please give a brief description in box. Yes

No

Environmental sustainability is

*
2. Answer the following questions about the environment
No Yes Hardly Ever A Little Sometimes A lot All the time

Answer the following Do you understand questions about the Environmental environment issues? Do you understand Environmental issues? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

Do you Do you care about care about the the Environment? Environment? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

24 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little Sometimes

A lot

All the time

Do you litter?

Do you litter? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

Do you recycle?

Do you recycle? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

Do you Do you shower for shower for more than 10 more than 10 minutes a day? minutes a day? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

Do you leave appliances on when you are not using them?

Do you leave appliances on when you are not using them? No

Yes

Hardly Ever

A Little

Someti mes

A lot

All the time

*
3. Answer these questions about your school!
Yes No Sometimes

Is your school Clean?

Answer these questions about your school! Is your school Clean? Yes

No

Sometimes

Do you put rubbish in the bin? If you see rubbish on the ground do you pick it up

Do you put rubbish in the bin? Yes

No

Sometimes

If you see rubbish on

No

Sometimes

25 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Yes the ground do you pick it up Yes Does your school waste power?

No

Sometimes

Does your school waste power? Yes

No

Sometimes

*
4. Do you thinks issues are important or not?
don't care not that important important Very important

Money

Do you thinks issues are important or not? Money don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Global Warming

Global Warming don't care

not that important

important

Very important

War

War don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Poverty

Poverty don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Hunger

Hunger don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Animal extinction

Animal extinction don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Recycling

Recycling don't care

not that important

important

Very important

26 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

don't care

not that important

important

Very important

Sustainability

Sustainability don't care

not that important

important

Very important

5. Which of these things would you like to learn about in school?
No Yes

Farming

Which of these things would you like to learn about in school? Farming No

Yes

Sport How to Grow Things Fish

Sport No

Yes

How to Grow Things No

Yes

Fish No

Yes

Algebra

Algebra No

Yes

Cars

Cars No

Yes

The environment

The environment No

Yes

Food

Food No
Done

Yes

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E6uK1MhOcpBUy

nb61dlj_2fDbaFlL

VW6Yh2TOSWX

9ui0jn_2bI24SotF

aWrhOGRiBgnne

Der9a3XW4bY8y

vQ0B5IccZM7RK

Bottom of Form

27 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Attachment 2 – Homestead Aquaponics System
Homestead Aquaponics Kit - Top of the line home food production. This is the top of the range in our "Ready-to-go" kits.Just assemble, add grow bed media, water, fish and plants. This Homestead kit is for serious home food production and is the basic single module of a multi module commercial production system. This Homestead kit comes with 4 grow beds, but is capable of being expanded to run up to 8 grow beds at maximum fish stocking levels. This Homestead kit can fit on an area 5 M x 6 M. This allows for comfortable working space around the grow beds and fish tank. This Homestead Aquaponics kit will give best results if it is housed in a rain-proof greenhouse with a solid roof over the fish tank area to prevent the direct sunlight contacting the water.
What is included in the kit.
Inclusions List 2300 Litre Fish Tank - fibre glass construction 585 Litre Grow Beds - fibre glass construction 585 Litre collection sump - fibre glass construction 200 Litre Fingerling Tank - fibre glass 8,000 lph Submersible Pump - 2 year warranty 6,000 lph Submersible Pump - 2 year warranty 12 volt emergency back up kit - Fail switch, 2 pumps, battery and charger Equipment Caddy including 60lpm aerator. Wood cover for tank and fingerling tank. 90mm pvc pipe kit with joiners, bends and adhesive 40mm pvc pipe kit with joiners , bends and adhesive Mineral Rock fertiliser kit Fish feed pellets kit Aerator power-head kit Freshwater Test Kit Assembly Instructions. This kit operates on the CHOP system Qty 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

Sourced from www.aquaponics.net.au

28 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

Attachment 3 – Simple Layout Example
Main Tank Plant Growth Bed

Fingerling tank

Water Flow

29 | P a g e Written by Jesse King Charles Darwin University s193157 ETL 329 – Entrepreneurial Professional

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