Charge comes in two types, positive and negative Opposite charges attract  Identical charges repel  each other each other

attraction repulsion

attraction

repulsion

1

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Model of charges in materials
According to our model: All objects contain many negatively charged electrons and positively  charged protons. In neutral objects (with no net charge) the number of + charges is  equal to the number of – charges and the charges are evenly  distributed.

2

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Model of charges in materials
An object aquires a charge when it gains or loses negative electrons.  Electrons are small and light, and found on the outside of atoms. The positive charges are carried by protons which normally do not  move. Protons are large and heavy and form the nuclei at the  center of atoms.

Negatively charged  object

Positively charged  object

3

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Nature of materials
A characteristic of different materials is their ability to allow internal  negative charges to move. Materials can be broadly divided into  two categories

Conductor

Insulator

Observe the behavior of the charges inside each material
4

D'Amato PTHS 2007

What seems to be the biggest difference between  these two types of material?
1) The balance of charges in  the neutral state 2) The way in which equal  charges interact with each  other 3) The amount of movement  in the material’s charges 4) One material does not  interact with external  negative charges 5) None of these describes a  difference observered in  the animations
5

0
u. . ch ar g. .

0
...

0
no

0
t.. .

0
rib ..

eq

m ov

w hi ch

do e

of

of

ce

ia l

nt

am ou

la n

m at er

ay

ba

w

e

e

e

ne

Th

Th

Th

O

D'Amato PTHS 2007

N

on

e

of

th es

in

e

de

sc

s

What seems to be the biggest difference between  these two types of material?
1) The balance of charges in  the neutral state 2) The way in which equal  charges interact with each  other 3) The amount of movement  in the material’s charges 4) One material does not  interact with external  negative charges 5) None of these describes a  difference observered in  the animations
6

0
u. . ch ar g. .

0
...

0
no

0
t.. .

0
rib ..

eq

m ov

w hi ch

do e

of

of

ce

ia l

nt

am ou

la n

m at er

ay

ba

w

e

e

e

ne

Th

Th

Th

O

D'Amato PTHS 2007

N

on

e

of

th es

in

e

de

sc

s

Nature of materials
Conductor • Negative charges (electrons) can  move freely through the material as  they are pushed or pulled Insulator • Negative charges (electrons) can only  redistribute themselves a little as  they are pushed or pulled

Conductor

Insulator

7

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Wimshurt Machine
Observe the operation of the Wimshurst machine. 

8

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Which item describes something you observe in the  operation of the Wimshurst machine?
Charges are being separated into  positive and negative 2) The handle is turned and after a  period of time there is a spark  and a noise between the two  globes 3) A positive charge and a negative  charge are attracted to each  other 4) Charges are being moved from  one globe to the other 5) Microscopic charges accumulate  in each globe until there are  enough to cause a spark
9

1)

0
d. .. ...

0
d. . an

0
...

0
ar ge s.

0
..

se

tu rn e

ar ge

in g

in g be M ic ro s co

m pi c

be

is

ch

nd le

ar e

si tiv

s

ha

rg e

po

e

ha

Th

A

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

C

ha

rg e

s

ar e

e

ch

Which item describes something you observe in the  operation of the Wimshurst machine?
Charges are being separated into  positive and negative 2) The handle is turned and after a  period of time there is a spark  and a noise between the two  globes 3) A positive charge and a negative  charge are attracted to each  other 4) Charges are being moved from  one globe to the other 5) Microscopic charges accumulate  in each globe until there are  enough to cause a spark
10

1)

0
d. .. ...

0
d. . an

0
...

0
ar ge s.

0
..

se

tu rn e

ar ge

in g

in g be M ic ro s co

m pi c

be

is

ch

nd le

ar e

si tiv

s

ha

rg e

po

e

ha

Th

A

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

C

ha

rg e

s

ar e

e

ch

Wimshurst machine
Suggest an explanation for what could be happening in the two  globes of the Wimshurst machine when the crank is turned.

11

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Which is the most plausible explanation of what happens in  the globes, based on our model of charge and materials?
1) The machine is creating  protons and/or electrons  and storing them in the  globes 2) The machine is moving  protons from one globe  and electrons from the  other globe 3) The machine is moving  electrons only 4) The machine is moving  protons only
12

0
.. ti. . ov i cr ea

0
.. ov i

0
ov i in e is m ac h m

0
..

m

is

is

in e

in e

ac h

ac h

m

m

e

e

m

ac h Th Th e

e

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

in e

is

m

Which is the most plausible explanation of what happens in  the globes, based on our model of charge and materials?
1) The machine is creating  protons and/or electrons  and storing them in the  globes 2) The machine is moving  protons from one globe  and electrons from the  other globe 3) The machine is moving  electrons only 4) The machine is moving  protons only
13

0
.. ti. . ov i cr ea

0
.. ov i

0
ov i in e is m ac h m

0
..

m

is

is

in e

in e

ac h

ac h

m

m

e

e

m

ac h Th Th e

e

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

in e

is

m

Wimshurst machine
The machine may be moving the negative charges from one globe to the other According to our model, only negative charges move because they  are carried by light, movable electrons. What explanations could you propose for the spark?

14

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Which could best be an explanation for the spark,  according to our model of charge in materials?
1) The spark is protons that  are moving to the  negatively charged globe 2) The spark is charges  moving, causing two  neutral globes to become  oppositely charged 3) The spark is electrons that  are attracted to the  negatively charged globe 4) The spark is caused by  charges jumping from  negative globe to positive  globe
15

0
... .. ar ge s. s

0
tr on .

0
.. us ed is ca ar k

0
..

pr ot on

ch

is

is

ar k

ar k

ar k sp e Th Th

is e sp

sp

e

Th

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

e

sp

el ec

Which could best be an explanation for the spark,  according to our model of charge in materials?
1) The spark is protons that  are moving to the  negatively charged globe 2) The spark is charges  moving, causing two  neutral globes to become  oppositely charged 3) The spark is electrons that  are attracted to the  negatively charged globe 4) The spark is caused by  charges jumping from  negative globe to positive  globe
16

0
... .. ar ge s. s

0
tr on .

0
.. us ed is ca ar k

0
..

pr ot on

ch

is

is

ar k

ar k

ar k sp e Th Th

is e sp

sp

e

Th

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

e

sp

el ec

Wimshurst machine
A spark occurs because negative charges pushed off one globe are attracted to the other globe

17

D'Amato PTHS 2007

If the spark is a movement of charges between the  globes, which should be true after the spark?
1) Both globes will have  opposite charges than they  did before the spark 2) The separation of charges  between the two globes  will be less 3) The overall number of  negative charges in the  machine will change 4) One globe will have a  greater net charge than it  did before the spark
18

0
... ... av ch

0
ro

0
... ve w ill ha e

0
a. ..

ra tio n

gl ob

pa

er al ln ov e O

es

ot h

se

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

B

ne

e

gl ob

um be

ill h

w

of

If the spark is a movement of charges between the  globes, which should be true after the spark?
1) Both globes will have  opposite charges than they  did before the spark 2) The separation of charges  between the two globes  will be less 3) The overall number of  negative charges in the  machine will change 4) One globe will have a  greater net charge than it  did before the spark
19

0
... ... av ch

0
ro

0
... ve w ill ha e

0
a. ..

ra tio n

gl ob

pa

er al ln ov e O

es

ot h

se

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

B

ne

e

gl ob

um be

ill h

w

of

Wimshurst machine
After the spark, there is less separation of charges between the two  globes Some of the excess negative charges have moved back to the  positively charged globe

20

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Wimshurst machine and interactions
We will use our model of charges in materials to predict observations  in an experiment with the Wimshurst machine

The material of a  styrofoam packing peanut  is an insulator Negative charges in an  insulator can only move a  little
21

The aluminum foil covering  this ball is a conductor Negative charges in a  conductor are free to move  wherever they are pushed or  pulled

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Which is true about the objects that will be used in  this experiment?
1) The charges in the  styrofoam peanut cannot  move at all 2) The foil is a conductor so it  always has a net charge 3) The negative charges in  both objects can move due  to the influence of external  charges 4) Charges in the insulator  separate into regions of  positive and negative if left  alone
22

0
... st ... uc to

0
ar ge s

0
..

0
ul a. ..

th e

co nd

ch

in

ar ge

tiv e

s

a

is

ga

fo il

ch

Th

Th

Th

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

ha

e

e

e

rg e

ne

s

in

th

e

in s

Which is true about the objects that will be used in  this experiment?
1) The charges in the  styrofoam peanut cannot  move at all 2) The foil is a conductor so it  always has a net charge 3) The negative charges in  both objects can move due  to the influence of external  charges 4) Charges in the insulator  separate into regions of  positive and negative if left  alone
23

0
... st ... uc to

0
ar ge s

0
..

0
ul a. ..

th e

co nd

ch

in

ar ge

tiv e

s

a

is

ga

fo il

ch

Th

Th

Th

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

ha

e

e

e

rg e

ne

s

in

th

e

in s

Induced separation of charge
Draw the charges in a styrofoam peanut suspended between the two globes. Remember, styrofoam is an insulator material. What will happen to the peanut? Draw the charges inside the peanut

24

D'Amato PTHS 2007

What can you tell about the styrofoam peanut from  drawing the charges inside it?
1) The peanut will be  attracted to both globes 2) The peanut will be  attracted to one globe and  repelled from the other 3) The peanut will be repelled  from both globes 4) The peanut will experience  no net force from the two  globes
an pe e

0
. . at t.. at t..

0
re ...

0
pe ex an ut w ill

0
r.. .

be

be

ut w ill

ut w ill

an

pe

pe

an Th e

e

Th

25

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

e

pe

ut w ill

be

What can you tell about the styrofoam peanut from  drawing the charges inside it?
1) The peanut will be  attracted to both globes 2) The peanut will be  attracted to one globe and  repelled from the other 3) The peanut will be repelled  from both globes 4) The peanut will experience  no net force from the two  globes
an pe e

0
. . at t.. at t..

0
re ...

0
pe ex an ut w ill

0
r.. .

be

be

ut w ill

ut w ill

an

pe

pe

an Th e

e

Th

26

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

Th

e

pe

ut w ill

be

Induced separation of charge
The charges inside the peanut rearrange a little. The peanut is  attracted to both globes and ends up moving toward one of them. What happens when it hits the globe?

attraction

attraction

27

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Induced separation of charge in an insulator
Since charges cannot move much inside the peanut, it remains  attracted to the globe

28

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Draw the charges in an aluminum ball suspended between the two  globes. What will happen to the ball?

Aluminum ball

29

D'Amato PTHS 2007

What can you tell about the foil ball from drawing  the charges inside it?
1) The ball will be attracted to  both globes 2) The ball will be attracted to  one globe and repelled  from the other 3) The ball will be repelled  from both globes 4) The ball will experience no  net force from the two  globes
ill ll w ba e Th

0
t.. t.. tra c tra c

0
pe l

0
l.. rie n ex ba ll w ill pe

0
..

at

at

be

be

ill

ll w

ba

e

ba

ll w Th Th e

30

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

e

ill

be

re

What can you tell about the foil ball from drawing  the charges inside it?
1) The ball will be attracted to  both globes 2) The ball will be attracted to  one globe and repelled  from the other 3) The ball will be repelled  from both globes 4) The ball will experience no  net force from the two  globes
ill ll w ba e Th

0
t.. t.. tra c tra c

0
pe l

0
l.. rie n ex ba ll w ill pe

0
..

at

at

be

be

ill

ll w

ba

e

ba

ll w Th Th e

31

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Th

e

ill

be

re

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Charges in the ball will move, the ball will be attracted to both  globes, and will move toward one of them. What happens when it hits one of the globes?

traction at
Aluminum ball

attrac t

ion

32

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Charges in the aluminum ball are free to move, so they can move  between the ball and the globe due to the forces exerted upon  them. What happens to the ball now?

33

D'Amato PTHS 2007

What happens when the foil ball touches one of the  globes?
1) The net charge on the ball  does not change 2) Charges can move through  the ball 3) There is no net force on the  charges in the ball 4) Charges in the ball can  realign themselves but  cannot move much
th ... on ha rg e ca tc

0
t.. .

0
or ce ..

0
ba ll in th e rg e s

0
c. .

m ov

e

n

s

rg e

ne

er e

is Th C

no ha

Th

34

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

ha

e

ne

tf

What happens when the foil ball touches one of the  globes?
1) The net charge on the ball  does not change 2) Charges can move through  the ball 3) There is no net force on the  charges in the ball 4) Charges in the ball can  realign themselves but  cannot move much
th ... on ha rg e ca tc

0
t.. .

0
or ce ..

0
ba ll in th e rg e s

0
c. .

m ov

e

n

s

rg e

ne

er e

is Th C

no ha

Th

35

D'Amato PTHS 2007

C

ha

e

ne

tf

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Now the ball has the same charge as the globe, so it is repelled from  the globe. What happens to the ball now?

e rep

l

36

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
The ball is attracted to the other globe, which now has the opposite  charge. What happens when it hits the other globe?

37

D'Amato PTHS 2007

What’s the difference between the styrofoam  peanut and the foil ball in this experiment?
1) The way both objects, in  their neutral state, are  attracted to the globes 2) One object does not  experience an induced  separation of charges 3) The net charge on one of  the objects does not  change in this experiment 4) One object does not  experience an attraction
w e Th

0
ct s, ... t.. . no

0
... on

0
t. es ct do no

0
..

ob je

do

es

bo th

ob je

tc ne Th e O

ha rg e ne

ct

38

D'Amato PTHS 2007

O

ne

ob je

ay

on

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Charges are free to move in the conductor, so they move into the ball  due to the forces acting on them

39

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Induced separation of charge in a conductor
Now the ball has the same charge as the globe, so it is repelled from  the globe. The charged ball is now attracted to the opposite globe and the cycle  continues.

40

D'Amato PTHS 2007

When will the ball stop bouncing back and forth  between the two globes?
1) It will not stop, it will keep  moving back and forth  indefinitely 2) It will keep moving until all  the extra charge on one  globe is transferred back to  the other 3) It will stop when all the  charges in the ball are gone 4) It will stop when the total  number of positive charges  balances the total number  of negative charges
41

0
,i tw ill ...

0
un t.. lt

0
h. ..

0
to ...

in g

m ov

n

w he

no ts

ep

st op

w ill

w ill

w ill

It

It

It

D'Amato PTHS 2007

It

w ill

st op

ke

w he

to p

n

th e

al

Observe and explain
A soda can is mounted horizontally. At one end is a Wimshurst  machine, at the other end a disk covered in foil hangs from a string,  resting against the end of the can Part 1: Describe what  you observe in this  experiment

42

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Observe and explain
Sample observation: "A foil disk hangs from a string, resting against a soda can. A  Wimshurst machine is cranked, and one globe of the machine is  touched to the soda can. The hanging disk is repelled away from the  can." Part 2: Explain what  happened using your  knowledge of charges and  materials

43

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Observe and explain
Sample observation: "A foil disk hangs from a string, resting against a soda can. A  Wimshurst machine is cranked, and one globe of the machine is  touched to the soda can. The hanging disk is repelled away from the  can." Part 2: Explain what  happened using your  knowledge of charges and  materials

44

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Observe and explain
Sample explanation:

Charges are balanced and  evenly distributed in the  neutral can and disk

The charged globe creates a  net charge on the can. Charges move through the  conductor and create the  same net charge on the disk The disk is repelled from the  can because they have the  same net charge

45

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Represent and reason
A different type of electroscope has a metal disk on top, connected  to a metal bar with a central indicator that can swivel as shown. Show how this electroscope would react if a negatively charged  object was brought near without touching

46

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Represent and reason
Negative charges in the electroscope are repelled by the negative  charges in the other object. The lower parts of the scope have a net  negative charge and the indicator is repelled away from the bar

47

D'Amato PTHS 2007

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.