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U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development Franklin Fellows Program 2010 Positions

U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development

Franklin Fellows Program 2010 Positions

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Below are challenging positions for which the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) wish to host Franklin Fellows. All positions are in Washington D.C. with the exception of several in New York with the Bureau of Public Affairs and U.S. Mission to the UN and one in Charleston, SC with the Bureau of Human Resources. This list changes and is not necessarily fully inclusive, but it does represent most of the requests for fellows.

Please note that some positions on this list may be filled at any given time. We have annotated the position descriptions in red to show which positions have been filled and when we expect them to open up again. If you are interested in a position that is now filled, we recommend contacting us about six months before the position becomes available again.

* If the links appear broken or do not seem to work, please scroll down to find the appropriate descriptions. Alternatively, use the Find command (Ctrl+F on Windows or Command-F on Mac) to search keywords in the document.*

For details on the Franklin Fellows Program, please see http://careers.state.gov/FF.

Newest Franklin Fellow Positions:

Advisor on Africa Peacekeeping, Office of Peace-Keeping, Sanctions and Counter- Terrorisms (IO/PSC)

Marketing Officer, Office of Employee Relations, Work Life Division (HR/ER)

MANPADS Destruction Officer (PM/WRA)

Senior Analyst for Cybersecurity (INR/CYBER)

Office of the U.S. Special Envoy (IO/OICSE) to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC)

Internet Freedom Portfolio, Office of International Labor and Corporate Social Responsibility (DRL/ILCSR)

Academic or Law Enforcement Professional, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL)

Lawyer, Legal Section of the U.S. Mission to the UN (USUN/L)

Office of the Secretary

Counterterrorism, Office of the Coordinator (S/CT)

Global AIDS, Office of the U.S. Coordinator for (S/GAC)

Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative, Office of the Coordinator for (S/GHFSI)

Global Intergovernmental Affairs, Special Representative on (S/SRGIA)

Global Partnership Initiative, Office of the (S/GPI)

Innovation, Office of Senior Advisor for (S/SAIT)

Nonproliferation and Arms Control, Office of the Special Advisor for (S/SANAC)

Protocol, Office of (S/CPR)

Policy Planning Staff, Office of (S/P)

Reconstruction and Stabilization, Office of the Coordinator for (S/CRS)

Special Envoy to Sudan, Office of (S/USSES)

Special Representative to Muslim Communities, Office of (S/SRMC)

War Crimes Issues, Office of (S/WCI)

Under Secretary for Management (M)

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance (F)

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U.S. Mission to the United Nations, New York (USUN)

Bureaus

Administration (A)

African Affairs (AF)

Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance (AVC)

Consular Affairs (CA)

Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL)

East Asian and Pacific Affairs (EAP)

Economic, Energy and Business Affairs (EEB)

Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA)

European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR)

Human Resources (HR)

Information Resource Management (IRM)

Intelligence and Research (INR)

International Information Programs (IIP)

International Narcotics and Law Enforcement (INL)

International Organization Affairs (IO)

International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN)

Legislative Affairs (H)

Legal Adviser (L)

Near Eastern Affairs (NEA)

Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES)

Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO)

Political-Military Affairs (PM)

Public Affairs (PA)

Resource Management (RM)

South and Central Asian Affairs (SCA)

Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA)

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Office of the Secretary

1. Counterterrorism, Office of the Coordinator for (S/CT) has the Department lead for diplomatic engagement on counterterrorism. Its statutory mandate states: “The principal duty of the Coordinator shall be the overall supervision (including policy oversight of resources) of international counterterrorism activities. The Coordinator shall be the principal adviser to the Secretary of State on international counterterrorism matters.” S/CT’s program initiatives and responsibilities include:

Building and implementing a Regional Strategic Initiative program through U.S. ambassador-led regional networks;

Building and sustaining the will of foreign governments to assist in the Overseas Contingency Operation;

Overseeing the delivery of anti-terrorist assistance and counterterrorism finance training;

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Coordinating counterterrorism activities and capacity building with the interagency community;

Enhancing border security through the Terrorist Interdiction Program;

Integrating Department of Homeland Security initiatives and activities with foreign policy;

Co-chairing with DOD the Technical Support Working Group to develop technology to detect, deter and defend against terrorist attacks; and

Providing the U.S. Government’s only interagency immediate reaction team to respond to terrorist incidents overseas, (the Foreign Emergency Support Team).

Regional Affairs, Office of (S/CT-RA) would like to host a Franklin Fellow. This Office has the lead role in ensuring that the U.S. Government fully uses its legal authorities, intelligence information and diplomatic resources to identify terrorists and their supporters and to take effective action to disrupt their operations in the United States and in the international arena.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Formulating and coordinating policy on counterterrorism issues, especially with regard to policy responses to terrorist threats or attacks, counterterrorism policy issues with regional governments and organizations, counterterrorism capacity building programs, counterterrorism finance issues, and military cooperation on counterterrorism.

Advising on desirable program and policy priorities based on a highly sophisticated and developed knowledge of terrorist activities and the political, military, law enforcement and financial regulatory situation.

Developing and implementing policy, preparing analytical reports, briefing materials, decision memoranda, and other documents defining policy and program requirements and objectives.

Mobilizing the resources of the State Department and the interagency community to advance USG policy priorities, and coordinating the efforts of the Department with other agencies, including providing policy guidance on the priorities and implementation of the S/CT-administered Anti-Terrorism Assistance, Counterterrorism Finance and Terrorist Interdiction Programs.

Working with the U.S. missions directly or through the relevant bureau to develop policies and programs to promote U.S. counterterrorism policy goals.

2. Global AIDS, Office of the U.S. Coordinator for (S/GAC) is responsible for implementing the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) – the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease in history. On July 30, 2008, the President signed legislation increasing the U.S. financial commitment to the fight against global HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, and authorized up to $48 billion to combat the three diseases for five additional years from 2009 through 2013. Since 2004, through PEPFAR, the U.S. Government has provided $18.8 billion to the fight against global HIV/AIDS. Working in partnership with host nations, over ten years PEPFAR plans to support treatment for at least 3 million people living with HIV/AIDS; prevent 12 million new HIV infections; and care for 12 million people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, including 5 million orphans and vulnerable children.

The U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, who reports directly to the Secretary of State, oversees and directs all resources and activities of the U.S. Government to implement the U.S. President’s

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Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and combat the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, including U.S. contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria and relations with other countries and multilateral organizations. S/GAC leads an integrated U.S. Government global HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care program; serves to rally the private sector, faith-based and non-governmental organizations engaged in the fight against HIV/AIDS; and ensures that U.S. Government policies are harmonious, programs are synergistic, and operations are efficient and effective. Additional information about S/GAC and the Emergency Plan may be found at www.pepfar.gov.

S/GAC wishes to host two Franklin Fellows:

S/GAC’s Strategic Information Unit wishes to host a Franklin Fellow as an Advisor for Public Health Evaluation to: Note: Position is filled until August 2011.

Provide expert advice and assistance to the staff within S/GAC, its inter-agency collaborators throughout the U.S. Government (USG) and the implementers in the field, both public and private, related to the effectiveness of current operations of the Emergency Plan. The Advisor generates data to improve program initiatives for populations rather than individuals and enables decision-makers to make informed decisions regarding future Emergency Plan resource allocations.

Initiate, establish and maintain a network of mutually supportive working contacts with individuals and/or groups involved in the PHE operational aspects of the Emergency Plan. In addition, exchanges information and to create a consensus on PHE strategies that improve the process of collecting and analyzing information.

Propose policies to the field on Public Health Evaluation and the inclusion in the Country Operational Plans and develop/prepare the policy statements for the Emergency Plan.

Review public health evaluation activities and proposals submitted by missions, participates in inter-agency process on funding priorities. He/she provides technical and logistical advice and assistance to the chairperson and develops an agenda, prepare from the work group’s recommendations. Drafts memoranda, statements, issue papers, talking points on the fight against the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

S/GAC wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as Headquarters Planning Coordinator. Supervised by S/GAC’s Management and Budget Director, the Fellow coordinates (1) the annual Headquarters Operational Plan (HOP) to guide S/GAC’s interagency coordination and field program support, and (2) S/GAC strategic planning and reporting requirements. The Fellow works with colleagues in S/GAC, other federal agencies and external stakeholders. Summary of the Fellow’s tasks:

Coordinate and facilitate interagency HOP Working Group meetings (draft agendas and minutes, ensure execution of all follow-up actions).

Develop, draft, and finalize HOP’s guidance document, which lays out the objectives and processes set by the HOP Working Group.

Coordinate and manage communications with the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, the Deputy Coordinators, PEPFAR Deputy Principals, and the Technical Working Group co-chairs about HOP processes and objectives.

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Develop an IT system to collect and process HOP information in collaboration with colleagues. Analyze data and produce reports.

Coordinate allocation and tracking of HOP budgets. Prepare budget tables and other graphics for the S/GAC Budget Office, other State Department offices and Congress.

Coordinate and implement Headquarters Staffing for Results (HQ SFR) with S/GAC Deputy Coordinators and PEPFAR Deputy Principals. (SFR develops an interagency team to plan, implement, and evaluate HOP programs.) Work with the Office of Acquisition Management (A/LM/AQM) on the Task Order Requirements (TOR) Package. The TOR will define a contract to perform the HQ SFR. Integrate the HQ SFR results into the HOP.

Draft clear policies and procedures to support S/GAC’s strategic planning. Resolve any issues about strategic planning and the budget with the Bureau of Resource Management (RM), Office of the Director of U.S. Foreign Assistance (F), and Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources (D(L)).

Serve as the action officer and principal point of contact within S/GAC for the Bureau Strategic Resource Plan (BSRP). With program area directors, identify realistic targets and goals. Coordinate the annual BSRP within the Department.

S/GAC is looking for a candidate to:

Communicate persuasively with senior government officials.

Know the mission, program of S/GAC and PEPFAR.

Exhibit high-level organization skills and attention to detail.

Display superb written and verbal communication skills.

Work in a fast-paced environment; juggle competing tasks.

Compile, consolidate, review and analyze budget data.

Draft procedures and policy to use in planning and budgeting.

Work with Word, Excel and PowerPoint to prepare financial reports, exhibits, charts and other material.

3. Office of the Coordinator for the Global Hunger and Food Security Initiative (S/GHFSI) was set up to improve the effectiveness of our contributions to global food security under the U.S. government’s Feed the Future (FtF) initiative. The two GHFSI deputy coordinators – the Deputy Coordinator for Diplomacy and the Deputy Coordinator for Development – are responsible for implementing FtF, including ensuring that all relevant USG agencies and departments are consulted and engaged as necessary for purposes of aligning and coordinating FtF with other food security-related programs and policies across the U.S. government and with other bilateral donors, multilateral development banks, international organizations, civil society and the private sector.

S/GHFSI wishes to host a Franklin Fellow with an understanding of the scientific issues surrounding agriculture production, nutrition, environment (water issues) or climate change. A key aspect of the Fellow’s duties would be to make those issues understandable to the non- scientific mind including the Coordinator, inter-agency Feed the Future (FtF) team, donors, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders. The Franklin Fellow would also assist the

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Technical Advisor to the Coordinator on FtF focus country investment plans. The Fellow may perform some official travel.

4. Global Intergovernmental Affairs (S/SRGIA) Special Representative on is located within the Office of the Secretary. The office works to build and enhance relationships between state and local officials in the U.S. and their foreign counterparts around the world, working closely with relevant State Department regional bureaus. S/SRGIA staff promotes effective local governance and local capacity-building efforts and works with U.S. Government agency partners and stakeholders on select policy issues.

S/SRGIA seeks a Franklin Fellow with strong communication and analytical skills to assume a substantive portfolio compatible with his/her background. The Fellow will collaborate with other USG agencies, state, and local officials and will represent the Department in meetings and conferences in fulfillment of these duties. The Fellow will also manage the office’s relationships with university, think tank and private sector partners assisting with research and data collection on state and local policy issues.

We are looking for a Franklin Fellow with a wide range of interests, including state and local governments, sustainable urban development, finance, multilateral development banks, U.S. tribal governments and/or international organizations. S/SRGIA is open to considering candidates with other relevant interests.

5. Global Partnership Initiative, Office of the (S/GPI) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to assist with partner outreach and relationship building with businesses, NGOs, foundations, and academic institutions, as well as across the U.S. Government.

The incumbent will assist with partner outreach and relationship building with businesses, NGOs, foundations, and academic institutions, as well as across the U.S. Government.

The incumbent will provide a partner perspective for GPI initiatives and partnership building efforts undertaken by the Department and interagency partners.

The incumbent will inform the development of training programs for the U.S. Government partnership practitioners and assist in the development of partnership tools, such as a how- to guide for partnerships, legal and financial guidelines, performance metrics, and best practices.

The incumbent will identify partnership opportunities that arise from their work with the GPI for partnership practitioners to pursue.

The incumbent will inform GPI processes and make recommendations for effective organizational changes to promote efficiency in partnership activity, and assist GPI efforts to coordinate mission/bureau-led private sector consultations that contribute to annual and multi-year strategic planning processes.

The incumbent will not be involved in any way on any matter related to the financial interests of the incumbent.

The incumbent serves in the Global Partnership Initiative (GPI), and reports directly to the Regional Director in close coordination with the Deputy Special Representative. The incumbent exercises latitude in planning, scheduling, coordinating, and executing assignments, subject to the approval of the incumbent’s supervisor. The incumbent may make recommendations but does not have any official decision-making authority. The incumbent also exercises no supervisory responsibilities.

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6. The Secretary of State’s Innovation, Office of the Senior Advisor for (S/SAIT) seeks a Franklin Fellow to drive the agenda of utilizing technology to increase the effectiveness of US diplomatic and development goals. The position of Senior Advisor for Innovation was created in part as a response to the need Secretary Clinton highlighted when she called on the State Department to embrace the fundamental shift in the speed and reach of information as an opportunity to engage millions more people seeking a peaceful world of economic growth and social progress. The Fellow will assist the Senior Advisor by shepherding the technology agenda as well as aid in facilitating technology-based policies and practices throughout the Department.

Responsibilities:

advance communications with a specific focus on 21st century technology and applications;

collaborate within and without the Department to maximize the effective use of increasingly universal technologies (web, mobile, SMS, social networking, etc) in communications and program delivery; and

aid in implementing policies and agreements that reflect a commitment to the use of technology and telecommunications to improve the education, health and welfare of the world's population.

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should be noted that the candidate’s experience in this field will not be weighed as heavily as

the individual’s ability to anticipate, absorb, and apply new concepts and technologies in addition to their propensity to work hard and fast on a heterogeneous mix of project types as reflects the pace of the office of the Secretary of State. A premium is placed on writing skills.

7. Nonproliferation and Arms Control, Office of the Special Advisor for (S/SANAC) seeks

a Franklin Fellow to serve as the Special Advisor’s primary expert on a wide range of technical issues regarding nonproliferation and arms control. The Special Advisor reports and provides advice and support to the Secretary, the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, and other Department Principals on nonproliferation and arms control issues, and helps develop and implement Administration policies and diplomatic strategies in those areas. The Fellow will assist the Special Advisor to develop policy positions on a range of nonproliferation matters with strong technical component, e.g. impeding the spread of centrifuge enrichment technology. The incumbent will prepare technical analyses of the complex issues underlying the formulation of recommendations, policy, and negotiating positions. Note: Position is filled until May 2011.

The incumbent will require a mastery of the concepts and principles of nuclear science and technology, and knowledge of the policy development process in order to make recommendations in developing important public policies or programs.

Working closely with the Special Advisor, the incumbent will observe and advise on the coordination of policy deliberation in his area of responsibility, within the Department and across agencies. The incumbent will review policy- and technical-related information related to the Office’s core responsibilities. The incumbent will represent the Special Advisor at any relevant interagency meetings. The position occasionally will require travel to various domestic and international locations.

8. Protocol, Office of (S/CPR) By Presidential direction, the Office of the Chief of Protocol serves as Chief of Protocol for the United States Government and as the Protocol Officer for the White House. The Chief of Protocol advises the President and the Secretary of State on matters of the United States Government’s obligations relating to national and international protocol. Note: Position is filled until April 2011.

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S/CPR wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as Outreach Liaison to the Chief of Protocol , Deputy Chief of Protocol overseeing the Diplomatic Partnerships Program, Assistant Chief of Protocol for Diplomatic Affairs, and Senior Gifts Officer. The incumbent will be privy to their political, personal and management philosophies and therefore performs all duties with discretion and confidentiality. He/She will assist the S/CPR by serving as an outreach liaison to vendors, craftspeople, community members, community leaders and others. He/she will also work with the Diplomatic Affairs and Diplomatic Partnerships Divisions on special projects.

He/she will also be responsible for making connections with relevant artists, vendors and production teams to assist the gifts unit with the selection and presentation of gifts. The incumbent will do research to identify appropriate contacts and assist with the facilitation of securing the gifts. The incumbent will also take the lead on preparing resources to assist incoming foreign ambassadors and their families with their transition to life in Washington. He/she will identify key individuals within the community who can assist with the day-to-day lives of the families of diplomats and embassy staff who recently arrived in the United States.

9. Policy Planning Staff, Office of (S/P) is located within the Office of the Secretary . It provides the Secretary and other Department Principals substantive analysis, review, and advice, including recommendations for alternative courses of action on major ongoing and prospective policy issues. The Policy Planning Staff overseas the entire portfolio of global issues that occupy the Secretary’s attention and identifies gaps in policy, new problem areas, and emerging situations requiring policy attention and proposes policies that respond to related needs.

S/P seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as an advisor to the Director of Policy Planning, Office of the Secretary . We are looking for Fellows with a wide range of interests and experience, including Africa, the Middle East, Western Europe, Latin America, the global economy and finance, international organizations and architecture, transnational terrorism, development, or human rights. S/P also is willing to consider candidates with other interests. Note: Position is filled until February 2012.

Outside the State Department, the Fellow will collaborate with senior officials and counterparts at the National Security Council and other USG agencies in the policy formulation process and may represent the State Department as required in specialized meetings and other fora in fulfillment of these duties.

10. The Reconstruction Stabilization, Office of the Coordinator for (S/CRS) wishes to host a Fellow to serve as an expert on reconstruction and stabilization operations . In this capacity, the Fellow will review and provide expert comment on development and institutionalization of doctrine and concepts for preparing, planning, and conducting reconstruction and stabilization operations. S/he will also represent the office in Department and interagency meetings as well as in seminars and outreach with official and unofficial foreign visitors. The Fellow will draft and clear with the other bureaus of the Department and interagency partners conceptual products such as doctrine, frameworks, templates, guides, as well as cables, memoranda, talking points, an input for Congressional testimony.

The incumbent serves as an expert in S/CRS Civilian Response Operations (CRO), Response Strategy Division and is under the direct supervision of the Chief, Response Strategy Division. The incumbent exercises latitude in planning, scheduling, coordinating, and executing assignments, subject to the approval of the incumbent’s supervisor. While formally assigned for management purposes to S/CRS/CRO, the Fellow will be expected to work in collaboration with the Strategy and Concepts Division of the office of Planning (PLN). Taskings will be jointly determined by CRO and PLN. The incumbent may make recommendations but does not have any decision-making authority. The incumbent also exercises no supervisory responsibilities.

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11. Special Envoy to Sudan, Office of the U.S. (S/USSES) wishes to host a Fellow to serve as Advisor on Electoral and Governmental Affairs provide educational expertise/consultancy to the Government of Southern Sudan . The Fellow will review and provide expert comment on education issues to the Juba Government and in support of the Special Envoy’s work to prepare for the January 2011 referendum on independence in southern Sudan. S/he will also represent the office in Department and interagency meetings as well as in seminars and outreach with official and unofficial foreign visitors. The Fellow will draft and clear with the other bureaus of the Department and interagency partners conceptual products such as doctrine, frameworks, templates, guides, as well as cables, memoranda, talking points, an input for Congressional testimony. Note: Position is filled until June 2011.

12. Special Representative to Muslim Communities, Office of the Secretary of State (S/SRMC) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to assist the Special Representative in fulfilling President Obama Secretary Clinton’s goal of enhancing engagement with Muslim Communities on a global level . The Office of the Special Representative to Muslim Communities was created in 2009 to engage with Muslim communities around the world on a people-to-people and organizational level, specifically focusing on using tools of 21 st Century tradecraft to engage youth. This is the first time in history such a position has been created, presenting a unique opportunity for a Fellow to work on one of Secretary Clinton’s key priorities in a creative office environment.

Assist the Special Representative by developing and implementing Muslim engagement initiatives around the world, in coordination with our Embassies, interagency partners, private sector partners, educational institutions and NGOs. The candidate will report to the Deputy Special Representative and will have daily contact with the Special Representative. The candidate should have excellent written and oral communications skills and be willing to work in a fast-paced and creative environment. While specific experience working with Muslim communities is not a requirement, the ability to use technology creatively to more effectively engage new audiences is a plus.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Creatively use social media websites, including Facebook and Twitter, to develop and enhance the Special Representative’s online engagement with young people around the world;

Work with U.S. embassies overseas and with regional bureau colleagues to develop new initiatives overseas, as well as initiatives that can be supported from Washington;

Draft policy papers and memos for the Secretary and other senior interagency officials, and monitor intelligence reporting, cables, and articles by other organizations that contribute to our understanding of Muslim communities overseas;

Support the Special Representative by preparing briefing materials prior to the Special Representative’s travel and accompany the Special Representative on official travel as needed.

13. War Crimes Issues (S/WCI), Office of wishes to host two Fellows to work as Foreign Affairs Officers. S/WCI advises the Secretary of State directly and formulates U.S. policy responses to atrocities committed in areas of conflict and elsewhere throughout the world. The incumbents

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will be responsible for a portfolio of war crimes issues matching their unique experiences and interest with needs of the office. This may include work on U.S. engagement with the International Criminal Court, genocide prevention, accountability and reconciliation, residual mechanisms, and regional tribunals in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The Foreign Affairs Officers have significant policy responsibility and considerable top-level support within the office. Note: One slot is filled until November 2010. The second slot is filled until March 2011.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Directly advise and make recommendations to the Ambassador-at-Large on policy issues within your portfolio;

Prepare briefing papers, talking points, and press guidance;

Travel to portfolio region to meet with Embassy staff , host government staff, and relevant international organizations and NGOs;

Work closely with NSC, USAID, State Department bureaus and embassies to develop country-specific strategies on justice and accountability;

Maintain direct liaison with non-governmental organizations concerned with human rights issues;

Monitor atrocities within regional areas and develop appropriate USG policy responses.

Qualities sought:

Candidates for these positions should have excellent drafting and analytical skills; flexibility and adaptability; strong interpersonal skills; ability to take on increasing levels of responsibilities in a fast-paced environment; sound judgment. A legal or human rights background; specific experience in international law, genocide prevention, or tribunals; and travel to relevant regions are a plus but not required.

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Under Secretary for Management (M)

The Under Secretary for Management (M) is responsible for the people, resources, facilities, technology, consular affairs, and security of the Department of State and is the Secretary’s principal advisor on management issues. He/she is the State Department’s representative on the President’s Management Council and serves as the Department’s Senior Sustainability Officer.

The Office of Management Policy, Rightsizing & Innovation (M/PRI) serves as the Executive Secretariat for the Secretary’s Greening Diplomacy Initiative (GDI) and seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Greening and Sustainable Diplomacy (GSD) Analyst. The GSD Analyst will support M, M/PRI and other Department Principals on greening and sustainability issues, and help in the development and implement Administration policies and diplomatic strategies in those areas.

Duties and Responsibilities

The GSD Franklin Fellow supports M/PRI’s role as coordinator for organizational and public outreach on GDI projects and the Department’s Agency Sustainability Plan (ASP). In this capacity, the Fellow will assess Department progress in reaching ASP goals during the Plan’s first year (of ten) and identify areas for improvement; liaise with bureaus, offices and overseas posts to encourage active participation in Department efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and help develop

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and implement a comprehensive communications strategy to reach all internal and external stakeholders, including domestic and overseas publics. The Fellow will prepare analyses of the issues underlying the formulation of operational recommendations to support proposals to the Greening Council, led by the Under Secretary for Management.

The Franklin Fellow will liaise with relevant parts of the USG community on greening issues to identify best practices and build the business case for implementing these practices in the Department’s operations domestically and overseas and be responsible for broadcasting greening messages to a range of audiences. This individual will work closely with offices of the Bureaus of Public Affairs; Administration; Oceans, Environment & Sciences; the members of the Greening Council and Greening Council Working Group; the Council on Environmental Quality; the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive; and other USG agencies.

The incumbent will facilitate activities in his/her areas of responsibility within M/PRI, including the review of policy- and technical-related information concerning E.O. 13514 and other Federal sustainability directives. Working closely with the M/PRI staff, the incumbent will observe and advise on the coordination of policy deliberation in his/her area of responsibility, within the Department and across agencies. The incumbent may represent M/PRI at any relevant interagency meetings. The position may occasionally require travel to various domestic and international locations.

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United States Agency for International Development

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is the leading U.S. agency providing assistance to countries to help achieve long term sustainable development. The Agency is also the first lead responder in humanitarian emergencies and has a significant portfolio of activities in disaster relief and recovery. With missions in more than 80 countries around the world, USAID works to ensure that all people have a chance to lead a healthy and productive life.

USAID works in close partnership with host countries, as well as with nongovernmental organizations, universities, American businesses, international agencies, other bilateral donor governments, and other U.S. government agencies. USAID has pioneered the use of public-private partnerships (PPPs) to tackle development challenges. Since 2001, the Agency has cultivated more than 900 public-private alliances with over 1,700 individual partners.

USAID extends assistance in five geographic regions: Sub-Saharan Africa; Asia; Latin America and the Caribbean; Europe and Eurasia; and the Middle East. Programs focus on helping countries address challenges in food security, global health, climate change, energy, gender equality, science and technology development, and others. USAID Bureaus and offices that may host Franklin Fellows include the Office of Development Partners, which is the Agency’s lead on PPPs; the Bureau for Policy, Planning, and Learning, which is USAID’s “intellectual nerve center;” the Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade; the Bureau for Global Health; and the Regional Bureaus and Missions.

1. The Office of Development Partners (USAID/ODP) is a dynamic office creating partnerships with the private sector, non-government organizations (NGOs), universities, international agencies, other governments, and other U.S. government agencies. Through these partnerships, ODP helps the Agency deliver critical results on some of the world’s most troublesome development challenges. Our motto is “lead, leverage, and innovate.” ODP’s Private Sector Alliance Division leads USAID’s creation and use of strategic Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) to amplify and sustain USAID’s development impact.

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USAID/ODP wishes to host a Senior Fellow for Alliance Building. Over the next several years, the U.S. Government is committed to doubling its funding for development assistance around the world. The Obama Administration has identified partnership as a core feature of U.S. Government efforts. USAID/ODP seeks a dynamic, experienced individual with significant private sector experience including some time spent working in a corporation . The Senior Fellow for Alliance Building will be a leading member of a high-performing, results-focused team with frequent exposure to senior USG officials, U.S. corporate executives, senior foreign officials and executives, and other donors. He/she can influence the identification, selection, and development of PPPs supporting the Agency’s impact on some of the world’s most critical development challenges. The Fellow can energize the U.S. Government’s leadership in international development. The Fellow’s private sector expertise can build potentially game- changing strategic public-private partnerships.

Duties and Responsibilities:

The Fellow will lead a small team to identify and nurture relationships with potential new strategic private sector partners for USAID initiatives in food security, education, health, small business and entrepreneur development and growth, and geographic priorities:

Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq, and sub-Saharan Africa.

The Fellow’s prior experience and interests will determine areas for leadership; he/she will work with experienced development professionals in a team effort to grow the Agency’s pool of strategic private sector partners.

Serve as private sector lead in an ODP-led SWAT team to identify and overcome USAID policy and procedural impediments to PPPs.

Serve as private sector lead on ODP/PSA teams to work with USAID missions, other US Government agencies, donors, and other USAID/W operating units to develop PPPs supporting high-priority foreign policy objectives.

Develop new instruments to negotiate and execute strategic PPPs. Serve as USAID’s private sector lead eliciting strategic priorities of new cooperators and find the best linkage with USAID’s strategic interests.

2. The Office of Health Infectious Diseases and Nutrition (HIDN/NUT), which is located within the Bureau of Global Health, wishes to host Franklin Fellow(s) to serve as Science Advisor(s) with GH/HIDN/NUT’s health research program team on product development and the introduction of products to reduce mortality and severe morbidity of women, children, and newborns.

The Fellow(s) GH/HIDN/NUT seeks should possess a range of expertise in product development, research, and translation of research findings into policy and programs. Experience in the application of private sector approaches and engagement of new partners in product development, launch, and introduction through public and private sector channels would be especially welcome.

Illustrative activities depending on areas of expertise include:

Conduct landscape analyses of research and introduction opportunities that advance USAID’s priorities for future consideration, beyond current portfolio priorities.

Advise on opportunities and strategies to strengthen collaborative approaches with private sector partners in influencing public health objectives.

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Provide technical review of on-going and proposed maternal, child, newborn, and nutrition development and introduction projects. Participate in site visits and brief USAID technical teams on progress and interim data analysis for potential programmatic and research implications.

GH/HIDN/NUT, which overseas health research and introduction/translation of research into programs, is integral to USAID’s ability to achieve its health and development objectives worldwide. Through its research to use strategy, USAID has developed and introduced affordable health products, policies, and practices appropriate for addressing health-related concerns in developing countries.

As the U.S. Government’s lead foreign assistance agency working in partnership with other public and private sector agencies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), USAID applies a cycle of assessment, development, pilot testing, and introduction of products and approaches to tackle the main diseases and health issues of developing countries. This cycle enables USAID to assess needs, solve research and development problems, and improve the effectiveness of health programs that address the main causes of mortality.

USAID’s research and evaluation role, aligned with its strengths, is to assess local health conditions, develop and adapt appropriate health products and interventions, and support their field testing and introduction, including strengthening local health systems.

A five-year plan to accomplish this strategy is described in the May 2006 Health-related research and development activities at USAID —(http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PDACH111.pdf)

3. The Health Team in the Office for Regional and Sustainable Development (RSD) in USAID's Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) Bureau wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Senior Technical Advisor for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). RSD is the technical office for LAC. Health is one of five technical teams in RSD which advise the LAC Bureau and Mission management on technical issues in the region. Note: Position is filled until October 2010.

The Health Team also implements region-wide programs and backstops mission health teams in 13 countries and three sub-regional offices. Regional health activities in LAC are designed to promote the equity, quality and sustainability of health care in the LAC region. Specifically, these activities increase the data available for health priority-setting by policymakers and other stakeholders.

The Fellow is expected to be USAID’s primary representative, engaging in a partnership with the Interamerican Development Bank, Pan American Health Organization and other donor organizations to develop a regional “trust fund” which will engage in response to Neglected Tropical Diseases throughout the region. The Fellow is expected to work in partnership with other organizations to establish governance and operating structures for the use of USAID and partner funds within this “trust fund” mechanism so that USAID funds comply with Congressional requirements and the overall trust fund adequately addresses the burden of NTDs in the LAC region.

Specifically, the Fellow is expected to design and establish a grant agreement with the Interamerican Development Bank which will articulate the use of USAID resources in the context of the “trust fund”. The Fellow will also work closely with USAID’s Bureau for Global Health, Office of Health, Infectious Diseases and Nutrition, with the team responsible for implementing the global neglected tropical diseases initiative in the context of these activities. The Fellow may also work directly with this team on overall strategic planning of USAID’s response to NTDs on a global level.

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4.

USAID Water Team and Urban Team. USAID’s Water Team in the Office of Natural Resources Management (NRM) and its Urban Team in the Office of Infrastructure and

Engineering (I&E) are committed to programs in support of the Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act. The Act requires USAID to assist developing countries in achieving the Millennium Development goals for drinking water supply and sanitation along with a comprehensive

approach to conserving and improving the quality of water resources.

The world’s population

is now more urban than rural; USAID’s Urban Team will update the “Making Cities Work” strategy, developing new ways to reduce urban poverty and improve service delivery. Note:

Position is filled until November 2010.

USAID’s Water and Urban Teams seek a Franklin Fellow to work as Senior Advisor with both teams, reporting to both the Team Leaders. The Senior Advisor provides advice to the Agency in USAID/W and the field on water and sanitation service delivery and expansion; urban planning and municipal services; and infrastructure finance. The Advisor helps develop strategies and programs supporting the Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act. The Senior Advisor will also contribute to USAID’s updatee “Making Cities Work” strategy, developing programs that meet the needs of slum dwellers.

The work includes mid-and high-level contact, both inside and outside the Agency. Some domestic and international travel may be required. While the Senior Advisor works under the direction of both the Water and Urban Team Leaders, s/he is expected to demonstrate a significant degree of autonomy and responsibility while simultaneously working as a collaborative team player with other team members.

The Senior Advisor will lead or support one or more of the initiatives described below. These initiatives are presented as prioritized activities for Urban Programs, the Water Team, and the Senior Advisor work plans. However, they may be amended or added to as appropriate.

Work with the Urban Team, Regional Bureaus, AID/W technical bureaus, field missions, non- governmental partners to updated USAID’s “Making Cities Work” strategy.

Support USAID’s participation in World Habitat Day and the World Urban Forum, in particular, working with implementing partners to develop operational approaches to addressing the needs of the urban poor.

Develop new partnerships with the private sector and NGO community in the US to support slum-upgrading activities and to bring US expertise and lessons learned on reducing urban poverty and improving service delivery to the developing world.

Develop a regional strategy for sub-Saharan Africa for the Millennium Development Goals on water and sanitation.

Assist the Water Team with Mission water and sanitation programs and develop new activities in support of expanded access to these services in cities and towns, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

Contribute to the development of other programs related to the financing and provision of urban infrastructure.

5. The USAID Africa Bureau Office of Sustainable Development would like to host a Franklin Fellow to support the Governing Justly & Democratically goals of its Conflict, Peacebuilding, and Governance Division (USAID/AFR/SD/CPG). In particular, CPG wishes to build and expand upon work regarding African decentralization and local governance conducted in 2010 that resulted in the “Africa Decentralization Comparative Assessment.” More specifically, the Fellow would:

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Continue and advance research on African decentralization experiences, deepening CPG’s understanding of country experiences, themes, or issues raised in the “Assessment” (such as Nigeria or fiscal decentralization) or expand upon the report with research into additional countries (such as Kenya or Somalia);

Provide advice and guidance to the Africa Bureau in Washington and Africa-based democracy and governance (DG) officers on decentralization, local governance, and possible programming;

Enhance AFR/SD/CPG outreach on DG issues through oral presentations and written material;

Build AFR/SD/CPG’s network of contacts and experts on decentralization, subnational levels of governance, and public service delivery in Africa;

Assist with outreach and relationship building with businesses, NGOs, foundations, and academic institutions, as well as across the U.S. Government; and

Inform the development of training programs for USAID and/or other USG personnel engaged in DG issues.

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Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance

In support of the Secretary’s transformational diplomacy agenda, the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance (F) was established to develop and implement a coherent foreign assistance strategy and associated budget, program, and implementation planning processes for the U.S.

Government to better align our foreign assistance programs with our foreign policy goals.

mandate stretches beyond the Department of State to include oversight of USAID funding, and

coordination with the interagency, NSC, Non-Government Organizations and Congress.

Its

The Director of Foreign Assistance wishes to host a Fellow to work as a country or program coordinator. The incumbent would serve as a point of contact for either foreign assistance programs in a specific group of countries or a specific foreign assistance program worldwide or within a region. The incumbent is responsible for the development, oversight and evaluation of multi-million dollar foreign assistance programs.

Continuing responsibilities include:

Develop foreign assistance strategies for assigned countries

Develop funding requirements for strategies for assigned countries

Develop plans to accomplish objectives based on foreign policy goals of the Department of State and USAID

Advise Office, Bureau, and Mission staff on a variety of program/project issues

Advise senior management on key issues, constraints, or political sensitivities associated with project or program development

Provide expert advice and guidance on broad projects and programs with national impact

Identify “hot issues” including proposed legislation, policies or guidance and performs analysis and develops strategies to respond.

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U.S. Mission to the United Nations

1. USUN’s Management and Reform Section (USUN/MR) is interested in hosting a Franklin Fellow who would assist the section in representing the United States in the Fifth Committee (Administration and Budget) of the United Nations as well as other Committees as required (e.g., the Committee on Program and Coordination and the Committee on Conferences). As a Fifth Committee delegate, the Franklin Fellow would be responsible for representing U.S. interests and ensuring implementation of U.S. policies in the areas of budget, finance, oversight and reform of the United Nations and the New York-based UN agencies. The Fellow would also be responsible for promoting U.S. policies in the area of human resource management for the UN and serve as a liaison between American UN employees and the Mission.

The Fellow would also serve as an advisor on complex budgetary, financial and management questions that involve the United Nations and other New York-based UN agencies. In this role, the Fellow would be responsible for researching and providing analysis of UN documents related to the areas above, as well as drafting policy statements for use during the General Assembly and other UN meetings. The Fellow should possess a high level of negotiating skills and ability to develop relationships with UN Secretariat officials and with officials/delegates from other Missions.

In addition to the primary role in MR, the Fellow would provide guidance on budget and financial policies to other U.S. delegates to the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and subsidiary organs of those bodies, as well as other sections within the Mission.

2. The Political Section of the U.S. Mission to the UN (USUN/POL) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow in its Sanctions Unit. The USUN Sanctions Unit is a small team within the Political Section responsible for the functional area of UN multilateral sanctions regimes. The Sanctions Unit is responsible for advocating and implementing U.S. policy at the United Nations related to current UN sanctions regimes, as well as helping develop new sanctions regimes as required and maintain existing regimes.

The Sanctions Unit Franklin Fellow is primarily responsible for USUN's interaction with the Security Council on issues related to al-Qaeda/Taliban sanctions. This sanctions program - known as the "1267 regime" - is one of the oldest and most well-developed targeted sanctions programs ever implemented by the Security Council.

The Fellow will also be responsible for providing guidance and recommendations regarding the strategic direction of the 1267 sanctions regime, including new measures to address recent litigation challenging the regime and to ensure the regime adapts to the evolving nature of the terrorist threat.

The Fellow represents the United States on the Security Council committee responsible for overseeing this regime (the "1267 Committee"). He/She advocates U.S. opinions in the Committee and negotiates with other Committee members to advance U.S. foreign policy priorities. The incumbent provides detailed and regular reporting and analysis to Washington about developments in the 1267 Committee.

On a day-to-day basis, the Fellow coordinates extensively with Washington to develop and advance U.S. positions related to the 1267 regime. This includes primary responsibility at USUN for managing proposals for new designations of individuals/entities, responses to de- listing requests, and requests for exemptions to the measures. The incumbent works closely with the State Department and Treasury Department on a number of major ongoing tasks in the 1267 Committee, including an ongoing comprehensive review of all 500+ names on the

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Committee's Consolidated List and the production of publicly-releasable "narrative summaries" of reasons for listings.

In addition to duties related to the 1267 Committee, the Fellow supports USUN efforts on other sanctions regimes, namely for Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Liberia, North Korea, and Iran. This may require attending Sanctions Committee meetings, negotiating texts, managing paperwork and assisting in the drafting of new Security Council resolutions.

The Fellow serves as a Political Advisor in the Sanctions Unit of the USUN Political Section. He/She directly reports to the chief of the Sanctions Unit. The incumbent exercises latitude in planning, scheduling, coordinating, and executing assignments, subject to the approval of his supervisor. The incumbent may make recommendations but does not have any official decision-making authority. The incumbent exercises no supervisory responsibilities.

3. The Office of Press and Public Affairs at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations (USUN/PPA) is responsible for all press and public diplomacy outreach for the Mission. On a daily basis, the press section supports the Front Office and Mission by ensuring that the U.S. message on any given issue before the UN is delivered to the UN press corps (domestic and international) as well as the broader media community in New York, Washington, and local markets around the country. Note: Position is filled until April 2011.

USUN/PPA seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as the Section’s primary writer and adviser for the website and related social media. The main objective is to present news of interest to the domestic and international public with respect to the conduct of U.S. representation to the United Nations. Specifically, the incumbent is responsible for enhancing the quality of news dissemination through the website and social media with the purpose of strengthening the overall USUN message on its work with the UN.

The Fellow, who will have strong research experience, must be able to write on policy and UN-related substance with speed and ease. The incumbent is expected to break new ground on the use of electronic media. The incumbent will need to work independently, show a high level of initiative, and obtain rapid knowledge about a number of technical UN issues.

The Fellow will also communicate throughout the U.S. Mission with other sections, especially ECOSOC, working to develop leads for stories to publish electronically and in social media. This effort should work to better integrate the Press and Public Affairs Section with other parts of the Mission.

The Fellow’s writing and research abilities will also be available for other office needs. Foremost among these will be the drafting and development of statements for each special international day to be highlighted by USUN. These statements will require coordination with the highest levels of Washington agencies.

4. The Office of Economic and Social Affairs (USUN/ECOSOC) works with the United Nations Economic and Social Council and advocates for U.S policies and interests across the board in the areas of economic policy, development, social affairs, the environment, humanitarian policy and human rights. Such programs account for over 70% of the regular UN budget. Note:

Position is filled until July 2011.

USUN/ECOSOC wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to represent the Mission in negotiations with various UN fora on macroeconomic, debt, trade, development assistance, financing for development, and related issues. The Fellow will report on UN activities on these issues to action offices in the Department of State and USAID, the Office of the U.S Trade

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Representative and the Treasury Department, and request guidance on negotiating points. He/she would also coordinate with Washington action offices to manage policy and strategy in advance of UN meetings in dealing with the above topics.

In addition to the regular General Assembly, we also anticipate the Fellow would serve as a member of the U.S delegation to various high-level meetings on economic issues, and assist with other duties as appropriate.

Particular areas of emphasis for the Franklin Fellow in 2010 will be shaping the UN’s response to the global and financial crisis, including its relationship with the international financial institutions, and advancing the UN’s development agenda during a period of economic challenge. In this context, strong private sector or financial experience is highly desirable.

5. The Legal Section of the U.S. Mission to the UN (USUN/L) handles a broad range of challenging and interesting international and domestic legal issues. In particular, the Legal Section has primary responsibility for international criminal tribunals, serving on the UN Security Council’s Informal Working Group on the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, representing the United States on the Management Committees of the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, and

serving as a member of the Steering Committee for the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.

Section also has primary responsibility within USUN for handling counterterrorism matters at the UN. With respect to counter-terrorism and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals in particular, the Legal Section has been a proactive force in ensuring that U.S. foreign policy objectives at the United Nations are achieved.

The Legal

In addition, the Legal Section frequently assists other sections in the Mission on the drafting of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions on a variety of topics that impact international peace and security, and provides procedural and strategic advice on Security Council and General Assembly meetings. The Legal Section also advises the Host Country section on issues arising from the UN presence in the New York City area, including the privileges and immunities of United Nations diplomats, and provides ethics guidance to Mission employees. The Legal Section represents the United States on the General Assembly’s Sixth (Legal) Committee, Credentials Committee and General Committee, and the Security Council’s Informal Working Group on Documentation and Other Procedural Issues.

USUN/L seeks to host a Franklin Fellow to:

Assist in handling issues related to the international criminal tribunals. This may require attending meetings of the Security Council’s Informal Working Group on International Tribunals and the Steering and Management Committees of the ad hoc tribunals and writing summaries of such meetings.

Assist in representing the United States on the Security Council’s Informal Working Group

on Documentation and Other Procedural Issues.

advocating U.S. opinions in Working Group meetings and negotiate with other Working Group/Management Committee members to advance U.S. foreign policy priorities. He/she will assist in providing detailed and regular reporting and analysis to Washington about developments in the meetings.

The Franklin Fellow will assist in

Support USUN/L efforts on counterterrorism, including our responsibilities in the Security Council and the General Assembly. This may require attending meetings of the Security Council’s Counterterrorism Committee (the CTC) and writing summaries of such meetings,

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negotiating texts, managing paperwork and assisting in the crafting of Security Council resolutions.

Support the Legal Section in its host country responsibilities, including attending the Host Country Committee meetings at the UN and assisting with research on a variety of host country legal issues.

Assist USUN/L in analyzing and responding to requests for ethics guidance.

Work on other legal issues and duties as assigned, including legal issues arising in the negotiation of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions.

6. The Host Country Affairs Section of the U.S. Mission to the United Nations (USUN/HC) carries out the responsibilities of the Mission as host to the United Nations and its Member States in accordance with UNGA Resolution 2819; the UN Headquarters Agreement; the International Organizations Immunities Act of 1947; the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations; and various other requirements and treaty obligations.

USUN/HC Wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as an assistant in the Accreditations Unit, working under the supervision of the Chief of the Unit and one Accreditations Officer. The Fellow also may serve in an administrative capacity assisting the Visa Unit’s Foreign Affairs Specialist and Visa Specialist in renewing visas for members of the UN diplomatic community.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Fellow will be Responsible for timely and accurate entry of accreditation information (personnel appointments and terminations of duty, notification of family members and domestics, promotions and redesignations and changes of address of UN Secretariat and UN Permanent Missions) into the Department of State TOMIS database for the 40,000 members of the United Nations community.

Generate Department of State diplomatic and official identification cards to entitled personnel and family members of the Permanent Missions to the UN.

Create hardcopy records of newly-arrived diplomatic personnel and their family members.

File both active and terminated hardcopy records to Host Country Archives.

Assist in the distribution of Host Country-issued documents to the UN community in the USUN Reception Area, as needed

Check incoming visa applications, accompanying passports and supporting documents for completeness and accuracy, under the direction of the Visa Unit’s Foreign Affairs and Visa Specialists.

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Bureau of Administration

The Bureau of Administration (A) is responsible for providing effective global support for the people and programs of America’s diplomacy through customer satisfaction, competitive sourcing and emergency preparedness.

1. The Bureau’s Office of Commissary and Recreation (A/OPR/CR) wishes to host a Fellow with experience in the business or accounting fields. The Fellow would serve as a management or financial analyst for a portfolio of employee associations (operating like small businesses) at our embassies and consulates abroad. Our team members conduct analysis on business

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operations to identify trends and provide solutions and best practices in business and finance. The Fellow may travel on site visits abroad.

2. The Office of Directives Management (A/ISS/DIR) wishes to host a Fellow with experience in research, writing reports and other materials, as required. The incumbent will act as the division’s point of contact on e-Government activities; represent the division at meetings; do research; and write reports and other materials, as required. Other duties will include assisting with accessibility requirements for forms under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act; requirements to provide electronic disclosure of information and the use of electronic signatures; and other regulatory requirements for Department forms and information.

3. The Office of the Executive Director, Human Resources Division (A/EX/HRD), wishes to host a Fellow with strong writing skills and experience in human resources and policy development. Web design and IT skills are very desirable. The incumbent will standardize human resources and benefits policies; organize such policies into a web-based FAQ site on government benefits; undertake research related to the website; and work on various other policy and research projects.

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Bureau of African Affairs

The Bureau of African Affairs (AF) is responsible for 48 countries in Africa south of the Sahara. The official languages (in additional to local languages) in these countries are French, English and Portuguese. Spanish is spoken in one country – Equatorial Guinea. AF would like to host three Franklin Fellows:

AF seeks to host three Franklin Fellows:

1. The Office of Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (AF/PDPA) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Special Advisor on African Diaspora and Regional Issues by outreaching to African Diaspora communities in the US and elsewhere. Our office has the lead in the Africa Bureau for engagement with key Diaspora organizations and individuals in various parts of the US, informing them about US policy in their countries of origin and listening to their concerns and questions. The information conveyed by Bureau spokespeople is great benefit to the Bureau’s understanding of political, economic and social issues in these countries as well transmitted back to the home country by way of social media. Note: Position is filled until August 2011.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Head the office’s efforts to get a better grasp of “who’s who” in the Diaspora, which groups are truly representative of a large body of opinion, and how best to make use of the contacts and information generated from the exchange.

Serve as the Deputy to the Planning and Coordination Officer, who is responsible for the office’s program resource and personnel support to Public Affairs Offices in the Africa. In this capacity he will research, advise on and coordinate the activities of the office’s thematic teams, currently consisting of environment, food security, governance, women’s issues, Muslim engagement and economic development.

Focus on effective means to reach young people from marginalized areas or in conflict or post-conflict situations. This program covers a broad range of youth, from rural Muslim populations to demobilized child soldiers to refugees to HIV/AIDS orphans. In Africa, there are many regions in which traditional family support groups are no longer there for the growing youth population. We need to have cost-effective, longer-term program and

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outreach strategies to build support for the U.S. and for democratic practices among this successor group. This will include the use of mobile telephony and social media platforms for communicating with youth.

2. The Economic Policy Staff (AF/EPS) is responsible for oversight of strategic health, scientific, environmental, humanitarian assistance, energy, transportation, financial, and macro-economic interests in the 48 countries that comprise the sub-Saharan Africa Region, including implementation of several Presidential initiatives. The Office coordinates with functional bureaus and other executive branch agencies to ensure that these aspects of the USG’s engagement with sub-Saharan African are formulated and put into operation in accordance with the Administration’s strategy for continued engagement with the region. AF/EPS has direct oversight and programming responsibility for millions of dollars of Economic Support Funds and a lesser amount of Development Assistance, and is the principal source of economic advice and support for Bureau principals.

AF/EPS represents the Bureau in a number of interagency groups charged with developing and implementing a wide range of Presidential and Administration initiatives such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), the Millennium Challenge Account, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS, the Kimberley Process (conflict diamonds), Safe Skies for Africa, the President's Malaria Initiative, the Women's Justice and Empowerment Initiative, and global initiatives on conflict minerals, water, and anti- corruption.

The Economic Policy Staff (AF/EPS) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as the officer responsible for food security and agricultural issues. The incumbent analyzes the impact of the recent rise in food commodity prices, drought, use of biotechnology, and local policies on food security in sub-Saharan Africa. The incumbent also represents AF’s equities in interagency working groups and Policy Coordination subcommittees on this matter and develops policy options and engagement strategies regarding sustainable agricultural development, appropriate technology transfer, and emergency commodity assistance programming. The incumbent supports Bureau interaction with congressional staff, industry, embassies in Washington, USAID, USDA and Department personnel in soliciting input and formulating recommendations.

The Economic Policy Staff (AF/EPS) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Senior Science Advisor. Working closely with colleagues within the State Department, other U.S. government agencies, international organizations, non-governmental organizations and the private sector, the Franklin Fellow/Senior Science Advisor will:

Monitor and report on environmental, scientific, and technological (EST) developments and their impact on Africa with an emphasis on climate change and renewable energy;

Maintain responsibility for portfolios concerning the Kimberley Process, to govern trade in conflict diamonds, and evolving USG policy on conflict minerals in the eastern Congo;

Promote increased scientific exchange between Africa and the United States (academic training, academic exchanges, short-term exchanges with USG agencies, development of incubators) through collaborations with university and research centers;

Represent the Bureau at domestic and international meetings as required, including the annual Kimberley Process conferences;

Maintain and analyze economic data and statistics related to the portfolio;

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Promote EST collaboration as a mechanism of science diplomacy and foreign assistance;

Coordinate other USG agencies’ EST initiatives in Africa;

Serve as AF’s coordinator for Intellectual Property issues;

Collaborate with other members of AF/EPS on EST and trade issues within their portfolios; serve as their “back-up” as appropriate.

Specific Tasks and Objectives

Coordinate with other scientists and engineers, with an emphasis on seeking out candidates with expertise in areas that further Bureau and USG interests (e.g., experts on desertification and rangeland management to combat desertification in Sahel countries);

Oversee U.S. Geological Survey analysis of diamond export data to produce a “footprint” based on size/frequency distributions and detection of anomalies for the Kimberley Process. Assist the Bureau in developing a USG strategy on conflict minerals in the eastern Congo;

Coordinate with relevant USG officials to develop and fund environmentally-related project proposals using Economic Support Funds, prepare all required documents to ensure smooth transfer of the funds to implementing agencies and/or organizations, and review project progress and financial reports;

Promote development and commercialization of appropriate technology to encourage sustainable management of natural resources;

Identify specific opportunities for strengthening trade with Africa and promoting economic development through growth in science & technology capacity.

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Bureau of Consular Affairs

The Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA) is the public face of the Department of State for millions of U.S. citizens and foreign nationals around the world. CA is responsible for the welfare and protection of U.S. citizens abroad, for the issuance of passports and other documentation to citizens and nationals, and for the protection of U.S. border security and the facilitation of legitimate travel to the U.S. CA also has a significant domestic presence, most notably the 17 Passport Agencies that deal directly with the U.S. public. These far-reaching consular activities have broad foreign policy and domestic political implications and involve serious legal, humanitarian and management concerns. Responsibility for these functions is vested within the Department of State in the Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs and for their implementation abroad in consular officers assigned to Foreign Service posts.

1. The Directorate for Visa Services (CA/VO) seeks a mid-level manager from a business/industry that uses some, but not exclusively, foreign specialist workers. The Fellow will serve primarily in the Directorate’s Office of Public and Diplomatic Liaison (CA/VO/P), working with the Office Director, website manager and the Business Visa-Center Chief and staff to identify private sector practices in recruiting, selecting and hiring workers and contracting with foreign partners that would assist CA/VO in focusing its business information efforts. Activities will include consulting with the Business Visa Center; preparing outreach materials for business presentations and website postings; broadening business contacts; and planning and managing business/industry outreach events.

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2.

The Office of Policy Coordination and Public Affairs (CA/P) wishes to host a Fellow to help develop and execute public relations strategies for media and/or Congressional relations. Elements of this would include:

Developing contacts with business and non-governmental organizations to convey information on visa, passport, and overseas citizen services policy;

Improving methods for collecting and using feedback on consular public outreach;

Working with Bureau’s Internet Working Group to manage content of our internet site (http://travel.state.gov/);

Working with information specialists to build a reference library for consular outreach activities; and

Establishing a Bureau Public Affairs Working Group to improve cooperation between of directorates within the Bureau.

3. The Directorate for Passport Services (CA/PPT) wishes to host two (2) Franklin Fellows to serve as mid-level management/operations analysts:

CA/PPT seeks one Fellow to serve as a Performance Management Analyst in the Directorate’s Office of Management Analysis and Coordination (CA/PPT/MAC), working with the Managing Director for Issuance, CA/PPT/MAC Director, program analysts and personnel from 25 domestic passport agencies and centers. CA/PPT/MAC develops and/or coordinates implementation of Directorate policies and procedures and develops systems for measuring performance across the network. The Fellow would assist CA/PPT/MAC in developing metrics for assessing individual passport agency performance across a range of activities and would play a key role in the in the design of a standardized and balanced scorecard. Analytical experience in a production-based work environment is desirable but not required.

CA/PPT seeks one Fellow to serve as an Audit and Risk Assessment Analyst in the Directorate’s Office of Adjudication, Adjudication Oversight Division (CA/PPT/A/AO). The Office of Adjudication is responsible for developing standardized policies and procedures for the adjudication of applications of U.S. passports and regularly measuring the quality of adjudications and compliance with current policies at both the agency and individual levels.

CA/PPT has implemented an audit program to measure individual employee performance against adjudication quality standards and seeks to calibrate the usefulness of the program, as currently designed. It seeks also to re-design the program as appropriate to maximize the reliability of the information gleaned from audits while minimizing the operational and administrative burden required to conduct the audits and report results.

Expertise in audit methodologies and statistical analysis is required, and experience in the development of quality assurance and risk assessment programs and reporting mechanisms is highly desirable

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Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor

The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) leads U.S. efforts to implement foreign affairs policies that promote and support democracy, human rights, religious freedom, and workers’ rights in all regions of the world. DRL’s objective is to work with partners, including NGOs, the private sector, and other governments, to spread democracy and respect for human

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rights. DRL would like to invite Fellows to apply for positions as described below in seven offices. All of the positions include opportunities for overseas travel, as needed.

1. The Bureau wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to work with its leadership and staff to develop proposals to strengthen human rights diplomacy.

Promoting freedom and democracy and protecting human rights around the world are central to U.S. foreign policy. The values captured in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in other global and regional commitments are consistent with the values upon which the United States was founded centuries ago. The United States uses a wide range of tools to advance a freedom agenda, including bilateral diplomacy, multilateral engagement, foreign assistance, reporting and public outreach, and economic sanctions. Working in collaboration with other parts of the Department, the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor plays a vital role in promoting freedom and democracy.

The Bureau seeks a Fellow who will engage in a dialogue with the leadership and staff of the Bureau and other key actors within the Department to examine ways to enhance the recruitment of talented Foreign Services Officers to serve in the Bureau, to increase the opportunities for training on human rights and democracy promotion both within the Bureau and within the Department as a whole and to strengthen collaboration between the Bureau and other parts of the Department. Candidates for the fellowship should have extensive knowledge of and experience in the human rights field, senior level management experience, detailed knowledge of the practices and procedures of the Department of State and a solid understanding of U.S. foreign policy. The Fellow would be expected to:

Engage in extensive discussions with current and former staff members in DRL concerning ways to enhance the effectiveness of the Bureau;

Engage in extensive discussions and facilitate dialogue with other parts of the Department, including the Foreign Service Institute, concerning ways to enhance training opportunities and strengthen collaboration in promoting human rights;

Examine procedures for recruitment, assignment and promotion within the Department as they relate to DRL;

Make recommendations to the Assistant Secretary of DRL on these issues.

2. The Office of Africa and Europe Affairs (DRL/AE), the Office of Asia and Western Hemisphere Affairs (DRL/AWH), the Office of International Labor and Corporate Social Responsibility (DRL/ILCSR) and the Office of Near Eastern and South and Central Asia Affairs (DRL/NESCA) are looking for Fellows to cover multi-country portfolios. These offices formulate human rights and democracy policy for their region, draft and review policy papers for principals, and work with the programming office to manage human rights and democracy grants.

The offices write two major reports on human rights practices and programs and weigh in on claims to asylum in the United States and decisions to train foreign military units or approve weapons sales to foreign countries. The Fellows in these offices would participate in all of these activities. DRL/AE would welcome an individual with experience in either Africa or Europe; DRL/AWH would be most interested in a Fellow with a background in Asia; DRL/NESCA would find Middle East or South Central Asian experience helpful.

The Africa/Europe Office (AE) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow. The Africa-Europe Office is responsible for reporting and policy formulation on issues of democracy and human rights

in Europe and Africa.

The office produces annual reporting on human rights, advises

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Bureau and Department leaders on policy issues, oversees democracy promotion programs and advises on political asylum cases.

Duties and Responsibilities:

The Fellow maintains responsibility for a given set of countries in which he/she is expected to develop expertise in human rights and democracy issues.

Draft briefing documents for Bureau and Department leaders on human rights issues in assigned countries.

Review press guidance and other internal Department documents concerning human rights and democracy in assigned countries.

Edit, redraft and conduct research on assigned countries for inclusion in the annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.

Review and monitor democracy and human rights grants programs in assigned countries.

Liaise with other bureaus at State, and within the interagency and the NGO community to develop and coordinate strategy and policy on priority issues.

Conduct vetting of foreign candidates for international assistance programs to ensure that global human rights standards are upheld.

Provide background and guidance to the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Immigration Courts for their use in adjudicating asylum claims.

Respond to Congressional and other requests for information regarding human rights in assigned countries.

Qualifications:

Applicant must possess strong writing and oral communications skills and a background in research and analysis. In addition, the applicant should have solid research and computer skills as well as the ability to work under deadline and take on increasing levels of responsibilities/tasks in a fast-paced environment.

3. The Office of East Asia and the Pacific and the Western Hemisphere (DRL/AWH) is seeking a Franklin Fellow to be responsible for promoting democratic reform, rule of law, good governance, and respect for universal human rights as part of U.S. policy in East Asia and the Pacific or the Western Hemisphere. The position has concrete and significant policy and programmatic responsibilities . DRL/AWH is currently responsible for the management and oversight of more than $67 million in foreign assistance programs in the Western Hemisphere and close to $82 million in East Asia for the promotion of democracy and human rights. Note:

Position is filled until February 2011.

DRL/AWH would like to host a Fellow who will be responsible for the following duties:

drafting and seeking approval on policy papers related to the promotion of democracy and human rights in East Asia or the Western Hemisphere for use by Bureau and Department

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senior staff;

representing the Bureau and Department in meetings, including developing and strengthening relations with U.S. and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and members of civil society;

drafting and negotiating press guidance; preparing congressional correspondence and testimony for senior staff;

editing annual reports (Country Reports on Human Rights Practice and Advancing Human Rights and Democracy Reports); and

managing Human Rights and Democracy Fund grants.

This position allows the Fellow to learn a wide variety of knowledge and skills of long-term use in building one's career in the foreign policy sector. It offers the opportunity for extensive networking within and across government agencies, non-governmental organizations, foreign government officials, and think tanks. In addition to becoming the expert on the countries of responsibility, the Fellow will become fully versed not just in the policy-making process but in the processes of foreign assistance funding (federal grant making). The incumbent would cover countries of strategic importance to the USG and have the opportunity to work with top State Department officials. There will be opportunities for travel to countries under the Fellow's responsibility.

Requirements:

The job requires sound judgment, strong interpersonal, organizational, analytical and written/oral communication skills, ability to learn new processes and information quickly, and a willingness to work as a team player in a fast-paced environment. Experience on the East Asia and Pacific region or in the Western Hemisphere is helpful, but is not a prerequisite.

4. The Office of Near East and South and Central Asian Affairs (DRL/NESCA) contributes to the development and implementation of foreign policies and programs to promote democracy and human rights in North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Central Asia, and South Asia. The office is responsible for the annual distribution of more than $300 million of democracy and human rights foreign assistance throughout the region. This work includes project proposal evaluation, grant administration and budget negotiations with selected organizations, technical coordination, and project performance review and compliance.

This Office is responsible for analysis, final editing, and completion of 33 of the 200 "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices" and 27 of the 97 "Advancing Freedom and Democracy" reports, both mandated by and annually submitted to Congress. This Office also provides analysis, evaluation, advice, and assistance to representatives of the Department of Homeland Security involved in the adjudication of requests by foreign nationals for asylum in the United States.

DRL/NESCA would like to host a Fellow who would be responsible for the following duties:

drafting and clearing memoranda for Bureau and Department senior officials related to the promotion of democracy and human rights in the broader Middle East and South and Central Asia;

representing the Bureau and Department in meetings, including developing and strengthening relations with U.S. and international NGOs and members of civil society;

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drafting and negotiating press guidance;

preparing congressional correspondence and testimony for senior staff;

overseeing extensive democracy and human rights programming;

editing annual reports (Human Rights Report and/or Advancing Human Rights and Democracy reports); and

drafting comments in response to asylum claims referred by the Department of Homeland Security. The incumbent would cover countries of strategic importance to the United States.

Requirements:

Knowledge of foreign policy issues (e.g., political, economic, public diplomacy), principles, concepts, and methods is essential. The job requires sound judgment, strong interpersonal, organizational, analytical and written/oral communication skills, and a willingness to work as a team player in a fast-paced environment. Experience on the region is helpful, but is not a prerequisite.

4. The Office for International Religious Freedom (DRL/IRF) promotes religious freedom as a core objective of U.S. foreign policy. The office monitors religious persecution and discrimination worldwide, recommends and implements policies in respective regions or countries, develops programs to promote religious freedom, and prepares an annual report on religious freedom.

DRL/IRF would like to host a Franklin Fellow to provide expert analytical and advisory support and oversee policy and project activities related to the promotion of religious freedom, handling a portfolio comprised of countries in one geographic region. The Fellow would draft and review policy papers relating to countries in his/her portfolio and advise DRL principals and others in preparation for meetings, congressional hearings, press events, etc.

5. The Office of the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism (DRL/SEAS) was mandated by Congress to monitor acts of anti-Semitism globally and to develop policies and projects to combat them. The Special Envoy serves as the key Departmental strategist and focal point in the design, development, and implementation of such policies and projects. DRL/SEAS would welcome a Fellow to provide effective communication, research analysis, and strategy development for a specific region of the world.

6. The Office of International Labor and Corporate Social Responsibility (DRL/ILCSR) monitors and promotes the rights of workers throughout the world. ILCSR’s mandates of strengthening respect for worker rights and promoting corporate social responsibility (CSR) contribute to U.S. foreign policy goals related to democracy promotion, trade, development, and human rights. Through its CSR promotion function, the Office also serves as the Bureau’s lead for the Secretary’s Global Internet Freedom Task Force. The office currently manages over $25 million in technical assistance projects to promote labor rights, strengthen CSR, and expand Internet Freedom.

ILCSR coordinates the labor-related work of Foreign Service Officers overseas, facilitates interagency cooperation on international labor affairs, and monitors countries' compliance with labor rights provisions in U.S. trade law. In carrying out its work, ILCSR coordinates closely with the U.S. Departments of Labor, Treasury, and Commerce; the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, and the Agency for International Development. The Office also works closely with organized labor, NGOs, companies, and international organizations.

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DRL/ILCSR would like to host a Franklin Fellow as Advisor for Business and Human Rights and provide his/her expertise: Note: Position is filled through August 2011.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Focus on business and human rights with a particular emphasis on multi-stakeholder initiatives comprising governments, private companies and nongovernmental organizations.

Support in strengthening the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, currently chaired by the United States. Other multi-stakeholder initiatives in which DRL maintains a strong interest include the Kimberly Process on conflict diamonds, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the Global Network Initiative and a number of other initiatives specific to various sectors.

Coordinate with the Bureau of Economic, Energy and Business Affairs to improve the functioning of the National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines on Transnational Corporations.

Develop deep familiarity with all of these initiatives and look for ways to strengthen their human rights component and increase accountability. The Fellow will work with counterparts within DRL, in other State bureaus and other U.S. Government agencies as well as external stakeholders in the private sector and NGO community.

Draft position papers, talking points and memoranda and clear them as appropriate and will represent the Office in Department and interagency meetings, as well as in seminars and outreach with official and unofficial foreign visitors.

Participate in the development, selection, and oversight of technical cooperation projects designed to promote increased corporate social responsibility.

7. DRL/ILCSR seeks a Franklin Fellow with a strong research background in control of the Internet and other digital technologies in repressive regimes to cover an Internet freedom portfolio. As illustrated by Secretary Clinton’s January 21 speech, Internet freedom is an area of increasing importance for the State Department and US foreign policy. DRL/ILCSR runs a $30 million program to promote free expression and the free flow of information on the Internet and other digital technologies. Additionally, DRL is charged with functional responsibility for the NetFreedom Taskforce, an internal policy-coordinating body within the Department, co-chaired by the Under-secretaries for Economics and Global Affairs.

The Internet Freedom Fellow would assist the office in monitoring and responding to existing and emerging threats to Internet freedom (i.e., censorship, surveillance of dissidents, and the passage of repressive media laws). The Fellow would advise the Bureau on improving its reporting on Internet freedom in the annual human rights reports and would assist in the preparation of this section of the report for key countries. The Fellow would lead an inter- bureau effort to develop Country Action Plans to positively affect Internet freedom in countries of particular concern. And the Fellow would assist in the development of a training course for Foreign Service Officers on monitoring and responding to threats to Internet freedom. Additionally, the Fellow will clear press guidance, respond to Congressional requests, and participate in relevant panels and conferences on behalf of the Department.

8. DRL/ILCSR would highly value the expertise of a mid-career professional from the private sector or an NGO to focus on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and internationally recognized worker rights issues. Regional expertise in CSR and/or labor issues is a plus, particularly expertise in East Asia and Pacific affairs. Note: Position is filled through October 2011.

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DRL/ILCSR envisions its Franklin Fellow working on the following issues/projects:

CSR and Worker Rights

Contribute to the office’s regional coverage of worker rights and CSR issues, particularly those worker rights relating to trade benefit programs.

Monitor and report on major CSR and worker rights initiatives and trends taking place both in the U.S. and globally.

Assist with management of CSR stakeholder dialogue initiatives.

Coordinate interagency communication with Labor Officers on critical worker rights and CSR issues by both sharing and requesting information on such matters as they arise.

Review and provide expert comment on the content of Worker Rights sections of the Department’s annual country human rights reports.

Draft cables, memoranda, and talking points on worker rights and CSR issues pertaining to region of coverage.

Programming

Assist in oversight of technical assistance programs focused on CSR and/or worker rights.

Assist in the development of advocacy for, and oversight of labor trade capacity building programs related to the U.S. trade agenda and other labor rights and CSR priorities.

Report regularly to ILCSR staff and relevant Labor Officers in the field on the progress of the technical assistance programs.

Outreach

Work within and outside of the State Department to promote increased respect for internationally-recognized worker rights and voluntary CSR initiatives.

Maintain contacts with the AFL-CIO, the American Center for International Labor Solidarity (ACILS), employers’ organizations, and labor-related NGOs.

Maintain contacts with CSR stakeholders including NGOs, industry representatives, international organizations, and socially responsible investment firms.

Establish and maintain contacts with NGOs working on Internet freedom of expression, as well as the Internet companies.

Plan, manage, and deliver worker rights and CSR presentations for conferences, such as the State Department’s annual Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Officers Conference.

9. The Office of Strategic Planning Affairs and Outreach (DRL/SEA) is responsible for strategic planning for the Bureau, for outreach to the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), NGO community, and Congress, and for all media affairs.

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DRL/SEA seeks a Franklin Fellow to work as a Bureau Planning Officer. The incumbent will provide direction, oversight and guidance to the Bureau and its offices, while handling the development of all Department strategic and performance planning activities and developing and interpreting guidance for the identification, analysis and implementation of strategic planning concepts. The Fellow must also develop long-range Bureau strategic plans, goals, objectives, and milestones for evaluating and measuring the effectiveness of major DRL initiatives. The individual must have excellent writing, analytical, and project management skills; needs to be highly-organized and efficient; and demonstrate the ability to work with efficiency, flexibility and diplomacy, particularly as part of a team effort.

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Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs

The Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs (EAP) plays an essential role in maintaining peace in the region. East Asia, in turn, has an enormous impact on the U.S., as the region is home to 30% of the world’s population; generates 25% of world GDP; and holds 65% of world’s foreign exchange reserves. East Asia is the destination for 27% of total U.S. exports (and 40% of our agricultural exports); and is a growing competitor for global resources. It has experienced some of the world’s fiercest military conflicts in the past century.

Despite strong U.S. military presence and alliances and relative peace in the region, EAP still includes some of the world’s most dangerous flashpoints, including the Korean peninsula and Taiwan Strait. The flourishing of democracy in the region, including in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim majority country, has given citizens a voice in their own governance and set an example for the rest of the world. Still, political repression and fragile democratic institutions continue to be the hallmark of many EAP countries.

Governments in the region have greatly increased their capacity and cooperation against terrorism, but sophisticated terrorist organizations pose a serious threat to the interests of the United States and its allies. Infectious diseases, narcotics trafficking and criminal activity emanating from the region also continue to threaten Americans. America’s deep engagement in the region has resulted in significant improvements; however, daunting challenges remain.

The Office of Economic Policy in the Bureau of East Asia and Pacific Affairs (EAP/EP) has the U.S. government lead for all programs under the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum and is responsible for regional economic and commercial affairs. EAP/EP wishes to host two Franklin Fellows.

1. The Office of Economic Policy (EAP/EP) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as part of the Staff in the Office of the Economic Policy, reporting to the Deputy Director. The incumbent is responsible for regional energy, transportation and climate change issues, sharing some responsibilities with another officer in EAP/EP.

Specific assignments may include cooperation with the Department of Energy and other interested agencies on initiatives in the Energy Working Group (EWG), cooperation with the Department of Transportation on the Senior Officials Committee on Economic and Technical Cooperation (SCE); Transportation Working Group (TPTWG), and with USTR and US Department of Commerce on the Committee on Trade and Investment on energy and transportation-related trade and investment issues.

Incumbent would, among other things, become familiar with the Eight Options for More Competitive Air Services, consider projects to foster competitiveness in maritime transport, follow the Aviation Emissions Task Force, and explore ways to implement the Energy Trade and Investment Action Plan. Note: Position is filled until February 2011.

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The Fellow will serve as primary liaison with the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC) and the National Center for APEC (NCAPEC), reaching out to business and private sector on APEC and regional issues. As a part of this function, the incumbent will be responsible for designing a program for the U.S. to begin issuance of the APEC Business Travel Card to U.S. private sector executives, an Administration commitment made at the 2007 APEC Summit.

The Fellow serves as primary source of information on specific subject areas, and is responsible for providing responses to requests from various sources including other agencies, congressional offices, and the private sector. The incumbent initiates and maintains personal liaison with various individuals in the policy-making chain including other State Department bureaus, the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Transportation, the Department of Commerce and the US Trade Representative, and coordinates interagency to achieve US energy, transportation and environment priorities within APEC.

The Fellow may represent the Office, Bureau or Department at various intra or inter-agency meetings. The Fellow will draft briefing papers, talking points, and/or speeches for the Ambassador for APEC and the EAP Front office, as needed. The Fellow may also communicate with the APEC Secretariat and non-governmental organizations to achieve goals. The Fellow may be required to assist on other tasks, as needed, to ensure EAP/EP achieves its goals.

The Fellow serves as an Expert in the Bureau of East Asia and Pacific Affairs under the direct supervision of the Deputy Director for the Office of Economic Policy. The incumbent may make recommendations but does not have any decision-making authority. The incumbent exercises no supervisory responsibilities.

2. The Office of Economic Policy (EAP/EP) seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as an Outreach and Communications expert on the Staff in EAP/EP and report to the Director. The incumbent will work under the direction of the Director of the Office and will be responsible for assisting that individual, the U.S. APEC Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) Chair, the U.S. APEC Senior Official and the deputy director in specific matters, as assigned, related to outreach and communications on APEC policy issues.

Duties and responsibilities:

Develop, coordinate and implement the US’s domestic and international communications and outreach strategy for APEC in the lead-up to and during U.S. hosting of APEC 2011. The incumbent’s key communications objective will be to promote an appreciation for how U.S. hosting of APEC and U.S. engagement of the Asia-Pacific contribute to U.S. economic prosperity and employment.

Support a whole-of-government integrated communications strategy. Aside from the Department of State, key stake holders include the White House/NSC, the National Committee for APEC, local APEC Host Committees and US APEC Business Advisory Committee members. The incumbent will represent the Office, Bureau or Department at various intra or inter-agency meetings.

Develop and maintain relations with Congress, research institutes and universities, the US Chamber of Commerce and other business groups, NGOs and specialized APEC non- government organizations such as APEC Studies Centers. The incumbent will work particularly closely with EAP’s Public Diplomacy section, and the Bureau of International Organization Affairs of the Department of State to support its responsibilities for logistical communications issues such as, branding, outreach to local communities affected by APEC

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events, merchandise/promotional products and the role of sponsors. The incumbent will also work closely with the APEC Secretariat Communications Unit.

Draft briefing papers, talking points, and/or speeches for key US APEC stakeholders, Cabinet-level officials, the EAP Front office and U.S. Embassies, as needed. The incumbent will develop – in conjunction with other stakeholders or agents – a range of formal material to support the U.S.’s messages on APEC. This may include text, audio, audio-visual and graphical material to be used in information kits, leaflets, newsletters and websites. The incumbent may be responsible for organizing and coordinating targeted APEC-related outreach events, including for youth, academic and business meetings and activities. During 2011, the incumbent will work with the Bureau for International Organization Affairs to help facilitate participation by international media in APEC events.

3. The Office of Japanese Affairs in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs (EAP/J) seeks to host a Fellow to work as Macroeconomic and Finance Officer, with a focus on foreign direct investment.

The incumbent will serve as the action officer for the Investment Initiative of the U.S.-Japan Economic Partnership for Growth (EPG) to promote favorable conditions for foreign direct investment. Working closely with the bureau’s Deputy Assistant Secretary-level Economic Coordinator and Embassy Tokyo, the Fellow will handle substantive and logistical preparations and follow-up for two U.S.-Japan Investment Working Group meetings, as well as U.S. participation in Japan’s investment promotion activities. The Fellow will advance U.S. economic policies, in coordination with other USG agencies, related to Japan’s macro-economy, financial services, investment, and insurance sectors.

He/she will promote regulatory transparency and efficiency in Japan, especially for financial services, especially for financial services, information technology, and telecommunications. The Fellow will be expected to draft memoranda and position papers for senior Department officials, as well as coordinating briefing materials for trips to the region by highest level Department officials.

We anticipate that the Franklin Fellow will generally be called on to evaluate ideas and

proposals, as well as identify strategies and mutually agreeable solutions for any variety of

issues.

required in the absence of economic unit colleagues. He/she will also serve as a point of contact for diplomats posted to the economic section of the Embassy of Japan. The Fellow may (but will not be required to) travel to Japan.

He/she will represent EAP/J in meetings and may be asked to handle other issues as

4. The Office of Korean Affairs (EAP/K) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as Korea Desk Officer for Environment, Science, Technology, and Health Issues (ESTH). As the Office of Korean Affairs’ subject matter expert, the Fellow will work to develop U.S. policy and advance U.S. cooperation with South Korea in the areas of environment, science, technology, and health (ESTH). He/she will focus on a broad range of issues that potentially have a tangible impact on U.S.-ROK cooperation, including implementation of the ESTH goals articulated in the 2009 U.S.- ROK Joint Vision Statement. Specifically, the Fellow will help our team achieve the Vision Statement’s goals of promoting low-carbon green growth as a new engine for sustainable economic prosperity; strengthening civil space cooperation; and cooperating on clean energy research and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Manage a portfolio of all ROK environment, science, technology, and health issues, including bilateral space cooperation, green growth technology, climate change, tuberculosis

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research, pandemic influenza, and U.S. involvement with the International Vaccine Institute.

Oversee ROK civil nuclear issues as we begin negotiations to conclude a new bilateral civil nuclear cooperation agreement with the ROK.

Pursue cyber issues, including “cyber-terrorism” and internet intellectual property rights issues.

Provide technical expertise to the Office of Korean Affairs, offering advice and guidance as needed on ESTH issues affecting the Korean Peninsula and Northeast Asia, including inter- Korean and North Korean ESTH issues as needed.

Support the ROK Unit Economic Officer on bilateral trade and development assistance issues as we work to regain momentum on ratification of the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA).

Draft memoranda, reports, press guidance, and papers on ESTH-related topics in preparation for interagency and international meetings.

Organize high-level visits and meetings and perform other duties as assigned.

Selection Criteria:

Interpersonal Skills: This position requires frequent coordination with, and maintenance of, productive relationships with representatives of other Federal agencies, international organizations, other governments, and non-governmental stakeholder groups.

Communication Skills: Strong oral and written communication skills are required to facilitate advancing U.S. interests, both in international and domestic settings, where the officer may prepare formal written communications to international interlocutors; deliver oral and written briefings to U.S. principals; or deliver public presentations to stakeholder groups.

Independent Research: Solid independent research skills are needed to support the development of policy papers or approaches.

Negotiating Skills: The ESTH officer will be expected to productively engage and negotiate with other USG agencies and foreign governments to negotiate agreed terms of U.S. positions or provisions in international agreements.

Regional Familiarity: A background working on Asia or Korea issues would be helpful, but is not a requirement and should not deter candidates from expressing interest.

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Bureau of Economic, Energy and Business Affairs

The Bureau of Economic, Energy and Business Affairs (EEB) is the Department’s principal bureau for international economic policy. It is responsible for promoting sustainable economic growth and development, trade, and enhancing investment climates abroad; foster modern, well- regulated global financial markets and help key countries avert or recover from financial crises; secure reliable, reasonably-priced energy supplies; increase market access for U.S. goods and services, protect intellectual property and promote global information technology and communications; advocate for U.S. companies to ensure transparency and fair play in international business transactions and to help solve international regulatory problems; cut off financial support to terrorist networks, implement sanctions regimes, and halt trade in conflict diamonds; and deepen international coalitions to protect transportation and communications networks. EEB acts

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as the Department’s principal link with USG economic agencies, including Treasury, Commerce, Energy, Agriculture, and U.S. Trade Representative, among others. EEB provides policy direction across the full range of international economic issues, including trade, aviation, intellectual property rights, energy, finance, economic development, and others.

1. The Office of Economic Policy Analysis and Public Diplomacy (EEB/EPPD) seeks an international economist with a strong macro and finance background to do policy-relevant research on issues related to the global financial crisis, international investment and other financial flows, international development, and comparative economic performance. Prior experience with an international organization or financial institution (IMF, World Bank, OECD, BIS, for example) or the U.S. Government (Treasury, Federal Reserve, State Department, USAID) preferred but not required; private sector financial experience also highly desirable. Good, non-technical writing skills are a must.

2. As part of EEB, the International Communication and Information Policy (EEB/CIP/BA) group leads the Executive Branch policy development process for international communications and information issues, and serves as America's advocate around the world for policies that:

expand access by all people to information and communication technologies (ICTs);

improve efficiency and security in the worldwide ICT and telecommunications markets, particularly relying on free-market forces; and

ensure fair opportunities for U.S. companies to participate in this important sector around the globe.

EEB/CIP would like to request one Franklin Fellow to serve in its Office of Bilateral and Regional Affairs (BA). The Fellow would advise the office on promoting fair, pro-competitive telecommunications regulatory regimes overseas; ensuring minimal regulation of the Internet and e-commerce to promote expansion in these areas and to support freedom of expression (under the Secretary’s Global Internet Freedom Taskforce (GIFT));opening access to foreign telecommunications and e-commerce markets; and implementing bilateral ICT development assistance through CIP’s Telecommunications Leadership Program (TLP) and the President’s Digital Freedom Initiative (DFI).

3. Within EEB’s Trade Policy & Programs Deputate, the Office of Multilateral Trade and Agriculture Affairs (EEB/TPP/MTAA) works to expand export opportunities for American businesses, farmers, ranchers and workers, including by advancing global trade negotiations, such as the World Trade Organization’s Doha Development Agenda. MTAA seeks to maximize the benefits of trade for economic development, poverty reduction, food security/hunger alleviation, environmental protection and worker rights.

The office’s Agriculture, Biotechnology and Textile Trade (ABT) Division manages programs to promote the use and understanding of agricultural biotechnology, seeks to maintain open markets for U.S. products derived from modern biotechnology, and oversees trade in textile and apparel products. ABT also covers all bilateral, regional and global trade negotiations or disputes relating to agricultural products, food safety issues, programs to enhance food security in developing countries, and U.S. food aid policy.

4. The Agriculture, Biotechnology and Trade Division (EEB/TPP/MTAA/ABT) seeks a Franklin Fellow to:

Coordinate and protect USG and U.S. industry interests related to international organizations.

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Manage regional and bilateral biotechnology trade policy issues, promoting USG agricultural biotechnology objectives in one or more regions and countries.

Advance acceptance and trade of ag-biotech products around the globe.

Serve as Department representative to international meetings.

Manage agricultural trade policy issues in one or more regions, such as Western Hemisphere or Africa.

Cover commodity policy issues, which might include effect of biofuel consumption on grain supply and prices, as well as secondary effects on poultry/livestock supply and prices.

Analyze bioterrorism as it pertains to safeguarding the U.S. food supply.

5. The Office of Intellectual Property Enforcement (EEB/TPP/IPE) promotes global policies that encourage adoption of high standards of protection for intellectual property rights (IPR) by our trading partners, and formulating State Department and USG strategies on promoting and protection innovation and IPR. This issue receives significant attention from the U.S. Congress and the private sector, and State is a key player in developing U.S. international policy on IPR and implementing that policy overseas. It represents U.S. views in bilateral and multilateral settings; builds international partnerships and coalitions to strengthen IP enforcement; works with U.S. Missions on public outreach efforts to promote the value of IPR to countries of all levels of development; and delivers IP training to our embassy officers and foreign government officials.

A Franklin Fellow assigned to EEB/TPP/IPE would be expected to serve as a Foreign Affairs Officer fully involved in policy and program formulation and perform functions like the following:

• Draft briefing papers, coordinate U.S. Government interagency with State Department positions and support senior State Department officials on negotiation of the Intellectual Property chapter of the Declaration of the 2009 G-8 Summit;

• Develop policy papers and points for use by the IPE Office Director in meetings of the Innovation Working Group of the Heiligendamm Process (G-8 plus Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa).

• Act as lead on State’s contribution to the Strategy Targeting Organized Piracy (STOP!) Initiative. Work with other IP policy and enforcement agencies in implementing existing STOP! Initiatives and proposing new initiatives.

• Act as liaison with the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordination Council. Prepare the State Department contribution to the annual IPEC Report.

• Coordinate the State Department position on legislation affecting IP enforcement and policy.

• Back up the officer coordinating the Department of State’s (State) role in the annual worldwide Special 301 review of other countries' IP regimes. Organize and coordinate relevant meetings with the private sector to discuss their views; coordinate and develop positions on country designations with State offices, overseas Posts and the Secretary’s office; coordinate with U.S. positions with other Federal agencies.

• Act as State Department lead officer on intellectual property matters for South and Central Asia, the Near East, or other region to be identified, and serve as the Department’s

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recognized expert on intellectual property considerations involved in U.S. policy for this region, including determining overall priorities and developing corrective measures in light of overall Department and Administration objectives in the region.

• Represent the State Department in bilateral and multilateral meetings and negotiations in the areas of promoting and protecting innovation and intellectual property.

6. The Office of the Special Representative for Commercial and Business Affairs (EEB/CBA) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as Senior Advisor for Global Women’s Business Initiative. CBA and the Department of State work with U.S. Government trade promotion partners and the U.S. embassies around the world to support American businesses overseas by providing commercial information and identifying market opportunities for American firms, advocating on their behalf, and encouraging corporate responsibility. Note: Position is filled until April 2011.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Serve as EEB/CBA’s primary advisor for the Global Women’s Business Initiative. In this capacity, the Fellow will serve as the Bureau’s coordinator of women’s business issues relating to domestic commercial and business affairs affecting a number of regions as designated by the Special Representative. The individual will work closely with other offices in the State Department, with other offices in the State Department, relevant U.S. government agencies, the private sector, and non-government representatives in areas relevant to global women’s business.

Serve as a subject area “expert” to the Special Representative on women in business issues.

Assist in development of standards, practices and policies in the area of internal audits and program review and analysis. In addition, the individual will provide policy guidance and instructions on requirements.

Coordinate taskings from working groups, develop summaries/evaluations of options and forge consensus on recommended actions.

Develop background information, tactics, and approaches for presenting policy and programmatic positions both in the department and in the interagency use in meetings, which include all levels of the U.S. government, the private sector, and representatives of other countries.

Observe and advise on the coordination, planning and execution of global women in business events and programs. S/he will also field questions from overseas posts relating to the topic.

Represent the Office of Commercial and Business Affairs at any relevant inter-agency meeting.

Position will occasionally require travel to various domestic and international locations.

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Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) of the U.S. Department of State fosters mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries to promote friendly, sympathetic, and peaceful relations, as mandated by the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchanges Act of 1961.

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ECA accomplishes its mission through a range of programs based on the benefits of mutual understanding, international educational and cultural exchange, and leadership development. ECA engages youths, students, educators, artists, athletes, and rising leaders in the United States and more than 160 countries through academic, cultural, sports, and professional exchanges, challenging negative perceptions about the United States and reinforcing positive ones. ECA has over 1 million program alumni around the world, including more than 40 Nobel Laureates and more than 300 current and former heads of state and government.

1. The Office of Private Sector Outreach in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA/EC) is responsible for engaging in collaborative partnerships with the private sector and further institutionalizing public-private partnerships within the Bureau. Institutionalizing successful private sector partnerships within ECA helps to further the State Department's overall public diplomacy efforts through promoting and understanding American society, culture, and values. Note: Position is filled until July 2011.

The Office of Private Sector Outreach (ECA/EC) wishes to host two Franklin Fellows to serve as advisors on effective mechanisms, models and frameworks for public-private partnerships. The incumbents will contribute to shaping strategies for interaction between business and foreign policy issues, and the wider political and economic context. The incumbent will develop and manage partnerships, implement the Office of Private Sector Outreach strategic plan and identify opportunities to leverage private sector resources. The incumbent will brief management on the status of initiatives, milestone attainment and program accomplishments.

The positions require highly developed oral and written communication skills in order to serve as a liaison between USG interests and organizations within the private sector; interface with various offices and outside agencies and organizations; serve on committees related to assignments; articulate and defend recommendations; conduct briefings of sensitive and sometimes controversial matters; and produce coherent reports, policy recommendations, memoranda, and written proposals which identify and recommend solutions to problems.

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Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs

The Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR) is responsible for coordinating interaction with 49 countries of Europe with the aim of advancing U.S. national and global interests through the promotion of democracy and respect for human rights, market-based economies open to foreign investment, and stability and security through military cooperation and transparency. Our goal of a Europe that is whole, free and at peace has been advanced closer to reality through concerted engagement in all regions of Europe with countries and through multilateral organizations.

1. The Office of the Assistance Coordinator for Europe and Eurasia (EUR/ACE) wishes to host a Fellow in the position of Security and Law Enforcement Assistance Coordinator. A Fellow in this position would coordinate and manage security and law enforcement foreign assistance programs in Europe and Eurasia, serving as liaison between EUR/ACE and the Department of Defense. He/she would also provide program management for the Aviation/Interdiction Program in Kyrgystan and Uzbekistan.

Additionally, he/she would support the program planning and budgeting process for security and law enforcement programs, and evaluate the performance of security and law enforcement programs, while drafting portions of annual reports to Congress relating to this assistance.

2. The Office of Policy and Regional Affairs (EUR/PRA) serves as the EUR Bureau’s principal link to the functional bureaus that report to the Under Secretary for Secretary Affairs (T).

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These include the International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN), Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC) and Political Military (PM) Bureaus.

EUR/PRA wishes to host a Franklin Fellow as a Foreign Affairs Officer. The candidate should have a strong interest in security issues and current and emerging security threats. The Fellow would develop and coordinate U.S. policy on reduction and destruction of conventional weapons, including small arms/light weapons and export control/border security issues. This work would be performed in the context of the national security issues on which PRA has the EUR Bureau lead, such as nonproliferation and arms control security interests. The Fellow would work closely with the ISN and PM Bureaus. PRA officers also work closely with interagency colleagues in the National Security Council; the Departments of Defense, Energy, Commerce, and NASA.

3. The Office of European Union and Regional Affairs (EUR/ERA) is seeking a Franklin Fellow with experience in finance and economics. The candidate should have a strong interest in financial issues and international aspects of the current global financial crisis. The position would involve development and coordination of U.S. policy on response to the crisis in Europe for which EUR/ERA has the Bureau lead. The incumbent would be responsible for monitoring the European economy and IFI and European government responses to it and developing appropriate strategic and diplomatic responses in coordination with Treasury and the NSC/NEC.

The position is also responsible for monitoring and reporting on the EU financial markets and oversees cooperation to lower barriers in financial services. The incumbent manages the U.S.- EU relationship regarding terrorist financing issues as well. Additional responsibilities include transportation security, counterterrorism, aviation, customs, and sanctions policy. This position involves 2-4 trips per year to Europe. Point of Contact is EUR/ERA Economic Deputy Director Jonathan Kessler.

4. The Office of South Central European Affairs (EUR/SCE) seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Kosovo Desk Officer. The Office for the South Central European Affairs (EUR/SCE) promotes U.S. policy regarding the Western Balkans. The position is supervised by the Lead Kosovo Desk Officer and reviewed by the Deputy Director of EUR/SCE. The incumbent also works closely with the Kosovo Status Coordinator and the Kosovo Desk Support officer.

The incumbent is an expert on Kosovo. He or she advises on policy, administers programs, researches, writes for top level officials, and briefs on Kosovo and USG policy. The incumbent is well-informed and current on policies, events, and developments relating to Kosovo and remains aware of how the Balkans fit into the larger European and world contexts. The incumbent evaluates information and initiates research to validate existing policy or recommend implementing changes, new policy, or new guidance on Kosovo and related issues. He/She works closely with Embassy Pristina on issues affecting USG policy and operations in Kosovo.

The incumbent performs policy analysis, development, and implementation. He/she helps coordinate taskings from working groups and interagency meetings, summarizes key discussions, evaluates options, and forges consensus on recommended actions. He/she writes quickly and clearly and consults within the Department and the USG to develop fully-cleared briefing papers. Some travel to Kosovo and elsewhere in Europe may be a possibility. Candidates for this position should have strong interpersonal, organizational, and written/oral communication skills. POC is Seiji T Shiratori.

5. The Office of Russian Affairs (EUR/RUS) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to focus on the U.S.-Russia relationship. Note: Position is filled until October 2011.

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Duties and Responsibilities

Draft policy planning documents focused on the U.S.-Russia relationship. This will include strategic planning, policy coordination, and policy implementation related to Russia's security relationship with the United States and with Europe.

Work closely with counterparts in other State Department bureaus, the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the EUR Deputy Assistant Secretary responsible for Russia, as well as the National Security Staff and analysts across the U.S. Intelligence Community.

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Bureau of Human Resources

The Bureau of Human Resources (HR) of the Department of State is responsible for recruitment, assignment evaluation, promotion, discipline, career development, and retirement policies and programs for the Department's Foreign and Civil Service employees. The mission of the Bureau of Human Resources is strengthening American Diplomacy through our people. We strive for excellence in building a skilled and diverse workforce to meet the challenge and opportunities of American Foreign Policy.

Our program focus includes:

• HR Share Services and HR Providers

• Career Development and assignment

• Civil Service Personnel

• Foreign Service Personnel

• Overseas Employment

• Employee Relations

• Family Liaison

• Grievance

• Casualty Assistance

• Policy Coordination

• Performance Evaluation

• Recruitment Examination and Employment

• Retirement

• Resources Management and Organizational Analysis

A Franklin Fellow assigned to the Bureau of Human Resources would serve in an office most suited to his/her expertise and interests.

1. The Office of Shared Services (HR/SS) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow in Washington, DC and Charleston, SC who could contribute substantially to transforming the way that State

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Department handles Human Resources functions. This includes a possibility of sharing private sector perspectives and methods.

The Franklin Fellow duties will include:

Providing authoritative leadership and staff advisory and consultative services to senior management officials to ensure successful implementation of the shared services initiative.

Formulating policies, procedures, and new operating instructions for department-wide use.

Develops a comprehensive approach to providing the full spectrum of HR services.

Providing recommendations to resolve immediate programmatic issues.

Assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of shared services business practices, operations and customer satisfaction.

Developing, implementing, and monitoring metrics to assess the effectiveness of shared services processes.

Provides leadership and advisory services to Shared Services Chiefs and management officials on department-wide HR initiatives.

Develops and monitors metrics to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of HR shared services processes.

Assesses the impact of new or proposed legislation or regulations on HR Shared Services Programs.

Recommends new HR business processes and policies to enhance customer services.

2. The Office of Resource Management and Analysis (HR/RMA) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow who could contribute substantially to transforming the way that the state Department and private sector work together. This includes a possibility of sharing state-of-the-art private sector perspectives and methods to influence Foreign Service, domestic, and Shared Service Operations.

Assist in conducting in-depth analysis and independent assessments of programs and efforts. Advise on ways to improve HR management and advisory services. Provide perspectives on best practices in the HR service industry and represent the HR Bureau in policy decisions both within the federal government and private industry. Identify and analyze policies that provide long term solutions to Department challenges.

Directly advise and make recommendations to the Director General (DG) on policy issues within your portfolio. Possibly travel with the DG to meet with relevant partners domestically and internationally. Serve as champion for HR initiatives throughout the federal government and private sector communities.

3. The Office of Employee Relations (HR/ER) seeks a Franklin Fellow with human resources and counseling experience to help the Department recruit, hire and accommodate people with disabilities. Responsibilities will include advising managers about candidates available for placement in jobs under special hiring authorities, and providing managers with information on reasonable accommodation and needs assessments for applicants and employees.

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We are seeking an advisor familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act, as amended, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and assistive technologies and requirements for reasonable accommodation. Experience in conducting assessments to determine the most appropriate assistive technology solutions for reasonable accommodation and follow up that would document the requirements for a case management system to be developed, purchased (COTS) or adapted from an existing IT platform in the central project.

4. The Office of Employee Relations, Work Life Division (HR/ER) is seeking a Franklin Fellow to develop a complete marketing campaign for two areas of responsibility: The Wellness Initiative, and Work Life Programs. In particular, we are seeking someone to liaison with the Office of Innovative Engagement to take full advantage of emerging social media, web tools, and to work with RMA to coordinate survey and measurement instruments related to the two programs. Our goal is to increase awareness of and participation in both programs. Contacts would be both within the Department, OPM, other Federal agencies, and private sector contacts which can inform us on developing such programs.

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Bureau of Information Resource Management

The Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM) provides the information technology and services the Department needs to successfully carry out its foreign policy mission. IRM constantly strives to improve its commitment to transparent, interconnected diplomacy, information systems and to incorporate new technologies for the advancement of U.S. foreign policy. Equally important, the bureau is focused on enhancing security for the Department's computer and communications systems.

IRM’s Office of eDiplomacy (IRM/BPC/eDip) wishes to host two Franklin Fellows. eDip was established in July 2002 with a unique, interrelated three-part mandate: to promote end user involvement in decision-making on information technology; to improve the way the State Department connects to and works with its USG foreign affairs partner agencies, with other nation's diplomatic institution, and with other entities involved in international affairs; and to foster knowledge management at State. To meet this mandate, eDiplomacy has created and led programs including Diplopedia, Communities@State, Virtual Presence Post, and developed enterprise search and the use of interagency classified and unclassified networks by State personnel. Its staff combines expertise in knowledge management and social media with extensive Foreign Service experience, both domestically and abroad.

1. The Office of eDiplomacy seeks a Franklin Fellow with a strong web/knowledge management and project management background to contribute to our work as innovators and practitioners on the intersection of communications, technology, and diplomacy within the Department of State and with partners in the public and private sectors. Retaining the leading edge of technology use within the US Government is an ongoing challenge, and it is also an opportunity for a Fellow to bring creativity, savvy, and collaborative expertise to public service.

Candidates for this position can expect to work in a start-up-like atmosphere, with a push to take good ideas to implementation and operation quickly. Essentially, an eDiplomacy Franklin Fellow would serve as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence, with responsibilities that could include analysis of current projects and identification of areas to expand, investigation and assessment of technology needs domestically and abroad, integration of multiple social media initiatives, and policy formulation in regard to how the Department and US Government should best leverage new technologies. This is a unique opportunity for a Franklin Fellow to burnish credentials as an innovator in risk-averse environments. Note: Position is filled until February 2011.

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2. The Office of eDiplomacy has established a Diplomatic Innovative Division (IRM/BMP/eDip/DID) which seeks a Franklin Fellow with a strong web innovation and social networking background to contribute to our work as innovators and practitioners on the intersection of communications, technology, and diplomacy within the Department of State and with partners in the public and private sectors. Retaining the leading edge of technology use within the U.S. government is an ongoing challenge, and it is also an opportunity for a Fellow to bring creativity, savvy, and collaborative expertise to public service.

Candidates for this position can work in a start-up-like atmosphere, taking good ideas to implementation and operation quickly. Drawing on private sector experience, an eDiplomacy Franklin Fellow would participate in policy formulation and analysis of current projects and identification of areas to expand domestically and abroad. This is a unique opportunity for a Franklin Fellow to burnish credentials as an innovator in risk-averse environments.

Specifically, the Fellow will be expected to participate fully in shaping the Department’s professional networking platform. This process will include refinement of the business case for professional networking at State; selection of initial features and a strategy for rollout of additional features of the platform; drafting and securing approval of governance for professional networking and management of the platform; monitoring and analyzing use of the platform; and recommending changes to the platform or governance as the Department gains experience with them.

To support and guide this initiative, the Fellow will be expected to research and adapt best practices in the private and public sectors regarding the use of professional and social networking platforms in enterprise strategies. The Fellow will also contribute to, and participate in, another key emerging area of eDiplomacy, the establishment of a metadata working group to create and implement a hierarchical taxonomy for working-level documents domestically and at overseas posts. This effort will incorporate a review of options determined by the subject matter and structure of these records, and the Fellow will advise on a process for the execution of these decisions in order to gather stakeholder input, distribute recommendations, and share information with personnel.

3. The External Affairs Branch seeks a Franklin Fellow with a strong telecommunications and national security background to contribute to our work as international liaison practitioners on the development of strategy to leverage the Department of State participation in the interagency national security/ emergency preparedness telecommunications arena, including formulating policy and position papers relative to international operational national security/emergency preparedness telecommunications issues.

The Fellow:

Will draft briefing papers and talking points;

Assist and participate in interagency meetings and intergovernmental meetings;

Work with mid- and high-level contacts, both inside and outside the Department of State; and

Advise Office, Bureau, and Branch staff on a variety of program/project issues.

Applicant must possess strong written and oral communications skills and background in research and analysis.

Applicant should have solid research and computer skills as well as the ability to work under deadline and take on increasing levels of responsibilities/tasks in a fast-paced environment.

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The position requires sound judgment, strong interpersonal, organizational, analytical, written/oral communication skills, and availability for worldwide travel.

The applicant will have U.S. citizenship; and be eligible for a Top Secret/SCI security clearance.

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Bureau of Intelligence and Research

The Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR) is the nexus between intelligence and diplomacy. Its primary mission is to provide raw intelligence and all-source analysis to the Secretary of State in her role as the President’s chief foreign policy advisor and to other key policymakers within the Department of State. As a statutory member of the Intelligence Community (IC) and under the leadership of the Director for National Intelligence, INR also plays an expanding role in providing all source intelligence assessments to the President, Vice-President and other Cabinet Members to support policymaking at the highest level.

1. The Office of Publications (INR/PUB) wishes to host a Fellow to serve as the Foreign Affairs Editor. He/she will be responsible for analyzing and recommending changes to INR’s written “product line;” proposing ways to improve its style, voice, and “brand;” and recommending new marketing strategies.

The Foreign Affairs Editor will draw on INR’s profound experience and deep expertise, canvas its readers, and recommend changes to INR’s product line in the most inclusive way possible. He/she will combine fresh perspective and professional expertise with existing talent to ensure that INR is providing a line of written products that are of superior quality in terms of content, value, style, and impact on foreign policy and diplomacy. Once product line and marketing strategy are established, the editor will provide group and individualized instruction, advise INR’s production staff on how to guide drafters and enforce Bureau product line standards, and explore software and other ways to aid staff in meeting them.

Experience, Qualifications and Suitability

a. This editorial work requires the highest-level mastery of written English communications.

b. Experience as a senior editor at a major commercial news magazine or newspaper is highly desirable.

c. Critical thinking skills and knowledge of the most up-to-date analytical methods must be at the highest level.

d. Must be thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Word and able to employ templates and macros to aid production.

e. In order to achieve the preceding expectations, it is expected that the editor will meet these qualifications:

Demonstrable expertise in writing and editing; and

U.S. citizenship; a current Top Secret security clearance; and be eligible for SCI access or be eligible for Top Secret/SCI access.

2. The Office of Analysis for Terrorism, Narcotics, and Crime (INR/TNC) within the Bureau of Intelligence and Research provides the Secretary and other Department principals all-source, finished intelligence analysis on current key developments and longer-range regional/worldwide

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trends in international terrorism, narcotics, and organized crime, particularly as they affect US security and diplomatic efforts.

INR/TNC wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to be the principal all-source analyst covering international organized crime issues globally. His/her duties will include:

Monitoring and evaluating the activities of international criminal organizations.

Conducting extensive research using both classified and unclassified sources to produce timely and insightful all-source intelligence assessments, delineating key strategic trends in organized crime and their implications. Emphasis is on placing developments in regional political, economic, and social contexts.

Interacting with senior policy officials, to include the Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs and his/her principal deputies, as well as the Office Directors and Program Officers for the issues and countries concerned.

Assessing cooperation among regional partners and the international community to address the issue of international organized crime.

Monitoring organized crime policy throughout the region, to identify potential shifts on issues such as anti-crime and money laundering legislation, prosecution, sentencing, etc.

Following potential indicators of other crime-related issues and the impact on the region concerned.

Academic and/or law enforcement experience focused on international organized crime and general background in U.S. foreign policy/international relations is preferred. Well-developed research and writing skills. Good public speaking ability. Ability to work as a member of a team.

A Top Secret clearance and eligibility for Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI) are required before appointment and must be maintained afterward. Applicants do not need to have the clearance before applying for the position. The Franklin Fellows Program will work with the successful candidate to obtain needed clearances.

3. The Office of Cyber Affairs (INR/CYBER) seeks to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Senior Analyst for Cybersecurity. The Fellow provides written and oral analysis, interpretations, and recommendations on emerging technological matters of potential importance to U.S. foreign policy, including briefings to senior Department of State officials and intelligence assessments. Areas to be assessed include the implications of technological advances for foreign policy and deterrence and ways in which other nations are likely to adopt this technology in their own national security plans.

A Franklin Fellow in INR would be uniquely positioned to leverage the expertise of the academic and intelligence communities to answer the needs of State Department policy makers. The Fellow is expected to bring her/his own well-established cybersecurity background as well as provide a link to the broader expertise in the academic community on issues such as deterrence strategies, vulnerability and threat reduction, and incident response and recovery policies and activities. The Fellow is expected to develop strong relationships with the other intelligence agencies engaging in cybersecurity policy and operations; State Department bureaus and offices engaged in cyber policy and internal cybersecurity efforts, and with other relevant government agencies, academic institutions, corporations and non-profit organizations, when coordinating interagency efforts.

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As Senior Analyst for Cybersecurity, the Fellow will use information gathered from a wide variety of sources including, but not limited to, classified material. He/she will investigate all facets of relevant cybersecurity fields, including R&D programs conducted by U.S. technical agencies, other government programs, similar programs in other countries and programs by non-governmental organizations and actors. The Franklin Fellow may work on his/her area of technical expertise but is expected to develop a knowledge of and to cover a much broader range of policy topics, as needed by the Department.

The Fellow will prepare briefing papers and assessments that identify current issues and emerging trends that potentially impact U.S. foreign policy or national security interests. The position supports the development of policy, including both formulating assessments of appropriate U.S. Government conduct towards state and non-state actors in cyberspace and technical recommendations on computer network operations and information assurance. The Fellow is expected to communicate this information to policy leaders in the Department.

The position requires a Top Secret security clearance, but it is not necessary to have such a clearance in order to apply. The Franklin Fellows Program will assist the successful candidate in the clearance process.

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Bureau of International Information Programs

The Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP) supports U.S. foreign policy objectives with public diplomacy products and services, providing speaker programs, web chats, library and book activities, Internet and multimedia services, and electronic and print publications. Electronic media products are distributed overseas through embassy Public Affairs and Information Resource Centers and by direct outreach through the Internet in order to influence policy and opinion on issues central to U.S. national interests.

1. The Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation (IIP/P) coordinates policy and planning within the Bureau, manages content for the public diplomacy/strategic communication site INFOCENTRAL, represents the IIP on issue-focused intra-and interagency working groups, coordinates strategic planning and evaluation for the bureau, manages the digital outreach team inserting USG messages on the international blogosphere and conducts audience analysis for the bureau. IIP/P is a part of the IIP Front Office.

The Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation (IIP/P) seeks to host two Fellows:

An Audience Analyst to develop thorough analysis and elaboration on the characteristics and information gathering behaviors of designated target audiences for IIP and public diplomacy programs and initiatives and to coordinate with appropriate offices throughout the interagency foreign affairs community for coherent and efficient information sharing on identifying and analyzing international audiences.

A Policy Materials Development Officer to provide timely guidance/ talking points in convenient form for use in the field (and in the Bureau); draft content, including Issue Briefs, for INFOCENTRAL, a web site containing guidance and other information resource databases for public affairs officers worldwide; draft generic op-eds for customization by COMs; and provide timely guidance/talking points in convenient form for use in the field (and in the Bureau).

2. IIP’s Office of Current Issues (IIP/C) seeks a Franklin Fellow to help it develop a mobile platform for the State Department’s America.gov web site. Duties include the following: Note:

Position is filled until July 2011.

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Edit, adapt, write and acquire textual and multimedia content suitable for mobile platforms;

Maintain expertise in the field of mobile communications and translate that expertise to America.gov and other IIP mobile platforms;

Participate in editorial planning meetings;

Coordinate with regional offices, posts, and other Department bureaus on mobile content distribution;

Develop mobile marketing strategies;

Prepare weekly web measurement reports on mobile usage;

Prepare strategic plan on mobile reach, and recommend new solutions to meet a mobile international market;

Develop and implement SMS message campaigns as required.

The Fellow would work under the immediate supervision of the Director of the Office of Current Issues, Who might assign other duties than those listed above. There would be no supervisory responsibilities.

3. The Office of East Asia-Pacific Affairs (IIP/EAP) is responsible for advising the Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP) on issues related to the East Asia-Pacific region, and working with other regional and functional offices and bureaus to ensure that IIP responds appropriately to field requests and Department-wide initiatives. Working closely with IIP's Offices of Current Issues, Speaker Programs, Information Resources, Publications, and Web Management; IIP/EAP ensures that the bureau produces an array of products and services, particularly in Chinese, consonant with USG policies and national interests and U.S. public diplomacy initiatives. Note: Position is filled until October 2010.

IIP/EAP wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to ensure that the Bureau’s programs and products reflect and support the policy priorities of the Department of State for East Asia and the Pacific. The incumbent provides regional policy and cultural expertise during the formulation, implementation, promotion, and analysis of public diplomacy products intended for East Asian- Pacific audiences. The incumbent collaborates with subject matter experts in regional and functional bureaus throughout the State Department, Defense Department and greater USG, as well as with NGOs, policy research organizations and academic institutions in support of the Department’s engagement efforts with foreign constituents.

Other tasks include promoting and training public diplomacy professionals in the use of products or programs; strategically and technically analyzing which traditional and digital methods are most effective and practical to convey foreign policy to a country or region; and conducting special projects as assigned. Familiarity with East Asia-Pacific policy, regional media environments, communication technology trends, public diplomacy best practices, and the greater foreign affairs community are highly desirable.

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Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs

The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) advises the President, Secretary of State, other bureaus in the Department of State on the development of policies and programs to combat international narcotics and crime. INL programs support two of the Department's strategic goals: (1) to reduce the entry of illegal drugs into the

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United States; and (2) to minimize the impact of international crime on the United States and its citizens.

INL’s bilateral, regional, and multilateral programs foster international and regional cooperation, strengthen the stability of foreign governments, and increase their ability to act against transnational crimes.

INL seeks to host a scholar or law enforcement professional with expertise in police or corrections training to serve as a Franklin Fellow.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Develop policies and programs to provide training and assistance to partner nation law enforcement organizations. We seek a scholar or law enforcement professional with expertise in police or corrections training, ideally with previous experience in an international or multi- cultural setting. Similarly, the Bureau would welcome an expert on a particular aspect of international law enforcement policy, such as intellectual property rights, money laundering or cybercrime, to further develop policies and programs in those areas.

Advise the Bureau on developing and improving policies and programs to train foreign law enforcement personnel in providing service to citizens. The specific duties of the Fellow and his/her office of assignment tailored to meet the interest and expertise of the Fellow and the needs of the INL Bureau.

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Bureau of International Organization Affairs

The Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO), domestically and through its seven missions, develops and implements U.S. policy in the United Nations, its specialized and voluntary agencies, and certain other international organizations. Our mission is to advance U.S. foreign policy strategic goals and U.S. interests through multilateral diplomacy, while ensuring that the international organizations through which we work remain viable and effective. A primary goal of the Bureau is to help shape the multilateral system into a more efficient and effective instrument to meet the challenges of the 21st century. To this end, we are pursuing a program of reform. We aim to preserve and enhance American leadership and influence in the multilateral system, inter alia, through paying our assessments in full and paying our outstanding obligations.

1. The Office of United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (IO/UNESCO) coordinates U.S. policy vis-à-vis the United Nations Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization and serves as the link between the U.S. Government and U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, an advisory body. IO/UNESCO urgently needs the services of one Franklin Fellow with a background in Social and Human Science to work on policy coordination within State, other USG entities, and the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO. Note:

Position is filled through December 2011.

2. The Office of Management Policy and Resources (IO/MPR) would like to host up to three Franklin Fellows to assist us with a comprehensive assessment of the work of the organizations funded through the CIO account. OMB and Congressional staff are aware of the chronic shortfall in the CIO account and have urged us to take a new approach in how we request and allocate CIO account funding. House Committee Report on the FY 2006 Appropriation for the CIO account (H. Report 109-118) stated “The Committee expects the Department to take immediate action to evaluate and prioritize United States participation in, and funding, for international organizations.

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In a climate of limited resources the Committee continues to insist that the Department live within appropriated amounts, prioritize as necessary among organizations according to policy goals, take steps to withdraw from low priority organizations, and refrain from entering into new commitments.” The Bureau lacks the resources to conduct evaluations needed to conduct in depth analyses of the program of work of the various international organizations in which the US participates. This information is critical to improving our ability to negotiate budgets that meet USG priorities.

A fellow with the right expertise could help us determine best practices and management surveys of international organizations. They could also assist with ongoing efforts related to mandate review. This would help us to lay the groundwork for prioritizing U.S. participation in international organizations funded through the CIO account and, in a worst-case scenario, prepare for the possibility of having to withdraw from one or more organizations.

3. The Office of Global Systems (IO/GS) would like to host a Fellow from a private sector delivery firm who could work with IOGS on Universal Postal Union (UPU) issues. Six years ago, UPU opened itself to the private sector by forming a mainly private sector “Advisory Groups”. This group was transformed into a more formal entity called the “Consultative Committee” by the 2004 UPU Congress in Bucharest. Private-sector trade associations that have an interest in UPU issues can join the Consultative Committee. So far, 19 such associations, which mainly represent the interests of large mailers and express delivery firms, have joined the Committee.

The main association representing the U.S. express delivery companies is called the Express Delivery and Logistics Association (XLA). The UPU issues that are of interest to the express delivery firms are customs clearance (of both postal and private courier items) and trade issues, such as those under discussion with the WTO (whose work tends to overlap with that of the UPU). These firms also have an interest in technical issues such as the security of shipments; technical standards; and regulation of the postal and express delivery sector. Express delivery companies have little knowledge about the inner workings of the UPU.

This Franklin Fellows assignment would provide an excellent opportunity for a relatively young manager to acquire practical knowledge about an organization, the UPU, whose decisions are of real importance to express delivery companies. In addition, the Fellow would gain experience working on international postal issues within IO/GS.

4. The Office of Human Rights (IO/HR) is seeking a dynamic Franklin Fellow with global multilateral perspective to help support our office's efforts to formulate, coordinate and implement policy across UN agencies and councils in New York and Geneva on human rights and humanitarian and social affairs. Strong writing and organizational skills are required as the position entails drafting guidance and instructing our overseas missions on USG positions. Note: Position is filled until July 2011.

Issues are wide-ranging and include working on country-specific and thematic human rights issues, democracy and governance, humanitarian assistance, women/children/gender issues and much more. Some travel to Geneva and New York is expected, as well as possible travel in conjunction with regular dialogue with allies on issues of mutual concern.

5. The Office of the U.S. Special Envoy (IO/OICSE) to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow. The Fellow would help deepen and expand partnerships with OIC countries in the manner that President Obama outlined in his June 4 Cairo address last year. As members of our office travel to OIC Headquarters and to OIC countries, we identify effective areas of current and future cooperation and work with other offices at the State Department, the NSC, and other agencies across the federal government to improve and implement these initiatives. The Franklin Fellow will attend meetings at State and

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across the U.S. government and will help strategize and plan ways to deepen and expand such partnerships. There may also be opportunities for the Fellow to travel to OIC countries.

6. The Bureau of International Organization Affairs, Office of Peacekeeping, Sanctions, and Counter-terrorism (IO/PSC) is responsible for developing and coordinating DOS and USG positions on major political issues dealt with at the United Nations, in particular within the Security Council. The Office provides guidance to USUN New York, and occasionally to other US Missions, on U.S. positions regarding Peacekeeping, Sanctions, and Counter-terrorism issues; maintains close ties with other appropriate DOS bureaus and offices, as well as with the USG interagency community as appropriate, to develop and consider options for advancing U.S. policy at the United Nations; and interacts with other countries' representatives with a view to gaining support for U.S. positions.

MAJOR DUTIES

The Franklin Fellow, serving as the Advisor on Africa Peacekeeping formulates and recommends policy positions, strategies and tactics to achieve U.S. objectives on UN political issues involving UN peacekeeping operations and sanctions in countries as assigned, coordinating within the Department and with other USG agencies the discussion and development of said positions, strategies, and tactics to ensure that policies as finally adopted have been exhaustively reviewed and fully embraced by all stakeholders. The incumbent will likely provide direct backup to the desk officers handling Sudan and Democratic Republic of the Congo, but will also cover other portfolios as required.

Develops expertise on the policy, administrative and operational aspects of UN peacekeeping operations.

Operationalizes agreed strategies and tactics to secure United Nations adoption of U.S. positions on UN peacekeeping operations and sanctions. In this connection, prepares and coordinates, within the Department and with other USG agencies, draft UN Security Council resolutions, presidential statements, and explanations of vote to support U.S. policy objectives; and prepares and coordinates instructions to USUN and on UN peacekeeping operations and sanctions.

Maintains personal contacts with officials in USG agencies dealing with all aspects of U.S. policy related to UN peacekeeping operations and sanctions, including several bureaus and offices within the Department of State and the Interagency, including the Departments of Defense, Justice and Treasury, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Agency for International Development, and the National Security Council.

Represents the IO Bureau at meetings with other bureaus and USG agencies on matters related to UN peacekeeping operations and.

Apprises senior Bureau and Department officials, through written and oral communications, of significant developments on UN peacekeeping operations and sanctions and of their implications for U.S. policies.

Prepares materials for Congress, including information for testimony by State Department officials, responses to Congressional inquiries and contributions to required.

Handles other issues as may be assigned by the Office Director or the Deputy Office Director

The incumbent reports to the Deputy Director of the Office, normally an FS-01 level Foreign Service Officer, who is the rating officer for this position, and to the Office Director and the Deputy Assistant Secretary (DAS), who oversee the Office for the IO Bureau.

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Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN)

The Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN) leads the U.S. effort to prevent the spread of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, their related materials and their delivery systems. The ISN Bureau spearheads efforts to promote international consensus on proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) through, developing diplomatic responses to specific WMD proliferation threats posed by non-state actors and terrorist groups.

1. The Office of Multilateral Nuclear and Nonproliferation Affairs (ISN/MNSA) develops and implements policy to maintain and strengthen treaties and international organizations that seek to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons to additional countries. These treaties provide the foundation of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, which includes a wide range of global, regional, multilateral, and national mechanisms and activities. The Office leads U.S. efforts relating to the 1970 treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), managing the NPT review process that culminates in an international conference of NPT parties every five years. The Office leads U.S. efforts in developing and implementing policy toward nuclear

weapons free zone (NWFZ) treaties and protocols.

U.S. government for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), negotiation of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT), as well as participation in the Geneva-based Conference on Disarmament (CD) and in the UN General Assembly’s First Committee on Disarmament in New York.

MNSA is also the lead action office in the

MNSA leads U.S. efforts to ensure the IAEA has the technical, financial, and political support necessary to implement an effective safeguards system under the NPT that deters and detects the use of nuclear material for nuclear weapons. This includes all aspects of safeguards design, implementation, and evaluation.

Priorities include universal adoption of IAEA safeguards agreements and Additional Protocols, and effective safeguards in countries of proliferation concern. MNSA oversees implementation of U.S. safeguards agreements with the IAEA, including bringing the U.S. Additional Protocol into force. The Office also formulates and administers the annual voluntary U.S. contribution to the IAEA of more than $60 million, above the annual U.S. assessment to the regular IAEA budget.

On April 5, 2009 in Prague, President Obama outlined a vision for his Administration’s work in securing the goal of a world without nuclear weapons. The President identified CTBT ratification and pursuit of an FMCT as key elements in our disarmament strategy; and working with others to strengthen the NPT as a cornerstone of our nonproliferation efforts.

MNSA leads U.S. interagency working level efforts, working in close concert with the National Security Council, State’s Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC), the Departments of Energy and Defense, and others. The office is staffed by physical scientists and foreign affairs professionals who are leading government experts in this subject matter.

MNSA seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as an Advisor on Nonproliferation Issues. The Fellow’s responsibilities would include providing advice, recommendations, and alternatives for the development of U.S. strategy and arguments on treaties under MNSA’s purview, surveying applicable current research that may be relevant, and analyzing alternative verification concepts, possible solutions, and areas of needed research. Note: Position is filled until September 2011.

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The Fellow would support efforts to formulate the results into policy proposals and would also provide alternatives for strategies to contain proliferation and promote the effective application of IAEA safeguards. The Fellow would also provide alternative viewpoints and opinions on MNSA’s work and that of other State Department offices and U.S. agencies, regarding technical aspects of safeguards and their implementation in the U.S. and elsewhere.

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Office of the Legal Adviser

The Office of the Legal Adviser (L) furnishes advice on all legal issues, domestic and international, arising in the course of the Department's work. This includes assisting Department principals and policy officers in formulating and implementing the foreign policies of the United States, and promoting the development of international law and its institutions as a fundamental element of those policies.

The Office is organized to provide direct legal support to the Department of State's various bureaus, including both regional and geographic offices (those which focus on specific areas of the world) and functional offices (those which deal with specific subject matters such as economics and business, international environmental and scientific issues, or internal management).

Three (L) units wish jointly to host a Franklin Fellow: Note: Position is filled until May 2011.

The Office of Private International Law (L/PIL) is responsible for the negotiation and conclusion of international conventions, model laws and rules, legislative guides, and other instruments governing private transactions that cross international borders.

The Office of International Claims and Investment Disputes (L/CID) is the largest office in the Office of the Legal Adviser. It represents the United States and coordinates activities within and outside the Department with respect to all aspects of international claims and investment disputes. L/CID has received the award of the American Bar Association's Section of International Law and Practice for "Outstanding Performance by an International Law Office in a Government or International Organization."

The Office of Economic and Business Affairs (L/EB) is responsible for the legal work of the Department concerning international economic questions. These include negotiation and advice concerning international investments and trade, telecommunications, economic sanctions, intellectual property and other areas. It coordinates economic legal activities with the Department and with other U.S. government agencies and the private sector.

L/PIL, L/CID and L/EB would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as an Adviser on the commercial aspects of private international law, international investment and international arbitration.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Assist in several projects relating to the UNIDROIT Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment (Cape Town Convention), including consultations with industry and other governments on implementation of existing protocols on aircraft and railroad equipment and the possible development of new ones in areas such as space finance as well as agricultural and mining equipment. UNIDROIT work in the field of agriculture may also include broader initiatives relating to FAO programs on food security.

Work with the WCO-UNCITRAL Joint Legal Task Force on the single window initiative to facilitate trade. Arbitration-related work may include assisting in the development of a USG

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position in UNCITRAL on the scope of new rules on transparency in investor-State arbitration; researching legal issues relating to the USG’s defense of a NAFTA Chapter 11 case brought by Mexican claimants regarding cross-border trucking; and exploring the possibility of new UNCITRAL arbitration rules relating to project finance.

Examine questions relating to the Foreign Investment and National Security Act of 2007 and the operations of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. The incumbent may also take on other projects that arise in the course of the work of the concerned L offices.

Incumbent will work individually or as part of a team, depending on the particular issue. The individual will work closely with relevant offices in the State Department and with other concerned federal agencies, as well as with a variety of domestic stakeholders in the private sector and foreign governments.

Write legal memoranda and position papers and help develop rules and guidelines and other international instruments. The position may require occasional foreign or domestic travel.

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Bureau of Legislative Affairs

The Bureau of Legislative Affairs (H) is responsible for coordinating legislative activity for the Department of State and advises the Secretary, Deputy, as well as the Under Secretaries and Assistant Secretaries on legislative strategy. H facilitates effective communication between State Department officials and the Members of Congress and their staffs.

H works closely with authorizing, appropriations, and oversight committees of the House and Senate, as well as with individual Members that have an interest in State Department or foreign policy issues. H manages Department testimony before House and Senate hearings, organizes Member and staff briefings, and facilitates Congressional travel to overseas posts for Members and staff throughout the year. H reviews proposed legislation and coordinates Statements of Administration Policy on legislation affecting the conduct of U.S. foreign policy. The H staff advises individual Department of State bureaus on legislative and outreach strategies and coordinates those strategies with the Secretary’s priorities.

1. The Bureau of Legislative Affairs wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Legislative Management Officer (LMO) to be responsible for a diverse range of issues of major importance to the Secretary of State and the Administration. The issues that the incumbent would confront in his/her assigned portfolio might include major authorizing and appropriating legislation; implementing legislation for treaties; issues of international law and conventions.

Serving as an LMO, the Franklin Fellow would:

Be responsible for a portfolio in the overall legislative program which is widely recognized for generating issues that are sensitive, multi-faceted and particularly complex, often crossing the activities and competing interests of several Department bureaus simultaneously. Coordinate and facilitate effective communication between diplomatic professionals of the Department and Members of Congress, their personal staffs and the staffs of Department oversight committees and subcommittees.

Provide a timely, appropriate analysis of any concern raised by a Member of Congress or his/her representatives, ensuring that its full significance and possible consequences are ascertained. As required, brief Members of Congress and their staff members on specific issues as well as on issues of general interest.

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Develop and execute strategic and tactical approaches to encourage the implementation of proposed legislative initiatives that further the Department’s foreign policy goals and objectives; or conversely, to discourage those proposed initiatives that might become detrimental to the interests of the Department.

Represent H in committee, subcommittee and/or group meetings, ensuring that information provided completely addresses Congressional requests.

Advise the Assistant Secretary and H management team on current attitudes and positions of Members of Congress on issues of importance.

Apprise Members of Congress of fast-breaking events and developments in the Department’s legislative program which may affect US foreign policy.

Perform a variety of ad hoc confidential and/or classified assignments as the Department’s senior-level management officials may direct.

Represent and speak for the Department in the development of interagency legislation, ensuring that any final product serves the Department’s legislative interests and the Administration’s strategic foreign policy goals.

Advise the various bureaus on the progress of legislation and facilitate efforts by the bureaus to influence legislation.

2. The Bureau of Legislative Affairs seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Congressional Inquiry Specialist in the Congressional Correspondence Unit (CCU). CCU ensures that all written and telephonic communications between Congressional offices and the Department are handled expeditiously and professionally. CCU is responsible for the final coordination, processing and signing of approximately 10,000 pieces of written correspondence and nearly 20,000 telephone inquiries from Congressional offices annually.

CCU also advises the Assistant Secretary on particularly sensitive correspondence dealing with important foreign policy matters. The Unit provides the Secretary of State and other Department Principals with a statistical analysis of Congressional correspondence to be used in preparation for testimony before Congressional committees.

CCU wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Congressional Inquiry Specialist, H’s focal point for responding to Congressional telephone inquiries, providing substantive information and guidance to Members and their staffs on the Department’s position on a variety of significant foreign policy issues. He/she:

• Provides such information after reviewing the Department’s position on issues, researching the relevant matters on the DOS Website, employing knowledge of current foreign affairs events and projects and discussing the issues raised with representatives in other bureaus;

• Maintains extensive liaison with Congressional offices, Department officers and high-ranking officials of other government agencies in providing appropriate information to Congress as requested in urgent telephone inquiries;

• Refers inquiries to other officers when inquiries pertain to restricted or classified program and policy matters;

• Maintains liaison between the Department’s Press Office and the Bureau;

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• Assists in a wide range of tasks including coordination of press guidance;

• Keeps Correspondence Officer and Legislative Management Officers (LMO) advised concerning urgent inquiries that may have a direct impact on foreign policy legislative matters under consideration in the Congress;

• Assists Deputy Assistant Secretary and other high-level officials with details regarding Congressional testimony by Department officials;

• Responds to telephone inquiries from Congress concerning issues such as visa and passport concerns; other constituent services; travel advisories; tours of the Department, attendance at United Nations’ seminars, issues of U.S citizens abroad; and related matters that are under the purview of DOS;

Analyzes Congressional and public interest in foreign policy issues measured by telephone inquiries. Schedules special briefings by Department Principals for Members of Congress, drafts the Assistant Secretary’s Foreign Affairs Memoranda for use by Members in replying to constituents on foreign policy issues and maintains biographies on Members of Congress.

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Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs

The Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs (NEA) deals with U.S. foreign policy and U.S. diplomatic relations with Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. NEA handles some of the key issues of our time, including Iraq, Middle East peace, terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, and political and economic reform.

1. The Office of Iraq Provincial Reconstruction Teams (NEA/I-PRT) is the lead office for the State Department on issues concerning the Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Iraq and supporting their operations. The current focus is on assisting senior leadership in organizing and implementing the transition of the PRTs toward a smaller number of organizations providing an enduring diplomatic presence in the provinces.

NEA/I-PRT wishes to host a Franklin Fellow with the following duties and responsibilities:

• Serve as one of six desk officers responsible for the design and implementation of PRT policy. The Franklin Fellow will be assigned a specific portfolio to match relevant background, for which the Fellow will become the lead action officer. The Fellow will monitor events in the portfolio, analyze policy options and recommend actions to make best use of program funds and USG political engagement.

• Develop contacts within the U.S. Government and the broader Washington community related to the specific portfolio.

• Prepare briefing materials, reports, memos and correspondence as required for senior USG officials on specific portfolio issues. Conduct oral briefings and represent NEA/I-PRT in State and interagency meetings.

• Support public affairs outreach programs to explain the PRT mission, operations, and the transition process, including by preparing materials and participating in briefings.

2. The Office of Regional Affairs in NEA/RA wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to undertake a variety of research tasks in the office. This resourceful and dynamic Fellow will:

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Duties and Responsibilities:

In the 100 th year of the existence of the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, create a history of the bureau that incorporates and compliments a sort of historical survey of the period from 1910 to 2010. This should be done in conjunction with primary sources in the Ralph Bunche Library, the National Archives, and the existing oral histories project being carried out by the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST).

A second project would be to collect info from a variety of sources to put together a history of the Multinational Force and Observers peacekeeping operation in the Sinai, for its 30 th anniversary.

Finally, we need to take a look at whole-of-government foreign assistance to countries in the Middle East and North Africa, annually and over a specified period of time. Right now, no comprehensive study of total annual foreign assistance to Middle East countries exists.

3. The Office of Egypt and Levant Affairs, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs (NEA/ELA) wishes to host a Fellow to serve as a member of the Jordan desk.

The Fellow will serve as the second Jordan desk officer in the Office of Egypt and Levant Affairs

The

Fellow will be responsible for developing a thorough working knowledge of all political, economic, and security issues influencing the bilateral relationship; drafting memoranda for principals; and liaising with and supporting Embassy Amman’s policy objectives and operational

and back-up the lead Jordan desk officer during an extended absence on maternity leave.

requirements. The Fellow will also liaise with the Jordanian Embassy in Washington on the full range of bilateral issues and be their primary point of contact within the USG.

Candidates for this position should have excellent drafting and analytical skills; attention to detail; flexibility and adaptability; strong interpersonal skills; an ability to take on increasing levels of responsibility in a fast-paced environment; and sound judgment. Experience in Jordan or the Levant is an advantage.

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Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

The Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES) promotes U.S. diplomacy through advancing environmental stewardship, encouraging economic growth, and promoting social development around the globe to foster a safer, more secure and hopeful world. Nearly 200 employees further these goals through programs and activities concerning infectious diseases, biodiversity, climate change, access to water and energy, oceans affairs, science and technology cooperation, management of toxic chemicals, environmental components of trade agreements, and the exploration of space. In addition, the Bureau represents the United States at major international negotiations. Together, these activities demonstrate the Bureau's commitment to policies that make concrete improvements in people's lives.

The Office of Environmental Policy (OES/ENV) plays a key role in development of U.S. policy on cutting edge issues related to trade and the environment and has the lead within the U.S. government for negotiation and implementation of Environmental Cooperation Agreements (ECAs), and other similar environmental cooperation mechanisms (ECMs), that are normally concluded in conjunction with free trade agreements (FTAs).

In this pursuit, the Office manages U.S. foreign policy considerations under a number of multilateral organizations that deal with trade and environment, including the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and

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in bilateral and regional trade agreements, including, among others, FTAs with Jordan, Chile, Bahrain, Australia, Morocco, and certain Central American countries.

The Office also is responsible for coordinating and overseeing all cooperative environmental work that occurs with our trading partners under the framework of an ECM. The aim of this work is to build capacity, or to work cooperatively, in a variety of environmental areas in the countries with which we have negotiated ECMs. For example, the Office currently is coordinating and overseeing implementation of $20 million worth of cooperative environmental projects in countries that have signed the Dominican Republic/Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR).

1. OES/ENV seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a senior advisor on U.N Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) process on issues of Chemicals, Waste, Mining, Transportation and Sustainable Consumption and Production. In this capacity, the Fellow will track issues and serve as a liaison with relevant parts of the USG community, the United Nations, and civil society for the Office of Environmental Policy. The incumbent will remain informed of CSD issues and initiatives, and provide recommendations on emerging matters of interest to the USG. The themes of the CSD are chemicals, waste management, transport, mining, and sustainable consumption and production. Note: Position is filled until September 2010.

The Fellow will fulfill a wide range of duties. S/he will serve as a subject area expert to the Division Chief and to the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) process in the U.S. Government and at the United Nations. The individual will work closely on areas relevant to CSD issues with other State Department offices, with U.S. Government officials, with private sector and non-governmental representatives.

The Fellow will coordinate and manage U.S. preparations for CSD. This will include leading in the preparation and clearance of a National Report for the United States, to be submitted on behalf of the U.S National Focal Point for CSD, covering the themes of the 2009-2010 CSD. The incumbent will also provide policy guidance and instructions on science-related issues that support USG objectives at CSD and as requested and appropriate for US interactions with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).

The incumbent, working with the Division Chief, will coordinate an inter-agency working group for matters related to the CSD themes. Position will possibly require travel to meetings in New York, Geneva and other places to be determined.

He/she reports directly to the Division Chief, in close coordination with the Deputy Director and Director of the Office of Environmental Policy. He/she exercises latitude in planning, scheduling, coordinating, and executing assignments, subject to the approval of the incumbent's supervisor. The Fellow may make recommendations but does not have any official decision- making authority. He/she also exercises no supervisory responsibilities.

2. The Office of Environmental Policy (OES/ENV) also seeks to host a Franklin Fellow with expertise in water/sanitation service provision, water resources management, and/or international development to work on the implementation of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005. The Act requires the Secretary of State, in consultation with the U.S. Agency for International Development and other U.S. Government agencies to develop and implement a strategy “to provide affordable and equitable access to safe water and sanitation in developing countries” within the context of sound water management.

OES is the office responsible for leading these activities and producing the annual report to Congress on the implementation of the Act. (The legislation as well as the 2006 and 2007 Reports to Congress can be found at www.state.gov/g/oes/water.) The incumbent would work directly with the Special Coordinator for Water Resources within OES to support the interagency process, conduct research, and assist in the development of the report to Congress.

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3. The Office of Global Change (OES/ECG) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as the US Government’s primary liaison for all activities related to the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP). OES/ECG is the lead U.S. Government office on most international issues relating to climate change and plays a lead role in many international energy issues. The office leads in preparing and representing U.S. positions in negotiations under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), and in other international fora in which the issue arises, including the OECD, G-8, and the UN General Assembly.

The office leads U.S. government involvement in the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate, the Administration’s signature international initiative on Clean Development and Climate issues. The office is also responsible for multiple bilateral and regional partnerships on climate change and clean energy and leads or participates in many interagency processes relating to climate-related science and technology.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Serves as U.S. Government’s primary liaison for all activities related to the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP), advising senior officials orally as well as through policy and briefing materials and developing U.S. proposals as appropriate.

Ensures that outcomes of GBEP meetings are consistent with U.S. policy by actively working with and coordinating positions among the interagency community.

Works with other GBEP partners to ensure U.S. goals for partnership are met. Works with appropriate USG officials to educate them on GBEP and identify how GBEP complements other USG biofuels efforts.

Chairs GBEP work on harmonizing greenhouse gas methodologies and ensures that U.S. views are foundation of any decisions and actions.

Serves as the Department’s primary staff liaison for issues relating to the sustainability of biofuels.

Coordinates and develops a positive international agenda on biofuel sustainability through close coordination with U.S. interagency community and the OES and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary.

Builds and maintains strong working relationships with those involved in this issue in the bureau, the Department, and other U.S. agencies, NGOs, and the private sector, and other countries.

4. The Office of International Health Affairs (OES/IHA) in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a global health advisor on infectious disease, health systems, environment health and sustainable development. The Office, under the leadership of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Science and the Office Director of IHA, coordinates and provides policy guidance regarding U.S. international policies on environmental health, infectious diseases, and health in post- conflict situations and other prominent issues of global health, and develops strategies to use diplomatic engagement to advance these priorities.

The Office maintains working relationships with other bureaus within the Department of State and with executive branch departments, as well as other stakeholders, and consults with them to formulate U.S. positions in negotiations with foreign governments and international organizations on global health issues.

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We are looking for a team-oriented professional with some experience in global health, foreign policy, or development, who can provide advice on these issues, and who has strong writing, communication, and interpersonal skills. If you are interested in development, global health, or simply foreign policy formation, this is an exciting and fulfilling position in which to work.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Under the general guidance of the Director and/or Deputy Director, as well as the Senior International Health Policy and Environmental Health Advisors, the Fellow will serve as a global health advisor on a wide variety of infectious disease, health systems, environment health and sustainable development-related matters.

The Fellow will work directly with Office Director-level and higher officials in a wide range of U.S. and foreign government agencies, and will build relationships with key senior officials in private organizations, think tanks and academic institutions, to assess the relationship of infectious disease, health systems, environmental health and sustainable development questions to foreign policy and international efforts by the Department and other Federal agencies.

Over the term of the Fellowship, the Fellow will be responsible for further developing the Department’s infectious disease, health systems and environmental health portfolios by undertaking activities in five broad areas:

working within the Department to facilitate the integration of infectious disease, health systems and environmental health considerations into foreign policy and foreign assistance budget planning processes;

coordinating and/or participating in interagency deliberations on infectious diseases, health systems, environmental health, and sustainable development issues;

working with regional and function bureaus in the Department to promote the inclusion of health considerations into foreign policy planning initiatives with respect to post- conflict/reconstruction contexts; and

developing strategies to mobilize resources and galvanizing foreign officials towards more effective action to address public health challenges; and building support for USG efforts on international health affairs through public affairs/diplomacy and outreach.

In this position, the Fellow can expect to write briefing memos and talking points for senior Department officials, conduct studies, develop options, and prepare position papers for interagency consideration, and brief senior officials and other agencies on findings. Interpersonal skills are important; the person selected for this position will often represent the office and the Bureau and chair meetings with other agencies, NGOs, think-tanks, and for-profit organizations involved in international health affairs. The office is fast-paced and very collegial.

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Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations

The mission of the Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) is to assure that the 260- plus U.S. Diplomatic missions around the world have safe, secure and functional facilities that allow 20,000 overseas employees to achieve U.S. foreign policy objectives. In order to accomplish this, OBO serves as the U.S. Department of State (DOS) Overseas Property Manager. The mission, simply stated, requires OBO to manage and lead all overseas facility actions, working with key DOS staff and tenants to find workable solutions, and in doing so, to make OBO one of DOS’s most accountable elements.

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1. The Energy and Sustainable Design Division within the Office of Design and Engineering (OBO/PDCS/DE/ESD) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as the Residential Energy and Sustainable Design (RESD) Expert with OBO’s Green Team. The Green Team was established as a multi-discipline workgroup committed to energy conservation initiatives, sustainable design research, public awareness and industry outreach. The Residential Energy and Sustainable Design (RESD) Expert serves as an advisor in OBO/PDCS/DE/ESD, applying expertise in residential planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance across a wide range of energy and sustainability issues. The RESD Expert will participate in all Green Team activities, advocating for residential enhancements as part of OBO’s worldwide building program.

In addition, the RESD Expert will work independently on residential energy and environmental concepts, technologies, and products. The Fellow’s independent research will be applied in diplomatic compounds and living quarters. The Expert will produce a comprehensive residential Green Guide with information on do-it-yourself home energy audits, simple performance improvements, and routine operation and maintenance tasks in support of the Department of State’s Green Diplomatic Initiative (GDI).

The Green Guide will be field tested at one major post (e.g., Tokyo, Bangkok, Mexico). Foreign travel to interview potential users and stake holders may be required to implement this task. Finally, the incumbent will serve as a liaison between OBO and US residential associations and institutions actively involved in green housing developments (NAHB, AIA, DOE, CSI, ICC, USGBC, and HUD). In this role, the Expert is expected to capture best industry practices in the area of residential energy and sustainable design.

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Bureau of Political-Military Affairs

The Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM) is the principal link between the Departments of State and Defense. PM provides policy direction in the areas of international security, security assistance, military operations, defense strategy and policy, military use of space and defense trade. PM activities are central to four of the Department’s strategic objectives: counterterrorism, regional security, humanitarian assistance and homeland security. PM wishes to host three Franklin Fellows:

1. The Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/WRA) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Foreign Affairs Officer. The Fellow will work on the Bureau’s destruction program for Man Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS) which, in the hands of terrorist organizations, pose a serious and catastrophic threat to civilian aviation. PM/WRA executes weapons destruction programs in 35 countries with a budget of $160 million. The MANPADS Destruction Program is an inter-agency effort established by the National Security Council as part of the U.S. Government’s International Aviation Threat Reduction Program. The Fellow will assist in implementing the MANPADS Action Plan, which involves international travel and strong program management and negotiating skills.

2. The Office of the Coordinator for Counter Piracy (PM/CP) has the United States Government lead and serves as de facto Secretariat for the fifty participating countries and international organizations making up the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia (CGPCS). In addition PM/CP co-chairs the United States Government’s interagency Counter Piracy Steering Group (CPSG) along with the African Bureau of the Office of Secretary of Defense. PM/CP has the lead for State and United States Government participation in the Gaza Counter Arms Smuggling Initiative (GCASI) and serves as de facto Secretariat for GCASI.

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(PM/CP) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow with a strong law enforcement background to assist with efforts to develop disincentives for pirates. The incumbent will work with the other State Department Bureaus and Offices, the Departments of Justice, Treasury, the FBI, law enforcement and the intelligence community to analyze pirate tactics and develop methods to track and disrupt pirate finances. The Franklin Fellow will examine legal impediments to prosecuting pirates and, working with other interested bureaus and agencies to suggest methods for criminalizing pirate activities connected to attacking vessels on the high seas. Incumbent will share his/her findings with international partners in the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia, INTERPOL and others.

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Bureau of Public Affairs

The mission of the Bureau of Public Affairs (PA) is to explain the foreign policy of the United States, to make it less “foreign” to citizens of this country, as well as people around the globe. This is done by explaining the goals of United States’ foreign policy initiatives to the media and the public including though the use of new “social” and other electronic media.

Effective public outreach requires effective planning; the Bureau provides guidance and direction to the various functional and regional bureaus of the State Department on the communication of foreign policy. This includes providing both short and long-range strategic planning to support the Secretary’s effort to bring foreign policy issues to the American people. We develop strategies to advance the Administration’s priority policy issues, shaping effective messages to explain these policies. The Spokesman for the State Department leads these efforts. The offices within Public Affairs also coordinate the communication of foreign policy with the White House, Department of Defense, and other agencies dealing with foreign affairs.

1. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs (PA) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as Personal Assistant to the Director of the News Planning Unit, with responsibility for handling a wide range of sensitive, confidential and complex functions of direct personal interest and concern to the Director. Assignments involve responsibility for the full range of administrative operations and include the conduct of independent coordinator, research, analysis, evaluation, scheduling, and assessments followed by independent decisions and recommendations for the Director’s action. They concern all administrative and related aspects of the Director’s functions and responsibilities and provide the basis for independent actions and input into policy decisions. The nature of the work is highly sensitive, often controversial.

Duties and Responsibilities:

• Provide staff support directly to the Director and other members of the Director’s senior staff on all issues requiring the Director’s attention.

• Ensure that all appropriate information and background are available to the Director as part of the decision-making process and provide background explanations and professional recommendations, as required.

• Serve as the initial point of contact for Department officers with respect to the Director’s activities and ensure that all meetings, appointments, information and action memoranda for the Director are adequately prepared.

• Routinely attend meetings in the office of the Director and elsewhere in the Department, as required.

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• Monitor the implementation of decisions made by the Director, initiate follow-up and provide necessary guidelines and clarification.

• Coordinate the substantive and administrative arrangements for all domestic and international travel by the Director and accompany, as necessary

2. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs (PA) would like to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as the Special Assistant to the Senior Advisor for Strategic News Planning with responsibility for handling a wide range of sensitive, confidential and complex functions of direct personal interest and concern to the Front Office of the Bureau of Public Affairs. Assignments involve responsibility for the full range of administrative operations and include the conduct of independent coordination, research, analysis, evaluation, scheduling, and assessments followed by independent decisions and recommendations for the Senior Advisor's action. They concern all administrative and related aspects of the Senior Advisor's functions and responsibilities and provide the basis for independent actions and input into policy decisions. The nature of the work is highly sensitive, often controversial. Duties and Responsibilities:

Identify upcoming media opportunities and newsworthy activity.

Recruit Department of State principals for special press briefings, video and new media content, and other press availabilities.

Coordinate with bureau/office PAOs and PA staff to facilitate amplifying Department messages and policy in the media.

Draft initial key messages, talking points, video scripts, and blog posts for clearance.

Provide copy-editing when necessary on final products.

Prepare, maintain, and circulate PA Planning Chart and PowerPoint’s.

Solicit contributions/information from PA offices for short and long-term strategic media planning.

Open-source research to flesh out Department principal activity.

Track various State Department public affairs activities.

Produce biweekly meetings of all Department of State PAOs.

Recruit guest presenters to discuss Department public affairs and public diplomacy initiatives/lessons learned/policies.

Coordinate follow-up activities and materials

3. The Office of the Historian (PA/HO) is seeking a Franklin Fellow with a strong academic and/or career background in diplomatic history, international relations, outreach, teaching, and publishing. HO is renowned among academics and policy makers for the professionalism, craft, and usefulness of its products and services; prospective Fellows will contribute to this

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tradition of excellence. The Fellow would serve as a historian , performing a broad variety of tasks related to one or more of the Office’s mandates.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Providing rigorous historical analysis to offices, agencies, and bureaus throughout the Federal government. This process might include research at government archives and dissemination of the final product through briefings and written reports for Department officials and others.

Teaching and lecture opportunities within the Department of State and at the Foreign Service Institute (FSI).

Planning and hosting seminars and conferences related to the Office’s work.

Compiling of a targeted volume for the Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series, the official documentary record of U.S. Foreign policy, on a topic for which the fellow has unique knowledge. Interested Fellows should note this task entails a two-year commitment, which is subject to approval by the Department of State.

Working on a joint volume of edited foreign relations documents; compiled in collaboration with foreign ministries of other nations. Interested Fellows should note this task entails a two-year commitment, which is subject to approval by the Department of State.

Using cutting edge digital history tools to enhance the Office’s online presence through website, social media and Web 2.0 initiatives.

Learning or using existing knowledge of XML mark up and manipulation, XQuery, and related technologies to digitally edit, enrich, and publish historical material online.

4. The Washington Foreign Press Center (WFPC) wishes to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Program Officer supporting U.S. foreign policy in a designated geographical region, promoting accuracy in regional media by organizing relevant briefings and reporting tours. The Fellow reports to the Washington FPC Director and through him/her to the Director of Foreign Press Centers, the Deputy Spokesman, and the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs. Note: Position is filled until October 2011.

The Fellow promotes regional U.S. policy by managing relations with foreign correspondents and by cultivating a comprehensive understanding of overall U.S. foreign policy objectives.

• The Fellow advises relevant State Department bureaus, U.S. Embassies and other U.S. government entities on media relations with regional journalists.

• The Fellow serves as the office’s expert on themes to be determined through consultation with the Fellow.

• Serves as the FPC liaison to designated Cabinet agencies.

• The Fellow independently plans, organizes and implements briefings, interviews, visits and reporting tours of specific value to U.S. policy on the region and themes in the Fellow’s portfolio.

• Serves as back-up Program Officer for other regions.

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• Supports press activities for high-level meetings of the President, the Secretary of State and other senior-level meetings as needed.

5. The New York Foreign Press Center (NYFPC) seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a Program Officer, promoting U.S. policy oversees by managing relations with foreign correspondents resident in or visiting New York. The Fellow must also cultivate a comprehensive understanding of overall U.S. foreign policy objectives. The Fellow reports on work with the media to the State Department geographical and functional bureaus, U.S. Embassies and other U.S. cabinet agencies, describing briefings and other activities involving foreign journalist. The Fellow will also serve as an expert and resource for the New York Foreign Press Center on U.S. Government relations with media from the Fellow’s area of interest by cultivating relations with regional journalists. The Fellow will also back up a colleague covering another geographical region. Note:

Position is filled until October 2011.

The Fellow will independently plan, organize and implement briefings, interviews, visits and reporting tours of specific value to U.S. policy on a geographical region, its countries as well as U.S. global policies and policies of global interest. The Fellow will track budget costs for visits and tours and keep in close contact with contractors expediting NYFPC programs.

The Fellow may be called upon to support high-level meetings of the President, the Secretary of State and other officials through press activities and briefings for the foreign press.

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Bureau of Resource Management

The Bureau of Resource Management (RM) is responsible for all financial management activities relating to the programs and operations of the Department of State. The hallmark of any top financial operation is its ability not only to provide accurate and timely financial data but also to use that data and expertise to give high-value financial advice to the key decision-makers. RM has built the foundation of solid budgeting and reporting. Our mission going forward will be to combine this strong financial information base with a high level of financial advisory expertise as a strategic partner to the Secretary and the Bureaus to ensure that the Department obtains maximum results from its funding. By focusing as well as documenting improved execution across the Department, we believe we will be better able to obtain the funding needed to complete State’s missions.

1. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Resource Management and Chief Financial Officer seeks to host two (2) Fellows with private sector perspectives to contribute substantially to transforming the way the State Department and the private sector work together and imbed relevant private sector perspectives and methods in appropriate areas of Department management. Note: One of two slots is filled until July 2011.

Duties would include:

Assisting in conducting in-depth analyses and independent assessments of State programs and efforts;

Advising on ways to deliver financial management and advisory services to the Department;

Providing perspective on best practices in private industry that could be applied to Department financial management;

Training staff in the CFO’s office on how to work with the private sector in expanding and creating partnerships; and

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Performing discrete tasks that relate to improving Department management.

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Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs

The Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs (SCA) is responsible for managing and promoting U.S. interests in thirteen countries, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and the former Central Asian Republics of the Soviet Union. The region contains a complex mixture of issues, such as stabilizing Afghanistan, Islamic extremism, economic development, democratic reform, energy and regional integration.

1. The Office of Press and Public Diplomacy (SCA/PPD) wishes to host

a Fellow with media

or public affairs-related experience to serve as Deputy Public Affairs Officer. The ideal candidate will possess excellent written and oral briefing skills, as well as an academic or professional background in international affairs.

The Fellow will respond to press inquiries and provide information to domestic and U.S.-based foreign media as appropriate; assist in the preparation and clearance of all press guidance relating to SCA countries; provide advice and recommendations on public affairs issues to SCA's Front Office as well as Public Affairs Officers in the region; liaise with State Department bureau and interagency counterparts on public messaging that relates to SCA countries; and manage the logistics and terms of interviews and other domestic media appearances involving SCA senior staff.

2. The Bureau's Office of Press and Public Diplomacy seeks to host a Fellow to serve as Public Diplomacy Desk Officer for Pakistan. The ideal candidate will possess excellent written and oral briefing skills, an academic or professional background in international affairs, and preferably experience living or working in Pakistan. Working closely with the Bureau's Office for Pakistan and Bangladesh (SCA/PB), the Fellow will coordinate with Public Affairs Officers based in Islamabad, Lahore, Karachi and Peshawar in the design and implementation of strategic communications and public outreach programs designed to promote mutual understanding and foster support for U.S. policy objectives in Pakistan. The incumbent will have the opportunity to travel to the region as well as participate in Department-wide and interagency deliberations on the shape and scope of public diplomacy activities in Pakistan.

3. The (SCA/INS) seeks a Franklin Fellow to focus on India (Political, Economic and Consular Matters). The ideal candidate will be adaptable, international relations-minded, a good writer, have some economic background (preferable but not a must) and be able to relate well in an interagency environment. Duties would include coordinating U.S. foreign policy with India with other State Department offices and U.S. government agencies; writing memoranda on India issues for the Assistant Secretary, under secretaries, and the Secretary; and communicating with the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in India to stay up to speed on the latest developments. The Fellow will be mentored by experienced desk officers.

4. The Office of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bhutan Affairs (SCA/INS) seeks a Franklin Fellow to focus on Sri Lanka and Nepal issues. The ideal candidate will have some background or experience working with a U.S. Government agency, Congress, or an international organization. Academic or work experience in one or more of the following is preferred:

human rights, democratization, political science or economics, terrorism, and/or South Asian issues. The Fellow’s specific portfolio will be adjusted based on the candidate’s area of expertise and/or interests. The Fellow will be in regular contact with U.S. embassies in Sri Lanka and Nepal and will be the face of U.S. diplomacy to domestic constituencies, regional visitors and interagency contacts. The Fellow will be mentored by an experienced desk officer.

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Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance

The Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance (AVC) ascertains that appropriate verification requirements and capabilities are fully considered and properly integrated throughout the development, negotiation, and implementation of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments. The Bureau ensures that other countries' compliance is carefully watched, rigorously assessed, appropriately reported, and resolutely enforced.

The Bureau also is responsible for ensuring that U.S. intelligence capabilities to collect, analyze, and disseminate precise and timely information bearing upon matters of verification and compliance -- e.g., on the nature and status of foreign governments' Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and delivery system programs -- are effectively acquired, maintained, and enhanced. VCA is designated by law as the principal policy community representative to the Intelligence Community with regard to verification and compliance matters. It uses this role -- and the access to and interaction with the Intelligence Community that it entails -- both to promote, preserve, and enhance key collection and analytic capabilities and to ensure that verification, compliance, and implementation intelligence requirements are met.

1. The Office of Chemical and Conventional Weapons Affairs (AVC/CCA) seeks a Franklin Fellow with strong analytical, research, writing and interpersonal skills to assist in the development of U.S. positions and tactics for bilateral and international European conventional arms control meetings and conferences. The Fellow’s responsibilities will include monitoring political and military developments, and trends in European conventional arms control in order to gauge the effectiveness of and to facilitate efforts to achieve U.S. foreign policy objectives.

The Franklin Fellow will be expected to offer insight into transparency measures and arms restraint activities and recommendations, in order to inform U.S. policy choices on European

conventional arms control, including through third parties or multilateral organizations.

experience or academic training in national security and arms control is required. Also necessary is regional expertise in European security issues and/or Russian affairs. Individuals with a thorough knowledge of history and political background of European conventional arms control (including issues involving CFE, Open Skies, and the Vienna Document 1999 and related CSBMs), as well as familiarity with the ongoing process relating to political-military security in the OSCE, are highly desired.

Prior

2. The Office of Technology and Assessments (AVC/TA) seeks to host a Franklin Fellow to serve as a technical and policy officer with strong quantitative and analytical skills, and significant research or systems engineering experience in sensor development, particularly utilizing MEMS or nano-scale devices. The office has responsibilities for coordinating verification technologies and for providing technical assessments on WMD and their means of delivery. The Franklin Fellow will add depth to evaluation of a broad range of issues concerning foreign nuclear, biological, chemical, and missile weapon programs and their input on verification and compliance. The Fellow will be engaged in identifying technologies applicable for use identifying and characterizing suspicious foreign chemical and biological weapon activities. The Fellow will assist the VCA/TA office in coordinating issues concerning weapons system analysis, verification sensor development, and technology assessment. The position may involve some domestic and foreign travel. The Fellow will represent the Bureau, the Department, and, as necessary, the U.S. Government in a wide variety of settings.

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Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs

The Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA) is responsible for managing and promoting U.S. interests in the region by supporting democracy, trade, and sustainable economic

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development, and fostering cooperation on issues such as drug trafficking and crime, poverty reduction, and environmental protection. WHA would like to host four Franklin Fellows:

1. The Office of Public Diplomacy (WHA/PDA): Public diplomacy is really about making our diplomacy public. It’s about explaining to people our government’s actions and priorities. It’s also about showing the linkages within the Americas, and between the United States and the rest of the world. Our public diplomacy is looking for a way to facilitate interconnectedness and to identify ways to deepen our government’s ability to understand how that interconnectedness links to our larger challenge of democracy and development.

WHA/PDA seeks a Franklin Fellow to serve as a consultant on leadership and strategy. The Fellow will work to develop planning documents for the region and individual embassies. He/she will coach public affairs officers in the region; travel to the region to promote and advise on new approaches to management and change; and offer seminars on organizational management. He/she will be responsible for promoting and setting up private, public, and academic partnerships on various initiatives. Working under the direct supervision of the Director of the Office of Public Diplomacy, the Fellow exercises latitude in planning, scheduling, coordinating, and executing assignments, but has no supervisory responsibilities. Specific responsibilities include:

Planning. Develop planning strategies to implement Mission Strategic Plans and specific campaigns highlighting areas of priority interest.

Coaching. Advise the office on management and business processes to facilitate and streamline work. Prepare reports on public diplomacy integration in the Department and recommend improvements.

Travel. Visit posts in region to consult on their efforts to fulfill mandates and focus on priorities. Offer workshops on management for Bi-national Centers and other post contact institutions.

Public-Private Partnerships. Arrange private sector outreach and involvement in key initiatives, such as Pathways, Brazil Joint Action Plan, counternarcotics public outreach and science education network.

Evaluating. Identify ways to make optimal use of evaluating mechanisms available to posts and offices.

Training. In coordination with the Foreign Service Institute and posts, develop a regional training plan. Prepare workshops on managing change and new technologies.

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