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D E S I G N P H O T O G R A P H Y V I D E O E D U C A T I O N
THE HOW- TO MAGAZI NE FOR EVERYTHI NG ADOBE
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S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 0 8
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for that story at www.layersmagazine.com. So be sure to visit the website and check it out.
'&&
Q 9 E B K C D I S
'.S Design Makeover:
Bright Ideas—Jake Widman
((S Artistic Expressions:
Reflecting Details—Bert Monroy
*&S The Digital Camera:
Love That Daylight Fill-In Flash
—Rick Sammon
,*S The Art of Type:
A Walk on the Wild Side
—James Felici
..S Digital Video Solutions:
Custom Background Animation
—Rod Harlan
Q : ; F 7 H J C ; D J I S
.S Letter from the Editor
'(S Layers News
(,S The Digital Canvas
(.S Photographer Spotlight
'&.S Tips & Tricks
''(S Creative Suite Q&A
')&S Design Contest
Q E D J > ; 9 E L ; H S
Chris Clor has more than 27 years’ ex-
perience as a commercial photographer
working with clients such as Coca-Cola,
Ford Motor Company, and DuPont. Chris
uses color, contrast, and composition to
tell a story with every image he produces.
Look for Chris’s unique imagery through-
out the magazine.
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'&&S Poser Pro—Bruce Bicknell
'&'S NTI Media Maker 8 Premium—Dave Huss
'&'S DesignMerge for InDesign—David Creamer
'&(S Eric Meyer’s CSS Sculptor—Cyndy Cashman
'&(S BannerZest Pro—Cyndy Cashman
'&)S AKVIS Enhancer 9.2—Dave Huss
'&*S Sorenson Squeeze 5 Pro—Erik Kuna
'&+S modo 302—Bruce Bicknell
'&,S Toon Boom Studio 4—Marcus Geduld
'&,S deskUNPDF—David Creamer
Contents_Sept/Oct08.indd 5 8/11/08 5:05:47 PM
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)&S Protecting What’s Yours
Are you a designer or photographer? If yes, then we’re willing to
bet that you have at least one, if not hundreds, of your images
somewhere on the Worldwide Web. With today’s technology, it’s
more important than ever to protect your copyright. We show you
all the steps you should take to do just that.—Rob Sylvan
| r a o ) u u a |
),S Large Format: A Matter of Size
As a designer, it’s important to have the skills to design for any type
of media your clients throwyour way, and that includes large-format
projects such as billboards and bus wraps. Learn the secrets of
creating large designs with very small file sizes.—Corey Barker
| ) u ) o u ¡ o | s |
**S Adobe Photoshop Lightroom:
Local Control—Chris Orwig
+&S Adobe Photoshop CS3
for Photographers:
Mirror, Mirror—Seán Duggan
+*S Adobe Photoshop CS3
for Designers:
Repeat After Me—Dave Cross
+.S Adobe Illustrator CS3:
Feelin’ Groovy—Corey Barker
,,S Adobe InDesign CS3:
Create an Interactive Portfolio
—Mike McHugh
-(S Adobe Acrobat 9 Professional:
Optimizing PDFs—Taz Tally
-.S Adobe Dreamweaver CS4
Public Beta:
CS4 Test Drive—Janine Warner
.*S Adobe Flash CS3 Professional:
Out of the Box—Lee Brimelow
/&S Adobe After Effects CS3:
You’ve Got the Key—Steve Holmes
/*S Adobe CS3 Production Premium:
Great Green Screen and Virtual Sets
—Richard Harrington
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We’re always adding new tutorials to the Layers website,
so be sure to visit often. And don’t forget to sign up for our
graphics tip of the day and to read RC’s daily blog, Living
in Layers. Here’s a small sampling of some of the tutorials
that you can find at the site now:
| p~o) os ~op|
www.layersmagazine.com/category/photoshop
Retouching Eyes in Photoshop CS3 (Video): The eyes are
the most important part of your subject. Learn how to
remove a catch light, recolor, get rid of red streaks, and
much more.—Chris Alvanas
| ¡ | | us ) u o) ou |
www.layersmagazine.com/category/illustrator
Blending Gradients in Illustrator (Video): How do you make
a gradient in Illustrator bend to the shape you’re creating?
The answer can be found in the Blend tool.—Corey Barker
Creating 3D Shapes in Illustrator (Video): Need a really cool
background graphic? Create a stroke in Illustrator and apply
3D effects. We’ll show you how.—Corey Barker
| r | os ~|
www.layersmagazine.com/category/flash
Flash Buttons with ActionScript 3 (Video): Creating buttons
that call to URLs has changed from ActionScript 2. RC
explains these changes and guides you through the latest
version of ActionScript.—Rafael “RC” Concepcion
| ou a onwa ov a u |
www.layersmagazine.com/category/dreamweaver
Feathered Transparency with Photoshop & Dreamweaver:
Most Web designers are very aware of the difficulties of
working with transparency, but with the latest technology
and CSS you can achieve some amazing transparency
effects.—Geoff Blake
| r ¡ u a wou r s | NEW SECTION!
www.layersmagazine.com/category/fireworks
Fireworks CS4 Overview (Video): You’ve been asking for
Fireworks and we’ve delivered. In this 10-part video series,
you’ll learn everything you need to know about the new
Fireworks CS4 Public Beta.—Rafael “RC” Concepcion
| | o - a u s ) v |
Hosted by Corey Barker and Rafael “RC” Concepcion
www.layersmagazine.com/tv
Be sure and join Corey and RC in their weekly video podcast. From
killer tips and tricks to full-blown tutorials, Corey and RC cover all of
your favorite print, Web, and video apps.
| o a s ¡ q n t o n ) a s ) |
www.layersmagazine.com/designcontest.html
Every issue, we have a new Layers Back Page Design Contest where you
can show us your skills. Be sure to visit the Layers website for all the details
and to see the cool prizes that you could win.
| n a w s | a ) ) a u |
www.layersmagazine.com/category/enewsletter
Want to keep up to date on all the latest tutorials on both the Layers web-
site and in the magazine, as well as all the latest industry news? Visit the
Layers website now and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter.
&,
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It wasn’t that long ago where if you created an illustration or produced a photo for a client, chances
were your final image would end up in print—a brochure, a flyer, an annual report, or maybe an
ad in a magazine. So the only person you were really concerned about stealing your work was your
client. You just wanted to make sure he didn’t repurpose or reuse your brochure cover image for a
direct mail piece or a nationwide ad campaign without first compensating you for the usage.
But today, more than likely your image is going to wind up at some point, in some form or another, on the Web—
usually with your consent (even if it was designed for the client’s brochure) and often under your direction. But now
you’ve got a new worry: You’re not just worrying about your customer misusing your image; you’re worried about your
customer’s customers (people who visit their website) using your images.
Although there’s a lot of pressure being applied in Congress, and plenty of talk about photographers’ rights and
changes to the copyright laws, I’m still amazed at how little (if anything) is being done to educate the public, or even
other designers, when it comes to what they can and can’t do with other people’s imagery. Because there’s so little
information on the topic, and nobody is seriously trying to educate our industry or the public, the
best thing to do at this point is learn how to protect your images yourself.
That’s why our feature story this issue, “Protecting What’s Yours” (by Rob Sylvan), looks at some
strategies for protecting your images online, from registering your work with the copyright office to
watermarking your images, and even tracking down unlicensed uses of your work. It starts on page 30.
(Note: If you’re a photographer, make sure you check out two live interviews I did with intellectual
property attorney Ed Greenberg and photographers’ copyright advocate Jack Reznicki on my daily
blog, Photoshop Insider at www.scottkelby.com.)
Also in this issue, our own Corey Barker takes a look at designing for large-format output. (Corey
knows this topic inside and out; before he came to us, he worked at a large-format service bureau.)
We also have in this issue special guest writer, Mike McHugh, who not only works for Adobe as a
Creative Systems Engineer in Australia, but also hosts the podcast Creative Sweet TV, and is author
of the book, How to Wow with InDesign CS2. Mike has a fascinating tutorial on how to create inter-
active PDFs right out of InDesign. This interactive design is really getting lots of buzz right now, so
if you haven’t had a chance to see what all the fuss is about, turn to page 66 to check it out.
In addition, Janine Warner gives you a tour of the recently released Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 Public Beta to get you
up and running fast (it starts on page 78).
One last thing: We’ve been continuing our popular “Designer Spotlight” column where we interview a designer or
photographer, and then showcase his or her work throughout the entire magazine. This issue, we’re honored to present
the amazing images of photographer Chris Clor.
Of course, all your favorite columns and tutorials are here, along with our reviews on all the latest gear and software from
a review teamthat has become one of the most trusted sources for straight, no-nonsense, to-the-point, product reviews. We
appreciate the trust you’ve put in us. Your support has helped the magazine grow and thrive, and I’m glad you’re with us
as we head into the fourth quarter, where I’m thinking some very exciting things are headed our way. Can’t wait!
All my best,
Scott Kelby
Editor and Publisher
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Editors Note_SeptOct08.indd 1 8/11/08 3:41:56 PM
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
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TRAFFIC DIRECTOR
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DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS
WEB PRODUCER
WEB TEAM
PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY
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COVER DESIGN

COLOPHON

VOLUML 4 · NUM8Lk s · lkl N1LD l N USA
www. l ayersmagazi ne. com
All contents © COPYRIGHT 2008 Kelby Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Any
use of the contents of this publication without the express written permission of the
publisher is strictly prohibited. Layers magazine is an independent journal not affili-
ated with Adobe Systems, Inc. Adobe, the Adobe logo, Acrobat, Adobe Premiere,
After Effects, Dreamweaver, Flash, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom, and Photoshop are
either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in
the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of
their respective owners. Some of the views expressed by contributors may not be the
representative views of the Publisher. ISSN 1554-415X
Scott Kelby
Chris Main
Mike Mackenzie
Barbara Thompson
Issac Stolzenbach
Kim Gabriel
Rod Harlan
Aaron Westgate
Corey 8arker · Þeter 8auer
8ruce 8lckne|| · Lee 8rlme|ow
Cyndy Cashman · Þaíae| ºÞC"
Concepclon · Davld Creamer
Dave Cross · :ean Duggan
lames le|lcl · Marcus Gedu|d
Þlchard Harrlngton · :teve
Ho|mes · Dave Huss · Lrlk kuna
Mlke McHugh · 8ert Monroy
Chrls Orwlg · Þlck :ammon
Þob :y|van · 1az 1a||y · lanlne
Warner · lake Wldman
Felix Nelson
Dave Damstra
1aííy Or|owskl
Christy Winter
Dave korman
kevln Agren 81!-4!!-z!70
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IT_Supplies_Ad:IT_Supplies_Ad 8/11/08 11:15 AM Page 1
Masthead SeptOct08.indd 1 8/11/08 11:26:55 AM
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Adobe Systems Inc. is helping search industry leaders to improve
search results of dynamic Web content and rich Internet applica-
tions (RIAs). The company is providing optimized Adobe Flash
Player technology to Google and Yahoo! to enhance search engine
indexing of the Flash file format (SWF). The aim is to provide more
relevant automatic search rankings of the millions of RIAs and other
dynamic content that run in Adobe Flash Player.
Although search engines already index static text and links within
SWF files, RIAs and dynamic Web content have been generally difficult
to fully expose to search engines because of their changing states.
Moving forward, RIA developers and rich Web content producers
won’t need to amend existing and future content to make it searchable—
they can now be confident it can be found by users around the globe.
Google has already begun to roll out Adobe Flash Player technol-
ogy incorporated into its search engine and can now better read the
content on sites that use the technology, helping users find more
relevant information when conducting searches. Yahoo! also expects
to deliver improved Web search capabilities for SWF applications in a
future update to Yahoo! Search.
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Adobe has released Photoshop Lightroom 2, the photographers’
software for managing, adjusting, and presenting large volumes
of photos. Enhancements include dual-monitor support, advances
in nondestructive localized image correction, and streamlined
search capabilities. As Adobe’s first application to support 64-bit
operating systems, Lightroom 2
provides improved memory perfor-
mance for dealing with large images.
Lightroom2 continues to improve
the digital photography workflow,
allowing photographers to batch pro-
cess, convert, and apply metadata to
photos upon import. The new Gradu-
ated Filter allows photographers to
create graduated areas of adjustment
over large portions of the image,
including Exposure, Sharpness,
Saturation, Clarity, and more.
Lightroom 2 gives users multiple viewing and comparison options,
as well as the ability to adjust and enhance color, exposure, and tone
curves nondestructively on more than 190 RAW file formats. It also can
track image changes automatically, allowing users to explore possibili-
ties and return to any version of a photo with a single click.
The estimated price is $299 for new users, with an upgrade price
of $99 for registered users. (For more information, visit the Adobe
Photoshop Lightroom 2 Learning Center sponsored by the NAPP at
www.photoshopuser.com/lightroom2.)
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Graphicxtras.com is a resource site with hundreds of products for
use in Photoshop, Illustrator, Painter, and many other applications.
The company recently announced the release of 130 unique radial
and solar symbols for Adobe Fireworks.
The new royalty-free symbols pack includes many different radial
designs that are all stored in PNG symbols libraries format for use
in Fireworks and can be imported simply via the Libraries folder.
The Fireworks set comes with many different colorful designs,
to which users can apply effects, modify colors, and combine in
thousands of ways. The radial set also comes with documentation
hints and tips.
The company also released a new pack of 130 vector radial
symbols designs for use in Adobe Illustrator. The radial symbols
come in many different high-impact designs, and all the symbols
are stored in native AI format. The set comes with documentation,
a gallery, and scripts. Users access them via the Symbols panel in
Illustrator, and they can be modified and turned into brushes.
Find out more by visiting www.graphicxtras.com.
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High-quality, free textures for your graphic
design and photography projects
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Photoshop brush sets from animals
to outer space
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A blog and tutorial site covering vector-
editingprograms, such as Adobe Illustrator
Canon (www.usa.canon.com) introduced the EOS Rebel XS, which Canon is marketing as an
entry-level digital camera for consumers looking to begin shooting with an SLR. According
to the company, the EOS Rebel XS was designed as a fast, nonintimidating, lightweight,
easy-to-use camera that produces excellent images and starts emerging photographers off
on the right foot.
The new model boasts an Optical Image Stabilized kit lens for crisp focus, as well as Canon’s
DIGIC III image processor; 10.1-megapixel CMOS sensor; Live View; Auto Lighting Optimizer;
7-point, wide-area autofocus (AF) sensor; and 3 frames-per-second continuous JPEG burst rate.
The estimated retail price is $699.99.
Canon also unveiled the new Speedlite 430EX II, which succeeds the 430EX. The new
model realizes an approximately 20%
reduction in recycling time
compared to its predeces-
sor. Like the 580EX II, the
430EX II allows users to
control flash functions
and input settings using
the camera’s LCD monitor,
and also offers a quick-lock
attachment system.
The new Canon Speed-
lite 430EX II will carry an
estimated price of $329.99.
Nikon (www.nikonusa.com) introduced the D700 digital SLR
that offers several key features taken directly from the pro-
fessional D3 camera, but at a fraction of the price. The two
cameras share the same 12.1-megapixel CMOS full-frame
sensor; EXPEED processing chip; ISO range; 51-point
autofocus system with 3D tracking; 920,000-dot LCD
screen; and scene recognition system.
Despite sharing many of the D3’s features, the D700
is smaller, lighter, and significantly more affordable at
$2,999.95 for the body alone or $3,599.99 bundled with a
24–120mmVR lens, compared to $4,999.95 for the D3 body alone.
Nikon also rolled out the SB-900 Speedlight, offering higher light
output, wider zoomrange coverage, and more advanced light-pattern
control than the popular SB-800. The new flash, which should be
available now for $499.95, offers three selectable light patterns and
the ability to move the flash tube and reflector system independently,
allowing the system to tailor the light pattern to match the subject.
In further camera news, Nikon introduced the new PC-E Micro NIKKOR
45mm f/2.8D ED and PC-E Micro NIKKOR 85mm f/2.8D lenses, expanding a
series of lenses that allows photographers to effectively correct perspective
and depth of field.
When shooting subjects, such as tall buildings, with a conventional lens,
composition often calls for tilting the axis of a camera. This can result in distor-
tion of converging lines. The PC-E NIKKOR lens shift control provides correction
for this type of distortion.
Their versatility makes these the perfect lenses for myriad applications, including photo-
graphing architecture, nature, interiors, and still-life, especially product photography.
The PC-E NIKKOR 45mm and 85mm lenses should now be available for an estimated
price of $1,799.95 and $1,739.95, respectively.
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News_SeptOct08.indd 14 8/11/08 11:37:47 AM

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Atlanta, GA (September 22, 2008)
Charlotte, NC (September 23, 2008)
www.kelbytraining.com
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September 22–24, 2008
Chicago Marriott Downtown
Chicago, IL
www.foliomag.com/show08
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September 23, 2008
Virginia Beach Convention Center
Virginia Beach, VA
www.kelbytraining.com
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Pittsburgh, PA (September 26, 2008)
Covington, KY (September 29, 2008)
www.kelbytraining.com
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Kansas City, MO (September 26, 2008)
St. Louis, MO (September 29, 2008)
www.kelbytraining.com
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October 12–15, 2008
Albuquerque Hyatt Regency
Albuquerque, NM
www.motionconference.com
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October 13–17, 2008
Orlando World Center Resort
Orlando, FL
www.createchaos.com/08
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November 4–6, 2008
Los Angeles Convention Center
Los Angeles, CA
www.dvexpo.com
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Artlandia, Inc. has released Artlandia LivePresets, a new plug-in that allows for simultaneous
interactive editing of multiple objects in Adobe Illustrator. By introducing a variety of formerly
“static” Illustrator presets, such as symbols and pattern swatches, LivePresets is designed to
increase productivity and open new possibilities for the use of repeating design elements in a
wide range of applications.
LivePresets allows the designer to interact with a single editable copy of the symbol and
apply edits simultaneously to all instances of the symbol in the artwork. Live pattern swatches
supplied by LivePresets similarly allow for editing and modifications of repeat patterns.
In addition to live symbols and pattern swatches, LivePresets features unlimited snapshots
that are automatically added to the Symbols and Swatches panels in Illustrator, a special mode
for insertion of new objects, instant linking and unlinking from the artwork, as well as support
for editable complex objects in pattern swatches.
More information is available at www.artlandia.com.
There’s a new black-and-white photographic plug-in from
Nik Software on the market. Silver Efex Pro, which runs under
Adobe Photoshop and Apple Aperture, uses a range of advanced
imaging algorithms that protect against unwanted artifacts. It
also features a collection of 18 emulated black-and-white film
types, and a state-of-the-art grain engine that Nik claims will truly
mimic the silver-halide process for the highest quality black-and-
white images from scanned or digital color photographs.
Silver Efex Pro begins by presenting photographers with a basic
neutral conversion of their color image to black and white. One-
click adjustments can be made from a choice of more than 20 pre-
sets that emulate the most popular film types and shooting styles.
In addition, color filters, variable toning controls (including sepia, selenium, split-toning,
and user-defined colors for maximum flexibility), and vignettes are included.
Additional sliders for global brightness, contrast, and structure, as well as smart filter
compatibility within Photoshop and multi-image support in Aperture, provide the ultimate
level of control.
Silver Efex Pro is available for $199.95. For more information, visit www.niksoftware.com.
For those managing and storing digital information, Data Robot-
ics has launched the second generation of its award-winning
Drobo product. The enhancements include an upgraded core
processor; two FireWire 800 ports; dramatically increased USB 2
performance; and newly optimized firmware that addresses the
needs of any user seeking a reliable method of managing vast
amounts of data without sacrificing performance. Drobo is ideal
for use as primary storage for media applications, such as photo-
graphy and video editing, as well as secondary storage.
The second generation Drobo is priced at $499 and also
comes in a 2-TB version for $899, and a 4-TB version for $1,299.
All are available for immediate purchase from www.drobostore
.com. For a list of vendors or to learn more about Drobo, visit www.drobo.com.
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News_SeptOct08.indd 16 8/11/08 11:38:24 AM
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raphic design is about organized communication. In the case of
commercial design, it’s vital that information is clear and acces-
sible. The challenge is to distill simplicity out of complexity and reduce
detail to the essentials.
I started with the Solar Home Systems brochure cover. It needs
to entice viewers to investigate further—to make them interested in
the product and to draw them in. I decided to take a magazine-cover
approach, using large images and treating the product features as bold
“story subjects.” As for the design details, I tried to pull together ele-
ments that subtly suggested the product and the brand: the translucent
blue of photovoltaic panels, with bits of the logo swirl in the top bar
echoing the logo at the bottom. I set the type in Avenir Black, Medium,
and Light for its modern feel and clean, easy-to-read characters.
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Greg started as a photographer in 1990. He worked for agencies and design studios shooting images for ads,
annual reports, lifestyle marketing pieces, and catalogs. The years of crafting images honed his eye for the
important details. He found himself drawn to the entire design process, and a combination of self-instruction,
trial by fire, and a Design and Advertising Certificate programat Rhode Island School of Design enabled him
to expand his skills and services.
Going into business as gwcreative in 2000, Greg began to design and produce appealing, user-friendly, and effective websites,
print projects, and photography. He now stays busy with freelance work, wedding and event photography, and a day job as the
lead Senior Graphic Designer for GTECH Corporation’s Sales and Product Marketing Department in Providence, Rhode Island.
He lives in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, with his wife and two teenage children, who are his favorite people in the world.
7FFB?97J?EDIKI;:0 Adobe Photoshop CS3, Adobe Illustrator CS3, and Adobe InDesign CS3
My approach to the Always Light data sheet was to repeat elements
fromthe brochure for consistency, to soften the stark feel of the original,
and to organize the information and highlight the important details.
Placing all the information into one vertical space, starting with a list
of product features and ending with the tech specs, makes it easy for
someone who is scanning to find the most important points quickly.
The background has a subtle grid pattern over a gradient tone that
softens the look while adding a “technology” feel. This was my attempt
to address the slight conflict in the client’s request for a warm, casual
image and a modern, high-tech look.
Nanergy makes some interesting and relevant products. I wish them
good fortune with their business.
Q 7 8 E K J J > ; : ; I ? = D ; H S
=
Brochure cover Sell sheet
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anergy started in the renewable energy business about four
years ago, specializing in photovoltaics (converting solar
energy to electricity). In the U.S., they market their products to con-
sumers through catalogs such as Hammacher Schlemmer, in-flight
magazines, and televised home shopping networks. Outside the U.S.,
their markets are primarily in third-world countries, which they reach
through organizations such as the United Nations or UNICEF.
The company also sends representatives to trade shows and
overseas trade missions where they distribute sell sheets describ-
ing their products. Typically, several sell sheets will be inserted in
a folder with a cover letter. Eva Csige, Nanergy’s Vice President
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Jake Widman is a writer and editor who lives in San Francisco. He’s been covering the intersection of computers and graphic design for about 20 years now—since back
when it was all called “desktop publishing.”
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of Marketing, asked if Layers could come up with a more effective
design for the sheets.
Csige likes several things about the current sell sheets: the layout
is neat and clean, and the angled rules makes them look modern.
But they’re inconsistent and not terribly eye-catching. One problem
is the color scheme. Because the current logo is red and blue, she
says, they had a hard time coming up with a background color to
work with it. They decided against green because it’s such a cliché
in the renewable energy field; the yellow they settled on is meant to
suggest sunlight, the source of the power for their products.
The corporate image Csige would like to project is informal and
friendly, but at the same time polished and high tech. “More Apple than
IBM,” she says. We gave three designers a pair of spec sheets and the
cover of a four-page brochure and asked themto generate a new look
that could represent Nanergy’s efforts across the entire product line.
Brochure cover
Sell sheet
Sell sheet
DesignMakeover_SeptOct08.indd 18 8/11/08 11:39:42 AM
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hile reviewing the existing Nanergy marketing collateral, sev-
eral issues became very clear, most notably that the company
wasn’t capitalizing on aesthetic communications for green energy,
the product capabilities, or the refinement of solar technology. When
you leave any piece of material with a potential customer it should
always be eye-catching and clever. The new design needed to be
modern, sleek, and refined, communicating to a market of sophisti-
cated customers with the interest and funds to invest in clean, green
energy for their homes and lifestyles. To accomplish this, we took a
minimalist approach, drawing on Swiss Modernism, and reduced the
color scheme to shades of gray and sky blues. The resulting design is
modern and elegant.
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DYKEMAN’s Graphic Design Services, located in Everett, Washington, provides clients with print, Web, and
environmental design services. Notable clients include Safeway, ICON, Krispy Kreme, Top Foods, and Hous-
ing Hope.
Andrea Jensen has worked in the design industry for the last four years as a copywriter, marketing manager,
and graphic designer. Her myriad skills assist DYKEMAN Graphics in design, as well as business development
and marketing ventures. Andrea has worked with the Washington State Ferries, PEMCO Insurance, and the
Urban Mobility Group.
Michael Olson has worked in the design industry for the last eight years as a graphic and Web designer.
As a graphics director at DYKEMAN Graphics, Michael contributes his award-winning talent and entrepre-
neurial experience. Michael has worked with PEMCOInsurance, Ignite Analytics, and the Diocese of Olympia.
7FFB?97J?EDIKI;:0 Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign
Q 7 8 E K J J > ; : ; I ? = D ; H I S
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The Always Light sell sheet was challenging if only for placing
so much information in too small of a space. Our team decided to
transform the page into a two-sided one sheet; the front displays
the simplicity of the product and the back details the product speci-
fications. We capitalized on the fact that the product emits light to
make the top half of the front of the sheet (starting where the light
is) a pale gray, while the bottom part of the sheet is dark to create
contrast and ground the design.
The previous Solar Home Systems brochure cover also contained
too much text. Continuing the clean and simple presentation estab-
lished with the Always Light sheet, we removed all the product informa-
tion fromthe front of the brochure and simply showcased the product.
The information inside the brochure is presented in a similar format
as the back of the Always Light one sheet. The design should remain
consistent in this way between all collateral items, creating a standard
design for the brand.
Sell sheet back
Brochure cover
Sell sheet front
DesignMakeover_SeptOct08.indd 21 8/11/08 11:42:28 AM
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anergy’s current look is not only inconsistent among their mar-
keting materials, but also in communicating a clear brand mes-
sage (which starts with a suitable and successful logo). The original
logo’s brush stroke effect makes it look either artistic or handmade,
and the colors are harsh and misleading. I set out to create a mark that
illustrates the main characteristics they use to describe themselves:
high-technology, environmental, polished, and people-focused.
My revised logo uses crisp lines that suggest energy being dispersed
as rays of light. The combination of bright green (representing both the
environment and the vibrancy of the sun’s energy) and blue (symbol-
izing the sky and solar panels) evokes a feeling of freshness. I set the
company name in lowercase Futura to complement the icon and pro-
vide a friendly but sophisticated tone. The rays-of-light theme is carried
through on the brochure cover where the use of ample negative space
communicates an overall feeling of expansiveness and clean energy.
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Fueled by her passion for designing the art of meaningful communication, Cristy Vallee established her own
design studio, vallee:design, in 2003.
Cristy received her Masters of Fine Arts in Graphic Design fromBoston University and worked as a designer
for a number of design studios, an advertising agency, an exhibit design firm, and as a freelancer. Her expe-
rience covers a wide range of media, including branding, print and marketing collateral, and large-scale
experiential design projects. Cristy also enjoys teaching graphic design at Bridgewater State College, where she’s continuously
reminded of the importance of meaningful and fresh design.
“What I enjoy most about design is the creativity and collaboration, but even more the point at which successful design does
more than simply attract a viewer, but reaches out to informand inspire. It’s at this point that I believe design shows its true strength
and power to ignite change and growth.”
7FFB?97J?EDiKI;:0 Adobe Photoshop CS3, Adobe Illustrator CS3, and Adobe InDesign CS3
bgufs
Besides inconsistency, I thought the sell sheets suffered from lack
of hierarchy, poor interaction of elements, and weak use of photogra-
phy. Nanergy’s mission combines compassion for humanity with envi-
ronmental awareness, and this became the force behind my concepts.
I decided to use typography and negative space in a very pure and
simple manner to communicate an overall feeling of expansiveness and
clean energy. I wanted the product sheets to organize the information,
but have some dimension and hierarchy. I did this by establishing a
grid, assigning levels of importance to type through size treatment,
and bringing out specific features in bold sidebars. The type in the
sidebar sits between parentheses and remains lowercase, maintaining
the techie-yet-friendly nuance. Different colors selected from the same
overall palette distinguish one product from another. I added images
that evoke feelings of well-being and attention to the environment and
the betterment of humanity.
Q 7 8 E K J J > ; : ; I ? = D ; H S
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Brochure cover Sell sheet
Sell sheet
DesignMakeover_SeptOct08.indd 20 8/11/08 11:41:35 AM
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Here’s the layer for the reflection:
a rough drawing I made with the
Brush tool, depicting a reflection
of me standing by my car taking the
picture with my old Nikon camera. As
you can see, there’s not much detail;
just enough to get the point across.
In the Raven painting, the movie
theater has a ticket booth that faces
the street. It’s glass and of course,
it’s reflective. How did I create that
reflection? If you take a good look
at the closeup of the ticket booth,
you’ll see that I took the Pic n Pac painting and flipped it horizon-
tally for the reflection. (Fortunately, no one has sent me an email [to
date] complaining that there’s no such place across the street from
the Raven movie theater.)
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As mentioned above, there will be times that require some manipula-
tion to make a reflection look right—the painting, marble and
matches, at the top of the next page, is one of those instances. In the
closeup, you can see that a reflection of the matchstick is visible along
the edge of the marble that faces it. The marble is smooth glass; the
matchstick is right next to the marble; therefore a reflection is needed.
The surface of the marble is rounded so it will distort anything
that’s being reflected onto its surface. Don’t believe me? Go look at
a marble!
Here’s how to manipulate this: Duplicate the layer containing the
matchstick onto a new layer (Command-J [PC: Ctrl-J]). Then apply
a spherical filter (Filter>Distort>Spherize) to the duplicate layer.
One important consideration is that the Spherize filter creates the
distortion outward from the center of the overall shape of a layer or
selection. So, to get the proper distortion of the matchstick, place it
Pic n Pac
Pic n Pac closeup
Reflection layer
Raven
Raven closeup
ArtisticExpressions_SepOct08.indd 3 8/11/08 3:47:01 PM
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C F S U ! | ~ ! N P O S P Z
Q 7 H J ? I J ? 9 ; N F H ; I I ? E D I S
Making things look real is what I always strive for in
my work. I never guess at how something should
look: I really look at things in the world around me.
You might be tempted to make it up, but if you’re
off by even a tiny bit, that mistake will stand out and make the image
look wrong. So, if you want to create something realistic, study the
world around you. Understanding how things should look is a matter
of going through life with your eyes open.
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In my studio, I have many objects and toys that serve as models when
I’m trying to figure out how something will cast a shadow and how
it will reflect other objects around it. And reflections are what we’ll
focus on in this issue.
How you handle the surface of an object that you’re creating in
Photoshop will be determined by what it’s made of. Photoshop isn’t
a 3D application: it won’t automatically create shadows or reflections
within a scene. Sure, there’s a layer style that creates drop shad-
ows, but these are shadows cast by an object onto a surface directly
behind it. In a three-dimensional space, shadows take on a shape of
their own. For instance, an object sitting on a tabletop won’t cast a
shadow onto the air behind it; the shadow will travel along the surface
of the table. Also, if an object falls within the area where a shadow’s
being cast, the shadow will change direction and follow the shape of
the object blocking it. But let’s talk about reflections (we’ll cover the
concept of shadows in more detail in a future issue).
If an object is made of glass, polished stone, or shiny plastic, it will
reflect other objects that lie beside it. There’s no layer style, easy trick, or
button to push to accomplish this. This detail needs to be handled with
a little effort and skill. You might say, “I’ma photographer, not a painter!”
But what if you’re combining two of your photographs into one and
they contain reflective objects? If a reflection doesn’t exist, the image is
lost and you’ll have to go in there and create the reflections.
Many times, it’s simply a matter of making a copy of the object and
flipping it horizontally to make your reflection. Other times, you have to
take your time and do a little manipulation to make it look right.
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When the reflections are on a window, then they need to be subtle
so as not to clutter the scene behind the window. Just a hint of a
reflection might be all that’s needed. This painting, Pic n Pac, at
the top of the next page, was the first I created after I moved to
California in 1993.
The store has big, plate-glass windows in front and, in the closeup
of the window facing the viewer, you can see the interior of the shop.
There’s also a reflection from some object outside that’s out of our
field of view. It’s not necessary to create that reflection from scratch.
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at the far right of the layer being distorted before going into the
Spherize filter.
Next, lower the Opacity for the layer of the distorted matchstick
and place this layer in the Layers panel above the layer containing
the marble. Use the Move tool (V) to position the distorted match-
stick where the reflection should be in the marble. Then Option-click
(PC: Alt-click) on the line between the matchstick and marble layers
to turn them into a clipping group and complete the effect. This will
“clip” out any of the matchstick outside the marble.
Nbovbm!npejßdbujpo
At other times, it might require some handwork to modify the layer
for a reflection. Say you wanted to show someone looking at himself
in a mirror. If you duplicate the layer with the person on it and flip it
horizontally, you’ll get that reflection; however, if the mirror is being
held at an angle, then you’ll need to distort the reflection. And if
the mirror is below the person, then you’ll need to do some major
work, because you’d see the bottom of the person’s chin and the
nose in the reflection.
In the example at top right, the Shoe Repair painting shows a
neon sign with the word “PAUL’S” suspended over orange plastic,
which is smooth and thus reflective. The basic reflection was easy to
create: I simply duplicated the layer containing the neon tubes and
offset it to the right, then lowered the layer opacity and clipped it
with the layer containing the orange plastic letter shapes.
But…there are places where the neon tubes are bent to either
travel under other tubes to form the letters or to connect them
into the sign. In these cases I had to do a little modification to the
reflection layer. The closeup below shows one of these instances.
Notice that the neon tube is bent to travel beneath another tube
and then connect into the sign. The original reflection traveled in the
same direction as the tubes. The reflection of the tube being bent
toward the plastic has to look as if it’s being reflected outward to
meet the reflection of the bar connecting it to the sign.
Another factor in this example is that you’re looking at it from
an angle, which will cause the shape visible within the reflection to
appear longer than the tube that’s being reflected. Try this: Hold
your finger against a mirror so that it’s pointing at an angle similar
to the tube in the painting and you’ll notice that you can see more
of the finger reflected in the mirror than you can see of the actual
finger. In the closeup, the angle and size of the tube has been modi-
fied to look the way that it should.
So, is there a science to all this? Do you have to go out now and
study physics? No! Just study the world around you. Open your eyes
and look at how things work. The answers are all out there.
Bert Monroy is considered one of the pioneers of digital art. His work has been seen in many magazines and scores of books. He has served on the faculty of many well-known institutions, written
many books, and appeared on hundreds of TV shows around the world. [ ]
ALL IMAGES BY BERT MONROY
marble and matches Shoe Repair
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The staff at Layers magazine appreciates the time and effort involved in the creative process, no matter how large or small the
project. With this in mind, we offer you the opportunity to display your work on The Digital Canvas. Please submit your print, Web,
or packaging design (jpeg or eps format) to: cmain@layersmagazine.com. Please include name of piece, client name (if applicable),
applications used, and any website where our readers can view more of your work.
Design: Book cover for Whispers from the Bay
] [ Client: John Tkac ] [ Designer: Marcus Laurinaitis ] [ Software: Adobe
Photoshop CS3, Adobe Illustrator CS3 ] [ Website: www.firstteamadv.com
Illustration: Z06 ] [ Personal Work ] [ Designer: Edward Eksi ] [ Software: Adobe Illustrator ] [ Website: www.edwardeksi.com
Children’s Book Illustration: Mandy and Pandy and Their Friends
] [ Client: Mandy and Pandy Co. ] [ Designer: Ingrid Villalta
] [ Software: Adobe Illustrator ] [ Website: www.wallsforfun.com
Children’s Book Illustration: Mandy and Pandy Visit Great Wall of China
] [ Client: Mandy and Pandy Co. ] [ Designer: Ingrid Villalta
] [ Software: Adobe Illustrator ] [ Website: www.wallsforfun.com
©
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T I P X D B T J O H ! U I F ! E F T J H O ! X P S L ! P G ! P V S ! S F B E F S T
Q ] W b b [ h o S
Illustration: Jack Be Clever ] [ Personal Work ] [ Designer: Megan O’Brien
] [ Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3 ] [ Website: http://starsandtea.blogspot.com
Illustration: Ghosts Lay Here
] [ Personal Work
] [ Designer: Megan O’Brien
] [ Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3
] [ Website: http://starsandtea.blogspot.com
Illustration: Lethargy ] [ Personal Work ] [ Designer: Megan O’Brien
] [ Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3 ] [ Website: http://starsandtea.blogspot.com
Illustration: Follow You ] [ Personal Work ] [ Designer: Megan O’Brien
] [ Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3 ] [ Website: http://starsandtea.blogspot.com
DigitalCanvas_JulyAug08.indd 1 8/11/08 3:48:48 PM
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Layers: Your images seemto tell a story. Do you stumble across these
without forethought or strategically plot them out?
Clor: I typically sketch an idea on paper first, then begin the process
of photographing the individual elements and backgrounds. Some-
times I’ll come across unusual backgrounds, objects, or people, and
these will be the impetus for an image. I also have a cinematography
background and try to instill a cinematic feel in my work.
Layers: Do you have a typical workflowyou use to process your images?
Clor: Of course, I capture in RAW for digital and process these in
either Adobe Photoshop CS3, LightZone, or Canon software. I also
shoot film, utilizing a fluid-mounted, HDR-scanning technique that’s
incorporated into the scanning software.
Layers: What applications do you work with regularly? Do you have
a favorite?
Clor: I use Photoshop CS3 the most for image editing, as well as
Corel Painter for certain projects. For the computer generated (CG)
elements you see in some of my work, I use Maxon Cinema 4D,
3ds Max, and Vue d’Esprit. I’ve been incorporating CG-rendered
elements into my work since 1993.
Layers: Do you have a favorite lens you shoot with? If so, why?
Clor: My favorite lens is my Canon 300mm f/2.8 IS lens. It is unbeliev-
ably sharp, and I always shoot it wide open. Unfortunately, I can’t use
the 300 for everything. I have most of the Canon glass available but
would have to say the 24–70 and 70–200 see the most use. They are
great workhorse lenses.
Layers: Do you rely more on lighting and camera settings
or digital manipulation to achieve the signature high-
contrast effect that marks your images?
Clor: It is really a combination of things. Generally, my
lighting is justified—meaning there is a natural or practical
source for the light to be there, not just edge lighting for
no apparent reason. The makeup, lighting, and contrast
ratios are designed to support the digital manipulation
later. This allows for the greatest degree of control in post-
processing. Contrast is added in various layers with masks
that are painted in or removed precisely. I build the color
in much the same way, utilizing many colors and overlays
to define the palette.
[CONTACT] Chris Clor www.clorimages.com ALL IMAGES BY CHRIS CLOR
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Layers: Howlong have you been working as a commercial photographer? Howearly did
you know you wanted to be a photographer?
Clor: I’ve been working as a commercial photographer for more than 27 years. I became
interested in photography at the age of 12 and have had a camera in hand ever since.
Layers: How did you discover your current style? Did something in particular serve as
the creative impetus?
Clor: I did a lot of darkroom printing early in my career, learning from a master printer
who taught me how to interpret a negative and really understand it. Dodging, burning,
and color correction were always part of the creation of every print. Pulling detail from
shadows; darkening areas of the print to lead the eye to the subject; creating lush, beau-
tiful images that were often mistaken for paintings…This was the very beginning of what
has become the illustrative look evident in my work to this day.
I also used montage techniques and multiple exposures to create my compositions—
yes, even during the film days. Now, of course, I use the computer to assemble the
images. But I rely on my earlier darkroom experience to guide my hand.
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was sporting an illustrative style long before digital manipulation was available. His photos are
products of his imagination and are sometimes dark and other times more humorous. Lush lighting and color dominate his work, which is often
described as cinematic.
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What’s Yours
for hire”) without having to register it and without having to affix a
copyright notice on the work. Registering your work with the U.S.
Copyright Office creates a public record stating that you’re the
copyright owner. In this digital age, everything you can do to cement
the connections between you and your work is in your best interest.
While this won’t prevent your photos from being misused, it’s a
required legal formality before you can file a copyright infringement
suit. If you register your work within three months of publication, or
prior to an infringement, and a court decides an infringement took
place, you’ll be able to recoup legal fees and punitive damages in
addition to actual damages. If you register your copyright after an
infringement has taken place, your award is limited to actual dam-
ages, which means your legal fees come out of your pocket!
You can register both published and unpublished work through
the U.S. Copyright office (http://copyright.gov) by mail for a fee of
$45 per registration. With an eye to the future, the Copyright office
is now offering an online registration service called eCO (electronic
Copyright Office), which is intended to be faster and cheaper ($35)
than the traditional paper-based method. Go to http://copyright
.gov/eco if you’d like to give this new service a try. Keep in mind,
however, that you’re limited to a 30-minute upload session, so your
connection speed will determine the number of photos you can
upload per $35 fee.

Pros: Creates a legal public record of your copyright ownership,
required before filing a lawsuit, and increases amount of award
when infringement is determined.
Cons: Costs a nominal fee and takes some time.
Verdict: So, what are you waiting for?
Embedding metadata
Okay, I’ll be the first to admit that it’s all too easy for the end user to
strip out the metadata, but just because someone could remove it,
shouldn’t prevent you from including your copyright notice and con-
tact information in every photo that leaves your computer. Plus if you’re
using Adobe Photoshop, Bridge, or Lightroom to manage your
photos, you already have the means to add this to your workflow at
no additional cost.
With Bridge and Photoshop, here’s how to create a metadata
template that contains your essential copyright and contact information
(feel free to add more information) and easily apply it to all your photos:
1. Open a photo in Photoshop, or select one in Bridge, and go to
File>File Info to open that dialog.
2. Choose Copyrighted from the Copyright Status drop-down menu
and then enter your Copyright Notice and Copyright Info URL.
3. Select IPTC Contact from the list on the left side of the dialog and
fill out all fields.
4. Select IPTC Status and fill out the Rights Usage Terms.
5. Click the flyout menu arrow at the top of the dialog, choose Save
Metadata Template, give it a name, and click Save. Then click OK
to close the File Info dialog.
In the future you can easily apply this metadata template to all your
work via that same flyout menu.
If you’re using Lightroom, it’s just as easy to create a similar
metadata template that you can apply to every photo as part of the
Import process. Here’s howto do that fromthe Import Photos dialog:
1. Click the Metadata drop-down menu and choose New,
which will launch the New Metadata Preset dialog.
2. Complete all the fields in the IPTC Copyright and IPTC
Creator sections.
3. Enter a name in the Preset Name field and click Create.
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T
he Worldwide Web is awash in images and I expect that
some are yours, as there’s probably not a digital camera
owner out there who hasn’t shared a photo with a friend,
family member, or the world via the Web. Whether uploading to your
own website, a blog, a stock agency, or one of the many sites dedi-
cated to sharing photos, once your digital photo leaves your computer,
it becomes part of the vast growing sea of intellectual property that is
the Internet. I couldn’t guess how many photos are out there, but if
you want to start counting, I can tell you that the 2-billionth photo
was uploaded to Flickr last November. Let’s just call it billions and bil-
lions (to misquote Carl Sagan).
The ultimate honor system
We put our photos online for many reasons, from simply sharing
moments of our lives to earning our livelihoods. The problem is
that the very nature of making a photo viewable on the Internet
involves putting it into the digital possession of the viewer. Imagine
a shopping experience where instead of going to a store to pick
what you want to buy, you could have every item delivered right to
your house for free, but with the understanding that you’d pay for
the items you keep and throw everything else in the trash. That’s an
extreme example of the “ultimate honor system,” but kind of how
the Internet works.
Even the act of displaying a photo on a monitor puts it a screen
capture away from being saved by the viewer, and a digital file can be
reproduced an infinite number of times without loss of quality. All the
files you view in a webpage are saved into a special file on your com-
puter (the browser’s cache), which is periodically cleared out.
In trying to get a handle on how much of a problem unauthorized
image usage is, I spoke to Niran Amir, the Director of Marketing &
Sales for PicScout (www.picscout.com), a company that specializes
in using its proprietary image-recognition technology for finding
its client’s rights-managed images being used online in commer-
cial projects. (Their client list reads like a who’s who of stock photo
agencies.) All matches found by their Image Tracker technology are
passed on to the client, and if a use is determined to be unlicensed,
PicScout will assist in recovering financial compensation for that use.
According to Niran, 80–90% of the matches they’ve found were ille-
gitimate uses. (I expected the percentage of unauthorized uses to be
high, but that’s a staggering figure.) Reasons for unauthorized uses
by image consumers include ignorance of copyright, mistakes in the
image acquisition and approval chain, and plain old bad decisions.
While it may be impossible to prevent a determined person from
using your work without your permission, there are a couple of things
you should do to protect your work: Establish yourself as the copy-
right owner; make it harder for the wrong people to use your work;
and make it easier for the right people to find and contact you when
they want to use your work with your permission. Compromises
may have to be made and costs considered, and although not every
solution will be suited for every place you upload images, it’s best to
focus your attention on the areas that are within your control—right
before you click the Upload button.
Register your copyright
According to U.S. Copyright law, you own the copyright to your
original work the moment it’s created (assuming it’s not a “work
8OHE8IOBL7D
Many designers and photographers use the Web to
share their work with as many people as possible. But
once your images are on the Web, how can you protect
them? Here are some of the best ways to safeguard
your copyright online.
What’s Yours
Feat_Copywrite_SepOct08.indd 30 8/13/08 1:26:25 PM
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sion. On the Web, the resolution of a photo is simply a function
of its pixel dimensions (that is, x pixels long by y pixels wide). You
may often hear people say, “Only put photos at 72 ppi on the Web,”
but the term “ppi” (pixels per inch) is meaningless in regards to
Web display; it’s just a metadata tag that tells a printer how large to
print a given photo. Onscreen, however, it’s pixel dimensions that
determine the size (and usefulness) of the photo.
For example, if you take a photo that’s 800x600 pixels into
Photoshop and open the Image Size dialog (Image>Image Size),
you can uncheck the Resample Image box and set the Resolu-
tion field to any number you desire. Let’s say we set it to 300. All
we’ve done is set the document size to print that photo at 300
ppi—the photo’s still 800x600 pixels.
Now, keep Resample Image unchecked and change the
Resolution to 72 to set the document size to print that photo at
72 ppi. But it’s still the same 800x600-pixel image we had before.
Nothing about the pixels has changed.
If you saved a copy of that photo at 300 ppi and another copy at
72 ppi and put themboth in a webpage, they’d both take up exactly
800x600 pixels onscreen. There would be absolutely no difference
in the quality of the two photos and anyone who downloaded either
one could just as simply set the resolution to any value just as we did.
So, how large is large enough will vary with your needs. After
polling some of the staff at Digital Web magazine (thanks to Nick
Fink and Matthew Pennel), a slew of photographers, and the Photo
Attorney, the dimensions of 800x800 pixels seemed to emerge as
the upper limit you should consider making images available for
display purposes.
Pros: Easy to implement, resulting in smaller file size, which leads to
faster upload time and less storage requirements.
Cons: Too small size can reduce visual impact.
Verdict: Err on the side of being a little too small.
JPEG over-compression
While I’m not a big fan of this method, it’s used often enough that we’ll
address it here. Some people use the lossy nature of the JPEG-compres-
sion algorithm as a means to slightly degrade the photo in an attempt to
decrease its usefulness to others. While this can be effective to a certain
extent, I find that degrading the photo quality usually runs counter to
most reasons for why you’d put the photo online in the first place. It may
also give the impression that the quality of the original file is poor, which
is the last thing you’d want people to think.
Saving images as JPEGs is part and parcel of putting them online,
so choosing a compression level will always come into play. Generally
speaking, you always want to use as much compression as possible to
reduce file size (which has ramifications for file storage and bandwidth),
but without introducing visible JPEG compression artifacting. If you
want to use artifacting as a theft deterrent, then you’d add a little more.
This is very subjective and you, as the artist, need to be satisfied with
how your work is displayed.
The Save for Web & Devices dialog in Photoshop is great for getting
a visual on the effect of the amount of JPEG compression being applied.
It even has five JPEG presets (Low, Medium, High, Very High, and
Maximum) that correspond to the Quality setting being used. The High
preset uses a Quality setting of 60, which is often a good starting point,
as it reduces file size quite a bit with minimal artifacting. You can then
adjust the Quality slider as needed. Here’s an example at the Low setting
that works as advertised. Note: I’m referring specifically to settings used
for displaying your work, not for delivering to a client or stock agency
where high quality trumps file size and minimal compression is desired.
Lightroom doesn’t offer a visual during export, but it does use the
same 0–100 quality scale, so start with 60 and check your results.
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You’ll see that your preset name appears
in the Metadata field back on the Import
dialog, which means that information will
be applied to the metadata of all your
imported files. Just make sure that you
always select that preset on future
imports as well.
Of course, the key here is not to
strip this data out when saving your
JPEG file destined for the Web. In
Photoshop, if you choose File>Save
As, then all the metadata is pre-
served, but if you choose File>Save
for Web & Devices, only your copyright
notice and copyright URL are left in
the metadata, unless you check Include
XMP from the Save for Web & Devices
flyout menu. In Lightroom, just remem-
ber to leave Minimize Embedded Metadata
unchecked on the Export dialog, or it will leave
only your copyright notice, usage terms, and
copyright URL in the exported copies. Tip: If you
do need to strip out all but the copyright notice and
copyright URL for certain uploads, make sure there’s
adequate contact information for you at the copyright URL
you designate.
Pros: Embeds your name and detailed contact information into the
photo, no cost involved, and easy to incorporate into your workflow.
Cons: It’s not permanent and easily removed after it leaves your control.
Verdict: Make it part of your workflow now.
Adding a visible watermark
With the legal formalities out of the way, the next consideration is
the application of a visible watermark, which can be anything (name,
logo, copyright symbol, etc.) that’s placed somewhere on the photo
and “burned” right into the pixels. Ideally, adding a watermark
should serve three purposes: making the photo less useful to those
who may download it; stating that it’s copyrighted; and identify-
ing the copyright owner. According to Carolyn E. Wright (a.k.a. the
Photo Attorney), a simple watermark that includes the copyright
symbol and your name works great to achieve those ends. Think of
it as digitally “signing” your work. With that kind of visible notifica-
tion embedded in the image, it reduces the number of people who
can claim they didn’t know it was copyrighted; it further cements
the connection between you and your work; and it may facilitate the
right people making contact with you for legitimate uses.
Three key variables to consider when applying a watermark are:
size, location, and opacity. While you want to deter people from
stealing your photos, you don’t want to turn off your paying custom-
ers, so finding that sweet spot between just enough and too much
is a subjective decision that we each have to make.
There are a slew of free watermarking tutorials for Photoshop
out there (including some at www.layersmagazine.com). Just do
a search for “watermark.” But the simplest way is to use the Type
tool (T) to enter the © symbol and your name. (To create the copy-
right symbol, just press Option-G [PC: hold the Alt key and enter
0169 using the numeric keypad]).
When exporting photos from Lightroom, you can leverage
the copyright metadata you already entered and check the Add
Copyright Watermark box on the Export dialog. This pulls the
data you entered in the Copyright field and displays it as a small
white watermark on each exported photo. For a more configurable
watermark option from Lightroom, I highly recommend the LR/
Mogrify Export plug-in (donationware) at http://timothyarmes.com/
lrmogrify.php. And there are also low-cost watermark applications
for both Mac and Windows, such as iWatermark (http://scriptsoft-
ware.com/iwatermark) and Dropwatermark (http://dropwatermark
.com) that are great for batch watermarking large groups of photos.
Pros: Literally puts your name on your work where people can
see it, and there are lots of options for how it looks.
Cons: Can detract from the eye appeal of the photo; may not be
appropriate for every place you upload photos to; and can be
digitally cropped or removed.
Verdict: Do it when you can, and as appropriate for that outlet.
Diminish usefulness
with diminished sizes
People can only use what you make available. The usefulness of a
photo decreases as its pixel dimensions decrease, and of course
the eye appeal decreases at the same time. The sweet spot you’re
looking for is just large enough to meet the needs for which you’re
uploading the image—and no larger. Whether you’re making
comps available to potential customers, posting photos to Flickr,
or uploading them to your blog, the reason you’re uploading the
image is the determining factor in how big is big enough.
Before we go any further, there’s a huge point of confusion
around the word “resolution” that often enters this type of discus-
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Don’t Orphan Your Work!
Rob Sylvan is a Help Desk Specialist for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals, host of Peachpit’s Lightroom Reference Guide, author of Lightroom for Dummies
and Site Director for iStockphoto. Check out his Lightroom tips and tutorials at lightroomers.com.
[ [
any work on the Web that you absolutely wouldn’t want to see
used without your permission, you shouldn’t be afraid to share your
work with the world. Just remember that the power to protect
your copyright starts with you.
Resources
Copyright Office: http://copyright.gov
Photo Attorney: http://photoattorney.com
Picture Archive Council of America’s Copyright Education
Program: http://pacaoffice.org/library.shtml
PicScout: www.picscout.com
TinEye: http://tineye.com
Have you heard about the Orphan Works bill that’s cur-
rently moving through the House and Senate? The goal
of this bill is “to provide a limitation on judicial remedies
in copyright infringement cases involving orphan works,”
which has huge implications for all copyright owners.
The original bill was born in 2006 after the U.S. Copy-
right Office released a study of the problems related to using
so-called orphan works (meaning copyrighted material whose
owners are considered impossible to identify and locate);
for example, an archive of photographs owned by a museum
that lacks any identification of the copyright owner. The concern
is that fear of litigation over copyright violations keeps these
works from being shown, reproduced, and used in new
creative works by those who would be willing to get permis-
sion and pay the copyright holder—if they could find them.
Although the original bill died in subcommittee back in 2006, a
new orphan works bill was drafted in 2008.
Advocates of the bill want to be able to use these
orphaned works after performing a diligent search for the
copyright owner, without fear of having to pay punitive
damages if the copyright holder comes forward; while
opponents of the bill feel it’s an encroachment on the rights
of copyright holders. The main concern expressed by those
opposed to the bill is that it’s too easy for works to become
orphaned in this digital age, and there’s no satisfactory way
to search for and find the copyright owners.
While the fate of the bill has yet to be determined, there is a
prevailing opinion that some form of an orphaned works bill will
be passed in the future. Whatever the outcome, it’s in your best
interest to take all possible steps to keep your work from being
orphaned in the first place. Go to the U.S. Copyright Office
website (www.copyright.gov/orphan) to learn more about the
origin of the bill and complex issues surrounding it.
Pros: Reduced file size, speeds upload time, and decreases storage
demands.
Cons: Too much compression can degrade visual impact.
Verdict: Use with caution, as you don’t want to give the wrong impression.
Finding your photos in use
Okay, so you’ve registered your copyright, embedded your metadata,
applied a conspicuous (but not too obtrusive) watermark, resized
the photo to a size you feel will get the job done, applied a suitable
amount of JPEG compression, and released your photo to the wilds
of the Internet. Now what? How will you know if they’re used without
your permission? Admittedly this isn’t an easy task but there are some
interesting technology solutions available.
We already mentioned PicScout and if you’re a photographer deal-
ing with rights-managed work and not already using the service (or not
submitting work to an agency that is), you might want to consider giving
it a test drive. There are fees involved but there’s also great potential
to recoup losses on unauthorized usages. Go to www.picscout.com to
learn more.
For the rest of us, there’s an interesting alternative called TinEye
that’s currently in private beta release. This image search engine uses its
own proprietary image-recognition technology to compare your photos
against its (growing) search index of images found on the Web. TinEye
is constantly building its search index by crawling the Web and analyz-
ing each image it encounters. With more than 1 billion images already
indexed, Leila Boujnane (the co-founder and CEO of TinEye’s parent
company Idée) expects to have tens of billions of images indexed by
2009. To use this technology, you just upload a photo, paste in a link,
or use a browser plug-in to quickly search the Web to see if your image
is found. Head over to http://tineye.com to learn more and request an
invite. The days of wondering where your images are used online will
soon be over.
Putting your photos on the Web involves a series of decisions and com-
promises, but there’s a lot to be gained. While you should never put
Feat_Copywrite_SepOct08.indd 34 8/11/08 3:39:30 PM
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hen it comes to file preparation of
large-format imaging, there’s a differ-
ent mode of thinking. The traditional
rules of file dimension and resolution
used in standard offset printing don’t
necessarily apply. Where traditional
print methods have you working in
the 300-dpi (dots per inch) range, large format basically reverses
that thinking altogether. This is where a number of traditional print
designers and desktop publishers find themselves in unfamiliar
territory. There’s a common misconception that bigger files need
more resolution than normal print jobs—this is simply not true. All
this does is give you a really huge file size.
The Eye Plays Its Part
When you’re getting started on a large-format project, the very first
thing you must consider is how you got into this mess (just kidding)!
No, you must first consider the viewing distance, which is perhaps
the most critical aspect of how you go about preparing your file.
When I was working in large format several years ago, this was
always one of my first questions to the client. So let’s consider the
aspect of “viewing distance” for a moment.
The human eye is a curious and fascinating piece of biology: perhaps
one of our most sophisticated and, at the same time, one of our
most flawed organs. That’s because the human eye is easily fooled,
especially when it comes to viewing color and tones. Consider a
rainbow, for example: When you see a rainbow in the sky, it really
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Over the past several years we’ve been inundated with really
big images. They’re everywhere: billboards, buses, banners,
even on the sides of buildings. Of course, large-format print-
ing is nothing new (it’s been around for quite some time) but
it seems until recently that it was the domain of only those
with virtually unlimited advertising budgets. Even today,
while the technology has improved tremendously, the process-
and-materials cost can be very high. So, if you’re going to
venture into large-format production (or even if you just
want to get a lile more familiar with it), then you’ll want to
learn some of the basic aspects.
By Corey Barker
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Now if the image is going to be viewed from a considerable distance—
say 10' or more—then we can certainly decrease the resolution
to around 100 dpi. Now you’re looking at a 200-MB file. On some
occasions, you can go even lower than that. This is where some
designers start to get nervous, but they don’t need to worry. Just
remember that the dot size is relative to the viewing distance. The
closer your viewer will be to the image surface, the smaller the dots
need to be; the farther away he is, the larger the dots. Relative to
your eye, the dot is the same size.
Just to give you an idea, a friend of mine recently completed a
banner print that was 6x84' and he set the Photoshop file at 20 ppi
(he could get away with this because the banner was going to be
viewed from 25' or more), which resulted in a file size of approximately
85 MB. Now that’s a much more manageable size of document.
That same file at 300 ppi would create an 18-GB file!
You can also keep in mind that if you’re using Photoshop to build
your large-format file, Photoshop will only handle a maximum pixel
dimension of 300,000x300,000. And since Photoshop CS, there’s a
large-document file format designated PSB, which will support your
large files while maintaining layers, styles, etc.
What about Adobe Illustrator?
We know that Photoshop is a pixel-based application, which means
that it’s resolution-dependent (you may have heard that term before).
On the other hand, Illustrator is a vector-based application, which
means that it’s resolution-independent.
Vectors are geometric shapes based on mathematical equations,
which means that they can be scaled to virtually any size without
even the slightest loss of quality. So if you can get away with designing
for large format with all-vector art, you’ll get very high-quality art
and a very manageable file size. Here’s the caveat: This only applies
to vector art. Yes it’s true: You can import raster- or pixel-based
art into a working Illustrator file but this would be a resolution-
dependent element that will print using the resolution settings from
the original file. Also, embedding raster art in an Illustrator file will
result in a ridiculously huge file size, which will take much more
time to RIP (see “RIP What?” below). So you’ll want to use Illustrator
for sharp, clean graphics and text and Photoshop for photos and
continuous tone images.
What Do I Save the File As?
Well most typically, a TIFF or EPS file would be the preferred format
to save to, but you’ll want to contact your printer to determine
their file specs. And always save a copy. Don’t flatten your original
file and then send it to print. Always keep an editable version
somewhere. Believe me, you don’t want to have to rebuild a bus
wrap design.
Of course, if you’re looking to outsource your project to a large-
format printing company, they’ll always be happy to answer your
questions. You should always find out what type of printer they’re
using and how they want the files set up. The more they can sort
out on the front end, the less difficult the job is on the back end,
and then everyone can see the big picture.
There’s a wealth of information on large-format printing but we
could only fit a few of the basics in this article. My hope is that this
has provided a good primer for you to approach a large-format
project with a little less confusion.
Corey Barker is an Education and Curriculum Developer for the National Association
of Photoshop Professionals. His expertise in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator
has earned him numerous awards in illustration, graphic design, and photography.
RIP What?
What’s a RIP? Ah yes, the RIP. And no, it doesn’t mean,
“rest in peace,” although many professionals who use
large format probably think it should. Anyway, RIP
stands for Raster Image Processor. It’s a computer
system that’s either built into your large-format
printer or a standalone PC.
What does it do? It takes your final file and renders
it to create the final print file for your specific printer.
Because there’s a tremendous amount of data to
process, it necessitates its own system—especially
if you’re using a printer with more than the traditional
four CMYK colors. Most large-format inkjets can have
up to 12 colors, sometimes more. The RIP station
needs to basically separate all the color plates inter-
nally and tell which print heads to print where on the
substrate. So as you can probably tell, an 85-MB file
will RIP much faster than an 18-GB file.
Pixel-based art Vector-based art
LAY_LrgFormatPrinting.indd 39 8/11/08 3:13:57 PM
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isn’t there. The mist in the air from a rainstorm is bending the light
that’s passing through it (like a prism), which in turn makes the
spectrum visible. But here’s the kicker: It’s only visible to a processing
system like the human visual system, which can detect the sporadic
wavelengths of light and generate the multicolored rainbow that
we all know. The point is that our visual system is responsible for
meeting us halfway by processing and rebuilding what we see.
Everything we see in the world is merely reflected or transmitted
light. The dimension and color of objects is the result of varying
wavelengths of light that enter the eye.
Detail is lost, however, in an object seen at a great distance
because, as your angle of vision to that object becomes narrower,
the eye cannot distinguish details, and simply clumps them together.
The science of a large-format imaging exploits this visual phenom-
enon to achieve its apparent clarity.
Say you’re driving down the interstate and see a really cool
billboard with a seemingly sharp photo. You may be surprised to
know that if you stood 3' away from that billboard, you would see
that the image is made up of very large scattered dots and the image
itself is barely distinguishable. Yet from 50' or more away, it appears
sharp and colorful. Why is this? It’s because the clarity of this image
relies on the functions of the human visual system. The farther we
are from the image, the narrower our angle of vision becomes to
that image and the dots appear to combine, resulting in a sharp
image. Conversely, as we get closer to an image, we can see more
details and the dots making up the image become visible. So the
closer an image is to be viewed, the more resolution or dots per
inch (dpi) are needed to make the image appear sharp and colorful.
Try it yourself: When you’re out in the world, get really close to
a large print and examine the quality. It most likely doesn’t look
that great. Then move away and look at it from a normal viewing
distance. Simply put, the perceived resolution decreases the closer
we are, and increases as we move farther away.
It helps the large-format designer, therefore, to be aware of the
human visual system. When you find yourself in heavily populated
areas (big cities), take a really good look at the billboards, bus
wraps, and mural prints and think about where they’re located. The
production artist has considered the location and set up the file
accordingly. If a large mural print is at eye level, then it’s been
output at a higher resolution than say, a billboard that’s 100' in the
air. Yet somehow they both have the same sharpness and detail.
That’s our remarkable and flawed human eye at work.
File Preparation
So why does the preparation of files for large-format output seem
to have traditional print designers scratching their heads in perplexity?
Let’s consider how viewing distance factors into how we set up a
Photoshop file for large-format output.
Let’s say that we have a client who wants a 4x12' full-color banner
with photos and text. The first thing to consider is: Where is the final
image going to be located and how far is it going to be viewed
from? Well if it’s going to be viewed from less than 3' (like a wall
mural), then we’re going to need some detail in there—around
150–200-ppi (pixels-per-inch) Resolution. So a Photoshop file at
48x144" and 150–200-ppi will give us a file between 400 and 800 MB.
That’s a lot of data because there are so many dots in a single
square inch.
Content and Design
It isn’t just the viewing distance that needs to
be considered; it’s also the content and design
of the image. The interesting thing about large
format, especially when it comes to billboards
and vehicle wraps, is that you have only a few
seconds to grab the viewer’s attention. This
makes your design choices more critical.
Here’s what to consider:
t.FTTBHJOH What do you want to say and
what is the quickest way to say it?
t$PMPST are critical; the more contrast you have,
the more readable your image will be.
t*UTCFTUUPBWPJEDMVɆFS Don’t confuse people.
You want it simple, clear, and to the point. Just
hook ’em and incite interest. You don’t have to
pour out your entire mission statement on a
billboard. Keep it simple.
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LAY_LrgFormatPrinting.indd 38 8/11/08 3:13:33 PM
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Here, I set the shutter speed at 1/125 to prevent camera shake
and subject movement. You’ll understand why I’m telling you this
when you see the motion blur example later in this article.
STEP TWO: Turn on your flash and set it to TTL (through-the-lens,
automatic exposure). Now, on your flash (or in-camera), reduce the
flash output by –1
1
/3. Take a shot and check your camera’s LCD moni-
tor. If the subject is too dark, try setting the flash output at –1 or even

1
/2. If the subject is overexposed, reduce the flash output until you
get the correct exposure. For my daylight fill-in flash portrait, I had
my flash reduced to –1
1
/3.
Some newer digital SLRs provide darn good daylight fill-in flash
pictures when the camera is set to the Aperture Priority mode; how-
ever, the aforementioned easy method offers more control over the
scene’s lighting. If you want to darken the background, increase the
shutter speed or f-stop so less available light reaches your camera’s
sensor. The flash exposure of your subject will remain the same (as
long as you’re within the flash’s range).
If you think that using daylight fill-in flash isn’t worth the effort,
here’s an example of what happens when you don’t use a flash and
simply set your camera to Program mode and point and shoot in a
backlit situation.
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We can add to the natural look of our flash pictures by using a
diffuser over the flash. For this portrait (of the security guard at the
Ambua Lodge where our group stayed), I used the Micro Apollo
flash diffuser from Westcott (www.fjwestcott.com) that attaches to
the flash head with Velcro. A flash diffuser softens and spreads the
light, which is useful when taking wide-angle photographs.
DigitalCamera_SeptOct08.indd 43 8/11/08 2:58:45 PM

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Technically speaking, every picture in this issue of
Layers has the same main subject: light. Therefore,
when we take a picture, all we’re doing is record-
ing light. It may sound simple but in reality, it’s not
that easy. Here’s why.
Our eyes have a dynamic range of about 11 f-stops, which is
why in a high-contrast scene we can see details in shadow areas
and highlight areas aren’t washed out. Our cameras, however, don’t
“see” exactly what we see. Digital cameras have a dynamic range of
about five f-stops. Sure, we can expand that range in Photoshop—
and expand it greatly with high dynamic range (HDR) photos, as
illustrated by my Photoshop buddy Ben Willmore in his lectures,
books, and articles.
Expanding the dynamic range of an image is only one option
to getting a good exposure: compressing the contrast range of the
scene is another. Photographers basically have three techniques for
compressing the contrast range of a scene: use a diffuser to soften
shadows; use a reflector to fill in shadows; and use a flash or several
flashes to fill in shadows.
In this issue, we’ll explore using a single flash for what’s called
daylight fill-in flash photography. To illustrate the technique, I’ll
share some photographs that I took on my recent photo workshop
to Papua New Guinea. The photographs were taken with my Canon
EOS-1Ds Mark III, Canon 24–105mm IS zoom, Canon 580EX II flash,
and Canon ST-E2 wireless transmitter.
Cbmbodjoh!mjhiu
Check out the picture of a Huli Wigman that opens this column. It
doesn’t look like a flash picture because the light from the flash is
balanced to the ambient (available) light. Actually, that’s my goal
when I take flash pictures (indoors and out): I try to balance the
light so my pictures don’t look like flash pictures—pictures with
harsh shadows.
Following is the simple technique, illustrated with three pictures
I took of a woman who lives in a remote village on the Sepik River.
STEP ONE: Set your camera on Manual and adjust the shutter
speed and f-stop for the correct exposure of the background or
surrounding area. As illustrated in this backlit picture, the back-
ground will be correctly exposed but the subject will usually be too
dark. Keep in mind that the brighter the background, the darker
the subject.
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DigitalCamera_SeptOct08.indd 42 8/11/08 2:57:57 PM

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Rick Sammon’s newest book, Face to Face: The Complete Guide to Photographing People, offers more tips on daylight fill-in flash pictures. Rick’s “On Location Photography”
class on Kelby Training (www.kelbytraining.com) also touches on this all-important topic.
[ [
ALL IMAGES BY RICK SAMMON
An essential accessory for the serious daylight fill-in flash shooter is
a wireless transmitter. A transmitter fits in the hot-shoe of the camera
and triggers a flash (or flashes) remotely. One advantage of wireless
flash photography is that you have more control over where the light
from the flash falls (i.e., the direction of the light). In this example,
taken during a sing-sing (local festival), I positioned the flash high
above my head so that the light from the flash didn’t overexpose the
foreground elements (the shoulders of other Huli Wigmen).
Of course, the motion blur picture was not my first attempt to
create this effect during the photo session. I had to experiment with
different slow shutter speeds and moving the camera at different
speeds to get the desired effect. If you like this technique, plan on
taking more than a few shots to get just the effect you want.
As you can tell, I’m big fan of daylight fill-in flash. In fact, I never
leave home without two flashes and two wireless transmitters because
I always want backups.
I’m also a big fan of Papua New Guinea, mainly because the
country offers unlimited on-location portrait opportunities. I’m not a
big fan, however, of the travel time to and from Papua New Guinea:
basically 2.5 days each way. What’s more, the malaria medicine
(mefloquine) produces very strange dreams, and Imodium A-D kinda
dries you out. It’s great fun being a travel photographer!
We can also use daylight fill-in flash
to add a sense of motion and drama
to a still picture. In the sharp shot of
the Huli Wigman warrior at the right
(he’s actually a nice guy!), I used a
shutter speed of 1/125 to ensure no
subject blur. In the motion blur shot
(honestly not created with the Motion
Blur filter in Photoshop), I set the shut-
ter speed to 1/15 and, just before I took
the picture, started to move the camera
from left to right.
DigitalCamera_SeptOct08.indd 44 8/11/08 2:59:29 PM
Q;H7I;7:@KIJC;DJIS
So what exactly is Flow? Recently, someone described Flow as “Flow-
pacity,” alluding to the idea that Flow works like Flow+Opacity in
Photoshop. In technical terms, Flow controls the rate of application of
the adjustment, and controlling Flow is essential for making seamless
adjustments. Therefore, you can use a low Flow amount and then
paint back and forth to build up the effect for a more natural look. In
this example, a low Flow amount of 25 was chosen and additional
brushstrokes of the darkening effect were progressively painted in
from left to right.
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The Adjustment Brush is smart too. The Auto Mask option proves
that the Adjustment Brush truly is the “sharpest tool in the shed.”
This time, we made the same adjustment in both images but the
Auto Mask limits the adjustment to a specific area. When you turn
on Auto Mask, Lightroom analyzes the area of the image that you’re
painting based on color, tone, contrast, edges, and more. It then
proceeds to limit the adjustment to that area. While this example is
specific, keep in mind that Auto Mask works incredibly well with all
of the different effects!
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The brush Density controls the overall intensity, or transparency, of
the effect. Think of this control as the “Boss” that has the final say in
the matter. For example, if you have a low Flow amount and paint
brushstrokes multiple times (as in the previous step), you can only
build up the effect as high as the Density control, which “trumps” or
determines all of the other controls’ overall strength. In this example,
the Size, Feather, and Flow are identical. The only difference is that
the Density is lower on the left and higher on the right.
Wondering how the effect in the previous photograph of Russell
Brown was accomplished? Actually, it was quite simple using the
Adjustment Brush. Decrease the Saturation to –100 and increase
the brush Size, Flow, and Density to 100. Paint the entire image
to desaturate it. Next, click on Auto Mask, click the Erase button,
choose an appropriate brush Size, and paint to erase the desatu-
ration (i.e., bring back the color). While this illustrates how you can
erase any of the effects you’ve added, most often you’ll use the
Erase option to clean up or back off the effect rather than take it
out completely.
Brush Strokes
Flow Amount 25
Same Brush, Same Effect —Lowered Exposure. Different Amount of Brush Strokes.
2 4 6 8 10
Auto Mask On
Auto Mask Off
LightroomTut_JulyAug08.indd 45 8/11/08 2:42:19 PM
Begin by navigating to the Develop module and selecting the
Adjustment Brush (K) from the Toolbar that’s located just below
the Histogram. To become familiar with the brush, select an effect
from the Effect pop-up menu. You can “add” to the effect by
modifying any of the sliders below (if you see + and – icons, click
the Show Effect Sliders button to the right). Position the cursor
over the image and you’ll see three concentric circles. The cross-
hair circle reveals the center painting area; the next brighter circle
denotes the brush size; and the final lighter circle reveals the
extent of the brush feathering.
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Now that you’ve been introduced to the Adjustment Brush, let’s
learn how to control and work with the brush Size and Feather. You
can change the Size and Feather with the slider controls (shown
in Step 1), but since this is a tool that you’ll use frequently, you’ll
want to learn these shortcuts: press the Left Bracket key ([) on the
keyboard to decrease the brush Size and the Right Bracket key (])
to increase the Size. Press Shift-[ to decrease Feather and Shift-]
to increase the Feather.
QMEHA?D=M?J>I?P;7D:<;7J>;HS
! mpdbm!dpouspm
There’s a groundswell of excitement surrounding the new local correction tools (Adjustment Brush and Graduated
Filter) that are now included in Lightroom 2—and rightly so! These new tools can make nondestructive corrections and
enhancements to specific areas of your image. Not only do they provide new raw processing functionality, they also dra-
matically speed up your workflow, as there’s no render or save time, and they don’t significantly increase the file size.
Feather - 0
Feather - 100
Adjustment Brush Pin
LightroomTut_JulyAug08.indd 44 8/11/08 2:41:38 PM
Burning refers to the traditional darkroom technique of darken-
ing an area of an image to create visual interest. The composition
of this image is good, but the sky needs to be darkened. While
there are different ways to accomplish this, let’s use the Adjust-
ment Brush with Auto Mask turned on (so that the hills won’t be
affected). Decrease Exposure and Brightness, and slightly increase
Contrast. Using a medium-sized brush, with a medium amount of
Feather and Flow, paint back and forth across the sky. (We painted
the fields in this example as well.)
|uuun¡nq ìou oouran¡nq}|
I used the Adjustment Brush to clean up the wall in the background
of this photograph of my wife and daughter. The Adjustment Pin
on the image not only shows where the painting began but it’s
also dynamic. Hover your cursor over the pin to view a mask of the
affected area, or hover over the pin and click-and-drag to the left
or right to decrease or increase the effect, respectively. Finally, to
delete the effect, click on the pin and press Delete (PC: Backspace).
(Note: To add additional Adjustment Pins, click the New button and
begin painting in a different area.)
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Dodging refers to the traditional darkroom technique of brighten-
ing an area of an image. Being able to do this from right inside
Lightroom is freeing, as it’s something that we need to do quite fre-
quently. In this image, the natural light was soft, but the eyes were
too dark. After increasing the Exposure, Brightness, and Contrast
(increasing Contrast is key because when you brighten something,
it tends to lose contrast), we used a relatively small brush with a
medium amount of Feather and a low Flow amount.
The Adjustment Brush can be used to work with color in really unique
ways. While this tip is creative, keep in mind that the technique
can also be used to correct color problems. To modify or change
the color of an area in an image, it’s most important to lower the
Saturation amount to –100, choose a color from the Color swatch,
then paint over the image to change the color. For more subtle color
effects, use a higher Saturation and a less saturated color.
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Adjustment Pin
Before
After
Before
After
continued on p. 48
LightroomTut_JulyAug08.indd 46 8/12/08 10:38:45 AM
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Chris Orwig, photographer and author, is on the photography faculty at the Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara, California. His publications include a number of best-selling Lightroom
and Photoshop training titles at Lynda.com as well as his books, Adobe Photoshop CS3 How-Tos: 100 Essential Techniques and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom How-Tos: 100 Essential
Techniques by Adobe Press. For more inspiration, visit his website at www.chrisorwig.com.
Q S
The Adjustment Brush can be used to make a wide range of special-
ized image enhancements, such as teeth brightening and whiten-
ing. To whiten teeth, we’ll follow similar steps as illustrated above
to modify color. First, change the Color back to white, then lower
the Saturation but be careful not to lower it too far as it will result in
colorless or lifeless looking teeth. Increase the Exposure, Brightness,
and Contrast as needed. Turn on Auto Mask and use a small brush
size with a low Flow to paint in the effect.
Q9h[Wj[W<_bc<hWc[S
Clarity adds extra midtone contrast to your photos. Think of it as
adding more dimension or shape to the image—it has the poten-
tial to make a subtle improvement that helps photos pop. First,
select the Adjustment Brush and choose Clarity from the Effect
menu. Choose a medium brush Size, a high Feather, and a low
Flow. Paint back and forth in the image where it needs more punch
until you’ve built up enough Clarity. Press the Backslash key (\) to
toggle the before/after view of the image. To better illustrate the
effect of Clarity, this graphic has Clarity painted on the top half.
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Recently, I photographed Ben Harper, the musician, and at the show,
another photographer asked Ben to smile. He responded, “I smile
with my eyes.” I thought that was a perfect answer, because the
eyes tell us so much about a person. That’s why it often helps to add
sharpening to the eyes. Select the Adjustment Brush and choose
Sharpness from the Effect menu. Choose a small brush Size, a
medium Feather, and a low Flow. Paint in the sharpness on the eyes
and the surrounding face.
')
Softening skin can subtly enhance a person’s photograph, but
over-softened skin can create a fake look. You can easily accomplish
subtle yet significant skin softening with the Adjustment Brush.
Select Soften Skin from the Effect menu and then choose a brush
Size and Feather amount that’s large enough to cover the skin area
but not affect areas that need to be sharp, such as the hair or eyes.
Typically, it works best to use a medium-to-high Feather. Next,
choose a low Flow amount like 20 and turn off Auto Mask. Paint in
the softening effect with multiple brush strokes.
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Before
After
after
before
Before
After
ALL IMAGES BY CHRIS ORWIG UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
LightroomTut_JulyAug08.indd 48 8/12/08 10:39:49 AM
Choose Image>Canvas Size. Use the Anchor grid to determine
where the original image will be placed in relation to the added
canvas. In this example, let’s mirror the image on the left side of the
original, so click the right center square to denote this as the posi-
tion of the original image. Uncheck the Relative box (if it’s checked),
and change the units for the Width to Percent (the Height will
change as well). Enter 200% for the Width if you’re mirroring to
the left or right (as is the case with our image) or 200% for the
Height if you’re mirroring the image above or below, and click OK.
For this image, we’ll also apply a Shadow/Highlight adjustment. In
order to preserve flexibility and keep our changes nondestructive,
we’ll first convert the two layers into a smart object. Click on the
bottom layer in the Layers panel, then Shift-click on the top layer to
select both of them. Open the flyout menu for the Layers panel and
choose Convert to Smart Object.
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After adding the extra canvas area, make sure the top duplicate layer
is active and choose Edit>Transform>Flip Horizontal (use Flip Vertical
if the reflected layer will be placed above or below). Choose the Move
tool (V), press-and-hold the Shift key, and drag the flipped layer into
position to create the mirror effect. If the Snap feature is enabled
under the View menu, the edges of the two layers should snap into
alignment. You may need to zoomin for a close view to ensure that the
edges line up well. With the Move tool active, you can nudge the layer
one pixel at a time using the Arrow keys on the keyboard.
Since the layers that create the mirror effect are grouped into a smart
object, we can apply the Shadow/Highlight effect as a smart filter.
This gives us adjustment layer-type functionality, which means the
change isn’t permanent, allowing us to revisit the settings if needed.
Choose Image>Adjustments>Shadow/Highlight and click the Show
More Options checkbox. For both the Shadows and the Highlights,
set the Amount and Tonal Width to 40% and the Radius to 90 px.
Click OK to complete the image.
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Before
After
PSTutPhotographers_SepOct08.indd 51 8/11/08 2:24:14 PM

Some of the most simple, yet very satisfying types of collages are image “mirrors” that are created by duplicat-
ing the image and flipping it to form a reflection. Landscapes, clouds, natural patterns and textures, as well as
architectural structures all work very well as image mirrors. Along the way, we’ll also use smart objects and smart
filters, and then finish up with a tip on using gradient masks to create reflections on polished surfaces.
Cropping the file prior to the mirroring process is not required, but
for some photos it can produce a more interesting reflected image,
and it’s always good to keep this in mind. For the Mono Lake
example used here, I decided to crop it as shown since I knew this
would result in a mirror where the tufa formations would look more
like an island. Study your own images to see if cropping will result in
more intriguing results. The more you play around with image mir-
rors, the easier it will be to see the possibilities that a certain crop
might provide.
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Start by opening an image you want to use for a mirror, or you can
download the Mono Lake file from the Layers website (if you do
use the Mono Lake image, crop it as shown in the previous step).
Double-click on the Background layer. Click OK in the New Layer
dialog that appears to turn it into a regular layer. Next, make a copy
of the layer by choosing Layer>New>Layer via Copy, or by using the
very useful keyboard shortcut Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J).
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[If you’d like to download the images used in this tutorial to practice these techniques, visit www.layersmagazine.comand navigate to the Magazine section. All files are for personal use only.]
njssps-!njssps!
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PSTutPhotographers_SepOct08.indd 50 8/11/08 2:23:36 PM
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Seán Duggan is co-author of The Creative Digital Darkroom and Photoshop Artistry. He teaches regular workshops on Photoshop and Lightroom for photographers. Sign up for his free
digital darkroom newsletter at his website, www.seanduggan.com. Q S
Reflections on polished surfaces are stronger and brighter the closer
they are to the object. To further fine-tune the reflection, we’ll add
a layer mask and use the Gradient tool (G) to feather the “lighting”
on the reflection. Click the Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom of
the Layers panel to add a layer mask to the top layer (the reflection).
Choose the Gradient tool and in the Gradient Picker in the Options
Bar, select the third swatch to set the gradient to Black, White. In the
Options Bar, make sure the style is set to Linear Gradient, the Mode
to Normal, the Opacity to 100%, and Reverse is not checked.
Choose View>Screen Mode>Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar.
Zoom out (Command-–PC: Ctrl-–]) to see the entire image sur-
rounded by the gray canvas. With the Gradient tool active, click
below the image in the gray area and Shift-drag a line up to the
top clock. Let go between the number 6 and the center point of
the clock (see illustration). The gradient in the mask now creates a
feathering effect so the brightness of the reflection fades out as it
moves away from the clock.
As a final step, let’s add an adjustment layer to color the reflection
a cool tone to suggest that the clock is resting on a colored surface.
To do this so it only affects the reflection layer, hold down Option
(PC: Alt), click the Create New Adjustment Layer icon at the bottom
of the Layers panel, and choose Curves. In the New Layer dialog,
click the checkbox for Use Previous Layer to Create Clipping Mask,
and click OK. In the Curves dialog, choose the Blue channel and
drag the lower part of the curve up a bit to add a blue cast to the
image. Click OK to complete the reflection.
The clock in this example was photographed on a black cloth back-
ground and cast no reflection, but it’s very simple to add one. The
basic steps are essentially the same as the image mirror shown in the
previous steps (the one difference is the addition of extra canvas area
that’s black). Since we have already covered that, I have jump-started
the process and prepared a clock file with a reflection layer already in
position. To make the reflection more realistic, lower the Opacity of
the reflection layer in the Layers panel to 50%.
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ALL IMAGES BY SEÁN DUGGAN UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
PSTutPhotographers_SepOct08.indd 52 8/11/08 2:25:28 PM
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Hold down Command (PC: Ctrl) and click on the rounded square
layer thumbnail in the Layers panel to select it. Press Command-
Option-T (PC: Ctrl-Alt-T) to activate Free Transform—with a twist:
The Option (PC: Alt) key tells Free Transform to make a copy of the
original. Hold down Shift and drag the copy of the square to the
right as shown. Press Return (PC: Enter), but don’t deselect.
Hold down Command (PC: Ctrl) and click on the layer thumbnail
to select all of the rounded squares on that layer. Press Command-
Option-T (PC: Ctrl-Alt-T) to copy the row of squares and enter Free
Transform. Hold down Shift and drag the line of squares down
until they’re the appropriate distance form the first row of squares.
Press Return (PC: Enter) and then press Shift-Command-Option-T
(PC: Shift-Ctrl-Alt-T) to make additional copies equally spaced
apart. Press Command-D (Ctrl-D) to deselect.
Press Shift-Command-Option-T (PC: Shift-Ctrl-Alt-T) to make addi-
tional copies of the square the same distance apart. Press the same
shortcut repeatedly until you get the number of copies that you
require. (Because the square was selected, all the copies appear
on the same layer.)
This technique can be used for a variety of objects. Create a new
layer, switch to the Ellipse tool, choose a gray color, hold the Shift
key, and draw a circle at the intersection of the four top left squares.
Then use the same method to make multiple copies: Select the
circle, press Command-Option-T (PC: Ctrl-Alt-T), drag while holding
Shift, and press Return (PC: Enter). Next, press Shift-Command-
Option-T (PC: Shift-Ctrl-Alt-T) to make additional copies. After
you’ve made all of your copies, drag the layer of circles below the
layer of squares in the Layers panel.
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PSforDesignersTut_SepOct08.indd 55 8/11/08 11:45:17 AM

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Although it’s not a layout tool, Photoshop does have a very powerful step-and-repeat function—if you know
just a couple of tricks. Once you learn these tricks, you can create a whole series of evenly spaced objects in
no time at all.
First, open a new (File>New), 16x12" document at 72 ppi. Click
on the Foreground color swatch in the Toolbox, choose a color for
your background (in this example, R:98, G:109, B:139), and click
OK. Press Option-Delete (PC: Alt-Backspace) to fill the Background
layer with your new color. Click the Create A New Layer icon at the
bottom of the Layers panel to add a new layer. Choose a different
color and use the Rounded Rectangle tool set to Fill Pixels in the
Options Bar to create your first shape. (Our shape is 2.75x2.75"
and R:65, G:36, B:40.)
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PSforDesignersTut_SepOct08.indd 54 8/12/08 10:44:13 AM
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Click on the squares layer in the Layers panel to make it active, and
use the Magic Wand tool (W) to select the top-left square. Hold
down Shift and click on the three surrounding squares to add them
to the selection. Open a photo, press Command-A (PC: Ctrl-A)
to select it, press Command-C (PC: Ctrl-C) to copy it, and then
switch back to the layout document. From the Edit menu, select
Paste Into—this will create a layer mask in the shape of the selected
squares. Press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) for Free Transform to scale
the pasted photo to fit. Repeat this operation to add photos to
different squares.
Dave Cross is Senior Developer, Education and Curriculum, for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals. He is the author of Photoshop Finishing Touches and The Photoshop
CS2 Help Desk Book, and is featured on a series of Photoshop training DVDs. Q S
Q7::=H7F>?9IM?J>F7IJ;?DJES
Add text and ornamental graphics to finish the layout.

If you need to space objects numerically, such as spacing
lines 50 pixels apart, try this: On a new layer, use the Line
tool to add a line at the very top of the document (hold
the Shift key to keep it horizontal). From the View menu,
choose New Guide. In the New Guide dialog, click
Horizontal and then in the Position field, enter the distance
you want for the spacing between all the lines. (The dialog
defaults to inches [in] but you can type “px” after the
number to measure in pixels.) Click OK. Now we’ll use the
same method to create and transform multiple copies.
1. Hold down Command (PC: Ctrl) and click on the layer
thumbnail to select the line.
2. Press Command-Option-T (PC: Ctrl-Alt-T) to activate Free
Transform(with a copy).
3. Holding Shift, drag the line until it snaps to the guide
(make sure View>Snap is turned on).
4. Press Return (PC: Enter) and then Shift-Command-Option-T
(PC: Shift-Ctrl-Alt-T) to make additional lines spaced
50 pixels apart.
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PSforDesignersTut_SepOct08.indd 56 8/11/08 11:46:20 AM
Press Command-C (PC: Ctrl-C) then Command-V (PC: Ctrl-V) to create
a duplicate of the type. Move the duplicate off to the side for now.
Select the original type and set a really thick 30-point black stroke.
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If Illustrator is already open, quit and restart it to load the new font.
Otherwise, go ahead and launch Illustrator. Select the Type tool (T),
click on the artboard, and type “GOIN’ RETRO.” With the text
selected, go to the Font pop-up menu in the Control panel and
look for the SF Groove Machine Extended font. Set the Font Size to
about 150 pt and set the Fill to black. Switch to the Selection tool (V),
go under the Type menu, and choose Create Outlines. Ungroup
the text (Shift-Command-G [PC: Shift-Ctrl-G]) and reposition as you
see here. Then regroup by selecting all the objects and pressing
Command-G (PC: Ctrl-G).
Go under the Object menu and choose Expand. Make sure that
Stroke is the only thing checked in the Expand dialog and click
OK. This will turn that thick stroke into a regular shape. You can
see the original shape of the text as well. We need to combine
the text and the expanded stroke into one shape, so go under
the Window menu and choose Pathfinder. With all the objects
selected (excluding the duplicate object, of course), Option-Click
(PC: Alt-Click) the Add to Shape icon in the Shape Modes section
of the Pathfinder panel.
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Q;NF7D:IJHEA;19EC8?D;I>7F;IS
With the Select tool, select both the shape you just created and the
duplicate text that you created in Step 4. In the Control panel, click
the Horizontal Align Center icon and then the Vertical Align Center
icon to center the duplicate in front of the larger, original shape.
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IllustratorTut_SepOct08.indd 59 8/11/08 11:49:53 AM

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Okay, I admit it. I’m a retro fan. In fact, I caught myself watching I Love the 70s on VH1 just recently and was
inspired yet again. So this time around, let’s launch Illustrator and take our own trip back in time. Groovy!
First, we have to start with the right font. For that we’ll turn to
one of my favorite sites: www.DaFont.com. Once on the site, enter
the word “groove” in the Search field, and click the Search button.
When the Groove Machine font shows up, click the download button
to the right. Notice you can download both Mac and PC versions.
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Next, you need to install the font into your system. To do this you
can either simply double-click the icon for each font and follow
the onscreen instructions (PC: Right-click and choose Install), or if
you use a font-management tool, go through the normal steps to
activate the font.
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IllustratorTut_SepOct08.indd 58 8/11/08 11:49:19 AM
Now that we have our shape, we need color. For this, we’re going to
use the built-in Kuler feed. Go under the Window menu to Adobe
Labs and choose Kuler. Click the Accept button in the resulting
dialog and the Kuler panel will appear. We’re looking for retro colors,
so enter “70s” in the Search field. You’ll see a number of seventies-
style color schemes. Simply choose one (we chose 70s Purple) and
click the Add to Swatches icon at the bottom of the Kuler panel.
This will put that set of swatches in your Swatches panel.
Now select the background shape and copy-and-paste a dupli-
cate like you did in Step 4. Double-click the Scale tool (S) in
the Toolbox and set the Scale in the Uniform section to 25%.
Make sure that the Scale Strokes & Effects option is checked
on and click OK.
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This is where you can get a little creative with the color. You can
either use the same color scheme shown here or experiment
with your own combinations. To apply a color, simply select
either the duplicate text in the front or the larger shape in back
and click on one of the new swatches in your Swatches panel
(make sure that you’re applying it to the Fill and not the Stroke).
For the background shape, we also added a new 10-point
stroke set to a bright pink.
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.
Position this shape in the upper right above the original shape.
We’re going to apply a blend, and we want the blend to appear
behind the original shape, so go under the Object menu to Arrange
and choose Send to Back.
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continued on p. 62
IllustratorTut_SepOct08.indd 60 8/11/08 11:50:50 AM
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Corey Barker is an Education and Curriculum Developer for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals. His expertise in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator has earned him
numerous awards in illustration, graphic design, and photography. Q S
To apply a blend, first select both the original background shape
along with the smaller duplicate. Double-click the Blend tool (W) in
the Toolbox. Select Specified Steps from the Spacing pop-up menu
and set the number of steps to 20. Click OK. Then press Option-
Command-B (PC: Alt-Ctrl-B) to apply the blend.
One last thing: Grab the Direct Selection tool (the white arrow
tool) and select just the small shape. Double-click the Rotate
tool in the Toolbox to bring up the Rotate dialog. Enter –90˚ for
the Angle and click OK. There you have it. Oh, we also added a
groovy disco girl for a final touch using the same Fill and Stroke
as the background shape. Groovy!
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Groovy Rock
Radio!
Groovy Rock
Radio!
IllustratorTut_SepOct08.indd 62 8/11/08 11:51:38 AM
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one’s going to think they’re hand-drawn when they see identical
consecutive letters, such as the “m,” “e,” or “l” in this ad. Making
them look different is a first priority.
Let’s start with the two “m’s” in Summer. For the first “m,” we
used the InDesign text Control panel tools to squeeze its width
(Horizontal Scale to 82%), raise the Baseline Shift 2 points above the
baseline, and give it a slight slant (Skew) of 2°.
For the second “m,” we’ll go in the opposite direction, bumping
up its Font Size a bit, sinking it 1 point below the baseline, and
using a backslant of –1°. To make it chunkier, we used the Stroke
panel (Window>Stroke) to add a 0.4-point (Weight) black stroke to
surround the character.
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For letters that consist mostly of vertical strokes (A, l, r, in this type-
face, at least), you can simply make their set width greater. But this
doesn’t work for letters with strong horizontals (E and e, for example)
because horizontal strokes keep their original weight while the
verticals get wider or narrower. Character proportions can become
seriously distorted.
Making characters bolder is easier, because you can use the
Stroke panel to add an outline to them. But you can’t apply a stroke
to an editable character that will make it thinner unless you first
convert the character to outlines, using the Type>Create Outlines
command. At this point, if you select the character outline, you can
now choose how to apply your stroke in the Stroke panel: to the
outside of the character’s outline (Align Stroke to Outside), centered
along that outline (not too useful in this instance), or inside its out-
line (see “Stroked”).
To create a thinner version of a character, convert it to outlines,
then apply a white (or “paper”-colored) stroke, and click the Align
Stroke to Inside icon in the Stroke panel. This has the effect of trim-
ming down the thickness of the character’s stroke by the weight of
the stroke you’ve chosen. Note that this “paper”-colored stroke will
only be invisible against a paper-colored (read, white) background;
against any colored background it will apper white.
Varying the baseline is another way to knock the stiffness out of
type, even if, like Impress, it’s pretty loosey-goosey already. The idea is
to use baseline shift to push selected characters up or down. A random
wobble is best rather than any patterned or calculated alternation.
Bojnbuf!uif!mjof
InDesign also lets you skew characters to give them a fake italic or
oblique slant. Using a negative value (add a hyphen before your
numeric value) creates what’s called a backslant. Again, the light
touch is the right touch—the variation you’re after is that which
you’d find in the range of normal informal hand lettering.
Rotating individual characters also helps animate the line and
knock some of the stiffness out of the setting. We did this to the
two “l’s” in the word “All,” with the first “l” leaning to the left and
the second to the right. Alas, InDesign can’t rotate individual
characters—you have to convert them to outlines first. Illustrator
can perform this trick, however, from within the Character panel.
Even in a whacky setting like this, spacing is crucial, and you’ll
James Felici is the author of The Complete Manual of Typography (Adobe Press), former managing editor of Publish magazine, and contributor to The Seybold Report, Macworld magazine,
PDFZone.com, and Publish.com. [ ]
notice our sample is heavily kerned. That’s because characters that
have been converted to outlines lose their side bearings, so they need
to be kerned to loosen up their spacing. Happily, when it comes to
kerning, InDesign doesn’t distinguish between normal characters and
those that have been converted to outlines.
B!xpse!pg!xbsojoh
All of the above shenanigans are best performed on informal faces,
such as those that mimic handwriting (for example, Tekton or Comic
Sans) or brush-painted letters (such as Dom Casual, or Flash). Avoid
using these techniques with script faces that have connecting letters
because variations in stroke weight will seem out of place. And by
all means, don’t apply them to text faces, because the result will
make a big mess, and I refuse to be held responsible. Here’s our
finished type in a poster.
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InDesign can add a stroke to the outline of typeset charac-
ters that can be additive or subtractive. In this example, a
lowercase Helvetica Bold “x” (top) has been stroked in three
ways. The middle row shows in red the stroke position when
it’s aligned outside the character outline (left), centered along
the outline (center), and inside the outline (right).
The lower-left sample has been stroked on the outside with
black, making the character appear bolder. The lower-right
sample has been stroked on the inside with white, making the
character appear thinner (Note: This only works on a white back-
ground.) The blue lines indicate the characters’ original baselines.
©
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Typefaces that imitate freestyle lettering aren’t
usually very convincing. But a little creative
“tweakery” can create a fresh and unique look
to your informal type.
When it comes to setting type, I’m generally a law-abiding citi-
zen…but not this issue. This time we’re going to break sacred rules,
abuse glyphs, and toss logical alignment to the wind. Everything
will be eyeballed, and any resemblance to graphic coherence will
be strictly coincidental. The goal? To try to simulate a hand-lettered
look with an off-the-shelf font, to produce a subtle lack of consis-
tency so the characters don’t look like the cookie-cutter shapes
they really are.
Bmufs!tibqft!boe!psjfoubujpot
InDesign and Illustrator give you several ways to alter the shapes
and orientations of individual characters, and by combining these,
you can create the impression that every character is unique. Here’s
a list of the controls we used to customize the sample type:
º Fonr Size (Conrrol ponel)
º verricol Scole (¦nDesiqn÷Conrrol ponel, ¦llusrroror÷C|orocrer ponel)
º Horizonrol Scole (¦nDesiqn÷Conrrol ponel, ¦llusrroror÷C|orocrer ponel)
º S|ew (Conrrol ponel, ¦nDesiqn only)
º Boseline S|ilr (¦nDesiqn÷Conrrol ponel, ¦llusrroror÷C|orocrer ponel)
º Srro|e: 6loc| ourline ro lorren, w|ire inline ro slim down (Srro|e ponel)
º Rorore (¦nDesiqn÷Rororion rool in r|e Tool6ox, ¦llusrroror÷C|orocrer
Rororion in r|e C|orocrer ponel)
T|e "6elore" disploy rype (s|own |ere) |os 6een ser in Bir-
stream’s Impress, a face designed to look like freehand commercial
brush lettering. But as loose and free as the letterforms are, no
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ArtofType_SeptOct08.indd 64 8/11/08 1:27:27 PM
Q9H;7J;HEBBEL;HIJ7J;IS
Using the same method as Step 2, we can create an email link in
our PDF. Instead of typing in a Web address that would typically
start with http://www.someaddress.com, we simply type in some-
thing like mailto:person@emailaddress.com. This will then link to
the reader’s default email software when clicked. The New Hyper-
link dialog also has some Appearance options. In this case, we
don’t want the email link to have a box around it or an underline,
so we’ll select Invisible Rectangle from the Type pop-up menu in
this Appearance section, then click OK.
Q9H;7J;F:<8EEAC7HAIS Q9H;7J;7D;C7?BB?DAS
Q9EDL;HJJED7L?=7J?ED8KJJEDIS
Select the object you want to convert into a button. You can select
an imported graphic, an object you drew in InDesign, or a text
frame. In our document, we’re using the navigation buttons that
reside on the master page. The buttons are a single, placed Illustra-
tor file with multiple layers for different rollover states. Choose
Object>Interactive>Convert to Button. If you’re in Normal View
mode, InDesign identifies the button onscreen with a small button
icon on the frame. (Note: If you can’t see the button icon, try going
to View>Show Frame Edges.)
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PDF bookmarks make it easy for viewers to quickly navigate through
a document. Here’s how to create them in InDesign. Use the Pages
panel to go to the page that you wish to create a bookmark for
and then choose Window>Interactive>Bookmarks. Click the New
Bookmark icon at the bottom of the Bookmarks panel. Rename it by
selecting it in the panel and typing the new name.
Note: Bookmarks can also be generated automatically in InDesign
if you’re taking advantage of the Table of Contents feature (found
under the Layout menu).
Choose Window>Interactive>States. The States panel contains
only the Up state, which is the default state for a button. In order
to change its appearance, we’ll need to create another state. Click
the Create New Optional State icon at the bottom of the States
panel. InDesign adds a Rollover state to the panel. If you click the
same icon again, InDesign adds a Down state to the panel. Don’t
forget to repeat this for each button and then give each button a
sensible name at the top of the States panel. In this case for navi-
gation, we chose Next, Home, and Back.
IndesignTut_SepOct08.indd 67 8/11/08 2:19:41 PM

Setting up master pages for your portfolio is a great idea and it
allows you to include items such as corporate branding, as well as
navigation buttons and hyperlinks so they’ll appear on each page.
In InDesign CS3, master page items are always in the back of
objects on regular pages so, to overcome this, place master page
items on their own layer. We can also easily recognize items on the
master pages, because frame edges are displayed as a dotted line,
rather than solid. Using master pages is also going to make your
document easy to update later.
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InDesign has a Hyperlinks panel, so you can work with hyperlinks
the way you work with links, layers, and other features. Open the
Hyperlinks panel (Window>Interactive>Hyperlinks), select the
object you want to be the button (make sure you’re on the master
page if it’s a master page item), then click the Create New Hyperlink
icon at the bottom of the panel (or choose New Hyperlink from
the flyout menu). In this case, we’ll select URL as the Type and
then type in our URL. This is a great way of creating a basic link to
your website from a PDF.
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dsfbuf!bo!joufsbdujwf!qpsugpmjp!
Supplying your portfolio in printed form is so last century. Everybody who’s anybody is using PDF as the means
to deliver their portfolios. So let’s learn not only how to create an easy-to-email PDF but how to make it interac-
tive as well—with navigation buttons and even movies!
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IndesignTut_SepOct08.indd 66 8/11/08 2:19:09 PM
Our buttons won’t be any good unless we can get them to actually
do something. Anyone clicking the Back button expects to go to
the previous page, so let’s set it up that way. Choose Button Options
fromthe States panel flyout menu then click the Behaviors tab in the
Button Options dialog. For the Event, we chose Mouse Up, so the
Behavior will occur when the mouse button is released after clicking.
And, because this is the Back button, for the Behavior we chose Go
To Previous Page. Click Add and then OK. Choose the appropriate
Behavior for each button.
Q7II?=D8;>7L?EHIS
Initially, each state is identical, but there isn’t much point in having
different states if the button doesn’t give any feedback. Select the
Rollover state for our button in the States panel, then use the Direct
Selection tool (A) to select the button on the page. At this point we
simply need to change the button’s appearance and we can do this
in a variety of ways. In this case, we selected Object>Object Layer
Options and chose a different layer to be visible from our placed
Adobe Illustrator file. To see how your button works, select each
state in the States panel. Repeat for each button.
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You place a movie in an InDesign document just the way you’d
place any other file. Choose File>Place, and then select the movie
file—QuickTime, AVI, and MPEG. (QuickTime 6.0 or later is required.)
Click where you want the movie to appear. Select the movie with the
Selection tool (V) and choose Object>Interactive>Movie Options to
set play options. Check the Play on Page Turn box to play the movie
automatically when a viewer turns to that page in the PDF file. You can
also provide buttons that will control it (Show Controller During Play).
Click OK.
Let’s create a hidden information field; for example, when the cursor
rolls over an image, the related text should appear next to it. First,
we need to convert the related text frame to a button. Select the text
frame with the Selection tool, and choose Object>Interactive>Convert
to Button and give it a descriptive name in the States panel. By default,
this button should be invisible. We only want it to show when some-
one moves the cursor over the graphic related to it. So choose Button
Options fromthe States panel flyout menu. In the General tab, choose
Hidden fromthe Visibility in PDF pop-up menu and click OK.
Q9H;7J;>?::;D<?;B:IS
/ '&
continued on p. 70
The board is a fantastically versatile
board that can be ridden as well
backwards as it can be forwards.
Designed by Birthday Boy
IndesignTut_SepOct08.indd 68 8/11/08 2:21:03 PM
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Now we need to convert the related graphic to a button as well, so
select it with the Selection tool and choose Object>Interactive>
Convert to Button. This will be the button that triggers the hidden
text. Open the Button Options dialog again and click the Behav-
iors tab. Choose Mouse Enter for the Event, because we want the
Behavior to occur whenever the mouse cursor enters the button
area, then choose Show/Hide Fields from the Behavior pop-up
menu. Don’t click OK yet.
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This is where you really appreciate good naming conventions.
Click next to the name of the button you want to reveal when
someone rolls over the graphic; an Eye icon appears next to it.
Now the field we named “googgy egg” will show when the cursor
enters the button area. Click the Add button, then select Mouse
Exit for the Event and Show/Hide Fields for Behavior. Click the
box twice next to the same button name and a red slash appears
through the Eye icon. Now when the cursor leaves the button
area, the text field will disappear. Click Add, then click OK.
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When you’re done, it’s time to test your work. To keep this simple,
let’s use the built-in PDF export preset for Smallest File Size. Choose
File>Adobe PDF Presets>Smallest File Size. With this setting we
just need to make a couple of tweaks. Choose a name and location
for your PDF in the Export dialog and click the Save button. In the
resulting Export Adobe PDF dialog, let’s increase the Compatibility
to Acrobat 8.0 and turn on Bookmarks, Hyperlinks, and Interactive
Elements in the Include section. When done, click Export. Finally,
open your PDF in Acrobat reader and test it out.
Adobe is always looking to deliver innovative tools and solutions
and is currently working on technology that will allow InDesign
users to directly export a layout created in InDesign to a new
interchange format called XFL. You open these XFL files using the
Adobe Flash authoring tool, which will make it extremely easy for
designers to publish their layouts to print and digital formats. Once
in Flash, a layout can have an unlimited amount of interactivity and
animation added to create sophisticated, engaging experiences in
the Flash player.
QBEEA?D=JEJ>;<KJKH;S
') '*
Mike McHugh is an Adobe Creative Systems Engineer in Australia. He’s also the author of How to Wow with InDesign CS2 and How to Wow with Photoshop Elements 5, both published
by Peachpit Press. Mike also hosts a popular video podcast, Creative Sweet TV (www.creativesweettv.com). Q S
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ALL IMAGES BY MIKE MCHUGH UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
IndesignTut_SepOct08.indd 70 8/11/08 2:21:44 PM
Q7II?=D?C7=;9ECFH;II?EDS
Further reducing the file size of this PDF can involve a combina-
tion of removing document components, reducing the resolu-
tion of contained images, and compressing file components.
You’ll want to carefully consider which combination of these
techniques you’ll employ to decrease the size of the PDF. Your
goal—and challenge—is to minimize quality loss while maximiz-
ing file size reduction. The PDF Optimizer provides plenty of
control over file size and quality, so choose Advanced>PDF
Optimizer to open the dialog.
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Q7II?=D?C7=;H;IEBKJ?EDS
Click OK in the Audit Space Usage dialog and then click on
“Images” at the top of the list on the left-hand side of the PDF
Optimizer dialog. This is where you control the amount and
method of resolution reduction. For both Color Images and
Grayscale Images, try 100 ppi in the Downsample fields. (Don’t
use 72 ppi, as this may not be sufficient resolution for display-
ing on a variety of monitors.) Also select Bicubic Downsampling
To (the default choice) as your Downsample method to produce
the smoothest tonal transitions in your image. For Monochrome
Images, try 300 ppi. Don’t click OK yet.
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To know where to concentrate your digital weight loss efforts, it’s
handy to know where most of the file size is contained. For many
PDFs, the majority of the file size is contained in the graphic files.
To see a detailed analysis of the content of your PDF, click on
the Audit Space Usage button located at the upper-right corner
of the PDF Optimizer dialog. For our example, you can see that
99.73% of the file size (45.8 MB of the 45.9 MB) is contained in
the images. So we know exactly where to focus our weight loss
program: the images.
The amount and kind of compression you apply will determine
how much tonal or color values you’ll lose. To prevent image data
loss, try Zip Compression. This will result in less compression (thus
less file size reduction) and works best for black-and-white images
(and okay for grayscale images too). For substantial compression,
assign JPEG, which typically varies from 5:1 to 100:1 compression
and reduction in file size. For viewing only, you can often use
Medium Quality (substantial but not maximum compression). If
you intend to use these PDFs for desktop printing as well, you
might want to choose High or Maximum. Experiment!
AcrobatTut_SeptOct08.indd 73 8/11/08 1:36:18 PM

In Acrobat 9, open a commercial, print-oriented PDF (here a two-
page brochure with uncompressed, 300-ppi, CMYK images). To
determine its file size, choose File>Properties (Command-D [PC:
Ctrl-D]) and view the Advanced section of the Description tab.
Notice the current file size in this example is 73.29 MB—fine for
commercial printing, but you’ll want to make this PDF substan-
tially smaller to make it appropriate for sending or viewing over
the Internet. You could create another PDF if you had the original
layout files, or you can use the following Acrobat 9 tools to repur-
pose your PDF.
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Choose File>Save As to save this PDF as another PDF (we named
ours Brochure_Web_1). View this new PDF’s file size in the Docu-
ment Properties dialog and it’s now 43.85 MB—about 40% smaller
than the original file. Performing a simple Save As will often result
in the deletion of unnecessary file components that have been
retained in the PDF, dramatically reducing the file size without any
reduction in the PDF’s output quality.
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PDFs are created with specific output in mind. Prepress-bound PDFs are usually large files with high linear resolu-
tions and CMYK color spaces that aren’t optimized for other uses, such as sending via email or viewing on the
Web. You can use Acrobat 9 to adjust the content and characteristics of a print-oriented PDF to repurpose it for
just such a use.
U B [ ! | ~ ! U B M M Z!
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AcrobatTut_SeptOct08.indd 72 8/12/08 10:41:03 AM
In any type of PDF file optimization, you typically want to retain
the original font files that have been embedded to maintain the
typesetting integrity of your document. Click on the Fonts list
choice and check Do Not Unembed Any Font. While it’s true
you can reduce the file size of your PDF by unembedding fonts,
the file reduction is usually minimal (here embedded font files
command only 19 KB or .04% of the file size) and the typesetting
consequences are often significant.
QFH;I;HL;<EDJIS
To prevent the Optimizer from applying unnecessary downsam-
pling or compression, be sure to check the Optimize Images
Only If There Is a Reduction in Size box. Even with this option off,
Optimizer will automatically ignore any images that are lower than
the prescribed resolution, such as Web images or screen grabs
you may have placed in your layout (although there are none here
in the commercial print PDF, and there better not be!). Note: You
can protect delicate images from downsampling by saving them in
EPS format prior to placing them in the original page layout before
creating your PDF.
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Flattening transparency can help reduce file size in your PDF docu-
ment; however, this may have little or no effect depending on the
amount and complexity of the transparent areas. If the Transpar-
ency box is checked on, this flattening will be applied prior to any
other optimization, such as image downsampling and compression.
If you use this feature, try using the High Resolution setting to
flatten the transparent areas, as this doesn’t convert text or strokes
to outlines, and then count on the image processor to control the
resolution and compression.
Objects such as form components, JavaScript actions, and alternate
images can add significant file size to your document. To selectively
remove the various types of objects that can be included in a PDF
document, click on the Discard Objects choice on the left of the PDF
Optimizer. (The PDF document we’re using doesn’t have many of
these objects.) Look through this list carefully though, as there may
be some objects that take up little space but may be very helpful,
such as bookmarks. Caution: Avoid checking the Convert Smooth
Lines to Curves to prevent any unpredictable line alterations.
Q:?I97H:E8@;9JIS
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continued on p. 76
AcrobatTut_SeptOct08.indd 74 8/11/08 1:37:05 PM
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Just like Discard Objects, Discard User Data allows you to selectively
reduce file size by removing various file components such as hidden
layers, comments, forms, multimedia, and file attachments. In our
document, this accounts for less than 1% of the document, but in
other types of PDFs, this content may be significant. Again, pay
attention to those document elements that you may want to retain,
such as comments.
Q9h[Wj[W<_bc<hWc[S
The Clean Up setting panel allows you to remove document
content and apply compression to document components. But
the most important option here is to Optimize the PDF for Fast
Web View. This allows your website-placed PDF to be served up
one page at a time rather than demanding the whole document
at once. This can really speed up Web viewing! Select Acrobat 5
and Later from the Make Compatible With pop-up menu to pro-
vide all-around viewing and opening compatibility of your PDF.
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Once you’ve set up the PDF Optimizer to suit your output needs,
think about saving these settings (click the Save icon located at
the top of the dialog). That way, you can easily use these settings
again in the future. Now you’re ready to click the OK button to
apply the PDF Optimizer settings. Acrobat will ask you to create
and name the new PDF. After you save the new PDF, choose File>
Properties to view the file size. Note that our file size is now only
728.88 KB—a 99% reduction in file size!
Finally, convert your CMYK images to RGB. Choose Advanced>
Print Production>Convert Colors. Under Matching Criteria, choose
Image for Object Type and Any CMYK for Color Type. Under
Conversion Attributes, choose Convert to Profile for the Convert
Command, sRGB IEC61966-2.1 (for generic Web viewing) for the
Conversion Profile, and Use Document Intent for the Rendering
Intent. Check the Embed option on to provide color profile guid-
ance when your PDF is displayed on various monitors. Click OK. This
doesn’t reduce the file size by very much, but it will give you a better
idea of how your PDF will appear when it’s displayed on the Web.
Q9EDL;HJ9COA?C7=;IJEH=8S
') '*
Taz Tally is the author of Acrobat and PDF Solutions from Wiley Press, as well as numerous other digital imaging books on Photoshop, scanning, digital photography, and prepress.
Visit Taz’s websites www.taztallyphotography.com and www.tazseminars.com. Q S
AcrobatTut_SeptOct08.indd 76 8/11/08 1:37:48 PM
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As soon as you launch the CS4 beta, you’ll notice the new interface,
which is now more consistent with other programs in the suite, and is
still quite similar on the Mac (shown in Step 1) and PC (shown here).
According to Adobe, the gray color is intentional: The idea is to cut
down on distractions and let the colors of your beautiful Web designs
dominate the screen. And if you miss those cute little colored icons,
just run your cursor over any one of them and the color will appear as
your cursor hovers over it.
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Dreamweaver has always made it easy to switch between different
workspace layouts, including a preset optimized for designers that’s
different fromthe one for developers. In the CS4 beta, you’ll find even
more options and more ways to customize your workspace, including
the ability to compact the panels at the side of the screen, making
more room for your document. And you can save your customized
workspace layouts to use again anytime, just as you could in CS3.
If you loved the convenience of the Insert bar at the top of the work-
space, you can always click-and-drag it back there, but before you do,
try it out in its new location as a panel at the top of the panels section
(located on the right in the Designer workspace and on the left in the
Developer workspace). Keeping all of your tools in one place has
some advantages, and you can now choose to view the icons alone or
icons with descriptions (shown here), which provides a handy reference
for each tool.
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To cut down on confusion when creating CSS, the Property inspector
at the bottom of the workspace now has two modes: CSS and HTML.
This division makes it faster and easier to create and use styles as you
work, but it takes a little getting used to if you’re the kind of designer
who simply adds formatting from the Property inspector without
worrying about styles. If you’re that kind of designer, this change can
save you frominadvertently creating styles with names like Style1 and
Style2 and help make it more intuitive to create styles intentionally as
you create your designs.
QFHEF;HJO?DIF;9JEH>7I:K7BCE:;IS
Dreamweaver CS4 for Windows
DreamweaverSepOct08.indd 79 8/11/08 1:48:29 PM

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Adobe has made Dreamweaver CS4 available as a public beta, which means that you can download a copy right now by visiting http://labs.adobe
.com/technologies/dreamweavercs4/. Just beware that beta means “not quite ready for prime time.” Adobe makes no promises that it has
worked out all of the bugs and no software company will ever suggest you should use beta software for mission-critical projects. If you have a
serial number for Dreamweaver CS3, you can use the CS4 beta until the full program ships. If not, it’ll time out in 48 hours.
Q:EMDBE7:79EFODEMS
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The Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 public beta has a fresh new look and loads of new features, including improved CSS
support, a new preview environment called Live View, and better integration with all of the other cool programs in
the Suite. All that and more makes this an upgrade worthy of the 10th anniversary of Dreamweaver.
K B O J O F ! | ~ ! X B S O F S
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Dreamweaver CS4 for the Macintosh
DreamweaverSepOct08.indd 78 8/12/08 10:51:45 AM
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The Spry menu was added in Dreamweaver CS3, but you’ll find
new additions and enhancements in the CS4 beta. Spry makes it
easier for nonprogrammers to add interactive AJAX features, which
combine CSS and JavaScript, to create drop-down menus, collaps-
ible panels, form validation, and many other interactive features.
Just above the workspace, you’ll find the new Related Files bar with a
list of associated files and scripts for any open documents, including
external CSS files, Server Side Includes, JavaScript files (such as those
created with the Spry features in Dreamweaver), and other pro-
gramming files. Not only is this a handy reference that can help you
keep track of all the files in your site, it’s also a shortcut. Click on any
filename to automatically open the file, and you can edit and apply
the changes automatically to the HTML page you’re working on.
The new Code Navigator is a handy way to check your CSS code
as you work. You can Control-click (PC: Right-click) anywhere in
a webpage and choose Code Navigator to open a small window
that details the CSS on the page. Roll your cursor over any of the
listed styles and you’ll see a little pop-up with details of the style
rule. Double-click on a style name and Dreamweaver takes you to
the style in the CSS code, making it quick and easy to edit styles
as you work in Design view.
Q9E:;D7L?=7JEHS
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QB?L;L?;MS
The CS4 beta’s new Live View makes it possible to render a page
as it would be displayed in a browser so you can see AJAX and
other interactive features in action without leaving Dreamweaver.
Live View uses the WebKit rendering engine (the same open source
option used in Safari). Not only does this save you from having
to launch a browser to test these kinds of features, you can also
disable JavaScript as you use Live View to do things like freezing a
drop-down menu in action so you can more easily edit the CSS
that controls its display.
continued on p. 82
DreamweaverSepOct08.indd 80 8/11/08 1:49:01 PM
Previous versions of Dreamweaver included a Check In/Check Out
feature to prevent designers from overwriting each other’s work by
requiring that a page be checked out (thus locked to other design-
ers) before it could be worked on. The idea was great in principle,
but the system was clunky and slow in practice and many designers
simply turned the feature off. Although I haven’t had time to test it
fully yet, the integration of Subversion software to handle this kind
of file management, as well as versioning and rollbacks, is a promis-
ing addition to CS4.
If you prefer writing the code yourself, Code Hints are your friends. In
the Dreamweaver CS4 beta, you’ll find additions to the Code Hints
for AJAX and JavaScript. As you write in Code View, these hints auto-
matically appear, making it easy to complete or verify your work.
QCEH;J?FI<EH9E:;HIS
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If you’re a former GoLive user, you’ll be pleased to find that Adobe
added smart objects to the CS4 beta. Smart objects make it possible
to drag-and-drop a PSDfile into a webpage in Dreamweaver and then
use the Image Preview dialog (shown here) to optimize and resize it
on the fly. Another great benefit is if you update the original PSD file
later, Dreamweaver adds a little red arrow to the optimized version in
your webpage. Click the Update from Original button in the Property
inspector and the changes are automatically applied.
Q?DJ;=H7J?EDM?J>IC7HJE8@;9JIS
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Normally, if you click on the Split view icon at the top of the work-
space (circled), the code and design views will be split horizontally.
If you'd like to see the Code and Design views side by side, try
using the Vertical Split view (View>Split Vertically). If you’re not familiar
with the integration between Code and Design views, here’s a tip:
Click on any element, such as the thumbnail photo selected here, and
Dreamweaver automatically highlights the corresponding HTML code
in Code view.
QL;HJ?97BIFB?JL?;MS
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Janine Warner has authored more than a dozen books about the Internet, including Dreamweaver CS3 for Dummies (and soon the CS4 version). She’s also the host of more
than 50 hours of video training in Web design for Total Training. A popular speaker, she has been working online since 1995. (www.JCWarner.com). Q S
DreamweaverSepOct08.indd 82 8/11/08 1:49:39 PM
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After downloading the TweenLite library, you need to import
those files into your Flash project so that you can use them. Select
the first keyframe in the actions layer and open the Actions panel
(Window>Actions). The way that you import external ActionScript
files into your project is by using the import command. Enter the
code shown above into the Actions panel. This imports all of the
ActionScript files found in the gs folder.
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Double-click on the orbButton movie clip on the Stage to enter
edit mode. We need to create a hit state for the button that will
trigger the animation. Double-click Layer 1, rename it “orb,” and
click the Insert Layer icon to create a new layer above it. Rename
this layer “hit.” Get the Rectangle tool (R) and draw a rectangle
over the innerOrb movie clip. It should cover the clip, so look at
the Property inspector to make sure it’s positioned roughly at X:0
and Y:0 on the Stage. Since this rectangle is only for the hit state
and shouldn’t be visible, remove any Stroke color and set the Fill
Alpha value to 0% in the Color panel (Window>Color).
Now you’ll create the movie clip that you’ll animate using TweenLite.
Select the first keyframe in the clips layer and drag out a copy of the
orb movie clip from the Library to the Stage. With it selected, give it
an Instance Name of “innerOrb” in the Property inspector. We need
to wrap this movie clip inside of another, so press the F8 key to open
the Convert to Symbol dialog. Give this new movie clip a name of
“orbButton” and then click OK. Give this newly created movie clip
an Instance Name of “orb1” in the Property inspector.
The TweenLite library consists simply of an ActionScript file that
you’ll be including in your project. Open a browser and navigate
to http://blog.greensock.com/tweenliteas3. Click on the Download
Now button to download the latest version as a ZIP file. Unzip it to
your desktop. Inside of the TweenLiteAS3 folder you should see a
folder named “gs.” This folder needs to be in the same folder as
your FLA file. Since the orb.fla file is on the desktop, drag the gs
folder to the desktop.
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FlashTut_SepOct08.indd 87 8/11/08 1:51:48 PM
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With each release of Flash, Adobe tries to add as many cool new features as possible. Despite this, there are many
community-based projects that have arisen to fill any missing gaps. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use the
open-source TweenLite library to achieve some effects that would be next to impossible to duplicate using
the Timeline in Flash alone.
Download the project files at the Layers website and unzip it to
your desktop. Open the orb.fla file in Flash CS3. This Flash file
contains two layers in the Timeline: one is named actions and will
contain all of your ActionScript code; the other is named clips and
will contain all of the visual assets. The frame rate has been set to
30 to make the animation nice and smooth. In the Library panel
(Window>Library), you’ll see an image of a glassy orb created in
Photoshop and a movie clip that contains the orb.
[If you’d like to download the files used in this tutorial to practice these techniques, visit www.layersmagazine.com and navigate to the Magazine section. All files are for personal
use only.]
FlashTut_SepOct08.indd 86 8/11/08 1:51:18 PM
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Lee Brimelow is a Platform Evangelist with Adobe and an award-winning interactive designer. Lee runs the free tutorial site at www.gotoandlearn.com and a Flash-related blog at
www.theflashblog.com. He is also the author of several titles for Lynda.com dealing with Flash and After Effects. Q S
Type the next function into the Actions panel. When the orbOut
function is called we’re again calling the TweenLite.to( ) function,
but this time we’re animating the orb back down to its original Y
position. Another difference is that we’re using Bounce.easeOut as
the easing type, which will make the orb bounce back into place.
Test the movie by hitting Command-Return (PC: Ctrl-Enter) and roll
your mouse over the orb to see the animation. In the next step you’ll
duplicate your work to add some more orbs.
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Now that you’ve successfully animated a single orb, you can dupli-
cate your work to create a row of orbs. This could be useful as a site
navigation element or quasi-Dock-look from a Mac. Click the clips
layer in the Timeline, drag out additional orbButton movie clips
from the Library panel onto the Stage, and align them as shown.
Give each an Instance Name of orb along with the next number in
the sequence. For instance, the next orb would have an Instance
Name of “orb2,” etc. In this example we’ve added a total of five
orbs but you can add however many you like.
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For each orb that you added to the Stage in Step 11, you’ll need
to duplicate some of the ActionScript code. Click the first frame in
the actions layer, copy lines 4 and 5, paste these lines for each
additional orb, and change the Instance Name for the two events.
The functions were written in such a way that they don’t need to
be duplicated. All of the orbs will call those two functions. That
way if you want to change something in the animation, you only
need to do it in a single place.
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I’ve shown you one effect out of potentially thousands that are
possible using this code. You can play with animating differ-
ent movie clip properties besides the Y property. You can also
change the animations duration and easing types to achieve a
wide range of different effects. TweenLite is just one community
ActionScript library that makes things much easier for Flash devel-
opers. You should never reinvent the wheel unless you really
have to.
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')
FlashTut_SepOct08.indd 87 8/12/08 10:49:15 AM
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Enter the next few lines of code into the Actions panel to assign your
function. When the orbOver function is called, the TweenLite.to( ) func-
tion is called to make the animation start. The first thing we pass to the
function is the object we want to animate. In this case, it’s the innerOrb
clip. The second itemis the time in seconds that we want the animation
to take. Lastly, we pass in an object containing the destination values
for whatever properties that we want to animate. Here we’re animating
the Y position to –50. The ease property is set to Exponential.easeOut,
which gives a strong easing effect.
/
Select the first keyframe in the actions layer and open up the Actions
panel. The first thing you’ll need to do is import some ActionScript
classes that describe the various types of easing effects that you
can use with TweenLite. These include effects such as bounce and
elastic easing. Type in the second line of code you see above into the
Actions panel directly below the import statement that you entered
in Step 3. With these two ActionScript libraries imported into your
project, you can now begin writing the code to handle the rollover
and rollout mouse events.
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There are two mouse events that Flash needs to listen for. The first
is the rollover event that gets fired anytime the user moves their
mouse over the object, and the second is the rollout event that fires
when the user moves their mouse off of the object. Type the next
two lines of code into the Actions panel. In this code you’re telling
Flash to call the orbOver function when the rollover event fires. In a
similar fashion you’re telling Flash to call the orbOut function when
the rollout event fires.
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.
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With the rectangle still selected, press the F8 key to open the
Convert to Symbol dialog. Name it “hit,” select Movie Clip as
the Type, and click OK. Now give it an Instance Name of “hit” in
the Property inspector. In the final movie, when the user rolls over
the hit movie clip, the orb will animate up, and when they roll off,
the orb will return to its original position. Click Scene 1 under the
Timeline to go back to the main Timeline.
FlashTut_SepOct08.indd 88 8/11/08 1:52:50 PM
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HI:E:><=I/ Close the smart object (Command-W [PC: Ctrl-W]) and
Save your changes. You’re now back in your regular document with
a single smart object layer containing your animation.
We’ll now add a layer to colorize the animation as well as bring
dimensions to our background clip.
HI:E;DJG/ Now we’ll add a
motion blur (Filter>Blur>Motion
Blur) with the following settings:
Angle 90˚; Distance 100. Click
OK to close the dialog.
HI:E;>K:/ Press Command-
Option- –(minus) (PC: Ctrl-Alt- –)
to zoom out while keeping your
window the same size. (You might
also drag out one corner of your
window for better visibility.)
Make sure your layer is unlocked. If it has a little padlock beside it
in the Layers panel, then it’s locked, so double-click on the Background
layer, rename it Layer 0, and click OK.
Now press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free Transform.
In the Options Bar, change
the Width to 200% and
the Height to 1600%.
Press Return (PC: Enter)
twice to commit the
transformation. This
stretches your “fibrous”
object vertically 1600%
and creates slightly fatter
strands of fibers.
HI:EH>M/ Using the Move tool (V), drag the stretched fibers down
so that the top of the object is aligned with the top of the canvas.
This will be the starting point for your animation.
Open the Animation
panel (Window>Animation)
and twirl down the arrow
beside Layer 0 to see the
layer’s properties. Now, click
on the Time-Vary Stopwatch
beside Position to set a Key-
frame at the 0 second mark
in the Timeline.
HI:EH:K:C/ In the Animation panel, drag the Current Time Indica-
tor (CTI) to the 10-second mark. Drag the stretched fibers straight
up so that the tail end of the object is aligned with the bottom of
the canvas. This should automatically add a keyframe for the Posi-
tion property at 10 seconds.
HI:EC>C:/ To add a
colorize layer, click on
the Create a New Layer
icon at the bottom of
the Layers panel. Click
on your Foreground
color to bring up the
Color Picker, choose
the color you want to fill
your layer (we used R:10,
G:140, B:210), and click OK. Press Option-Delete (PC: Alt-Backspace)
to fill the layer with your new color. Change the blend mode of this
new layer from Normal to Screen in the Layers panel.
HI:EI:C/ Next, let’s apply
the Polar Coordinates filter to
the smart object layer. Click
on that layer in the Layers
panel to make it active, then
go under the Filter menu and
choose Distort>Polar Coor-
dinates. In the dialog, click
on the Rectangular to Polar
radial button and click OK.
HI:E:A:K:C/ The trick to
adding the cool vertical lines back into your animation is to edit the
filter blending option for the Polar Coordinates control. To do this,
double-click on the little “lines” icon to the right of the Polar Coor-
dinates name in your Layers panel. Choose Darken or Darker Color
for the Mode to get a similar effect to what’s shown here and click
OK. As always, feel free to try the other blend modes for lots of
different-looking results. Click the Play icon in the Animation panel
to test your animation.
Rod Harlan is a video industry veteran and founder of the Digital Video Professionals
Association. Through his company DriveDV Inc., Rod works on special projects for
Fortune 500 clients such as Adobe and private institutions such as the NAPP. His
popular industry blog is packed with tips, tutorials, and industry insight and can be
found at DVconfidential.com.
And that’s all there is to a custom background animation with infinitely
variable possibilities that you can create yourself anytime…and more
importantly, own all the rights too!
DVS_SeptOct08.indd 89 8/11/08 5:27:15 PM
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[If you’d like to preview the final movie from this technique, visit www.layersmagazine.com and navigate to the Magazine section. All files are for personal use only.]
! S P E ! | ~ ! I B S M B O
Q : ? = ? J 7 B L ? : ; E I E B K J ? E D I S
Last issue, I showed how to create an After Effects-
like animation in Photoshop Extended that involved
playing video inside the graphic of an iPhone. For
that technique, I used a background animation
clip that I’d created in Photoshop CS3. Since then,
readers have been asking how they can make their own animated
background—what filters to use, etc. So, I thought that would make
a good tutorial for this “Digital Video Solutions” column.
While I’ll use a specific set of filters in this tutorial, you’ll find that
using any of the Render choices under the Filter menu and combin-
ing them with at least one choice from the Distort folder will always
yield interesting results. So, let’s begin.
HI:EDC:/ In Photoshop CS3 Extended, create a new document
(File>New) at the size you want your final output to be (720x480
pixels in this example). In the Layers panel, this will give you a locked
Background layer that you need to convert to a smart object: Click
on the Layer menu, go under Smart Objects, and choose Convert to
Smart Object.
HI:EILD/ Double-click on the Smart Object icon that
appears on the layer in the Layers panel to work “inside”
that smart object. Next we’ll fill the smart object with
50% gray. Press Shift-Delete (PC: Shift-Backspace) to
open the Fill dialog. Make sure Use: 50% Gray is selected
then click OK.
HI:E I=G::/ Press D to set your Foreground color to black,
then go to the Filter menu and choose Render>Fibers.
In the dialog, type in 15 for Variance and 10 for Strength.
These low settings will give you smoother-looking fibers
with more “white” areas. Click on the Randomize button
until you see about a 50:50 ratio of black to white fibers in
the Preview, then click OK.
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Final image
DVS_SeptOct08.indd 88 8/11/08 5:26:47 PM
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Select your Green_01 clip and drag it straight into the Timeline.
Now, when keying a large area like this with a small subject area,
it’s best to first remove as much of the background as you can
so the keyer has less work to do. In the Tools panel, select the
Rectangle tool (Q), then click-and-drag a rectangle around the
subject to remove everything except our dancing Marina. This
is removing all the “garbage” we don’t need—hence the name
Garbage Matte.
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With the layer selected, go to Effect>Keying>Keylight to apply
the effect. In the Effect Controls panel (ECP), click the Eyedropper
tool next to the Screen Colour swatch and click on a midrange
green in the image. Then, click on the Toggle Transparency Grid
icon at the bottom of the Composition window to view the alpha
channel—certainly not great at this point. To further illustrate this
point, choose Status in the View pop-up menu in the ECP to view
the simple transparency information.
Go back to the main Selection tool (V) and scrub the Current Time
Indicator (CTI) in the Timeline to check that none of your subject gets
cropped during playback. In the case of people dancing, jumping,
and moving, arms, hands, or feet can easily go outside the garbage
matte later down the line without you realizing. Simply double-click
on the edge of the mask border to resize and move it accordingly—
but keep it as tight as possible to the focus on the shot.
Let’s work at the size this was intended for—NTSC Widescreen. So
go to Composition>New Composition, and in the Composition Set-
tings dialog, set the Width and Height to 960x540 (16:9) with a Pixel
Aspect Ratio of Square Pixels (when working on keying, it’s easier to
see clean edges and results when not viewing expanded rectan-
gular pixels). Set the duration to at least the length of your clip (2+
seconds), then click OK. Finally, go to Composition>Background
Color, click the color swatch in the Background Color dialog, and
choose white in the Color Picker.
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AfterEffectsTut_SeptOct08.indd 91 8/11/08 1:55:52 PM
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With the accessibility of green screen setups these days, it’s easier to get keyable footage than ever before—
opening up creative options without set or color restrictions. Once you have your footage, After Effects has some
wicked tools to key and extract—and when combined they can create some wonderful results. [For techniques to
capture your own footage turn to the “Production Premium Tutorial” on page 94.—Ed.]
Starting out in Adobe After Effects CS3 with a blank project, double-
click in the Project panel to bring up the Import File dialog. Locate
and select the green screen clip(s) you plan to use and click Open.
Here, I’m importing three clips of our intern, Marina, shot in HD in
the green screen studio. One of these clips “Green_01.mov” is avail-
able (shortened) for you to download from the Layers website. Click
the Create a New Folder icon at the bottom of the Project panel,
name the new folder, and drag your clips into it to store them.
[If you’d like to download one of the clips used in this tutorial to practice these techniques, visit www.layersmagazine.com and navigate to the Magazine section. All files are for
personal use only.]
T U F W F ! | ~ ! I P M N F T
Q 7 < J ; H ; < < ; 9 J I J K J E H ? 7 B S
AfterEffectsTut_SeptOct08.indd 90 8/11/08 1:55:18 PM
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Reapplying the saved preset to other clips will either work per-
fectly, terribly, or be somewhat usable—depending on the clip.
We’ve added two more clips from the green screen shoot to the
Timeline, one medium distance and one close-up (you can use
your own footage or drag in the same clip that you used for the
previous steps). To use your new preset, select a clip in the Time-
line, go to Animation>Recent Animation Presets, and choose
Key & Color. In this example, the same settings from Green_01
are too harsh on Green_02, but the color adjustment matches
fine. A couple of tweaks then...
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In the ECP for Keylight, we adjusted the Clip Black value to around
20 to reintroduce some of the softness around the hair. Then, under
Matte Choker, we changed the Geometric Softness 1 to 10 and the
Choke 1 value to 1. This softened the edge of the matte for this
medium zoom image quite nicely. Now, moving on to the close-up
Green_03, this is a true test of keying settings—loose hair transpar-
ency! Selecting the clip, we applied the same Animation Preset
once more.
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We then played with the Screen Matte settings in Keylight to bring
the hair softness back in. We adjusted the Clip Black to around
14, and then in this instance, turned off the Matte Choker effect
by clicking the small fx icon next to its name in the ECP. Looking
pretty good! As you can see, an initial key created for one clip can
easily be reused and adjusted for each future keying operation,
with the simple use of an Animation Preset.
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Q9ECFEI?J;879A=HEKD:19>7D=;9EBEHS
Now that you have your clip(s) nicely and very cleanly keyed,
the After Effects world is your oyster. Add new backgrounds,
new effects, type titles, movies, logos—whatever works to com-
plete your project and present your keyed footage as cleanly
and strongly as possible. Enjoy! [If you arrived here from the
“Production Premium Tutorial,” return now to page 98 for some
compositing techniques.—Ed.]
')
Steve Holmes is the creative director at Energi Design in Sausalito, California, creating award-winning motion graphics and Web design for clients worldwide. He also speaks at
various design conferences on the subjects of After Effects, motion graphics, and typography, and can be reached at steve@clickenergi.com. Q S
AfterEffectsTut_SeptOct08.indd 93 8/11/08 1:57:07 PM
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In the Curves controls, choose Blue from the Channel menu, then
drag a point from the middle of the graph slightly up and left to
lighten the channel, bringing a little more red back into the image—
perfect! As keys and color adjustments go, this is a good template
to use, so let’s save a preset for reapplication. In the ECP, Shift-select
Keylight 1.2, Matte Choker, Auto Color, Levels, and Curves to select
them all, then go to Animation>Save Animation Preset. Name it “Key
& Color.ffx” and click Save.
/
Turn the Transparency Grid off to return the white backdrop. This
reveals that we have slightly jagged edges, but we can easily
smooth them out. Go to Effect>Matte>Matte Choker, and in the
ECP adjust Geometric Softness 1 to around 4 and Choke 1 to
around 2 pixels (no more). This gives us a much better edge to
the key—perfect for an image like this at this size. If you scrub
your Timeline now, the key is looking good, so let’s restore some
color into the clip and give it some punch.
Q9>EA;C7JJ;S
Go to Effect>Color Correction>Auto Color to auto-boost the color.
Now go back and choose Levels from the same submenu, and in the
ECP, adjust the Input White to around 235 to boost the brightness
of the clip. To reduce the slight green colorcast that still remains, go
back to Effect>Color Correction and choose Curves.
Q7:@KIJ9EBEHS
.
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Twirl down Screen Matte in the ECP, and drag the Clip Black until
the gray area around Marina is black (around 48–50). Drag the
Clip White to get Marina as white as possible, leaving some green
(around 80). Now choose Screen Matte in the View pop-up to see
the actual matte, then adjust Screen Shrink/Grow to –0.2 to trim
the edges of the alpha channel slightly. Now switch View to Final
Result, and the first part of the key is complete.
AfterEffectsTut_SeptOct08.indd 92 8/11/08 1:56:30 PM
Q97FJKH;L?:;EM?J>FH;C?;H;FHES QC7A;OEKH;II;DJ?7B;:?JIS
QIJ;F7M7O7D:C7A;7879A:HEFS
You’ll need to get the video into the Creative Suite in order to work
with it. With Adobe Creative Suite 3 Production Premium, you have
Adobe Premiere Pro for digitizing or importing video. If working
with tape-based sources, choose File>Capture and use your deck
or camera to load footage. If working with tapeless sources (such
as P2 Cards or XDCAM) simply choose File>Import and navigate to
the clips on your hard drive. It’s a good idea to transfer the media
first to an edit-grade hard drive.
Adobe Dynamic Link works across many of the applications in the
Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium. It can significantly speed
up your workflow as it provides the ability to create dynamic links
between applications, without a need for exporting or rendering.
In the Project window, select the sequence you want to share and
choose Edit>Copy. Switch to After Effects and choose Edit>Paste.
A new composition that matches the settings of your Premiere
sequence is created and the associated media is imported into After
Effects. Double-click the new sequence to open it.
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First, you’ll want to edit your clips in Premiere. Simply put, keying
takes time—time to set it up and render. You don’t want to bother
keying footage you don’t need. Create a new sequence and get
it edited in a rough form. It’s a good idea to leave one second
of pad on both ends of the shots you want to key (this is called
“laving handles”). This pad gives you overlap that you’ll use for
transitions (wipes and dissolves). You’ll add these after you’ve cre-
ated the composited image.
In order to key, you’ll need a backdrop. This can be a stock back-
ground, a 3D rendering, or a photograph. One of our favorite tech-
niques is to use a panoramic photo. This gives you a lot of options
as you can easily resize and reposition the backdrop for different
framings. To create a pano, use a digital still camera. Orient the
camera for portrait, then shoot three to five photographs. Be sure
each shot overlaps the previous shot by 10–20% so the photos can
be stitched together easily. Load the photos onto your computer.
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ProdPremiumTut_SeptOct08.indd 95 8/11/08 2:11:39 PM

Cameras often have auto features turned on that can make keying
much more difficult. Turn off auto-exposure, auto-white balance,
and auto-focus. If any of these are left on, this means the green
you’re trying to key will constantly change as your model moves.
While you’re in the setup menu, be sure to turn off Sharpening.
Keep your model and your camera as far away from the screen as
possible. If your camera shoots progressive, take advantage of it.
Fields definitely get in the way of a good key. If possible avoid DV
and HDV.
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The chroma key wall has come to be used for much more than just the weather. With improvements in both keying
technology and cameras, it’s possible to get professional results on tighter budgets. How you key will vary on the
footage you use, but Production Premium offers an integrated solution. Let’s explore how Premiere Pro, Photoshop,
and After Effects can work together to take advantage of great keying.
S J D I B S E ! | ~ ! I B S S J O H U P O
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ProdPremiumTut_SeptOct08.indd 94 8/11/08 2:10:56 PM
The files you selected in Bridge are automatically loaded in the Use:
Files list. There are several layout options, but we’ve found that Auto
works very well most of the time. Be sure to check the box next to
Blend Images Together. Click OK and be patient—each image has
to open. Photoshop will attempt to automatically align your images
and use layer masks to blend them together seamlessly.
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The easiest way to browse your photos is with Adobe Bridge. This
file navigation tool allows you to visually browse your media, which
comes in handy when looking for your background images. If
needed, you can even rotate images in Bridge. Once you’ve found
and selected your panoramic images, choose Tools>Photoshop>
Photomerge. If it’s not running already, Photoshop will launch and
become the active application. The Photomerge dialog presents
itself and awaits your input.
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Once the image is built, you should optimize it for a video work-
flow. If you’re happy with the Photomerge, you’ll likely no longer
need layers. Choose Layer>Flatten Image to reduce the image to
a flattened file. This will reduce render times and RAM overhead
for the After Effects Composition. Crop the image to a clean
rectangular shape using the Crop tool (C). Save the file as a TIFF
image to your project folder.
Unfortunately, there’s no Dynamic Link between Photoshop and
After Effects (but the workflow is still easy). Switch back to After
Effects and double-click in an empty area of the Project panel (or
choose File>Import>File). Navigate to the file just created with
Photomerge, select it, and click Open. Drag this imported file to
the bottommost layer in the open composition (placing it below
your video footage). Now turn to the After Effects column on
page 90 for instructions on keying your footage using Keylight,
a powerful chroma keying plug-in from The Foundry. Then return
here to composite your background with your keyed video.
.
continued on p. 98
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ProdPremiumTut_SeptOct08.indd 96 8/11/08 2:13:55 PM
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Once you’ve nailed the key, you can tweak the background. The
advantage with an oversized background is that you can position
it to taste. This way, as your shot composition changes (such as a
medium shot to close-up), you can change the size and position
of the background. This also allows for a background to be reused
on multiple interviews with greater flexibility. To access position
controls, simply select the layer and press the shortcut key P. You
can then tweak the layer’s X Y Position to suit. To use Scale, just
press the shortcut key S.
Chances are that your backdrop is a little too clear. Most photogra-
phers make it a point to take pictures in focus. But if this scene were
really being filmed with a video camera, the backdrop would be out
of focus due to depth of field. You can tweak this using a Gaussian
or Lens Blur effect (both under Effect>Blur & Sharpen) to soften the
background and simulate depth of field. Gaussian Blur is faster than
Lens Blur if you’re in a hurry, but Lens Blur offers some realistic set-
tings you can tweak, such as Grain and Highlights.
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Your foreground and background elements will likely not match from
a color balance point of view, but it’s easy to tweak your colors. One
effective way is to apply an Adjustment Layer (Layer>New>Adjustment
Layer) with a Photo Filter (Effect>Color Correction>Photo Filter),
which offers useful presets for warming or cooling shots. Addition-
ally, Keylight offers color-correction controls to match foreground and
background elements. Paying close attention to color will help make
the composite more believable. Additionally, you can use any other
Color Correction effects in After Effects to refine the shot. The profes-
sional workflow is to key the shot first, then tweak color and exposure.
It’s generally a good idea to invoke a full-quality RAM preview first
to make sure the key works well. Simply mark out a work area of a
few seconds and check the key. When satisfied with your composi-
tion, you’ll need to render it. This can be done via the After Effects
Render Queue (Composition>Add to Render Queue), which allows
you to create QuickTime, AVI, or FLV files. If further editing is needed,
simply invoke Dynamic Link (copy-and-paste) to return the compos-
ite to Premiere Pro.
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Richard Harrington is owner of RHED Pixel (www.rhedpixel.com), a visual communications company in Washington, D.C. Author of Photoshop for Video and co-author of Producing
Video Podcasts, Richard is Program Manager for the NAB Post-Production World Conference and a regular speaker at Photoshop World. Q S
ALL IMAGES ©RHED PIXEL UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED
ProdPremiumTut_SeptOct08.indd 98 8/11/08 2:14:28 PM
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Media Maker 8 Premium by NewTech Infosystems (NTI) is an all-in-
one CD and DVD burner for Windows users. It provides a suite of
easy-to-use tools for creating and recording data (audio, photos, and
video) onto CDs and DVDs, plus Blu-ray support for backups and
creating data discs (but no Blu-ray video capabilities).
Media Maker 8 features a Video Converter that allows you to convert
videos for playback on an iPod, PSP, Zune, and other portable video
players. It also includes the NTI Photo Maker, which enables users to
quickly import, edit, and share their digital photos and slide shows;
the NTI Ripper for ripping and archiving music; and NTI Digital Jack
for playback of music collections
All of these programs are opened from an application appropri-
ately called Launch Pad. Many of the applications use a Windows
Explorer-style view that allows you to drag-and-drop files you want
burned or copied to a CD or DVD. Wizards, called EasySteps, guide
you through the process.
Perhaps the most important part of this programis its full-featured
backup package called Backup Now 5. It takes only a few minutes to
set up a systemof scheduled backups to a hard drive on the network.
Backup Now 5 also provides disc spanning, so you can archive por-
tions of a library across multiple DVDs. The selection setup is a simple
procedure to select which files or file types to back up, or to selectively
restore. So what backup devices does it support? The list is too lengthy
to include in this review, but if you can record to it, Backup Now 5
supports it.—Dave Huss
DesignMerge is a plug-in that allows custom printing based on an
exported database file. Why should you spend that kind of money
(approximately $1,000–3,000) on a database plug-in when InDesign
comes with Data Merge? Well, there are several critical differences
between the plug-ins:
First, DesignMerge merges the data during printing. Say your database
contains 1,000 records, unlike Data Merge, the InDesign document doesn’t
end up with a 1,000-page document; it prints a single-page document
1,000 times. More importantly, if you’re printing to a PPML supporting
device, the common elements can be processed once, and only the
changed data is processed per page. DesignMerge also supports multi-
up layouts for gang printing, allowing users to create multiple layouts on
a single page and sequence the data to each template.
Second—and perhaps the most important feature—DesignMerge
supports conditional rules. Say the database contains information
about a person’s gender (or other condition), the text, graphic, or
entire layout can change based on the supplied data. Also included is a
PostNet font for generating USPS codes and an add-in that can create
retail-oriented barcodes.
Third, DesignMerge includes the CopyFit plug-in that allows text to
be resized according to set rules when the database text won’t fit in the
allowed space. After you connect to the database file, just insert the
fields and apply any conditional rules to them. Then using the onscreen
preview, you can inspect the setup of the merged data before printing.
One minor issue: The database text must be an exported (typi-
cally tab-delimited) file, as DesignMerge for InDesign doesn’t yet
support direct database connectivity.
The product is not inexpensive and, although its ease of use belies
its power, DesignMerge can be worth every penny.—David Creamer
EftjhoNfshf!
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QMVH.JO!GPS!WBSJBCMF!EBUB!QSJOUJOH!
Company: NewTech Infosystems Price: $79.99 (Upgrade$49.99)
Web: www.ntius.com Rating: ●●●●
Hot: Covers every aspect of media creation and backup
Not: NoMac version
Company: Meadows Publishing Solutions Price: Quoted
Web: www.meadowsps.com Rating: ●●●●
Hot: Variable data printing by conditional rules
Not: No ODBC connectivity in InDesign version yet
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 101 8/11/08 3:34:30 PM
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I’ve had the privilege of reviewing the past few versions of Poser and
been pleased with the content and improvements made from the pre-
vious versions. Well, the newest version, Poser Pro, is no exception. The
new enhancements left me with a big smile on my face and just so you
know, Poser Pro is targeted at users who want to take their creativity
and work to another level.
Under new direction from Smith Micro Software, Inc. (which pur-
chased the Poser line as well as some other titles from eFrontier late
last year), Poser Pro was developed with a feature set and functionality
that’s geared for professional content creators in studio and produc-
tion environments. This version offers pro-level application integration,
as well as a 64-bit render engine, COLLADA support, and advanced
network rendering, which allows users to reduce their design and
production time while allowing them access to thousands of rigged
and textured models.
Let’s take a look at the new features:
º Unrestrictive Network Rendering allows you to use unlimited
computers/nodes to render your images. (This is limited to three
nodes in the Base version. The Base version is a sidegrade option
available to Poser 6 and 7 users only.)
º Queue Manager is a powerful tool that lets you manage your
rendering process.
º Wir| Background Rendering, you can work on Poser scenes in
the foreground while rendering time-consuming images in the
background.
º T|e 64-bit Firefly Render Engine takes advantage of today’s
more powerful 64-bit systems.
º Gamma Control lets you specify gamma and apply the values
to textures.
º Creore Hiq| Dynomic Resolurion ¦moqes wir| HDRI support.
º Normal Mapping support is a resource-efficient technique to add
the appearance of complexity and surface detail to 3D objects.
º Distributable Content is available with a set of four redistributable
3D characters to help you save production time.
º PoserFusion Plug-ins include hosting plug-in licenses for Maxon’s
CINEMA 4D and Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya. The plug-ins
let users integrate Poser Pro scene files within these production
applications. (These plug-ins are not available in the Base version.)
º Full COLLADA support gives you unrestricted ability for import
and export via COLLADA to assist with the integration of 3D
character content and scene data into third-party applications.
(Limited to export of geometry and textures in the Base version.)
Getting into the product was familiar and as usual, the interface is
very intuitive. Even newbies will be up and running once they familiarize
themselves with the tools and take a run through the tutorials. I can
see where designers, animators, and modelers in professional environ-
ments will benefit greatly from the Pro version of Poser, as the new
features rocked and integrated nicely into both Maya and Max without
a problem.
Current users will find that the new features are well worth the
upgrade. The network and background rendering, along with the
64-bit support, make this a must-have for anyone creating complex
scenes or pro|ecrs. Add ro r|or or|er leorures, suc| os HDR¦ exporr,
COLLADA import/export, normal mapping, and gamma correction,
and this is a no-brainer for anyone wanting to create great content
quickly and affordably.—Bruce Bicknell
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QSPGFTTJPOBM!4E!GJHVSF!EFTJHO!BOE!BOJNBUJPO
\ m b z f s t ! s f w j f x t ^
Company: SmithMicroSoftware, Inc. Price: $499.99
Web: www.smithmicro.com Rating: ●●●●●
Hot: Integrationwithprofessional applications
Not:
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 100 8/11/08 3:17:38 PM
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AKVIS Enhancer 9.2 is a multipurpose image utility that’s available as
a standalone application or a Photoshop plug-in. The standalone ver-
sion has three modes of operation: Enhancer, Focus, and HDR (high-
dynamic range), while the plug-in version doesn’t support HDR.
In Enhancer mode, the application attempts to enhance images by
intensifying color transitions between adjacent pixels. In testing, the results
were uneven. Overall, most images were improved, but the default set-
tings tended to oversaturate the images. Controls allow you to fine-tune
the settings and save themas a customsetting. Enhancer also recovers
lost detail in shadows, but the recovered areas exhibited an unaccept-
able amount of noise for professional use.
BLWJT!Foibodfs!:/3
EFUBJM.FOIBODFNFOU!BQQMJDBUJPO
Company: AKVIS Software Inc. Price: $81 (App); $69 (Plug-in)
Web: http://akvis.com Rating: ●●●
Hot: Simplies HDR creation
Not: Excessive noise in shadowrecovery
Focus mode selectively improves sharpness of mildly out-of-focus
areas of a photo, but it won’t convert an out-of-focus photo into a sharp
one. In some tests, the autofocus focused on the wrong subject or sharp-
ness was lost due to depth of field. To use Focus mode, isolate the area
to be brought back into focus by outlining it with the drawing tools. The
program made the blurry areas a little crisper if they weren’t too large
and there was sufficient detail to recover.
When using HDR mode from the standalone application, if you
shoot RAW files, it’s necessary to convert them to a format that
Enhancer accepts (I used 8-bit RGB TIFF). My test images of the Colos-
seumin Rome resulted in a properly exposed sky while retaining details
inside the tunnel entrances. Alignment of the different images is done
automatically. My test images were shot without a tripod, which made
alignment problematic but still it did an okay job. It didn’t remove ghosts
(subjects in the photo that move between frames). The finished HDR
images were also a little oversaturated but can be corrected by fine-
tuning the settings.—Dave Huss
www. phot os hopus er. com or c al l 800- 738- 8513
Adobe and Photoshop are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated. *Prices are for U.S. residents only. Corporate, Educational and International rates are also available.
Join today and receive...
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NAPP_HalfPG_0708.indd 1 8/5/08 2:59:20 PM
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 103 8/11/08 3:36:12 PM
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CSS guru Eric Meyer, in collaboration with WebAssist, has released CSS
Sculptor for Dreamweaver. This easy-to-use extension makes creating
CSS layouts in Dreamweaver a snap. The last two releases of Dream-
weaver included CSS templates; however, users needed an in-depth
knowledge of CSS to modify the layouts. Enter CSS Sculptor!
This template-basedapplication makes it easier for both designers and
programmers to quickly design CSS layouts. It’s easy to install this exten-
sion using the Manage Extension Command in Dreamweaver, and then
the application is launched by choosing File>New CSS Sculptor Page.
The interface contains six tabs: Layout, Box, Type, Design, Print,
and Output. Each tab’s screen contains controls for customizing the
look of the final page. Layout (the first tab) contains 41 different CSS
layouts, including one-, two-, and three-column static, elastic, fluid,
fixed, and hybrid layouts with optional header and footers. Users
can select from the included color schemes or create their own. The
ability to customize almost all aspects of a layout from margins and
padding to borders and colors is a welcome attribute.
I have to say that when I initially opened the program, I was skepti-
cal of how useful it would be…but I quickly changed my mind. CSS
Sculptor allowed me to generate a custom layout for a client that con-
formed to Web standards, was accessible, and best of all, contained
the code necessary to correctly display pages in Firefox, Safari, and
Internet Explorer. CSS Sculptor is one of those programs where you
might find yourself saying, “I don’t know how I got anything done
without it!”—Cyndy Cashman
If you’ve ever wanted to add a professional-quality, animated banner to
a website or blog, you’ll want to check out BannerZest fromAquafadas.
This theme-based animation software makes it easy to quickly add Flash-
based slide shows and animated banners without owning or knowing
anything about Flash. BannerZest is available in two flavors: Standard or
Pro. This review is based on experiences using the Pro version.
Creating a Flash banner using BannerZest is surprisingly quick and
easy. Upon launching the program, the first thing you’ll see is a desig-
nated drag-and-drop area. To create a banner, you must first select your
images and drag-and-drop themonto the designated area. This action
launches an Inspector panel that allows you to choose the layout and
type of animation from a list of 27 themes. Once you select a theme,
you can adjust most of the theme’s attributes, such as dimensions, back-
ground colors, gradients, borders, fonts, and transitions. Even though
you must use a theme to create a banner, adjusting the settings allows
you to create a customlook. Adding a URL link to the banner images is
easy using the Media panel tools.
The final step is to publish the banner. The Publish settings allow
you to specify whether you want to publish the banner to a Web
server or a local directory. Clicking the Show HTML button opens a
window containing the code needed to integrate the banner on a
server. Clicking the Show Banner button opens an HTML page
displaying the banner.—Cyndy Cashman
Cboofs[ftu!Qsp!2/3
GMBTI!CBOOFST!NBEF!FBTZ
Company: WebAssist.comCorporation Price: $99.99
Web: www.webassist.com Rating: ●●●●●
Hot: Cross-browser compatibility
Not:
Company: Aquafadas SAS Price: $129 Pro ($49 Standard)
Web: www.aquafadas.com Rating: ●●●●●
Hot: Easy to use; ability to customize settings
Not:
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 102 8/11/08 3:35:21 PM
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modo 302 from Luxology is an amazing 3D program that honestly,
until this review, had me very skeptical about its capabilities and
position in the world of 3D. But after spending some time with it,
I have no doubt that it’s a pro-level 3D modeling solution.
I was up and running with the software in about an hour with the
help of the tutorials available in the program. The tools were clear
and I was able to import models that I already created in other pro-
grams without any problem. modo also allows you to export your
model to many of the top programs.
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Although I use a few of the more expensive programs, I was
pleasantly surprised with the number of features available in modo
302. These include 3D modeling, painting, rendering, and anima-
tion tools for artists who want to create 3D images without having
to resort to other software. It supports polygonal and subdivision
surface modeling and has impressive rendering capabilities along
with an awesome Sculpting tool. Features new to this version are
pretty impressive as well. The addition of PSD support, Physical Sun
and Physical Sky (which provide more realistic outdoor scenes), and
a new Flex tool are only a few of the cool new features available.
I’d recommend this program to anyone who wants a very capable
3D content-creation program that has a very powerful set of tools.
—Bruce Bicknell
Company: Luxology LLC Price: $895 (Free upgrade from301)
Web: www.luxology.com Rating: ●●●●
Hot: Polygonandsubdivisionsurface support
Not: Noriggingcontrols for character animation
Produced by
M A G A Z I N E
Adobe is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated
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LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 105 8/11/08 3:37:23 PM
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If you’re looking for compression and encoding software that’s easy
to use and at the same time a fully featured professional application,
look no further than Sorenson Squeeze 5 Pro. Building on Sorenson’s
history of producing high-quality, easy-to-use, video compression
software, Squeeze 5 has evolved into a one-stop shop for all your
video encoding needs.
Some may ask, “Why not buy a $23 shareware application?” Or,
“Why not use the bundled encoder that came with my Suite?” I’ve
used different encoders—shareware and bundled applications—and
none but Squeeze has the accuracy in detail or clarity in compression,
while allowing control over file size and bit rate.
What does this software do so well? First, in version 5, searching
and sorting encoding formats and filters has been totally redesigned
to allow for a more efficient workflow. Also, Squeeze 5 allows for
simultaneous encoding across multiple cores, with up to 1.5 files per
core, which dramatically increases encoding times for multiple core
machines. And this version permits simultaneous multi-encoding of
the same file with different compression settings. This lets you mix
Flash, QuickTime, Windows Media, MPEG-2, and much more in the
same batch without having to baby-sit the application—a must for
anyone having to deliver multiple files in multiple encoding formats
efficiently. In addition, the improved H.264 encoder is one of the
best I’ve seen so far, producing accurate, high-quality MPEG-4 files
every time.
The On2 VP6 Pro Flash video encoder cannot be beat. With 2-pass
VBR capability (a feature that Adobe removed from their own Flash
video encoder), VP6 Pro increases the quality of your FLV movies with-
out sacrificing precious bandwidth and bit rates. Also, if encoding in
Flash is important to you, the ability to encode in the new FV4 format
will be a strong benefit if Squeeze 5 is added to your arsenal.
If that’s not enough, Squeeze 5 has brand-new video filters (such as
watermarking, sharpening, and saturation) that can be applied to your
files in Squeeze before encoding. And speaking of filters, Squeeze
includes new audio filters for adjusting volume. The Pro version
includes Bias SoundSoap, a filter that will remove hum and noise right
inside the audio filters tab without leaving Squeeze.
Some other features worth mentioning are watched folders, Blu-ray
support, and the optional WMV Component for Mac. With watched
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folders, Squeeze will encode any movie file that appears in the folder
using the compression setting you’ve assigned.
Now that Blu-ray has won the VHS/Beta war of the 21st century,
support for Blu-ray encoding in Squeeze will be an invaluable asset
moving forward. Also, the support for Microsoft’s VC-1 codec is a
nice bonus since it has now been adopted as one of the encoding
formats for Blu-ray.
Finally, Mac users will benefit from being able to encode with the
WMV format using Squeeze’s WMV Component (available at an addi-
tional cost) just in case you have a client who wants a WMV file.
So, what’s the verdict? The new version of Sorenson Squeeze Pro
offers a complete video compression and encoding package for around
$600. Because of the cost, however, it may not be for the beginner.
You’ll be hard pressed to find an easier-to-use, more comprehensive
program, while still having complete control over quality and output.
Squeeze is definitely worth a serious look for anyone having to encode
videos in a professional setting.—Erik Kuna
Company: Sorenson Media, Inc. Price: Starting at $599
Web: www.sorensonmedia.com Rating: ●●●●
Hot: Simultaneous multile encoding; ease of use; quality
Not: Canbe pricey for some users
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 104 8/11/08 3:36:45 PM
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deskUNPDF is an easy-to-use PDF converter with some interesting fea-
tures: It can convert PDFs to Microsoft Word, Open Document, HTML,
XML, Sony ebook, Excel, and image formats. It can also batch convert.
In my tests, I took three different PDFs—one created from Micro-
soft Word, one from Excel, and one from InDesign—and exported
them back out to Word or Excel in an attempt to extract the text.
deskUNPDF did an adequate job on both the Word and Excel PDFs,
but the InDesign PDF was virtually useless, even though I tried all
the text formatting output options available (word processing, page
layout, line by line, per character, and unformatted) and changed
the default font settings to the same as the font used in the InDesign
document. (It should be noted that I only tested the Macintosh version;
the Windows version may produce slightly different results.)
Based on my limited results, I cannot recommend this product
unless you use only conversions to Microsoft Word and Excel. Also keep
in mind that according to Docudesk’s website, “deskUNPDF was devel-
oped in response to the feature most commonly requested by deskPDF
customers—the ability to make changes to a PDF without the need
for Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader.” So if you already have Acrobat
Pro, a separate conversion utility isn’t really necessary because most of
these features can be found in Acrobat Pro. Other than the Excel PDF,
Acrobat did a better job with the conversions.—David Creamer
eftlVOQEG
DPOWFSU!QEG!GJMFT!UP!EPDVNFOU-!XFC-!BOE!JNBHF
Company: Docudesk Price: $69.95
Web: www.docudesk.com Rating: ●●
Hot: Supports many conversion formats
Not: Doesn’t work well with complex PDFs
Be careful what you wish for: You might get it. That’s what happened
to me when I moaned about Flash’s lack of pro-level animation capa-
bilities. I wound up with Toon Boom Studio 4, a power tool for anima-
tors that can export to several popular formats, including QuickTime
and SWF.
While Flash is easy to learn (if you skip scripting), Toon Boom
is a monster. But the flip side of the coin is that Flash doesn’t have
many tools for the animator—that’s why it’s easy to learn. On the
other hand, Toon Boom Studio, as the name implies, is an entire
studio worth of tools: pro-level lip-synching, virtual cameras, vector
tracing, a rotary drawing table, exposure sheets, forward kinetics,
an advanced color palette system, and…well, you get the point; it’s
feature-packed.
Those of you upgrading from older versions of the program will
likely enjoy its new interface, which is very similar to the one in many
of the Adobe CS3 applications, with dockable panes you can drag
to resize. Version 4 also includes feathered edges and the ability to
import Illustrator files with layers intact.
Toon BoomStudio isn’t a use-out-of-the-box application; you have
to delve into the documentation (in addition to the docs that ship
with the program, the Toon Boom Animation website is loaded
with helpful tutorials and user forums). But the serious animator will
willingly climb to the top of the learning curve. The view is spec-
tacular from there. [As we go to press, Toon Boom announced the
availablility of Studio 4.5. Visit their website for more info.—Ed.]
—Marcus Geduld
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Company: Toon BoomAnimation Inc. Price: $399.99
Web: www.toonboom.com Rating: ●●●●
Hot: Swiss Army knife of tools for the pro-animator
Not: You actually have to read the darn manual
LayReviews_SeptOct08.indd 106 8/11/08 3:38:46 PM
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Just as in InDesign, you can double-click with the Selection
tool on text and automatically switch to the Type tool—and
if you press the Escape key after typing, you’ll switch back
to the Selection tool.
7KJE#;NF7D:?D=8EN<EHJ;NJ
Here’s how you can create an auto-expanding box behind text:
1. Select the type with the Selection tool.
2. From the Appearance panel flyout menu, choose Add
New Fill and move the Fill below the Characters item.
3. Add a second Fill, but keep this one on top of the Char-
acters item. Select the top Fill and set it to the type color.
4. Select the bottom Fill in the Appearance panel and use
the Effect>Convert to Shape menu. We’re using a rounded
rectangle in this example. Adjust the settings similar to the
ones shown.
5. In the Graphic Styles panel, choose New Graphic Style
from the flyout menu to save the settings (and to globally
update them if you change the colors).
JH7DIF7H;DJ=H7OI97B;
Most users know that grayscale images can have a solid-color
background or, with the Direct Selection tool, be colored as a
“fake” duotone. What if you need a transparent background?
Technically it can be done and you can get good results with
the following method:
In Photoshop, convert the image to Bitmap mode (Image>
Mode>Grayscale then Image>Mode>Bitmap) using a high-
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The graphic style
will auto-expand
based on content.
If you want the style
to be the same size regardless of the text, use the Absolute
Width and Height, rather than the Relative settings in the
Shape Options dialog. Note: This cannot be saved as a Para-
graph Style and should be used only on large point type.
output setting with Diffusion Dither, and Save As an LZW-
compressed TIFF file.
In InDesign, simply
place the image
(File>Place). Note:
It may not look very
good onscreen at
Typical Display so
set it to High-Quality
Display (View>Display
Performance>High
Quality Display), or
turn on Overprint
Preview temporar-
ily. Here’s a standard
grayscale (top) with
a dithered bitmap
(bottom) against a gradient background.
JEEC7DOIFEJI
If you like to use Pantone solid (a.k.a. spot) colors for process-
color jobs, reconsider. You can’t use Overprint Preview or Separa-
tion Preview. Unless your job is actually using 10 spot colors
(possible, but unlikely), consider using a Pantone Process
Guide, or at least the Pantone Color Bridge guide (formerly
called the Solid to Process guide).
:EJ>;C7J>
You may be aware that you can type different measurements
in numeric dialog fields; for example, you can type in 6p and
have it convert to 1 in. Did you also know that you can add dif-
ferent measurements? Say your field contains “3 in,” you can
type in additional info, such as “3 in+18pt,” and InDesign will
do the conversion and addition (3.25 in). You can also divide
and multiply by using the slash (/) and asterisk (*), respectively.
In some cases, you can even use percentages (50%).
These settings work just about anywhere, including the Tabs
panel. The units are as follows: in for inch, p for pica, pt for
points, mm for millimeter, cm for centimeter, c for ciceros,
and ag for agates.
I9H;;D97FJKH;I
In case you missed it, Acrobat includes the ability to create
screen captures as PDFs. From the File menu, choose
Create PDF, and you have the option of the entire screen,
a user-selected window, or a user-selected area—great for
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TipsTricks_SeptOct08.indd 109 8/11/08 1:29:49 PM
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When working with shape layers, did you know that you can
assign a layer style before you create the shape? Choose the
Shape tool from the Toolbox, go up to the Options Bar, click
on the Shape Layers icon, and pick your Style from the drop-
down menu. Then drag the Shape tool of your choice and
you’ll see the shape develop with the style already applied.
When making a series of shapes, create the first one, add
a style, and that style will be retained in the Options Bar as
you create additional shape layers.
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With the Move tool selected, you can align or distribute
the content of selected layers in relation to each other. For
example, if you want to space several shapes evenly in a
row, select the (unlocked) layers in the Layers panel and
choose the Move tool (V). Up in the Options Bar, align themas
you like using the first six icons (their positions will be aver-
aged), then distribute according to edges or centers using
the next six icons. When using the distribute commands, you
might want to start by positioning the first and last objects
manually as they don’t move horizontally; then the others
are distributed between them.
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If you like to fiddle around with your layouts when creating
album pages or composites, use smart objects because you
can scale, rotate, or transform images as many times as you
want, and each time Photoshop goes back to the original
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As a rule, you should use effects rather than filters (unless
you have a good reason to do otherwise). That’s because
filters become permanent when you use them (not counting
undos). On the other hand, effects can be edited any time in
the future. Plus, effects are affected by the Effect>Document
Raster Effects Settings menu, which means you can work at
low-res (72 ppi) to prevent slowing down your computer,
and then increase the setting when proofing and for the
final output.
In addition, use the Effect>Rasterize menu command rather
than the Object>Rasterize menu command. Just like filters,
rasterizing objects is a permanent change.
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pixels, so there’s no additional image degradation. Use the File>
Place command or Layer>Smart Objects>Convert to Smart Object.
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a ruler and a drop-down menu offers
you common unit options that you
can select.
7::<B7I>M?J>EKJ<B7I>
While most times you’ll be design-
ing Flash assets within the Flash
app, sometimes you may need to make a quick button and
don’t want to spend a lot of energy in Flash. Try this: Click
on Insert>Media and select Flash Button. You’ll then see
a dialog where you can specify the type of button you’d
like, linking options, button text face options, as well as the
options to get additional styles to add to Dreamweaver.
I;J:;I?=DL?;MEDJEF
I get confused at times when
working with a Dreamweaver
page in Split view because
of the code at the top of the
page. If you click on the View
Options icon at the top of
the window, you’ll be able to
choose Design View on Top.
As the code is now at the
bottom of the workspace, this
helps to provide an unobtru-
sive way to design and code
at the same time.
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B Y C Y N D Y C A S H M A N , P H . D .
capturing a “moment in time” on your computer. The only
downside is that you can’t capture menu selections, so it
won’t replace a true screen-capture utility.
9EDD;9JDEM
One of the best new features of Acrobat 9 is the addition
of ConnectNow—an offshoot of Acrobat Connect and
part of the new Acrobat.com package. Start it by going
to the File>Collaborate>Share My Screen. You can have
up to two other people online looking at your screen or
even taking over your programs (with your permission, of
course). Unlike Acrobat Connect, which was fee-based,
ConnectNow is a free service. The major downside is that
ConnectNow is limited to three people, whereas Acrobat
Connect was limited to 15 (Acrobat Connect Pro has dif-
ferent package options).
EKJFKJFH;L?;M
Acrobat 9 has added
some improvements to
existing Output Preview
features (Advanced>
Print Production>Output
Preview) and some
new features too. For
example, there are more
options to choose from
when previewing certain
types of image formats
(as shown).
Also, a new feature
called Object Inspector lets you click on individual images
or text and get detailed information about the object.
9KIJEC?P;JEEBIF7D;B
You can use the Customize Tools Panel to group paint and
fill tools. Just open the Customize Tools Panel by choos-
ing Flash (PC: Edit)>Customize Tools Panel. Click the
Paint Bucket icon. Select the Brush tool and click the Add
button. Select the Gradient Transform tool and click Add.
Click OK to close the panel. The Brush and Gradient Trans-
form tools are now grouped under the Paint Bucket tool.
EF;DJ;IJCEL?;?DJ78I
Did you know that you can set your test movie to open in
a tab instead of a new window? Choose Flash (PC: Edit)>
Preferences to open the Preferences window. Click on the
General category and under the Workspace section, check
the box next to Open Test Movie in Tabs.
I7L;7D:9ECF79J
To permanently remove deleted items in a Flash document,
reduce the document’s file size, and decrease the amount
of time it takes to publish a document, select File>Save
and Compact.
KI;I9HEBBM>;;B<EHPEEC
Last issue, we had a tip on how to maximize desktop
real estate using Zoom; however, there may be times
where using the zoom is tedious because of the number
of mouse clicks you’d need. But did you know that if you
hold down the Command (PC: Ctrl) key, you can use your
mouse scroll wheel to zoom in and out of the page? Tip:
Remember to zoom back to full view so that you don’t
design really large pages.
9>7D=;OEKHHKB;HI
Rulers are a great way for you to position and lay out
items on a webpage but sometimes your ruler won’t
necessarily match what you’re trying to do. This is an
easy fix: Just Control-click (PC: Right-click) anywhere on
Q7ZeX[:h[Wcm[Wl[h9I)S
B Y R A F A E L “ R C ” C O N C E P C I O N
TipsTricks_SeptOct08.indd 110 8/11/08 1:30:16 PM
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B Y D A V I D C R E A M E R
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B Y D A V I D C R E A M E R
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B Y C Y N D Y C A S H M A N , P H . D .
QGS
How can I create an auto-expanding box with rounded
corners behind my text in InDesign?
You can fake it by creating a custom Stroke and using Para-
graph Rules. Starting in the Stroke panel (Window>Stroke),
click on the flyout menu (at top right), and choose Stroke
Styles. Then click on the New button. In the New Stroke Style
dialog, name your style, choose Dotted for Type, set Pattern
Length to 0.0035 in, Preview Weight to 5, and click OK.
Now choose Type>Paragraph Styles, double-click on
a style to open the Paragraph Style Options dialog, and
choose Paragraph Rules fromthe list on the left-hand side of
the dialog. Click on the Rule On checkbox; then choose your
customstroke in the Type drop-down menu. Set the Weight
to larger than your intended point size of the text, and choose
the Color for the stroke that you want to appear behind the
text. Finally, change the Width drop-down menu to Text and
set the Offset to –0.125 in, and both Indents to –0.25 in.
Click OK. [To learn how create an auto-expanding paragraph
rule in Illustrator, turn to “Tips & Tricks,” page 108.—Ed.]
QGS
Can I break a PDF into separate files at certain loca-
tions in the PDF?
In Acrobat 9, you can add Bookmarks to the PDF in strategic
locations and then use the Document>Split Document fea-
ture. It can break the file up by Top-Level Bookmarks.
If using Acrobat 8, you’ll have to use the Extract command
and do it manually or look into a third-party utility.
QGS
Is there a more efficient way to add editing comments
when proofreading a PDF? It seems that constantly
using the Comments Toolbar isn’t the best way.
Acrobat 9 has the ability to add popular editing comments:
Just highlight the text, and Control-click (PC: Right-click) to
bring up the menu choices. If you do lots of commenting in
PDFs, that could be worth the price of the upgrade right there!
QGS
How can I draw a glowing sun in Flash?
You could use the PolyStar tool and Glow filter to quickly
make a glowing sun. Click the PolyStar tool then click the
Options button at the bottom of the Properties inspector.
In the Tool Settings dialog, choose Star fromthe Style menu,
enter 18 for the Number of Sides, 0.50 for Star Point Size,
and click OK. Then click on Fill Color and choose a Radial
Gradient. To create the sun shape, just click-and-drag the
PolyStar tool on the Stage.
Now select Modify>Convert to Symbol, choose Movie
Clip, and click OK. In the Properties inspector, click the Filters
tab, then click the plus sign, and choose Glow from the
filter menu. Adjust the glow settings until you’re satisfied with
the results.
QGS
Why does my Flash document Library panel contain
symbols named “Tween 1,” “Tween 2,” etc.?
Flash automatically converts objects or shapes to symbols
when motion tweening is applied between two keyframes in
the Timeline. These are the symbols you’re seeing in the
Library. It’s better to convert objects and shapes to symbols
before applying motion tweening; otherwise, you’ll have a
Library full of symbols with names that are meaningless.
Q7ZeX[Zh[Wcm[Wl[hYi)S
B Y R A F A E L “ R C ” C O N C E P C I O N
QGS
What are design notes?
Design notes (located under the File menu) are notes that
you can save separately from a file, giving you an area
to make comments and talk about the specific project.
The good part about design notes is that the information
doesn’t appear in the source of the page; the information
can only be seen from within Dreamweaver. In the design
notes, you can also set a status flag for the note to control if
you want this note to appear as soon as the page is opened.
This is great when you want to alert someone immediately
of something on a specific page.
QGS
Dreamweaver files are now opened in tabs, so what are
the keyboard shortcuts to tab through the pages?
If you want to cycle through the open pages, press Com-
mand-` (PC: Ctrl-`) to cycle forward to the page on the
right of the tab. Pressing Shift-Command-` (PC: Shift-Ctrl-`)
will allow you to move back to the previous page on the
left. If you’re someone who doesn’t like to use tabs at all,
you can turn them off by clicking on Dreamweaver (PC:
Edit)>Preferences, and unchecking the Open Documents
in Tabs option in the General section.
QGS
How can I validate my pages against different versions
of HTML?
There’s a drop-down menu to the left of the Check Page
option that allows you to validate the code for an individ-
ual file, selected files, or the entire site. Clicking on one of
those options runs a check based on what you’ve chosen
in the Settings option. Clicking on the Settings option in
the drop-down will take you to the Validate Markup tab of
the Dreamweaver options, which lets you select the versions
of HTML, XHTML, or other technologies you’d like to vali-
date your code against.
Q&A_SeptOct08.indd 113 8/11/08 1:33:00 PM
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QGS
Photoshop is stuck on the Hand tool. What did I do?
First take a look at the keyboard and make sure that there’s
nothing pressing down on the Spacebar—it might be your
Wacom tablet, the book from which you’re working, a plate
of homemade cookies, that sort of thing. Next, check the
connection between the keyboard and the computer. If
you’re using a wireless keyboard, it might be time to change
the batteries or there could be an electronic device between
the keyboard’s transmitter and the receiver.
QGS
Although I set my digital SLR to shoot grayscale, my
images show up in color in Bridge and Camera Raw.
What’s up with that?
Your camera always captures RGB. When you have it set to
Grayscale or Black and White, the camera simply embeds a
Desaturate command in the file’s metadata. That’s a nonstan-
dard instruction, meant for use with the camera’s own software,
so Bridge and Camera Raw can’t read it. No worries! Simply
create a grayscale image in the HSL/Grayscale panel in Camera
Raw, where you have far more control over the final appearance.
Q7ZeX[?bbkijhWjeh9I)S
B Y D A V I D C R E A M E R
QGS
I’m using a Mac and when I copy my files to a server,
they become generic gray icons and won’t open
when I double-click the file. What’s happening?
Most likely, you’re not keeping the file extension on the
filenames. When you first save, type the name of the
file before you navigate to the storage location. That
way, the file extension is left intact. If you navigate first,
make sure you leave the extension intact or just type
it in. If you add the extensions on the existing files, as
long as you’re positive they’re the right program and
format (for example, .ai versus .eps), the file will be
recognized properly.
QGS
How can I convert multiline point type to para-
graph text?
Select all the point type, copy, then click-and-drag a text box,
and paste. Unfortunately, you’ll have to manually remove
all the point-type paragraph returns because the Find and
Replace feature can’t find paragraph returns in CS3. (I’ll never
understand how this was left out.)
Q&A_SeptOct08.indd 112 8/11/08 1:32:23 PM
4 Over, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116–117
www.4over.com
Q7S
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 Book
for Digital Photographers, The . . . . . . .114
www.kelbytraining.com
Adorama Camera, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
www.adorama.com
AMC Colorgrafix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
www.amc-color.com
Q8S
B&H Photo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
www.bhphotovideo.com
Berthold Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
www.bertholdtypes.com
Boss Logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
www.bosslogo.com
Q9S
CDW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
www.cdw.com
Copy Craft Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
www.copycraft.com
Corel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
www.corel.com
cPanel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
www.cpanel.com
Create Chaos 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
www.createchaos.com
Creative Juices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
www.bigposters.com
Q:S
Dahle North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
www.dahle.com
Data Robotics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
www.drobo.com
Digital Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118–119
www.digitalroom.com
Q;S
eprintFast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
www.eprintfast.com
Q<S
Focal Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
www.focalpress.com
Q=S
GridIron Software, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
www.gridironsoftware.com
Growll. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
www.growll.com
Q>S
Hewlett-Packard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
www.hp.com
Q?S
iStockphoto.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC–3
www.istockphoto.com
I.T. Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
www.itsupplies.com
Q@S
Jakprints, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
www.jakprints.com
QAS
Kelby Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 111
www.kelbytraining.com
QBS
Layers Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
www.layersmagazine.com
Layers TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
www.layersmagazine.com/tv
LC Technology, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IBC
www.lc-tech.com
QCS
Machine Wash Image Filters
from Mister Retro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
www.misterretro.com
Markzware Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
www.markzware.com
Media Lab, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
www.medialab.com
Microsoft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
www.microsoft.com
MisterClipping.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
www.misterclipping.com
Mpix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
www.mpix.com
QDS
National Association of
Photoshop Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . .103
www.photoshopuser.com
QES
onOne Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC
www.ononesoftware.com
QFS
Pantone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
www.pantone.com
Peachpit Publishing Group . . . . . . . . . . .71
www.peachpit.com
PhotoPlus Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
www.photoplusexpo.com
Print Factory, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
www.GoPrintFactory.com
PrintRunner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
www.printrunner.com
QHS
Really Right Stuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
www.reallyrightstuff.com
QIS
Shutterstock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
www.shutterstock.com
Smith Micro Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
www.mysmithmicro.com
Softpress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
www.softpress.com
QMS
Wacom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
www.wacom.com/americas
QPS
Zoo Printing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
www.zooprinting.com

J O E F Y ! P G ! B E W F S U J T F S T
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to order cal l 800- 201 -7323 or go to www. kelbytrai ni ng. com
G O B E Y O N D
P H OT OS H O P
®
Subscription information and pricing can be found at www.layersmagazine.com or by calling 877-622-8632. Layers is produced and published by Kelby Training, Inc. – www.Kelbytraining.com.
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