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Town of Garner

Town Council
Work Session Agenda
November 30, 2010 - 6:00 P.M.

The Garner Town Council will meet in a Work Session at 6:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Town Hall Council Meeting Room to
discuss the following:

Dinner will be provided at 5:15 p.m. for Council Members and Staff in
the adjacent conference room.

A CALL MEETING TO ORDER

B DISCUSSION

1. Peacock Pond BMP, Feasibility Report


Presenter: Frank Powell, Town Engineer
Doug Jewell, Jewell Engineering

2. Fire Department Bi-Monthly Update


Presenter: Matthew Poole, Fire Chief

3. Proposed Sign Ordinance Change


Presenter: Brad Bass, Planning Director

4. Review Statement of Expenditures for First Quarter


Presenter: Lin Jones, Finance Director

5. Fiscal Policy Guidelines


Presenter: Lin Jones, Finance Director

6. Proposed Changes to Town Charter Giving Mayor the Right to Vote


Presenter: Ronnie S. Williams, Mayor

7. Proposed Changes for Street Lights to LED Lighting


Presenter: Ronnie S. Williams, Mayor

C REPORTS

1. Garner Historic Auditorium Focus Group Update


Presenter: Sonya Shaw, Parks & Recreation Director

2. ConAgra Redevelopment Initiative Update


Presenter: Tony Beasley, Economic Development Director

3. Economic Downturn Update


Presenter: Lin Jones, Finance Director

D ADJOURNMENT

Note: The Work Session does not include any Public Hearings or Public Comments during
said meeting. Usually no actions are taken; this is only a discussion session.

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TOWN OF GARNER
MEMORANDUM

TO: Hardin Watkins


Town Manager

FROM: Frank H. Powell, Jr., PE


Town Engineer
DATE: November 23, 2010
SUBJECT: Peacock Pond BMP
Feasibility Report

The Engineering Department has been investigating the possibility of using the Peacock Pond
located between NC 50 and Rand Mill Road, as a water quality treatment best management
practice (BMP). Initially the intent was to potentially use this pond as a BMP for the regional
Stormwater Retrofit Program. Later there was interest in using this pond as a stormwater BMP
for the proposed downtown redevelopment. It was determined early on that there might be some
state and federal regulatory issues that could affect the conversion of the pond into a water
quality BMP. As such Jewell Engineering was engaged to assist the Town with this effort. This
effort has been going on for several years and has involved numerous meetings and
conversations with DWQ and Army Corp of Engineers representatives. After much investigation
and discussion with the regulatory agencies it appears that it will not be feasible to convert the
Peacock Pond into a water quality BMP. Mr. Doug Jewell with Jewell Engineering will be at the
work session to make a short presentation and answer any questions.

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MEMORANDUM

TO: Hardin Watkins


Town Manager

FROM: Brad Bass, AICP


Director of Planning

DATE: November 23, 2010

SUBJECT: UDO Amendment Regarding Sign Regulations

Background

The Planning Staff briefed the Town Council at their October work session regarding
complaints we had received regarding signs. The majority of the concerns involved off-
premise signs advising residential subdivisions and on-site signs advertising large construction
projects. Council directed staff to develop possible amendments to the UDO sign regulations
for further review and discussion.

Findings

The types of signs that are being reviewed for possible changes in the UDO sign regulations
are listed below.

- Construction Identification Sign that names the project, developers,


contractors, and others associated with the construction, sale, or lease of the
property is allowed (temporary sign permit, limited to one-year, with a
renewable option). Signs must be removed within ten days after the final
certificate of occupancy has been issued. They are required to be on-premises
with no more than one such sign per site, and it may not exceed 32 square feet
in area or six feet in height. Such signs cannot be erected prior to Town plan
approval of the project identified.

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- Off-Site Subdivision Signs allowed on private property directing the public


to a subdivision or multifamily development with the property owner’s
permission. These signs are limited to one year through the issuance of a
temporary sign permit. They cannot exceed 32 square feet in surface area, and
can only display the name of and direction to the development.

Suggested Amendments

Attachment One highlights suggested changes to the UDO temporary sign regulations
regarding construction identification signs and off-premise subdivision signs. The
amendment clarifies renewal options available for each type of sign and set limits on
the amount of time they may be posted. Attachment Two is a table summarizing how
other municipalities in Wake County regulate these signs. If Council wishes to move forward
with a formal text amendment to the UDO regarding temporary signs as discussed herein,
then a request to set a public hearing for January 3, 2011 should be placed on December 6,
2010 Town Council agenda.

Should you have questions, please advise.

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ATTACHMENT ONE

UDO Text Amendment Regarding Temporary Signs

I. Miscellaneous temporary and permanent signs. The following temporary and


permanent signs are permitted in addition to any allowed in above, and all
require a sign permit.

1. Temporary signs.

a. Construction site identification signs, naming the project,


developer, contractors and others connected with the
construction, sale or lease of structures, and related information,
are permitted. Not more than one such sign may be erected per
site, and it may not exceed 32 square feet in area or six feet in
height. Permits for such signs shall be limited to one-year, with an
annual renewable option, provided such signs are not erected
prior to site, Special Use or Conditional Use approval of the
project identified and are maintained in good condition and
appearance as determined by the Planning Director . Any such
sign shall be removed within ten days after the issuance of the
final occupancy permit or after ten (10) years has passed
whichever occurs first. Renewals beyond the ten (10) year
maximum time period may be granted only in limited
instances at the discretion of the Planning Director if he or
she finds conditions such as extreme financial hardships,
changes in project ownership status or similar issues are
preventing the sale or completion of the project. Such signs
shall be removed from property within ten (10) where a site,
Special Use or Conditional Use permit approval has expired.

b. Signs or banners advertising special events must be on private


property and shall not be permitted within public rights-of-way.
Permits for such banners or signs shall be limited to 30 days and
no more than three times each year. Any such banner or sign
shall be removed within ten days after the event was advertised.

c. Signs or banners advertising the initial opening of a business


establishment may be permitted on private property. Not more
than one such sign or banner per site is permitted at any one time;
such sign or banner shall not exceed 32 square feet in area and
shall meet all other requirements. Permits shall be limited to 30
days from the date of issue.

d. Signs on private property directing the public to a subdivision or


multifamily development are permitted, provided that the property
owner's written permission for such use of his land accompanies
the permit request, that the sign does not exceed 32 square feet in
surface area, and that the sign bears only the name of and

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direction to the development. Permits for such signs are limited to


one year with an annual renewal option provided such signs
are maintained in good condition and appearance as
determined by the Planning Director. Any such sign shall be
removed within ten days after the issuance of the final
occupancy permit or after ten (10) years has passed
whichever occurs first. Renewals beyond the ten (10) year
maximum time period may be granted only in limited
instances at the discretion of the Planning Director if he or
she finds conditions such as extreme financial hardships,
changes in project ownership status or similar issues are
preventing the sale or completion of the project.

e. Signs providing direction to a U-pick farm operation or agricultural


market are permitted. Any such sign shall not exceed 32 square
feet in area. Permits shall be limited to a maximum of 60 days
from the date of issue and require the written permission of the
property owner or his agent for such use of his land.

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ATTACHMENT TWO

Construction Site Identification Signs

Municipality Size Permit Duration Removal


Required
Holly Springs 6 sq ft Yes Construction 15 days end of
construction or
development.
Fuquay- 64 (all signs) Yes Based upon number of Expiration of Permit
Varina 32 (one sign) lots
18 months first 50
6 months/addl. 50
Morrisville 32 (residential) Yes Construction Permit to Occupy
64 (all others)
Apex 64 sq ft (non- Yes 6 months may be Issuance of C.O.
residential) renewed additional 6 (Commercial)
32 square feet months 100% Sold to builders or
(residential) private owner (residential)
Raleigh 32 (non- Yes Construction 15 days after a certificate
residential) of compliance is issued.
15 (residential)
Cary Same as ground Yes Construction C.O. Issue Date or First
sign C.O. for Subdivisions
Wake Forest 32 square feet Yes Undefined Undefined
Knightdale 4 (Residential) No Construction 30 days after a C.O.
32 (Others)
Garner 32 sq ft Yes 1 year with a renewable 10 days after the issuance
option of final occupancy permit

Off-Premise Directional Subdivision Signs

Municipality Number Size Duration Notes


Holly Springs n/a n/a n/a Not Permitted
Fuquay Varina 5 6 square feet Weekends Only
Morrisville Based on Lots 6 square feet Weekends Only Permits Required
Apex 1 4 square feet Until Lots Sold
Raleigh n/a n/a n/a Not Permitted
Cary undefined undefined Weekends Only Open House Signs
Wake Forest undefined 2 square feet Allowed Property Owner's
Permission req'd
Knightdale 3 4 square feet Removed 7 days
after Sale, Lease,
or Rental
Garner 1 32 square feet One Year *

* Garner also allows small directional real estate signs on the weekend, but is the only municipality
surveyed that allows for larger off-premise signs. The only thing permitted on the sign is the name
and direction of the development.

h:\pla-02\sign_memo_11-23-2010.doc

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TOWN OF GARNER

MEMORANDUM
To: Hardin Watkins
Town Manager

From: Lin Jones


Finance Director

Date: November 23, 2010

Subject: Analysis of Departmental Expenditures through October 31, 2010

The financial report for October 31, 2010 indicated that several departments have expended
more than 33% of their total budget. I have analyzed each department’s expenditures and
identified reasons for these variances.

My analysis revealed several reasons for the expenditures exceeding 33% of the budget.
Items identified were:

1. Major one time expenditures including capital outlay, insurance premiums and
other contracts that were paid prior to October 31

2. Expenditures included 34.6% of expected payroll. We have processed nine of


twenty-six payrolls through October 31. (This adjustment is identified as
“Salaries over 33% expected amount” on the attached analysis)

3. In the Inspections Department, salaries include payroll for two months, accrued
vacation and early termination benefits for employees included in the reduction
in force policy

4. Payments for contracts that were entered into but not completed during the year
ending June 30, 2010. Additional funds will be budgeted for the carryover
purchase orders.

I have attached an Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures for each department that
reflects these items. In this analysis I have reduced the budgeted and actual amounts for each of
item that was identified. I have also adjusted the budgeted amounts for large items that have not
been purchased. After adjustment for these items the total departmental expenditures through
October 31 were 31.13% of the adjusted budget.

This analysis does not include amounts for economic incentives, payments to the fire and
rescue departments, transfers to other funds and debt service.

I will continue to monitor departmental expenditures.

If further explanations are needed please let me know.

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Town of Garner
Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures
July 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010

Carry Over Adjusted Percentage


Budget Purchase Orders Budget Expended to Date Expended
Town Council 917,489.00 5,750.00 923,239.00 445,147.52
Purchase of Rescue Truck (324,891.00) (324,891.00)
Subsidized Programs (59,525.00) (59,525.00)
NC League Dues (15,914.00) (15,914.00)
Triangle J Dues (9,673.00) (9,673.00)
Contingency (336,502.00) (336,502.00)

580,987.00 5,750.00 176,734.00 35,144.52 19.89%

Attorney 89,945.00 89,945.00 14,427.00 16.04%

Total Town Council 670,932.00 5,750.00 266,679.00 49,571.52 18.59%

Town Manager 557,364.00 557,364.00 136,743.90


Insurance & Bonds (not paid) (181,750.00) (1,430.00)
Reallocate Temporary Salary 6,620.00

557,364.00 - 382,234.00 135,313.90 35.40%

Town Clerk 173,000.00 173,000.00 52,257.44


Reallocate Temporary Salary (6,620.00)

173,000.00 - 166,380.00 52,257.44 31.41%

Personnel 694,631.00 6,700.00 701,331.00 334,647.87


Workers Compensation Insurance (251,000.00)
(251 000 00) (236,947.04)
(236 947 04)

694,631.00 6,700.00 450,331.00 97,700.83 21.70%

Safety 8,475.00 8,475.00 1,987.00 23.45%

Total Town Manager 1,433,470.00 6,700.00 1,014,040.00 287,259.17 28.33%

Finance Administration 561,204.00 2,520.00 563,724.00 197,809.17


Equipment (2,520.00) (2,520.00)
Professional Services
Software Maintenance Agreement (36,958.00) (36,958.00)
Debt Capacity Study (25,000.00) (25,000.00)

561,204.00 2,520.00 499,246.00 133,331.17 26.71%

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Town of Garner
Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures
July 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010

Carry Over Adjusted Percentage


Budget Purchase Orders Budget Expended to Date Expended

Purchasing 250,866.00 250,866.00 85,702.51 34.16%

Total Finance 812,070.00 2,520.00 750,112.00 219,033.68 29.20%

Total Economic Development 370,296.00 15,002.00 385,298.00 126,537.00 32.84%

Planning Administration 274,233.00 88,594.00 362,827.00 71,879.95 19.81%

Land Use Permits 175,462.00 4,200.00 179,662.00 61,289.72 34.11%

Community Planning 182,649.00 182,649.00 100,241.54


Garner Road Overlay (70,907.00) (70,907.00)

182,649.00 - 111,742.00 29,334.54 26.25%

Total Planning 632,344.00 92,794.00 654,231.00 162,504.21 24.84%

Inspections 744,734.00 744,734.00 290,671.00


Salary - Employee #1 (24,482.00) (24,482.00)
Salary - Employee #2 (27,440.00) (27,440.00)
Benefits - Employee #1 (3,447.00) (3,447.00)
Benefits - Employee #2 (3,864.00) (3,864.00)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (10,098.00)

T t l Inspections
Total I ti 744
744,734.00
734 00 - 685
685,501.00
501 00 221
221,340.00
340 00 32
32.29%
29%

Engineering 504,188.00 123,862.00 628,050.00 242,345.81


Hwy 50 Sewer Line (79,083.00) (79,083.00)

Total Engineering 504,188.00 123,862.00 548,967.00 163,262.81 29.74%

Information Technology 966,031.00 45,922.00 1,011,953.00 295,691.00


Equipment (153,500.00) (55,146.00)

Total Information Technology 966,031.00 45,922.00 858,453.00 240,545.00 28.02%

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Town of Garner
Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures
July 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010

Carry Over Adjusted Percentage


Budget Purchase Orders Budget Expended to Date Expended
Police Administration 1,623,396.00 6,154.00 1,629,550.00 567,147.00
Outside Employment Self supporting (148,000.00) (52,986.00)
Police Attorney - Reflect 4 months payment (8,000.00)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (19,641.00)

1,623,396.00 6,154.00 1,481,550.00 486,520.00 32.84%

School Crossing Guards 38,426.00 38,426.00 8,070.40 21.00%

Investigations 861,646.00 861,646.00 318,732.00


Salaries over 33% expected amount (13,084.00)

861,646.00 - 861,646.00 305,648.00 35.47%

Operations 4,151,959.00 4,653.00 4,156,612.00 1,474,176.73


Raleigh Dispatch fees paid 6 months (31,874.00)
Wake 800 mhz fees paid 6 months (7,102.00)
Software Maintenance Fee (13,475.00) (13,475.00)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (45,987.00)

4,151,959.00 4,653.00 4,143,137.00 1,375,738.73 33.21%

Total Police 6,675,427.00 10,807.00 6,524,759.00 2,189,061.13 33.55%

Public Works Admin 392,111.00 392,111.00 137,614.00


Travel - all conferences attended (2 355 00)
(2,355.00) (2 359 70)
(2,359.70)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (5,493.00)

392,111.00 - 389,756.00 129,761.30 33.29%

Street Maintenance 943,994.00 54,846.00 998,840.00 313,780.00


Salaries over 33% expected amount (3,056.00)

943,994.00 54,846.00 998,840.00 310,724.00 31.11%

Powell Bill 530,784.00 6,895.00 537,679.00 182,619.00


Salaries over 33% expected amount (5,472.00)
Equipment not purchased (5,400.00)

530,784.00 6,895.00 532,279.00 177,147.00 33.28%

Snow Removal 3,925.00 3,925.00 558.08 14.22%

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Town of Garner
Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures
July 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010

Carry Over Adjusted Percentage


Budget Purchase Orders Budget Expended to Date Expended
Public Grounds 954,557.00 5,000.00 959,557.00 322,843.56
Salaries over 33% expected amount (8,272.00)
Equipment (26,000.00) (19,553.00)

954,557.00 5,000.00 933,557.00 295,018.56 31.60%

Solid Waste 1,651,065.00 1,651,065.00 417,122.89 25.26%

Public Facility 579,514.00 70,386.00 649,900.00 217,377.42


HVAC Renovation (40,000.00)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (3,009.00)
Roof Repairs (20,085.00) (20,085.00)

579,514.00 70,386.00 589,815.00 194,283.42 32.94%

Fleet Maintenance 321,548.00 321,548.00 116,150.98


Salaries over 33% expected amount (4,770.00)

321,548.00 - 321,548.00 111,380.98 34.64%

Total Public Works 5,377,498.00 137,127.00 5,420,785.00 1,635,996.23 30.18%

Parks & Recreation Administration 192,569.00 15,603.00 208,172.00 64,457.77


NGMS Landscaping (10,628.00)
Salaries over 33% expected amount (2,621.00)

192,569.00 15,603.00 197,544.00 61,836.77 31.30%

Celebration & Events 409,877.00 1,300.00 411,177.00 123,437.00


Salaries over 33% expected amount (1,372.00)
Equipment not purchased (10,800.00)

409,877.00 1,300.00 400,377.00 122,065.00 30.49%

Marketing 80,238.00 1,435.00 81,673.00 18,594.65 22.77%

Sports and Fitness 665,881.00 2,265.00 668,146.00 250,991.32


Salaries over 33% expected amount (5,115.00)

665,881.00 2,265.00 668,146.00 245,876.32 36.80%

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Town of Garner
Analysis of Budget to Actual Expenditures
July 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010

Carry Over Adjusted Percentage


Budget Purchase Orders Budget Expended to Date Expended
Outdoor Adventure 181,723.00 181,723.00 52,912.20
Salaries over 33% expected amount (890.00)

181,723.00 - 181,723.00 52,022.20 28.63%

Program Partners 164,680.00 164,680.00 57,959.65 35.20%

Total Parks and Recreation 1,694,968.00 20,603.00 1,694,143.00 558,354.59 32.96%

Total All Departments 19,881,958.00 461,087.00 18,802,968.00 5,853,465.34 31.13%

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TOWN OF GARNER

MEMORANDUM
To: Hardin Watkins
Town Manager

From: Lin Jones


Finance Director

Date: November 18, 2010

Subject: Adoption of Fiscal Policy Guidelines

During their preparation of the Town’s debt capacity study, Davenport & Company
stressed the importance of adopting fiscal policy guidelines. These guidelines will influence and
guide the financial management practice of the Town. Adhering to these policies is recognized as
the cornerstone of sound financial management. During our conversations with the bond rating
agencies they also stressed the need for adopting fiscal guidelines. They also inquired about the
Town’s policy and if it had been adopted by the governing body.

The adoption of these policies will:

1. Contribute significantly to the Town's ability to insulate itself from fiscal crisis,

2. Enhance short term and long term financial credit ability by helping to achieve
the highest credit and bond ratings possible,

3. Promote long-term financial stability by establishing clear and consistent


guidelines

4. Direct attention to the total financial picture of the Town rather than single issue
areas,

5. Promote the view of linking long-run financial planning with day to day
operations, and

6. Provide the Town Council, citizens and the Town’s professional management a
framework for measuring the fiscal impact of government services against
established fiscal parameters and guidelines.

The Town is currently in compliance with the recommended guidelines. While we


have followed these guidelines in the past, I recommend formal adoption of the attached
guidelines

Please let me know if you have questions.

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Fiscal Policy Guidelines

Town of Garner,
North Carolina

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

Adopted: __________________

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Objectives 3

Capital Improvement Budget Policies 4

Debt Policies 5

Reserve Policies 6

Budget Development Policies 7

Cash Management and Investment Policies 8

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES - OBJECTIVES

This fiscal policy is a statement of the guidelines and goals that will influence and guide the
financial management practice of the Town of Garner, North Carolina. A fiscal policy that is
adopted, adhered to, and regularly reviewed is recognized as the cornerstone of sound financial
management. Effective fiscal policy:

• Contributes significantly to the Town's ability to insulate itself from


fiscal crisis,

Enhances short term and long term financial credit ability by helping to
• achieve the highest credit and bond ratings possible,

Promotes long-term financial stability by establishing clear and


• 
consistent guidelines,

Directs attention to the total financial picture of the Town rather than
• 
single issue areas,

Promotes the view of linking long-run financial planning with day to


• day operations, and

Provides the Town Council, citizens and the Town’s professional


management a framework for measuring the fiscal impact of
• 
government services against established fiscal parameters and
guidelines.

To these ends, the following fiscal policy statements are presented.

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT BUDGET POLICIES

1. The Town will prioritize all capital improvements in accordance with an adopted capital
improvement program.

2. The Town will develop a 5-year plan for capital improvements and review and update the
plan annually. Additional projects can be added to the CIP at any time, but funding for
projects added in this manner are subject to normal operating budget constraints.

3. The Town will coordinate development of the capital improvement program with
development of the operating budget.

4. The Town will maintain all its assets at a level adequate to protect the Town's capital
investment and to minimize future maintenance and replacement costs.

5. The Town will identify the estimated costs and potential funding sources for each capital
project proposal before it is submitted for approval.

6. The Town will attempt to determine the least costly and most flexible financing method
for all new projects.

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

DEBT POLICIES

General

1. The Town will confine long-term borrowing to capital improvements or projects that
cannot be financed from current revenues except where approved justification is
provided.

2. The Town will utilize a balanced approach to capital funding utilizing debt financing,
draws on capital reserves and/or fund balances in excess of policy targets, and current-
year (pay-as-you-go) appropriations.

3. When the Town finances capital improvements or other projects by issuing bonds or
entering into capital leases, it will repay the debt within a period not to exceed the
expected useful life of the project. Target debt ratios will be calculated annually and
included in the review of financial trends.

4. Where feasible, the Town will explore the usage of special assessment, revenue, or other
self-supporting bonds instead of general obligation bonds.

5. The Town will retire tax anticipation debt, if any, annually and will retire bond
anticipation debt within six months after completion of the project.

Tax Supported Debt

6. Direct net debt as a percentage of total assessed value of taxable property should not
exceed 2.0%. Direct net debt is defined as Town-issued debt that is tax-supported.

7. The ratio of direct net debt service expenditures as a percent of total governmental fund
expenditures should not exceed 15% with an aggregate ten-year principal payout ratio
target of 50% or better.

8. The Town recognizes the importance of underlying and overlapping debt in analyzing
financial condition. The Town will regularly analyze total indebtedness including
underlying and overlapping debt.

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

RESERVE POLICIES

1. Unreserved, Undesignated Fund Balances will mean funds that remain available for
appropriation by the Town Council after all commitments for future expenditures,
required reserves defined by State statutes, and previous Council designations have been
calculated. The Town will define these remaining amounts as “available fund balances.”

2. The Town of Garner will strive to maintain available fund balance in the General Fund at
a level sufficient to meet its objectives. The Town will target an available fund balance
at the close of each fiscal year equal to at least 30% of the General Fund Operating
Budget; at no time shall the available Fund Balance fall below 25% of the General Fund
Operating Budget. Available fund balances in excess of the target 30% of General Fund
Operating Budget may be appropriated from time to time for pay-as-you-go capital and
other one-time uses.

3. The Town Council may, from time-to-time, appropriate fund balances that will reduce
available fund balances below the 25% policy for the purposes of a declared fiscal
emergency or other such global purpose as to protect the long-term fiscal security of the
Town of Garner. In such circumstances, the Council will adopt a plan to restore the
available fund balances to the policy level within 36 months from the date of the
appropriation. If restoration cannot be accomplished within such time period without
severe hardship to the Town, then the Council will establish a different but appropriate
time period.

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

BUDGET DEVELOPMENT POLICIES

1. The Town will develop its annual budgets in such a manner so as to incorporate historic
trend analysis for revenues and expenditures with an adjustment for current financial
trends and developments as appropriate.

2. One-time or other special revenues will not be used to finance continuing Town
operations but instead will be used for funding special projects.

3. The Town will pursue an aggressive policy seeking the collection of delinquent utility,
license, permit and other fees due to the Town.

4. The Town Council will receive a financial report no less than quarterly showing year-to-
date revenues and expenditures.

5. Budget amendments will be brought to Town Council for consideration as needed.

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FISCAL POLICY GUIDELINES


Town of Garner, North Carolina

CASH MANAGEMENT AND INVESTMENT POLICIES

1. It is the intent of the Town that public funds will be invested to the extent possible to
reduce the need for property tax revenues. Funds will be invested with the chief
objectives of safety of principal, liquidity, and yield, in that order. All deposits and
investments of Town funds will be in accordance with N.C.G.S. 159.

2. The Town will use a Central Depository to maximize the availability and mobility of cash
for all funds that can be legally and practically combined.

3. Liquidity: No less than 20% of funds available for investment will be maintained in
liquid investments at any point in time.

4. Maturity: All investments will mature in no more than thirty-six (36) months from their
purchase date.

5. Custody: All investments will be purchased “payment-versus-delivery” and if certificated


will be held by the Finance Officer in the name of the Town. All non-certificated
investment will be held in book-entry form in the name of the Town with the Town’s
third party Custodian (Safekeeping Agent).

6. Authorized Investments: The Town may deposit Town Funds into: Any Board approved
Official Depository, if such funds are secured in accordance with NCGS159 (31). The
Town may invest Town Funds in: the North Carolina Capital Management Trust, US
Treasury Securities, US Agency Securities specifically authorized in GS-159 and rated no
lower than “AAA”, and Commercial Paper meeting the requirements of NCGS-159 plus
having a national bond rating.

7. Diversification: No more than 5% of the Town’s investment funds may be invested in a


specific company’s commercial paper and no more than 20% of the Town’s investment
funds may be invested in commercial paper. No more than 25% of the Town’s
investments may be invested in any one US Agency’s Securities.

8. Allocation: Investment income will be allocated to each participating fund or account


based on a fair and equitable formula determined by the Finance Director.

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9. Reporting: The Town Council will receive an investment report at the end of each month
showing current investment holdings.

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Garner Historic Auditorium


Focus Group Summary
11.22.10

Background

Garner Parks and Recreation Department staff hosted several focus group meetings,
during the month of October 2010, in an effort to gather public input concerning the
future direction of Garner Historic Auditorium. Focus groups included local citizens,
auditorium event attendees, event promoters, auditorium renters and user groups,
programming partners, downtown revitalization association, theater managers,
consultants, and the parks and recreation advisory committee.

Additional focus groups will be conducted to include more business owners, seniors
living at Old School Commons and local arts, music and drama teachers in Garner area
schools. These will be conducted in early December 2010.

Background information on Garner Historic Auditorium was shared with each focus
group detailing current Auditorium budget, staffing, and events, along with recent
research gathered on area theatres.

Focus Group Discussions

Several topics were discussed with focus groups aimed at collecting data on the
Auditorium’s overall perception, programming, marketing/advertising, management
options/staffing and facility enhancements. The following section lists common themes
discussed among focus group participants:

Overall Perception of GHA


 Most people don’t know about it
 There’s always been a struggle with programming
 Lacks vision- Needs to be a big vision set to do something great
 It should be something that gives back to the community and not be all about the
money
 Senior apartments
 Needs new signage
 People know the name
 People don’t realize public is invited
 Arts should provide opportunities for residents
 GHA has a sense of place already, more people need to experience it

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 Have elected officials ever discussed goals for GHA


 Town needs to put dollars behind the facility
 Underutilized
 Nice and open space, nicely decorated, intimate
 Needs its own website
 Plan events with consistency for the entire year

The Name - Garner Historic Auditorium


 Does not say what it really is - performing arts center
 Should be associated with arts and creativity for branding
 Historic reminds you of old
 There are benefits to having historic in the name (grants)
 Changing name is a diversion- focus should be on what’s on stage to define who
you are
 Grant opportunities exist for historic facilities- keep the name
 Gets in the way
 Adds flavor
 Historical to entertainment; change names YES

Programming
 Define your niche
 More music
 Turn musical programming into production; youth theater series
 Include youth- high school- students in discussion for new youth programs
 Multicultural programming series- outreach to various communities
 Host various competitions- gospel, band, dance
 Be inclusive in programming
 Move high school performances to GHA
 Sponsor various series- speakers, children, arts, political debates, performing
troupes
 Don’t program anything- Hire a consultant to develop a strategic plan with
Council, Management and Staff
 Set up for failure until a vision and financial support is provided
 Yearly Artist fees for numerous venues ranged from $75,000-$250,000 (average
yearly performance fees budget)
 Refine rental process
 Slow down and plan
 Utilize Arts Council as a resource- United Arts of Wake County
 Niche will take time to develop and everyone will not like it
 Senior citizen programs and matinees since a large number live in Garner
 Summer camp music programs
 Create an orchestra program for low income children

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 Don’t get into booking large performances if you don’t have the dollars to support
it

Marketing
 Need more flyers like parks and recreation summer event insert in News and
Observer
 Department’s brochure quality needs improving
 Market GHA at July 3rd
 Work to build reputation
 Greeters at entry door dressed in uniforms, vests or coats
 Auditorium is buried on parks and recreation website- hard to find- needs
independent site
 Feature of GHA on website and WTOG monthly
 Develop an Arts Advisory group to come in quarterly to review operations,
marketing, programming, etc.
 Garner Citizen ads are not large enough for GHA events
 Put event posters throughout the building
 Hire PR agency to assist with publicity
 Need marketing money to leverage ads and attract sponsors
 Review data to track where event attendees are coming from
 Recognize competition from other Town events
 Market to a variety of people
 Build email database for information distribution

Staffing and Management Options


 Will lose the soul of the facility by outsourcing to promoter/promotion company;
need to keep sales/promotion separate from normal manager duties
 Manager will have a heart for the facility and work to develop its identity and
carry forth the vision
 Better working with a staff person versus an outside person
 Need to establish a mission so that GHA tradition remains
 Promoters will provide more staff, lose out on personal touch and control of
venue booking
 Ticket prices will increase with using a promoter
 Need staff to build programming to capacity, develop successful performance
series
 Can’t run facility without full-time staff
 There will be value added if Town can increase Lead Technician position’s hours
 Great staff – kind and responsive with an emphasis on good customer service

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Auditorium Manager Skill Set Needs


 Dynamic
 Grant Writer
 Someone to go out and sell the venue
 Works well with promoters
 Passionate about facility
 Aggressive
 Dedicated and love for facility
 Knows about small town theatres
 Diplomatic and decisive
 Marketing and Sales background
 Theater background and theater management experience
 Knowledgeable about business contracts
 Empower manager to make decisions
 Position needs to be exempt- professional position (salaried)
 Creative and familiar with Garner
 Knowledgeable, artsy and thinks outside the box
 New ideas and possibilities

Facility Enhancements
 New sign- larger, brighter
 Directional signage from main highways into town
 More lighting in front, sides and rear
 When walk in door- WOW!
 Show starts when you drive up
 Entryway needs awning
 Landscaping needs improving
 Get billboards on highway to promote venue
 Building across street unattractive
 Town needs to purchase surrounding property for future expansion
 Additional parking-overflow parking for sellout crowds
 Parking in rear does not feel safe
 Create separate entrance for residents
 Move keypad from main lobby door
 Clearly define parking; difficult at night

Future Recommendations

As a result of focus group discussions, the following section details initial


recommendations for moving programming forward at Garner Historic Auditorium.

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These recommendations will hopefully establish the foundation for successful


programming.

Staffing
 Fill the vacant Auditorium Manager position with expanded responsibilities
 Review Lead Technician position for possible upgrade to Facility Supervisor with
additional responsibilities
 Create a part-time, temporary Theater/Administrative Assistant position
 Work with special event planners and coordinators to recruit potential renters for
weddings, reunions, etc. at GHA
 Continue working with current event promoters to book shows at GHA
 Recruit additional volunteers to serve as lobby hosts and greeters; determine
attire- coats, vests, etc.

Marketing
 Develop independent website for GHA
 Develop an overall marketing plan for GHA
 Develop various GHA brochures for rentals, concerts, and special events
 Post special event posters, flyers and brochures throughout building to market
upcoming events
 Utilize target marketing techniques to increase awareness of audience; add zip
codes to current surveys
 Continue building email database via ticket purchases
 Consider rebranding GHA with name change, yet keeping historic piece (Garner
Historic Theatre/Garner Historic Performing Arts Center, etc.)
 Recommend marketing budget to support future programming needs

Facility Enhancements
 New GHA sign
 Directional signage for parking lot and facility entry
 Directional signage for major roads leading to GHA
 Purchase surrounding property to expand parking area
 Additional lighting for front and rear parking lots
 Awning and additional lighting for main entry to GHA
 Remove, trim, or limb up trees from front of facility to increase visibility from
Garner Road and replace with appropriate sized trees
 Enhance alternate front entries to encourage use by residents; move key pad from
main entry; remove (or trim) trees and shrubs, add lighting
 Remove landscaping along building front and replace with appropriate plantings
and shrubs
 Schedule date for Town Council members to walk exterior of GHA

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Programming and Operations


 Define our niche and determine programs of success
 Work with Town Management, Council and Staff to determine future vision;
depending on costs, hire a consultant to help establish this vision
 Continue communicating with NC Presenters Consortium Work Group
 Consider Foundation for GHA
 Determine potential performance series programming and budget
 Review current rental guides and applications
 Establish better communications with residents
 Use of event parking signage to direct traffic info front parking lot

Focus Group Attendees

Dana Stephenson, Helen Phillips, Lillie Sanders, Tim Stevens, Cheryl Ward, Tammy
Kennedy, Doris Allen, Shaffy Booth, James Booth, Lisa Stanley, Tom Browne, Martha
Browne, Aleisha Sanyika, Harold Garner, Mark Hensley, Evan Barnette, John Norris,
Scott Honeycutt, Beth Honeycutt, Frances Stanley, Wren Peele, Stephen Whetle, Marti
Hall, Sarah Preston, Cary P&R ; Noelle Scott and Sara Heiser, Cabarras County Arts
Council & Davis Theater; Stephen Barefoot, Thalian Hall, Wilmington; Jamie Katz,
PineCone; Renee Anderson, Halle Cultural Arts Center; Ray Jordan, Sampson County
Agri-Expo Center; Heidi Stump, The Clayton Center, John Hodges, Tom Giroux,
Eleanor Oakley and Ginny Zehr of United Arts Council of Raleigh/Wake, Lyman
Collins, Town of Cary; Neal Padgett, Faye Gardner, Carol Schriber, Amaka Flynn, Derek
Nunn, Rochester White, Nathan Cottrell, Jack Mixell, Kim Cattani, Gra Singleton,
Cherry Gay, Sonya Shaw

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