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12.6.

2003 EN Official Journal of the European Union C 137 E/177

(2003/C 137 E/200) WRITTEN QUESTION E-3223/02


by Eija-Riitta Korhola (PPE-DE) to the Commission

(14 November 2002)

Subject: Accession countries and volume of ‘hot air’

Is there an estimate on how big a volume of so-called ‘hot air’ is possessed by the 10 (and later 12) new
Member States during the initial period of the EU emission trading scheme (2005-2007) or the subsequent
period(s)? What is the volume, in comparison, of the ‘hot air’ the German Federal Republic is able to sell
taking into account the fact of the German reunification which took place after the base year of the Kyoto
protocol?

Has the EU developed strategies on when and how this hot air should be put on the market in regard to
the price of emission allowances (and the actual reductions of emissions in the EU)  and where have such
strategies been published if they exist?

Answer given by Mrs Wallström on behalf of the Commission

(14 January 2003)

The targets of the Kyoto Protocol apply in the period 2008-2012. Prior to that date, there are no legally
binding targets.

The Community’s greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme, as foreseen by the Commission’s proposal (1),
is an entity based allowance trading scheme. Allocations of allowances must be made to entities covered by
the Directive according to pre-determined criteria and in accordance with the EC Treaty’s provisions, in
particular with regard to state aid.

If ‘hot air’ is understood as being a greater allocation of allowances than the expected real needs of
companies, then the Commission is confident that there will be no ‘hot air’ traded, neither in the period
2005-2007, nor in subsequent periods. This is because the proposal would prohibit governments from
giving to their entities more than their likely need.

In these circumstances, it is not foreseen that any so-called ‘hot air’ will be traded by operators in any
Member State, whether new Member States or not.

(1) OJ C 75 E, 26.3.2002.

(2003/C 137 E/201) WRITTEN QUESTION E-3225/02


by Eija-Riitta Korhola (PPE-DE) to the Commission

(14 November 2002)

Subject: Accession countries and joint implementation projects (Kyoto Mechanism)

Has the EU made any agreements in the accession talks for the ten new Member States to promote JI
projects during the initial period of the EU emission trading scheme (2005-2007) or the subsequent
period(s)?

Is there an estimate on how big a volume of such projects will be initiated during each of the ET periods
(absolutely and in proportion of ‘hot air’)? Has the EU made any models on how effective implementation
of JI projects would affect the price of emission allowances (and the actual reductions of emissions in the
EU)  and where have such models been published if they exist?
C 137 E/178 Official Journal of the European Union EN 12.6.2003

Answer given by Mrs Wallström on behalf of the Commission

(18 December 2002)

No specific agreements have been made in the context of the European Union enlargement on Joint
Implementation projects under Article 6 of the Kyoto Protocol. However, the Commission has launched a
study to identify specific capacity building needs and priorities in Central and Eastern European countries
for the establishment of national Joint Implementation programmes. This study will be completed early
2003 and will provide a sound basis for making recommendations for further technical assistance to
facilitate the development of Joint Implementation projects.

Emission reduction units generated by Joint Implementation projects will not be available before 2008 in
accordance with the implementing provisions of the Kyoto Protocol. Therefore, the recognition of Joint
Implementation credits for their use in the initial phase of the forthcoming Union emissions trading
scheme (2005-2007) is not practicable. The modalities for linking credits from the Kyoto Protocol’s project
based mechanisms (Joint Implementation and the Clean Development Mechanism) will be laid down in a
proposal for a Directive to be made in 2003, as outlined in the Commission’s Work Programme for 2003.

The Commission has undertaken no modelling exercise on the potential volume of Joint Implementation
projects or on the extent to which the availability of Joint Implementation credits would affect the price of
allowances. It is assumed, however, that the availability of credits will reduce the price of allowances.

(2003/C 137 E/202) WRITTEN QUESTION E-3238/02


by Christopher Huhne (ELDR) to the Commission

(15 November 2002)

Subject: Identity cards

1. Does any EU Member State require that employers are shown an identity card before an employee
can be hired?

2. Do any EU Member States require that such a card is nationally-issued so that a foreign but EU
citizen has to apply first for a national identity card before availing themselves of the provisions for
freedom of movement?

3. In the Commission’s view, is such a procedure consistent with EU rules?

Answer given by Mrs Diamantopoulou on behalf of the Commission

(20 December 2002)

The Honourable Member asks two questions:

 whether any Member State requires a person to show an identity card before he can be hired,

 whether any Member State requires a person to apply for a national identity card before they can
exercise their right to freedom of movement.

Article 18 of the EC Treaty lays down the principle of the right of citizens of the Union to move and reside
freely within the territory of the Member States. However, this right is subject to the limitations and
conditions laid down in the EC Treaty, and to the measures adopted to give it effect.

According to Article 2 of Council Directive 68/360/EEC of 15 October 1968 on the abolition of


restrictions on movement and residence within the Community for workers of the Member States and
their families (1), Union citizens can leave the territory of a Member State in order to enter another
Member State on simple production of a valid identity card or passport.