Prelaunch

_I

Mission No. TO: FROM: SUBJECT: A/Administrator MA/Apollo Apollo Program 13 Mission Director (AS-508)

Operation 13

Report

M-932-701970

31 March

l

On . the

11 April Kennedy

1970, Space

we

plan

Center.

to launch This will in the

Apollo be the

13 from Pad A of Launch Complex third manned lunar landing mission Formation. inspection, deposited during Lunar to work will survey, the Surface in the sites. and

39 at and is

targeted Primary sampling the ment; records The and Package; and

to a preselected objectives of the basin; continuing obtaining will of this ejecta

point mission

Fra Mauro

include activation

selenological to have been

blanket the

thought and

formation Experiments lunar environ-

of

lmbrium

deployment photographs and

of an Apollo capability lunar activities exploration

development the

of man’s

of candidate extravehicular with and Center isolation.

Photographic

be obtained mission of the at the that will crew, Manned

be televised.

IO-day transport

be completed spacecraft, Spacecraft for biological

landing in the Pacific Ocean. Recovery lunar samples to the Lunar Receiving will be conducted under quarantine

r/-

Laboratory procedures

provide

EL~kRocco A.

Petrone

~s!Zc~;e%%%f!tor Manned Space Flight

for

FOREWORD

MISSION Management, 15 August with timely,

OPERATION as required 1963. The complete, mission

REPORTS by and the purpose

are

published reports

expressly in NASA on is to provide

for the NASA flight for

use of NASA 6-2-10, plans, of Senior

Senior dated and to

Administrator information which provide

Instruction mission

of these definitive

Management mission

establish official accomplishment. Initial Following ment 6-2-10 Primary The Press. APOLLO OPERATION SUPPLEMENT. the MOR, with SUPPLEMENT. document with ment, the MISSION Office distribution reports currently are

objectives

the basis

assessment

prepared updating

and reports

issued foreach

for each mission

flight

project issued

just in

prior NASA

to

launch. Manage-

launch,

missionare results

to keepGeneral

informed

of definitive

as provided

Instruction

of these Affairs NASA flight

reports which publishes

is intended sometimes

for personnel results are in a highly series available

having technical

program/project orientation. and postto the

management launch reports

responsibilities of Public on

a comprehensive which

of pre-launch for dissemination

missions

OPERATION (MOR) format ; was This

REPORTSare and the and designed to

published provide

in two

volumes:

theMISSION APOLLO document MOR, APOLLO in

REPORT

MISSION facility

OPERATION description

REPORT, in the

a mission-oriented

supporting

equipment

The MOR, APOLLO SUPPLEMENT is a program-oriented reference a broad technical description of the space vehicle and associated equipand mission control and support facilities. launch complex,

Published PROGRAM EXECUTIVE and SPECIAL SECRETARIAT - NASA

and

Distributed DIVISION

by (XP)

REPORTS

HEADQUARTERS

M-932-70-

13

CONTENTS Page Summary . NASA OMSF Primary Mission and and Objectives for Apollo 13. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 5 6 29 32 39 41 45 46 of Apollo/Saturn Missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

.

Detailed Launch Flight

Objectives Countdown Mission

Experiments Turnaround

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capability, AS-508. . . . . . . . . . . .

Description. Operations.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contingency Mission Support

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Differences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Configuration IFlight Mission Crew

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Responsibility Acronyms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Management and

Abbreviations

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-.

3/27/70 ~-

i

M-932-70-

13

LIST Figure 1 . 2 No. Apollo Lunar 13 Flight Orbit Geometry 3 4 5 6 7 8 LM Descent Orbital Title

OF

FIGURES Page 9

Profile and Descent Orbit Insertion

Insertion

14

Events Activities Summary

15 17 18 Stowage Assembly 19 19 Thermoelectric 20

Apollo Apollo Deployed Deployed Apollo

13 Lunar 13 EVA-l

Surface

Time1 ine Equipment

Modularized S-band 13 ALSEP

Antenna Radioisotope (Unfueled) Deployment Timeline Docking Deorbit Network (Apollo 13)

,--

Generator 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 EVAApollo 1 Equipment 13 EVA-2

21 24 25 26 33 34 36 Force Voice Calls 37 38

LM Ascent LM Ascent Lunar Manned Apollo Primary Recovery Prime Crew

Through Stage

Surface Space

Communications Flight Network Area

13 Primary Landing Force

Landing Area Support

Recovery

of Seventh

Manned

Apollo

Mission

42

3/27/‘70

ii

M-932-70-

13

LIST Table Apollo Apollo Apollo Apollo

OF Title

TABLES Page Windows of Major Events 6 10 11 12

13 Launch 13 Sequence

13 TV Schedule 13 Weight Summary

3/2 7/70

... III

SUMMARY
Mission AS-201 Launch Date 2/26/66 Launch Vehicle SA-201 Payload CSM-009 Description

OF APOLLO/SATURN
Mission APOLLO 6

MISSIONS
Launch Date 4/4/68 Launch vaiTEie SA-502 Payload CM-020 SM-014 LTA-2R sLA-9 CM-101 SM-101 .%A-5 CM-103 SM-103 LTA-B S&A-11 CM-104 SH-104 LM-3 SIA-12 CM-106 SM-106 LM-4 SLA-13 Description Launch vehicle and spacecraft development. Demonstration of Saturn V Iaunch Vehicle performance. Manned CSM operations. Duration 10 days 20 hours. Lunar orbital mission. Ten lunar orbits. Mission duration 6 days 3 hours. Manned CSM operations. Earth orbital mission. Manned CSM/LM operations. Duration 10 days 1 hour. Lunar orbital mission. Manned CSWLM ooerations. Evaluation'of ti performance in cislunar and lunar environment, following lunar landing profile. Mission duration 8 days. First manned lunar landing mission. Lunar surface stay time 21.6 hours. Mission duration 8 days 3 hours. Second manned lunar landing mission. Demonstration of point landing capability. DeDhVWZ”t Of ALSEP I. Su+or III investigation. Lunar Surface stay time Two dual EVA's 31.5 hours. (15.5 manhours). 89 hours in lunar orbit (45 orbits). Mission duration 10 days 4.6 hours.

Launch vehicle end CSM Test of development. CSM subsystems and of the Demonspace vehicle. stration of reentry adequacy of the CM at earth orbital conditions. Launch vehicle development. Demonstration of control of LH2 by continuous venting in orbit. Launch vehicle end CSM Test of CSM development. subsystems and of the structural integrity and compatibility of the space vehicle. Qemonstratio" of propulsion and entry conDemontrol by G&N system. stration of entry at 28,500 fps. Launch vehicle and spaceDemo"craft development. stration of Saturn V Launch Vehicle performance and of CM entry at lunar return velocity. Verified LM development. operation of LM subsystems: ascent and descent propulsion systems (including restart) and structures. EValUatiOn Of LM Staging. Evaluation of S-IVB/ILl orbital performance.

APOLLO 7

10/11/68

SA-205

AS-203

l/5/66

SA-203

LH2 in S-WE

APOLLO 8

12/21/68

SA-503

AS-202

B/25/66

SA-202

cm-011

APOLLO 9

3/3/69

SA-504

APOLLO10

5/18/69

SA-505

APOLM 4

11/g/67

SA-501

CSM-017 LTA-1OR

APOLLO 11

7/16/69

SA-506

APOLLO 5

l/22/68

SA-204

r&l-l SLA-7

CM-107 SM-107 LM-5 SLA-14 CM-108 SM-108 LJ4-6 SLA-15

APOLLO 12

11/14/69

SA-507

M-932-70-

13

NASA PRIMARY

OMSF

PRIMARY

MISSION

OBJECTIVES

FOR APOLLO

13

OBJECTIVES selenological region and activate inspection, of the Fra Mauro Lunar survey, and sampling of materials in a

.

Perform preselected

Formation. Surface lunar Experiments environment. sites. Package (ALSEP).

. . .

Deploy Develop Obtain

an Apollo

man’s

capability

to work

in the exploration

photographs

of candidate

Apol

lo Program

Director Manned Space Flight

3/27/70

Page

2

M-932-70-13

DETAILED SPACECRAFT DETAILED Sample Surface

OBJECTIVES AND

AND

EXPERIMENTS

OBJECTIVES Collection. Experiments

EXPERIMENTS

.
. .

Contingency Apollo Selected Lunar Lunar

Package

(ALSEP

III)

Deployment.

Sample Field

Collection. (S-059). Exploration Accuracy Sites.

Geology

Photographs Evaluation Television EVA Lunar

of Candidate of Landing Coverage. System

Techniques.

Communication Soil Mechanics. Reference Close-Up

Performance.

Selenodetic Lunar Thermal CSM Surface

Point

Update. (S- 184).

Photography

Coating Orbital

Degradation. Photography.

Science Lunar

Transearth Solar Wind

Photography. (S-080). Unit Orbit Water Consumption Measurement.

Composition Mobility From Lunar

Extravehicular Gegenschein Dim CSM Light S-band

(S-178).

Photography. Transponder Bistatic Radar (S- 164). (VHF Only) (S- 170).

Down1 ink

3/27/70 I --

Page

3

M-932-70-

13

LAUNCH

VEHICLE the

DETAILED

OBJECTIVES on the point lunar surface to excite ALSEP I.

.
.

Impact Determine

expended actual

S-lVB/IU S-lVB/lU

of impact.

3/27/70

Page

4

M-932-70-

13

LAUNCH COUNTDOWN Countdown begin with countdown and launch for

COUNTDOWN

AND

TURNAROUND

CAPABILITY,

AS-508

launch

of the starting

AS-508 at T-94

Sp ace hours

a precount activities vehicle

Vehicle during

for the Apollo 13 Mission which launch vehicle and Official coordinated

will spacecraft spacecraft

will be conducted independently. countdown will begin at T-28 hours.

SCRUB/TURNAROUND A scrub and repair count is a termination down to launch are following that from chilldown) to T-22 Mission result results the point required. a scrub activities of the (T-O) countdown. The during Turnaround launch plan is the window will time required to recycle no serial in effect

in a subsequent scrub/turnaround the

assuming be placed

immediately For a hold initiated bottle recycle Launch could automatic 30-DAY A 30-day launch In the beginning Test (CDDT)

countdown. turnaround procedures from T-22 minutes (S-II disconnect), conditions T-8.9 the then stated are start a in the An

in a scrub of hold.

prior to T-22 minutes, Should a hold occur

to T-16.2 minutes, Rules.

seconds (S-IC umbilical f orward a hold, or a scrub is possible under between T-8.9 T-16.2 seconds seconds will and or a scrub depending upon result

A hold a recycle cutoff after

seconds

(ignition)

in either or manual

circumstances.

in a scrub.

SCRUB/TURNAROUND turnaround window event available of a 30-day of precount. will not capability within exists in the event that a scrub occurs capability. will be started at the Countdown Demonstration and there is no

the 24 or 48-hour

turnaround

scrub/turnaround a new countdown The Flight Readiness Test (FRT) and

be rerun.

48-HOUR The T-8.9 required 24-HOUR A 24-hour This redline next

SCRUB/TURNAROUND scrub/turnaround is 48 hours. it provides time from Th is maximum all any point in the launch time assumes no serial space vehicle countdown up to repair activities are

maximum seconds and

for reservicing

cryogenics.

SCRUB/TURNAROUND turnaround depends stated window. quantities capability upon Only in the one exists having Launch 24-hour as late sufficient Mission in the Rules countdown for the as T-8.9 period seconds. margins remaining above to the

capability launch

spacecraft

consumables can

scrub/turnaround

be accomplished.

3/2 7/70

Page

5

t

M-932-70-

13

FLIGHT LANDING The landing SITE site of the Apollo

MISS ION

DESCRIPTION

13 Mission The lunar surface during the provide and establish lmbrium

is a point around formation

3”4O’S

latitude,

17O29’W geologic has been basin.

longitude unit interpreted Sampling and on Age material on the

in the

Fra Mauro

Formation.

Fra Mauro

Formation,

an extensive

covering large portions of the as the ejecta blanket deposited of the the and Fra Mauro and returned of the scale time Formation yield of the lunar modification, composition the the age dating geologic LAUNCH The launch samples

Mare Imbrium, of the lmbrium on ejecta material active of premare provide early

may

information crustal processes the age basin and the

blanket giving

formation information

of deep-seated

interior should of the

in its formation. deep-seated important history of the points moon.

samples formation leading

to an understanding

of the

WINDOWS windows for Fra Mauro are shown in Table 1.

TABLE

1

APOLLO LAUNCH April **May **May **May NOTE: 11, 9, 10, 11, DATE 1970 1970 1970 1970 Only others * These ** values (T-24) (T-O) (T+24) one are are OPEN

13 LAUNCH

WINDOWS CLOSE 17:37 16:43 16:44 16:38 ELEVATION

SUN ANGLE*

14: 13 13:25 13:35 13:32 is feasible

9.9O 7.8’ 7.8” 18.5” April times are EST; all

scrub/turnaround EDT. subject T-24 flexibility to possible hour and

for May.

refinement. T+24 all hour three windows to the optimum are T-O window for

The addition provides choice.

of the

increased

in that

opportunities

available

3/27/70

Page

6

M-932-70-

13

LAUNCH The three

OPPORTUNITIES opportunities May launch established in effect, window the occurs for May --in flexibility on 10 May. than the recycle. with site case The the launch of two 3-day is postponed launch permits from The a the a choice

11 Apri optimum

I --provide,

of a choice optimum It also

attempts.

window

of attempting further choice first launch window powered sun angle scrubbed, status (T-O instead HYBRID The Apollo for the (T-24

a launch 24 hours earlier of a 24-hour or 48-hour attempt hrs.) landing on the requires to arrive will (T+24 but optimum at the be made and hrs .) day landing an additional

window and, if necessary, permits a choice of making recycle orbit and reason flight time window on the the whether landing capability. before hence launch The initiating have attempt for the plan will will for be 18.5’ the be

a 24-hour at the same the 9 May based

9 May same

24 hours

in lunar

descent for

as on 10 May. cryogenics

Should at that weather If I aunched

a decision

time,

scrub, 10 May be similar

of spacecraft hrs. ) or 11 May 10 Mayomission of 7.8

predictions, on 11 May, angle

to recycle

the sun elevation

at lunar

TRAJECTORY 13 Mission will the The system will use a hybrid but 210 can without injected nautical return trajectory the into miles to the depart from a highly (NM), earth from the that retains eccentric most of the safety From earth orbit features orbit (pericharacterfurther the a pro28 hours by the having SPS to a peri-

of the cynthion istic, Lunar pulsion after place cynthion The

free-return

trajectory be initially

performance

limitations. elliptical

the spacecraft i.e., Module translunar the

of approximately spacecraft spacecraft

which has a free-return entry corridor without any free-return vehicle (SPS). ellipse and can provide

maneuvers.

wi II not extracted Service

the

unti I after

(LM) backup

has been to the

launch System

Propulsion trajectory

Approximately

injection

(TLI),

a midcourse approach

maneuver

wil I be performed (non-free-return)

spacecraft of 60 NM.

on a lunar

use of a hybrid Daylight horizon launch Desired adjustment angles

trajectory

will

permit: the provides coverage.

launch/Pacific injection. This allows the crew to acquire as a backup attitude reference during high altitude abort, abort recovery visibility, and improves launch photographic lunar on the landing landing site site sun elevation. transit during The hybrid profi

le faci Ii tates

of translunar

time which
lunar

can be used to control orbit and at landing.

sun

-

3/27/70
’ _--

Page

7

M-932-70-1

3

Increased lunar a full required Improved powered antenna. LIGHTNING During cal ware Apollo vehicle initiating FLIGHT Launch The 14:13 Florida, the and the

spacecraft

performance.

The energy

of the

spacecraft

on a hybrid

approach free-return

trajectory is relatively low thus reducing trajectory, lunar orbit flexibility. (PDI) insertion. This to occur

compared to what it would be on the differential velocity (AV)

to achieve communication descent

permits within

adjustment view

of the

time ground

of

initiation

of a 210-foot

PRECAUTIONS Apollo 12 Mission, the space vehicle was subjected to two distinct electriHowever, no serious damage occurred and the mission proceeded Intensive investigation led to the conclusion that no hardconclusion. necessary Rules into to protect have been cloud the space revised although that flight vehicle contain into from the all similar events. that is not conducive For the space to precluded. to reduce probability conditions clouds

discharge changes 13 the will

events. were

to a successful

Mission be launched

formations

similar PROFILE Through

electrical

discharges

Earth

Parking

Orbit for the from of 72’. Apollo 13 Mission is planned to be launched at Center insert The S-lVB/IU Figure weight. 1

AS-508

Space

Vehicle I 1970 azimuth Unit will

EST on 11 Apri on a flight S-IVB/lnstrument

Launch Complex The Saturn into flight

39A at the Kennedy Space V Launch Vehicle (LV) will a 103-NM, during events circular and space orbit. coast phase. vehicle the orbital

(lU)/LM/CSM be accomplished the

and spacecraft Tables

checkout 2 through Injection 2.6 hours parking vehicle

4 summarize

profile

Translunar Approximately during placing mately Transl The

after

liftoff,

the

launch

vehicle

S-IVB

stage

will

be reignited

the second the space 210 unar NM. Coast will

orbit to perform on a free-return

the translunar injection (TLI) maneuver, trajectory having a pericynthion of approxi-

CSM

separate transpose, maneuvers,

from

the

S-lVB/IU/LM

approximately of the

4 hours LM/CSM

Ground from the to provide

Elapsed S-lVB/IU. engineer-

.-

Time (GET), During these ing data.

and initiate ejection dock, will the LM and S-lVB/lU

be photographed

3/27/70

Page

8

Y \y” 2

TRANSEARTH ASCENT STAGE

TPI -1-i x 61 NM

CMSM SEPARATION LM INSERTION
(9 x 44 NM UKtSIII

; . /&

CSM\

INITIATION -LAUNCH

(REV 14) ,CSM ORBIT CIRCULARIZ ATION (REV 12) 60 ;cl

EIVB RESTART DURING 2ND OR 3RD ORBIT S-IV6 2ND BURN TRANSLUNAR IN
FRFF-RFTIIRN

SPLASHD COVERY S-IVB AP! ‘. TRIM BURN(S) I S-IVB RESIDUAL PROPELLANT ouw (IMPACT) AND SAFING
TRA IFrTnRV
I I\nYL” I

LOI CSM/LM

60x170 NM
TRAJECTORY
I

(XT 2 ORBIT ‘5) -DOI CSMILM :

“I\

JECTO RY - , .._ T. . .. L / SC SEPARATION, TRANSPOSITION, DOCKING, & EJECTION

TRANSFER

I’

(I.2 ORBITS)

: :

S-‘IVB AP+ EVASIVE MANEUVER

APOLLO13 FLIGHTPROFILE

TABLE 2 APOLLO 13 SEQUENCEOF EVENT LAUNCH

MAJOR EVENTS
REMARKS PAD 39A, 4/11/70, 14:13 EST

GET HR:MIN 0o:oo 2:35
11:41 30:41

BURN DURATION -SEC. (SYSTEM)

TLI
MIDCOURSE CORRECTION-l

358 (S-IVB)
AS REQ'D

PACIFICINJECTION NOMINALLY ZERO HYBRID TRANSFER
74.9-HR. TRANSLUNAR COAST

MIDCOURSE CORRECTION-Z
MIDCOURSE CORRECTIONS (AS REQ'D) LUNAR ORBITINSERTION (LOI) DESCENTORBIT INSERTION CSM/LM UNDOCKING & SEPARATION

2

(SPS)

77:25 81:45
99:16 100:35

CSM ORBITCIRCULARIZATION POWERED DESCENT INITIATION (PDI) LANDING MAURO FRA
EVA-l EVA-2 ASCENT (LM LIFTOFF)

103:31 103:42 108:OO 127:45
137:09 140:45

357 (SPS) 23 (SPS) 6 (SM RCS) 4 (SPS) 687 (DPS)

60 x170-NM ORBIT 8 X ~&NM ORBIT(CSM/LM) SOFT UNDOCKING 53 x 62-NMORBIT(REV. 12) LANDING NT UPDATE PO1
SEA = 7.1°, 4/15, 21:55 EST

4 HR. PLANNED
4 HR. PLANNED

528

(APS)

DOCKING BURN LM IMPACT TRANSEARTH INJECTION (TEI) ENTRY INTERFACE
LANDING

144:32
167:29

75 (LM RCS) 135 (SPS)

4/17, 7:22 EST CSM-ACTIVE ASCENT STAGE IMPACT 145:00 AT
73.6-HR. TRANSEARTHCOAST

240:50 241:03

VELOCITY 129 FPS 36, PACIFIC, 4/21, 15:16 EST

TABLE 3

APOLLO TV SCHEDULE 13
DATE APRIL 11 APRIL 11 APRIL 12 APRIL 14 APRIL 15 APRIL 16 APRIL 16 APRIL 17 APRIL 18 APRIL 18 APRIL 20 EST 15:49 17:28 20:28 00:13 14:03 02:23 22:03 lo:36 12:23 14:13 19:58 GET 01:36 03:15 30:15 58:00 95:50 108:lO 127:50 140:23 166:lO 168:OO 221:45 DURATION 05 MIN 1 HR 08 MIN 30 MIN 30 MIN 15 MIN 3 HR 52 MIN 6 HR 35 MIN

DAY SATURDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SATURDAY MONDAY

ACTIVITY/SUBJECT COLOR PHOTOSOF EARTH TRANSPOSITION & DOCKING SPACECRAFTINTERIOR (MCC-2) INTERIOR & IVT TO LM FRA MAURO LUNAR SURFACE (EVA-~) LUNAR SURFACE (EVA-2)

VEH CSM

STA KSC GDS GDS GDS MAD GDS/HSK GDS MAD MAD* MAD* GDS

CSM CSM
CSM CSM LM LM

12 MIN
40 MIN 25 MIN 15 MIN

DOCKING
LUNAR SURFACE LUNAR SURFACE (POST TEI) EARTH & SPACECRAFTINTERIOR

CSM CSM
CSM CSM

* RECORDED ONLY

M-932-70-13

TABLE 4 APOLLO 13 WEIGHT SUMMARY (We jht in Pounds
I-INHL

TOTAL EXPENDABLES TOTAL

s-IC/S-II Interstage S-II Stage S-II/S-IVB Inters tage S-IVB Stage Instrument Unit

11,464

4,746,870 --996,960 m-m

WEIGHT WEIGHT 5,034,870 363,403 mm11,464
1,075,OlO 92,523 mm-

SEPARATION

78,050 8,100 25,050 4,482
Launch Vehicle

8,100
261,721

236,671 --at Ignition

4,482
6,395,647

35,526 ---

1
“33,941

Spacecraft-LM Adapter Lunar Service Module Module

4,044
9,915

4,044 23,568 40,567 33,483 51,099 12,572
9,012

Command Module

10,532 12,572
9,012 Spacecraft

**14,076
**11,269 (Landing) ---

Launch Escape System

---

at Ignition

110,210 1 6,505,857
(-)84,598

Space Vehicle

at Ignition Buildup at Liftoff at Orbit

S-IC

Thrust

Space Vehicle Space Vehicle

Insertion

6,421,259 299,998

* CSM/LM Separation ** CM/SM Separation

3/2 7/70

Page 12

M-932

-70-l

3

At 4.2 operations

hours

GET

the will

S-IVB/IU alter point burn recontact (LOX) APS ul lage duration the

will providing evasive of the dumping

begin

a series so that

of programmed the S-lVB/lU for source

and will the

ground-commanded impact the lunar 12 ALSEP

which

LV trajectory a known maneuver two the burn attitude

surface at the desired seismology equipment. ullage separation grammed trajectory. 6.0 hours motor liquid GET. retrograde to prevent oxygen A second

energy

Apollo

The first

is a programmed

Auxiliary to provide will

Propulsion initial launch be placed commanded

System (APS) vehicle/spacecraft of proimpact basedon

vehicles. S-lVB/lU will

Second,

by a combination on a lunar in real-time

motor and

wi I I be ground the S-IVB/IU motor burn, trajectory. be within impact will photograph of actual

at approximately

The burn

be determined

This burn trajectory data. impact at the desired point. be performed mately point, the area. 3 S. backside if necessary GET. moon. that latitude, of the and 9oO hours

is intended to place A third APS ullage to refine the S-lVB,/lU will The crew will impact

on the trajectory for lunar also ground commanded, will This occur the impact burn will the occur of the CSM/LM target approxitarget is on impact 350 kilometers while S-IVB/IU be within

The desired 30°W.

longitude. Later, the

It is desired

postflight in time.

determination

5 kilometers

in distance The spacecraft System cynthion System Earth 7 hours hours (SPS) approximately

1 second will

be placed at the hours GET.

on a hybrid time scheduled The

trajectory

by performing

a Service

Propulsion

maneuver 30.6

CSM/LM

for the second combination

Midcourse Correction (MCC), will be targeted for a periwill LM be placed on a Descent Propulsion

altitude (DPS) weather GET. GET.

of 60 NM trajectory. as the

non-free-return

and, as a result of the SPS maneuver, The spacecraft will remain within the SPS return capability. for a 3 to 4-hour period

as well will

be photographed

beginning

at approximately

Lunar photgraphy may be performed, using MCC’s will be made as required, navigation. Insertion insert GET two the spacecraft (Figure revolutions. 2). into The an initial will

at the crew’s the Manned

option, at 56 and 75 Space Flight Network

(MSF N) for Lunar The Orbit SPS will

lunar

orbit

(approximately in a 60 x 170-NM

60 x 170 orbit

NM) for

at 77.6

hours

spacecraft

remain

approximately Descent After will while and periods, two Orbit

Insertion in lunar orbit. candidate (CDR) The crew orbit, the the 4th Lunar SPS will revolution, site Module be used to insert the spacecraft in a the Command Module Pilot (CMP) from enter powered the CSM at low and altitude rest (LMP) six and the LM for for eat descent. checkout

revolutions descent the Commander and then

60 x 8-NM the

During and will the

photograph housekeeping.

exploration

Censorinus Pilot

use approximately LM for separation

revolutions

wi I I prepare

3/27/70

Page

13

APPROACHHYPERBOLA

8 x 60 NM(12 REVS) /

EARTH \

LUNARORBIT INSERTION AND DESCENTORBIT INSERTIONGEOMETRY

M-932-70-

13

A soft radially

undocking below the

will LM

be made Service (Figure LM

during 3). DESCENT (REV

the Reaction

12th

revolution. Control System

Spacecraft (SM

separation the

will CSM

be executed

by the

Module

RCS) with

ORBITAL 12)

EVENTS

CSM ClRCULARlZATlON (53 x 62 I1M) I

LM DESCENT (8 x 60 !IM)

ORBIT

-.

UNDOCKlNG
SEPARATION

AND
(REV 12)

/

.SUN

EARTH

Fig. CSM During Lunar the Solo 12th (Pre-Rendezvous) revolution (after undocking) the CSM will perform

3

a circularization

maneuver to a near-circular will include the candidate and dim light photography performed. 3/27/70

60-NM exploration of zodiacal

orbit. The CSM will photograph selected sites that site Censorinus. Lunar orbital science photography light, solar corona, and gegenschein will be

Page

15

M-932-70-

13

Lunar During which

Module the

Descent 14th revolution approximately the DPS will be used for the powered descent maneuver, The vertical descent portion of an

wil I start

at pericynthion.

automatic and will s elect automatic During record LM

landing during the landing be terminated at touchdown over manually is a newly the lunar and control descent, added surface surface

to take

phase will start at an altitude of about 100 feet on the lunar surface (Figure 3). The crew may Return to at an altitude of about 500 feet or below. capability will of the LM guidance from the computer. LMP’s window the to

be photographed and to aid

LM movement

disturbances

in determining

landed

location. Surface Operations lunar surface activities is shown in Figure 4.

Lunar

A summary

of the

Postlandina Immediately list and reach gyro will Inertial (AGS) upon Measurement landing, Unit the (IMU) and LM crew will will After execute reaching the the and the Abort lunar contact checkthe System be al I loose

a stay/no-stay be calibrated

decision. aligned,

a decision lunar surface

to stay, will

be aligned,

Guidance

photographed through the LM window. items not required for extravehicular EVA-l The activity timeline

Following a crew eat period activity (EVA) will be stowed.

don helmets, gloves, Systems (OPS) and th e cabin the hatch, deploy the Lunar ladder (MESA), where he will 6, deploy which Figure

for EVA-l is shown in Figure Portable Life Support Systems will be depressurized. Conveyor Equipment

5. Both (PLSS), The (LEC), and from

crew members will and Oxygen Purge wil I move move the to the Assembly MESA. He will through

CDR

the Modularized initiates television

Equipment coverage

Stowage

then descend the ladder to the lunar surface. The LMP will monitor and photograph the CDR using a still camera (70mm Hasselblad Electric Camera) and the lunar geologic exploration sequence camera (16mm Data Acquisition Camera). Environmental to the Mobility make surface Unit it possible Familiarization/Contingency and checking the his mobility, will collect of the nature (EMU), the CDR Sample stability, lunar Collection and surface the - After Extravehicular sample. material at this sample This at the point. of the will stepping

a contingency

to assess

Apollo 13 landing site in the The sample will be collected

event the by quickly

EVA were scooping

terminated up a loose

3/2 7/70

Page

16

,

APOLLO13 LUNAR SURFACE ACTIVITIES SUMMARY
103:42 TOUCHDOWN GET (2155 EST)
r c/O

t-r
c

POST- EAT EVA LAND, PREP,

1ST EVA 4 HR,

2 HR,

EAT PLSS EVf CHECK- DEBRIEFOUT ING 142HRi HRn0,5 HR,

;;;-

SLEEP

916 HR,

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIGDSIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIII

LIFTOFF m EAT 1 EVA PREP, 2ND EVA POSTEVAC/O / LAUNCH PREP,

I.,2 H ,
ccl . P J
n -.

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll~DS

I I
2 HR,

& DEBRIEF215HR,
ING

4 HRu

3 HR,
7

llllllllllllllllllllllnllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

3315 HR, TOTALTIME EVAEXTENDABLE 5 HOURS TO BASED A REALTIME ON ASSESSMENT REMAINING OF CONSUMABLES,

APOLLO 13 EVA-I TIMELINE
I I I

ES CDR ;"p I

S-BAND DEPLOY

PHOTO TRANSFERS I

iALSEP ;;FL DEP. INSP. OFF- I,h -

PHOTOAND TV PANS

:““‘1
LMP 30

S TI

I
ANT. SW. TRANSFERS DEP. INSP. OFF- FUEL SRC 1 LOAD UP

40

50

CENTRAL STATION ACTIVATICN / ALSEP DEPLOY ASSEMBLEDRILL DRILL BORE HOLE 1 lt40 160 2tOo 2t10 2+20 2+30 DEPLOY CORE ,

2+40

2t50

3tOo

CDR --..

FINAL SELECTED ALSEP SAMPLE PHOTOS DEBRIS SELECTED CLEAN SAMPLE JP 3+10

SRC PACK AND CLOSE OUT TRANSFERS CLOSLOUT OFF-LOAD SRC 2 DEPLOY SWC .INGRESS PREP. 3+20 3+30 3t4D

I
JINGR~

I
!EvA EXTENSION

n -. M . 0-l

.INGRESS

LMP 1 3tOo

TRANSFERS 3+50

(N1
4tOo

4t10

M-932-70-

13

DEPLOYED EQUIPMENT

MODULARIZED STOWAGE ASSEMBLY

lunar

material

(approximately

2

pounds), sealing it in a Contingency Sample Container, and placing ment the later LEC. the sample Transfer lithium transfer The and hydroxide into LMP will the in the Equipalong for the the with Bag (ETB), PLSS bat.teries transfer

(LiOH) LM using

canisters

70mm cameras the LEC. The to the S-band The the it, the Fig. 6 moved site surface. Antenna from the

to the surface with LMP wi II then descend

Deployment LM and the CDR to the 7, carried will LM,

to

S-band

antenna

wil I be reerect and

where

as shown antenna the

in Figure cable required

connect

perform

alignment.

DEPLOYED

S-BAND

ANTENNA

Fig. 3/27 ‘PO Page 19

7

M-932-70-

13

Lunar antenna,

TV Camera the and LMP verify

(Color) will from

Deployment unstow the LM.

- While The with equipment the hatch the flag LMP

the and will

CDR deploy then

deploys ingress

the the

S-band tripod LM to

the TV camera

it on the Center. into to the and area

approximately activate The and The the LMP LM bay I, will II,

50 feet

TV transmission and other leaving the

the Mission will camera

Control

contingency the LMP surface. egress. Inspection area, Ill, also the and inspect (ALSCC) Deployment 16mm will

sample lunar egress The Following - After LMP will IV with and will

be transferred transferred ajar,

the surface.

LM to the

geologic again, this, CDR

exploration

slightly

descend and

wil I photograph

contingency

sample

American the and

wil I be deployed. the LM scientific footpads equipment and quadrants the CDR Close-Up sun.

repositioning inspect an EMU-mounted photograph be removed

TV to view the

photograph

Camera ALSEP will the

70mm camera. The Apollo the LM. from the MESA and ALSEP be fueled from the

Concurrently Lunar Surface placed LM, 8), the the down

- After Generator

offloading (RTG) will

Radioisotope ALSEP packages

Thermoelectric

(Figure

be attached to a one-man carry bar for traverse in a barbell mode, and TV will be positioned to view the ALSEP site. The hand tools will be the the tool While the LMP will ALSCC. and 500 desired packages feet will CDR obtains TV and photographic unload Sample Return Container The CDR from then and Lunar the LM. for the shown LMP wi II then Drill crew The carry (ALSD) will The assembled, 9. Apollo Surface experiments. in Figure

loaded on the hand tool carrier. panoramic views from the site, number the to the survey following and deployed 1 (SRC deployment the site and individual 1) and site remove hand determine experiment sites ALSEP packages,

carrier, the

approximately

location

be separated,

to respective

in the arrangement

Fig.

8

3/27/70

Page

20

-Y
\=: 2

EVA-l EQUIPMENTDEPLOYMENT
INITIAL TV PLACEMENT BY LMP

TV PLACEMENT FOR ALSEP

ALSEP

DEPLOYMENT

SITE

TV POSITION FOR SEQ. BAY ACTIVITY

SAMPLE

COLLECTION

ALSEP OFFLOAD AREA OF ACTIVITY

CCGE

LEGEND:

LMP CDR PSE HFE CPLEE CCGE RTG

- Lk PI-LOT - COMMANDER - PASSIVE SEISMIC EXPERIMENT
- HEAT FLOW EXPERIMENT - CHARGED PARTICLE LUNAR ENVIRONMENT EXPERIME-WT - COLD CATHODE GAUGE EXPERIMENT

ALSEP - APOLLO LUNAR SURFACE EXPERIMENTS PACKAGE

SEQ - SCFENTIFIC EQUIPMENT

n -. ul . 9

- RADIOISO’I;oPIC THERMOELECTRICGENERATOR

M-932-70-

13

Passive Passive Charged

Seismic Seismic Particle

Experiment Experiment Lunar

(S-031) package Environment

- The with

CDR

will

deploy cover.

and

set up the

its thermal

Experiment Lunar Environment and drilling the

(S-038)

- The

CDR

will

deploy while flow

and orient the Charged the LMP is assembling experiment. Cold Cathode Ion Gauge

Particle the ALSD

Experiment package first hole for the heat

(S-058)

- The CDR

will

deploy

and

orient

the

Cold

Cathode Heat ALSD Each probes ALSEP Flow and bore are

Ion Gauge. Experiment will stem drill will two (S-037) be left - The LMP deep will holes assemble using the into battery-powered bore stems.

three-meter in place

hollow-center

as an encasement

which

the heat flow

inserted. Station - The CDR will I evel and align the central At this time the LMP will The activate is implanting CDR the will the then Heat will LMP central station which be drillina assemble station Flow and

Central

includes deployment of the sun shield. the second hole for the Heat Flow Experiment. and align the the ALSEP ALSEP antenna. layout The CDR while the photograph Experiment Core core Sampling samples

probes. - The and CDR will assist the LMP in modifying the ALSD, collecting

photographing Collection of the and, with

the operation. - The crew will begin At 1 will - The the stowed the return traverse LM, the into and samples SRC will the panel LM. of be

Selected initiate will sealed. Solar

Sample collection

selected the core

samples. stems, SRC (S-080) by the LMP. and

return in SRC

to the 1 and

be weighed

SRC 2 will Wind Composition foil will

be offloaded Experiment

be transferred four-square-foot

aluminum

be deployed

EMU cleaning and ingress into the CDR. EVA-l will terminate Post-EVA After 1 Ooerations the per LiOH and LM systems

the LM will when the

be accomplished by the LM cabin is repressurized.

LMP

and

configuring

for Post-EVA-l

operations,

the

PLSS’s

will

be recharged. of 875 pounds battery the will and beginning be stowed,

This includes
square canister. end of the followed inch,

filling

the oxygen

system to a minimum

pressure

filling the water A one-hour eating PLSS recharge our

reservoir, and replacing the period is scheduled between and The PLSS’s and OPS’s another eat period.

by a 9-1/2-h

operations. rest period

3/27/70

Page

22

M-932-70-13 EVA-2 The LMP lunar activities Sample LM will will be configured monitor leaving the and LM in the is shown Collection ETB to the in Figure and Camera for EVA activities the the and CDR LEC. ajar. the and The CDR then will transfer egress. camera to the descend of EVA-2 The

again

photograph CDR with hatch 10. Calibration

equipment surface

LMP will

slightly

A summary

- The crew will collect a thermal sample and a sieve sample from near the LM and a contaminated sample from under the LM. They will calibrate their cameras by photographing a special contrast chart on the hand tool carrier and then will position the TV camera for the Lunar field geology Geology traverse. (S-059) which Traverse - Both in detai crewmen I prior will conduct the field support of the from areas.

Field

geology

traverse,

is planned

to launch.

Additional

and real-time planning will be provided from the ground based on features landing site obtained from crew descriptions and TV. Traversing outbound the LM, the crew will obtain Close-Up Stereo Camera photos of selected They will take filter core panoramic photographs of the lunar surface and will polarizing samples, to photograph selected features. They will obtain . camples, and surface samples. Special gas analysis, Approximately for lunar soil a special of the will boot also

use a special subsurface environmental, l/2 mile mechanics in the in

and magnetic from the LM evaluation. sample from trench the The vicinity crew will

lunar surface samples will be collected. the CDR will dig a two-foot-deep trench The the LMP will trench Gas and collect obtain and a core magnetic sample and data samples photographic

environmental prints be obtained

material. of the

analysis

trench. traversing inbound to the LM by a different route to

begin

obtain additional documented A typical documented sample sun of the the sample, core typical sample and site, stowage will

samples as performed on the outbound traverse. procedure will include locating the gnomon up of the lunar surface the core of placing site and material the tube gnomon into the sample, description bag. The and of in a sample the surface,

photography of the consist

sampling

up sun and

photography recovery

of the sample site cross sun, driving capping the sample within the tube.

Upon return to the LM, the CDR will
LMP down the LEC. into ment The 3/27/70 will and SRC. The the and reposition roll The CDR LM. ingress. samples up the LMP and The Stereo the Camera will LMP CDR The will TV, collect Wind magazine clean will will LM will be stowed utilize clean Solar

offload
a soil

the samples into SRC 2.
sample, and then LM, the and place close and LM, EVA-2. the and then and hook jettison experiment He will into the into made

The
take the seal up the the

mechanics

Composition in the SRC. ingress the his EMU,

it and

Close-Up

LEC to transfer ascend terminating and

samples

equipment Equipjettison.

his EMU, and

LEC and

be repressurized, preparations jettisoned, equipment Page 23

for equipment

LM will

be depressurized,

LM repressurized.

Y 2: -a 0
CDR PLSS CHECKOUT EGRESS CAMERA TRANS. CAMERA TRANS.

APOLLO 13 NA-2 TIMELINE

SRC TRAV. THERM SIEVE COLOR OPEN PREP, SMPLE SMPLE CHART N p ALHT T L EGRS. TRAV. THERM SIEVE COLOR F';';. SMPLE SMPLE CHART Q p T R

GEOLOGY TRAVERSE

LMP 0

PLSS CHECKOUT

GEOLOGY TRAVERSF

2 (0 ID 2

CDR

BIG TRENCH SPECIAL ENVIR. SAMPLES GAS ANALYSIS SAMPLE MAGNETIC SAMPLE

CORE TUBES

LMP 1+40 1+50 2too 2t10 2t20 2+30 2+40 260 3too

CDR , (I) . "0
n -.

SRC PACK AND CLOSEOUT ACT. SOIL SAMPLE RETRIEVE SWC CLOSEOUT ACT.
I m I

SRC & EQUIP. TRANSFERS

INGRESS

EVA EXTENSION

LMP 3tOo 3+10 3+20

INGRESS TRANSFERS
I

EVA EXTENSION

3+30

3t40

360

4tOO

4+10

4t20

M-932-70-

13

Lunar The hours.

Module LM ascent The The

Ascent (Figure 11) will begin System after (APS) a lunar stay of approximately is divided to achieve orbit insertion 33.5 into two terrain the

Ascent

Propulsion

phases. clearance,

first phase is a vertical rise, and the second phase is orbit insertion.

povvered ascent which is required After

LM will execute the coelliptic rendezvous sequence which nominally consists concentric sequence initiation (CSI), constant of four major maneuvers: delta height finalization scheduled maneuvers (CDH), (TPF). between will terminal phase initiation A nominally zero plane (TPI), change nominally TPF; the and terminal (PC) maneuver zero midcourse TPF maneuver phase will is be
actually

CSI

and

CDH,

and

two

correction

be scheduled

between

TPI and

divided into several braking will be performed with the men will placed will transfer in the to the Decontamination be configured operations Interim

All maneuvers after orbit insertion maneuvers. Once docked to the CSM, the two crewLM RCS. with will and equipment, be performed, Assembly lunar and impact. lunar transferred samples, to the and items LM, exposed will and be the LM film. jettisonable

CSM

Stowage for deorbit

LM

ASCENT

THROUGH DOCKING
,~~~=-~-=~~~Rendezvous
l

-•-¤-•

radar tracking MSFN tracking

CSM

parking

orbit

EVENT 1. Liftoff Insertion

-Sun

2. LM 3. CSI 4. PC

5. 7.
10. 11.

CDt -I

6. TPI
MC-l Braking Stationkeeping

Earth

8. MC-2 9. Begin
Begin Docking

Fig.

11

3/27/70

Page

25

M-932-70-13

-

LM Ascent The ascent for lunar deployed

Stage stage surface ALSEP

Deorbit will impact Ill, be deorbited between to provide (Figure the ALSEP a known 12), energy during source the 35th revolution, the newly signals radially 2 hours the CSM for

I of Apollo

12 and to produce be separated approximately maneuver,

recording by the seismic experiments. The CSM will from the ascent stage with a SM RCS retrograde burn after will docking perform the to the RCS 13 landing surface area burn CSM. initiated surface site. will Following maneuver. the LM jettison a pitchdown lunar The LM deorbit by ground control and 36.5 NM

retrograde to impact Apollo lunar

maneuver will be a the LM will be targeted west northwest and of the impacted

approximately

The ascent stage jettison, ignition, be photographed from the CSM.

LM ASCENTSTAGEDEORBIT

CSM q

lMPACT( 36.5

r / /

WEST NORTHWEST OF LANDING SITE)

JETTISON (RADIAL)
EARTH Fig. 12

3/27/70

Page

26

M-932-70-

13

CSM

Lunar

Orbit

Operations an orbital plane change, 9 hours soon after of lunar MSFN acquisition of signal photography.

The CSM in the 35th

wi II execute revolution,

for approximately

reconnaissance

High resolution vertical and oblique topographic photography, stereo strip photography, science photography and landmark tracking will be performed. The Censorinus, Descartes, and Davy Rille sites are of special photographic interest as candidate future landing Transearth At the acquisition trajectory. 11 April 40 degrees. navigation. end sites. lniection of the and 46th Coast and approximately to inject (to the 10 minutes the earth’s as required, CSM onto prior the will to MSFN transearth (based not the MSFN on an exceed for

revolution,

the SPS wil I be used of signal, flight duration will Th e return launch) and the return corrections inclination M’dI course

be approximately

73 hours equator) using

wil I be made

-

Entry Prior

and

Landing entry, will entry the CSM interface Earth longitude will the landing maneuver SM and will (based to a heads-up orient nominally on an to the feet 11 April entry altitude be in the launch) attitude, attitude. to landing Pacific will Ocean at the

to atmospheric

Command Module (CM) The nominal range from be approximately l”34’S latitude 241 Crew hours after

jettison

(El) at 400,000

1250 NM.’ and 157°30’W liftoff. and Quarantine the the Apollo

approximately

Recovery

Following in to them scuba

landing, through

13 crew hatch

will

don

the

flight

suits

and

face

masks standard

passed

spacecraft

by a recovery

swimmer

wearing

gear. Integral Biological Isolation Garments (BIG’S) will The swimmer will swab in case of an unexplained crew illness. The crew will then areas with a liquid decontamination agent. to the Missions. recovery crew ship where they will enter will a Mobile be the Quarantine same subsequent quarantine procedures

be available for use the hatch and adjacent be carried by helicopter Facility Apollo (MQF) 11 and and 12 all

as for the

3/2 7/70 I ..-

Page

27

M-932-70-

13

CM After

and

Data

Retrieval crew the pickup

Operations by the ship. helicopter, The CM the will CM wil I be retrieved to the out MQF, through The (LRL). and passed and placed the a deconspacecraft where will plans on lunar

flight

a dolly samples, tamination will

aboard film,

recovery

be mated

and

will be retrieved flight logs, etc., lock for shipment to the Lunar Receiving from the ship at Pearl Harbor and

Laboratory transported

be offloaded

to an area

deactivation This operation then call be flown

of the CM pyrotechnics and propellant system will will be confined to the exterior of the spacecraft. to the LRL and and early placed release in a special of the room for storage. if the spacecraft

be accomplished. The spacecraft Contingency so requires. situation

for sterilization

.-

3/27/70 .-

Page

28

M-932-70-

13

CONTINGENCY GENERAL If an anomaly its nominal provide alternate as well occurs flight missions as provide plan, will after liftoff flight attempt that crew would and flight

OPERATIONS

prevent Command the crew and

the

space will

vehicle be initiated. (CM)

from

following Aborts while obiectives will

an abort

or an alternate to maximize

mission

for an acceptable

Module CM

recovery

accomplishment recovery.

of mission

for an acceptable

ABORTS The following phase sections in which present they the could abort occur. procedures and descriptions in order of the

mission Launch

There are six of the launch

launch abort modes. sequence and a CM are essentially Module for the

The first three abort landing in the launch

modes would abort area.

result in termination The remaining

three abort modes the Command/Service are Earth the same Parkina

alternate (CSM) into Apollo

launch procedures and result in insertion of earth orbit. All of the launch abort modes

as those Orbit abort

11 Mission.

A return the CSM Propulsion Service burn. selected Translunar Translunar order abort.

to earth from Module After target the System

from

earth of the

parking space System and entry, entry.

orbit vehicle (SM the

(EPO) and Should RCS) will crew

will the will

be performed SPS be inoperable,

by separating Service the the deorbit to a pre-

remainder (SPS) burn Reaction separation

performing be used fly

a retrograde to perform entry

to effect

Control if available.

CM/SM point,

a guided

Injection injection crew (TLI) will be continued malfunction to nominal analysis and cutoff, determine whenever the possible, of an in

for the

to perform

necessity

Translunar If ground differential gram prior will

Coast control and the spacecraft velocity (AV) targeting be used as required. maneuver if a direct crew will determine be voiced the that an abort situation exists, to the crew or an onboard abort Lunar Module (LM) will will An SPS burn be

pro-

In most cases, return

be jettisoned

to the abort

is required.

M-932-70-

13

initiated capability

to achieve will several Insertion

a direct CSM/LM

return

to a landing systems

area.

be exploited

as necessary propulsion

for a direct

However, a real-time decision return or circumlunar trajectory configuration.

by use of the Lunar . Orbit

in a docked

In the event contingency shutdown was will are (DPS) Orbit event immediate decision SPS limits System Descent In the the could mission, Transearth

of an early action will inadvertent, be made exceeded, will serve restart

shutdown of the SPS during lunar orbit depend on the condition which caused and on possible a manual as a backup if specified Upon alternate shutdown propulsion SPS I imits completion missions. will system. have If, not during The of the

insertion (LOI), the shutdown. been LOI the LM exceeded, burn LOI

If the an the Propulsion

.

wil I be attempted.

a real-time burn,

be made.

Descent

Insertion of a descent remains the orbit lower pericynthion. of the termination. insertion than (DOI) Based nominal overburn a so-called landing where, despite trim corrections, “bail-out” SPS burn will be Rules mission, criteria, selection this situation of an alternate

pericynthion to raise or early lniection lead

desired,

performed

on Mission

to a continuation mission

An SPS shutdown inadvertent automatic ALTERNATE The Apollo several mission these Earth two shutdown

during

transearth shutdown.

injection Manual

(TEI) shutdowns restart

may will

occur not

as the

result

of an If an

automatic

are

recommended.

occurs,

an immediate

be initiated.

MISSION

SUMMARY of alternate orbital upon status depend systems is contained missions and the in the nature that can be performed of these A brief leading during categories to the description the have alternate of

general 13 Mission variations and the

categories are which resulting missions

(1) earth

(2) lunar. of the LM and

Both CSM.

anomaly

of the

alternate Orbit will LM.

following

paragraphs.

The CSM from achieve orbital the to eliminate

dock debris

with

the this,

Following

LM, and the photographic the LM will be deorbited The CSM of 40” with will perform daylight

equipment into the SPS plane

will be retrieved Pacific Ocean area change maneuvers to Earth US passes.

problems. inclination will then

an orbital photography

coverage

of all

be conducted.

3/27/70

Page

30

-

M-932-70-13

Lunar

Orbit CSM and LM will be accomplished. Descartes, and Davy photographic

The nominal mission bootstrap photographic objectives These objectives include photographs of Censorinus, The LM will CM normally window be jettisoned blockage. prior to avoid CSM

Rille. objectives

to accomplishing

Alone transfer will be deleted in this case. If the hybrid transfer has been the CSM will be placed back on a free return trajectory. A two-burn be used to place the vehicle in a sequence, as on Apollo 8, 11, and 12 will circular and orbit. Mosting The LOI b urn will also and establish landmark an orbit tracking. to pass over C for photography

The hybrid performed, LOI 60-NM Censorinus

3/27/70

Page3 J

M-932-70-

13

MISSION GENERAL Mission description Support is provided Flight mission by the Network, support Launch and elements the

SUPPORT

Control recovery is in the

Center, forces. MOR

the Mission Supplement.

Control

Center,

the Manned

Space of the

A comprehensive

.

CONTROL The Launch

CENTERS Control for overall and launch Control Texas, Center (LCC), I ocated at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, checkout, is the

focal point countdown The Mission Houston,

direction, control of Apollo/Saturn Center (MCC), centralized

and monitoring V Space Vehicles. at the Manned control from

of prelaunch

I ocated mission

Spacecraft the time the

Center space The MCC Telemetry System;

in vehicle System Display in be

provides

clears the launch tower through functions within the framework (CCATS); Control Support contact processed alternatives. mission of mission MANNED The Manned that Real-T ime Computer System; and a Mission Rooms (SSR’s) . These with the space vehicle, by the CCATS The MOCR provide progress. SPACE Space FLIGHT Flight the

astronaut and spacecraft recovery. of a Communications, Command, Complex Operations systems receive allow (RTCC); Control the telemetry Voice Room flight and (MOCR) operational

and

Communications supported personnel data control

by Staff to remain which can

and RTCC for verification of a safe mission, and SSR’s are staffed with specialists in all Flight Director and Mission Director with

or compute aspects of the evaluation

who

real-time

NETWORK Network by the (MSFN) MCC is a worldwide communications and tracking

network

is controlled

posed of fixed stations supplemented are to provide tracking, telemetry, Connection spacecraft and the MCC. MCC Figure Figure is provided 13 depicts 14 shows by the NASA

during Apollo missions. The network is comThe functions of these stations by mobile stations. updata, and voice communications between the between these many MSFN stations and the Network. surface 13. operations.

Communications during lunar

communications the MSFN

configuration

for Apollo

3/2 7/70

Page

32

-

2272.5-MHz 2287.5-MHz

I PIAVRnr ,.-..aur\bK 1c PRN.
VnTrF

VOICE AND TLM)
nm 71s.

~106.4-MHzF-W, VOICE,AND UPDATA
.

296.8-Mel:

VOICE

S-BAND ANTENNA I

LMP

11 -. (D . w

LM

LUNARSURFACE COlW1UNICATIONS NETWORK

M-932-70-13

-

Fig. 3/27/70 Page 34

14

M-932-70-1

3

RECOVERY General The Apollo possible isolation the and and CM, after

SUPPORT

13 flight landing, flight of the first

crew crew,

and

Command observing and aid

Module the materials

(CM) removed

will

be recovered to maintain the CM. from

as soon as biological After locating astronauts wi I I be cover, be used rock

while

constraints to determining

required

CM, will medical

consideration first-level astronauts

be given

to providing of the clothing, drogue

if required.

the condition of the The second consideration main parachutes, if feasible and Facility (MQF)

recovery Special

parachutes,

and CM. Retrieval in that order, is highly and the Mobile

of the CM desirable Quarantine

apex practical. will and

procedures,

to provide biological isolation samples will also be isolated Primary Landing Area area, point moves

of the astronauts and CM. The lunar soil for return to the Manned Spacecraft Center.

The primary following Ocean. the ability Figures entry weather, The

landing circumlunar target area point the

shown will feet along

in Figure normally

15, be 1250 If the

is that that

area are range and

in which targeted miles (NM) all 3500

the

CM will

land of bad

or lunar

orbital altitude). with as the

trajectories

to the

mid-Pacific

nautical

downrange to avoid the high NM. forces

(400,000 points 17

entry point does

is increased contains

the entry

target range

prob-

landing 16 and

as long the

not exceed

show

primary

landing and

area

and worldwide changes

recovery

deployment.
l

Recovery beacon inside “Mae

equipment CM CM

procedures switched

for Apollo

13 are

as follows:

Recovery Sea dye Navy New

antennas

l

deployed

on request egress lifejacket

l

type design

West’,’

astronaut liferaft

l

recovery

3/27/70

Page

35

M-932-70-

13

“y, 3j.i ..,,. :::. _.:. $:.:.: ..!.. ;,::: ... L :..:

Fig.

15

3/27/70 .._I_

Page 36

i

i

HAW ABBREVIATIONS: R RECOVERY P PHOTO S-l SWIM 1 ST-l SWIM TEAM 1 S-2 SWIM 2 ST-2 SWIM TEAM 2 HAW RES HAWAII RESCUE

RES 2

b

CHRISTMAS ISLAND

2? ca . z

PRIMARY

LANDING

AREA

RECOVERY FORCE VOICE CALLS

RECOVERY FORCE SUPPORT
DESTROYER PEASE “I .-A

7

LAJES (1)
/-

r-HAWAII (2) DESTROYER (IN PORT)

\

l-

N 15” 0” f s 15”
P --I I ..t -._ .t -,1

-iv .i --

‘“90”

45” -i-E

0” I LASCENSION (2)

45”

90”

135”

180” E-i--W

135”

90”

M-932-70-

13

CONFIGURATION SPACE VEHICLE Module Service (SMJC) Module timers. (CSM109)

DIFFERENCES REMARKS

Command/Service
0

Changed Controller

Jettison

Allows additional SM movement away from CM prior to RCS termination during separation. CM&M Provides recontact decreased during probability earth entry. of

l

Added system.

Lunar

Topographic

Camera

Provides graphic

for high resolution photography with . dust.

lunar topoimage motion

compensation
0

Added Module Added modes and

cabin

fan

filter. (Ascent Stage) hold” P65

Removes

lunar

Lunar 0

(LM-7) “auto” and

“attitude eliminated programs.

Aids

crew

during

lunar

landing

in obscured

in P66 and

visibility.

P67 software

l

Incorporated limiter Control canister. System

a non-clogging Environmental lithium

flow

Improves water

crew in suit

comfort loop.

by eliminating

in primary

hydroxide

Lunar
0

Module Installed I ine

(LM-7) heat

(Descent exchanger stage fuel (SLA-16) differences

Stage) bypass line. Facilitates tanks after planned landing. depressurization of fuel

on descent

Soacecraft-LM
l

Adapter

(No

significant

.)

3/2 7/70

Page 39

M-932-70-

13

LAUNCH Instrument
l

VEHICLE Unit fourth (S-IU-508) battery to IU. Extends tracking traiectory Command to assist corrections. data for analysis if a flight anomCommunications S-IVB/IU lunar System impact

Added

l

Relocated measurements vestigation platform.

and

added

telemetry in-

Provides aly occurs

for vibration of ST- 124 inertial

on ST- 124.

l

Added Detection

four

wires System

to IU Emergency distributor.

Provides capability

automatic vehicle ground at spacecraft separation separation.

command in event

of a contingency
S-m

Stage (No Stage lnstal Stage (No

(S-~VB-508) differences .)

l

significant (S-11-8)

S-II 0 S-IC
l

led al I spray (S-K-8) significant

foam

insulation.

Reduces

weight

of the stage.

differences

.)

-.

3/27/70

Page40

M-932-70-

13

FLIGHT FLIGHT Prime CREW Crew ASSIGNMENTS 18) Pilot James (CMP) A. Lovell,

CREW

(Figure

Commander Command Lunar Backup

(CDR) Module Pilot

Jr. K.

(Captain, Mattingly,

USN) II USN)

Thomas

Module

(LMP)

(Lieutenant Fred W. Haise,

Commander, Jr. (Civilian)

Crew (CDR) Module Pi lot follows Pilot John W. Young John M. Charles the training One, foundation unavailable, weeks prior crew organize (Commander, L. Swigert, Duke, schedule they for receive later the Jr. USN) Jr. (Civilian) USAF) crew and funccrew. to fly fully out the (Major, prime

Commander Command Lunar The tions training Two, as prime informed hardware. During hardware to perform that are costly would PRIME the not the final and flight repeated and time require CREW ground backup in three which should crew the Module crew

(CMP)

(LMP) closely

for the nearly

significant becomes prime who up until

categories. a valuable crew the help becsome last the few prime

complete crew

mission

assignments backup the Three, mission

as a prime is prepared they and are check

to launch.

assistants

weeks

before and

launch, flight and crew other

the

flight

hardware crews take part upcoming

and work

software, mission.

ground team

software, crew for that the

and ground tests the backup lunar of the crew. launch mission prelaunch

as an integrated

simulations will benefit

conduct of the

in these

It is necessary activities, which

consuming rescheduling DATA

period

to the

To do so would add an additional schedule, which for a lunar mission window.

for a later

Commander
NAME: SPACE James FLIGHT A. Lovell, Jr. (Captain, Captain command USN) Lovell pilot was selected served for the as an astronaut pilot for the 9 flight. by

EXPERIENCE: 1962. backup and

NASA Gemini

in September 4 flight

He has since

as backup Gemini

-

3/27/?‘0

Page

41

M-932-70-1

3

Fig. 3/27/70 Page 42

18

M-932

-7O-

13

On 4 December the Gemini

1965,

he and

command lasted

pilot 339

Frank hours,

Borman spacecraft

were

launched and included

on 7 was

7 Mission.

The flight

35 minutes

the first rendezvous of two manned joined in orbit by Gemini 6. As command in November pilot, 1966. Lovell This launched flew flight,

maneuverable

as Gemini

the 4-day, 59-revolution, Gemini which included a third-revolution marked the successful completion

12 Mission rendezvous of the

with a previously Gemini Program. Love1 I served 1968) lunar Captain the space Command Module first first orbit and

Agena,

as Command flight returned has since lunar

Module to the to an earth served

Pi lot on the 6-day moon.

Apollo

8 (21-27

December

manned

Apollo 8 performed 10 revolutions in landing after a total flight time of 147 hours. backup spacecraft a total Commander of 572 hours, for Apollo 10 minutes 11, of

Love1 manned flight

as the

landing. missions.

He has logged

in three

Pi lot K. Mattingly, II (Lieutenant Commander, Mattingly USN) was selected of the as an

-

NAME: SPACE

Thomas FLIGHT by crews Pilot Fred FLIGHT W.

EXPERIENCE: NASA for the in April Apollo

Lieutenant 1966. 8 and

Commander He has served 11 Missions.

astronaut support Lunar Module NAME: SPACE

as a member

astronaut

Haise,

Jr.

(Civilian) Mr. as a Haise was selected of the as an astronaut astronaut backup by crews NASA in

EXPERIENCE:

April Apollo BACKUP Commander NAME: SPACE CREW

1966. He has served 8 and 11 Missions. DATA

member

for the

John. FLIGHT

W.

Young

(Commander, Commander He served launched for Gemini

USN) Young as pilot 6. was selected on the 1965. as an astronaut by

EXPERIENCE: 1962. mission pilot

NASA flight ment

in September - a 3-orbit he was backup

on 23 March

first manned Following

Gemini that assign-

3/27/70

Page

43

M-932-70-1

3

On which

18 July made

1966, two Gemini

Young successful

was

the

command and

pilot

on the with earth

Gemini Agena orbital Module

10 Mission target flight. Pilot for

rendezvous’

dockings

vehicles.

10 was a 3-day, assigned as the

44-revolution backup

He was subsequently Apollo 7. Young which

Command

Commander orbital landing. Command NAME: SPACE Module John FLIGHT

flew

as the performed

Command all but

Module the final

Pilot minutes

on the

Apollo

10 lunar lunar

mission

of an actual

Pi lot L. Swigert, EXPERIENCE: 1966. Jr. (Civilian) Mr. Swigert was selected as an astronaut by NASA

in April Lunar Module NAME: SPACE Pilot

-

Charles FLIGHT

M.

Duke,

Jr.

(Major, Major

USAF) Duke was selected as an astronaut by NASA

EXPERIENCE: 1966.

in April

3/27/70 --

Page

44

M-932-70-13

MISSION MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY
Title Director, Mission Assistant Director, Saturn Mission Apollo Director Mission Mission Director Operations Program Dr. Capt. Col. Maj. Name Rocco A. Petrone Chester M. Lee (Ret) Organization NASA/OMSF NASA/OMSF NASA/OMSF (Ret) NASA/OMSF NASA/MSFC NASA/MSFC NASA/MSC NASA/MSC NASA/MSC

Thomas H. McMullen Gen. John D. Stevenson

Program Manager Operations Manager Program Operations

Mr. Roy E. Godfrey Dr. Fridtjof A. Speer McDivitt

Apollo Spacecraft Manager Director Flight of Flight Directors

Col. JamesA.
Mr. Sigurd Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Capt. Cdr.

A. Sjoberg

Milton Windler Gerald D. Griffin Eugene F. Kranz Glynn S. Lunney

Spacecraft Spacecraft Apollo Director Launch

Commander (Prime) Commander (Backup) KSC

JamesA. John W.

Love11

NASA/MSC NASA/MSC NASA/KSC NASA/KSC NASA/KSC

Young

Program Manager of Launch Operations

Mr. Edward R. Mathews Mr. Walter Mr. Paul

Operations Manager

J.

Kapryan

C. Donnelly

Page

45

M-932-70-13

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

AGS ALSEP AOS APS APS ARIA AS BIG CCATS CCGE CDH CDR CPLEE ZP csc CSI CSM DAC DDAS it: DPS DSKY ECS EI EMU EPO EST ETB EVA FM fps FDA1 lily GNCS GSFC HBR HFE HTC IMU IU IVT KSC LBR LCC LDMK LEC LES LET LH Ll 4 H ZP LO1 LOS LOX LPO LR LRL LRRR

-

Abort Guidance System Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package Acquisition of Signal Ascent Propulsion System (LM) Auxiliary Propulsion System (S-IVB) Apollo Range Instrumentation Aircraft Apollo/Saturn Biological Isolation Garment Cmnunications, Ccmrnand, and Telemetry System Cold Cathode Gauge Experiment Constant Delta Height Commander Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment Command Module Command Module Pilot Close-up Stereo Camera Concentric Sequence Initiation Coimmnd/Service Module Data Acquisition Camera Digital Data Acquisition System Department of Defense Descent Orbit Insertion Descent Propulsion System Display and Keyboard Assembly Environmental Control System Entry Interface Extravehicular Mobillty Unit Earth Parking Orbit Eastern Standard Time Equipment Transfer Bag Extravehicular Activity Frequency Modulation Feet Per Second Flight Director Attitude Indicator Fixed Throttle Position Ground Elapsed Time Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (CSM) Goddard Space Flight Center High Bit Rate Heat Flow Experiment Hand Tool Carrier Inertial Measurement Unit Instrument Unit Intravehicular Transfer Kennedy Space Center Low Bit Rate Launch Control Center Langark Lunar Equipment Conveyor Launch Escape System Launch Escape Tower Liquid Hydrogen Lithium Hydroxide Lunar Module Lunar Module. Pilot Lunar Orbit Insertion Loss of Signal Liquid Oxygen Lunar Parking Orbit Landing Radar Lunar Receiving Laboratory Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector

Lunar Surface Magnetometer Launch Vehicle Midcourse Correction Mission Control Center Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly MHZ Megahertz MOCR Mission Operations Control Roan MOR Mission Operations Report MPL Mid-Pacific Line Mobile Quarantine Facility W MSC Manned Spacecraft Center MSFC Marshall Space Flight Center MSFN Manned Space Flight Network NASCOM NASA Camnunications Network Nautical Mile :;SF Office of Manned Space Flight OPS Oxygen Purge System ORDEAL Orbital Rate Display Earth and Lunar PCM Pulse Code Modulation Powered Descent Initiation PDI PGA Pressure Garment Assembly Primary Guidance, Navi ation, PGNCS and Control System (LM 3 Portable Life Support System PLSS PSE Passive Seismic Experiment Passive Thermal Control PTC Ouadrant QUA0 y--m.RCS Reaction Control System RR Rendezvous Radar RLS Radius Landing Site RTCC Real-Time Computer Canplex RTG Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Spacecraft SIC SEA Sun Elevation Anole s-IC Saturn V First Stage S-II Saturn V Second Stage S-IVB Saturn V Third Stage SIDE Suprathennal Ion Detector Experiment Spacecraft-LM Adapter SLA 94 Service Module SPAN Solar Particle Alert Network SPS Service Propulsion System Sample Return Container SRC SSB Single Side Band Staff Support Room SSR sv Space Vehicle SWC Solar Wind Caaposition Experiment TD6E Transposition, Docking and LM Ejection TEC Transearth Coast TEI Transearth Injection TFI Time From Ignition TLC Translunar Coast TLI Translunar Injection TLM Telemetry TPF Terminal Phase Finalization Terminal Phase Initiation T-time Countdown Time (referenced to liftoff time) TV Television USE Unified S-Band USN United States Navy USAF United States Air Force VAN Vanguard VHF Very High Frequency AV Differential Velocity

LSM LV MCC MCC MESA

ibi

_.-

3/27/70

GPO

891

180

Post Launch Mission No. Operation 3 Report M-932-70-1

TO:
FROM: SUBJECT:

A/Ad ministrator
MA/ApoI
Lip01 IO

28 April Director (AS-508)

1970

lo Program 13 Mission

Post L aunch

Mission

Operation

Report

No.

1

The

Apollo until

13 Mission 11 April about

was successfully 1970. Apollo into the

launched 13 was flight and life This when

from

Kennedy smoothly

Space

Center, in the

Florida lunar

on Saturday, landing Module electrical Module. to earth Safe recovery to determine The Mission

progressing a failure

to a planned

56 hours oxygen to provide was crew Lunar

occurred in the landing propulsion, in the

Service

cryogenic power, The using area the

system. oxygen, made and for

resulted perform support, Module An

in a loss of capability water lunar place the took mission

to generate Command/Service and to return and Pacific guidance. Ocean initiated

to produce

decision of the the

to not

Module 17 Apri of the Summary Report Apollo

power,

recovery

Command I 1970. anomaly. Report No. 13.

on Friday, cause

intensive

investigation

has been

Director’s Operation for

for 1.

Apollo Also these

13 is attached attached Primary data are that will Manned the the Objectives

and

submitted OMSF not 13 Mission and Flight could

as Post Primary be be

Launch Mission achieved considered refined technical

Mission Objectives without results

NASA Apollo

Since analysis

a lunar of the

landing, Detailed

I am recommending of all in the

unsuccessful. reports.

continue Space

appropriate Centers’

mission

wil I be reported

kfLM=Rocco A. APPROVAL:

Petrone

M-932-70-

13

NASA PRIMARY

OMSF

PRIMARY

MISSION

OBJECTIVES

FOR APOLLO

13

OBJECTIVES selenological region and activate inspection, of the Fra Mauro Lunar survey, and sampl ing of materials in a

.

Perform preselected

Formation. Surface lunar Experi ments Package (ALSEP).

. . .

Deploy Develop Obtain

an Apollo

man’s

capability

to work

in the exploration

environment. sites.

photographs

of candidate

Apol

lo Program

Director Manned Space Flight

RESULTS Apollo adiudged 13, launched 1970. unsuccessful

OF

APOLLO

13 MISSION 56 hours of flight accomplished and stated. above. and this terminated mission is

on 17 April

11 Apri I 1970, was aborted after The planned lunar landing was not in accordance with’ the objectives

ELS.BZU
Rocco Apollo A. Petrone Program Director Manned Space Flight

7
I/

r;f.

/470

A

3/27/‘70 .). .“, .-.______

Page .,_-._-..I---..

2 ._. ^--... .---...*.__ _.. _ ._ “._. _._-. I_ .--._ _I_-.“-,^ -- .-_-‘_. “,__,,., “_-. ._. .“._.1__

NATIONAL

AERONAUTICS

AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
20546

WASHINGTON, D.C.

20 April

1970

TO: FROM: SUBJECT:

Distribution MA/ApoI Mission IO Mission D Nirector’s Director Summary Report, Apollo 13

INTRODUCTION The Apollo moon and and 13 Mission during the consequent to produce was third water with and Jr.; Mr. planned day as a lunar of flight due landing mission electrical Module. but was aborted enroute

to the oxygen oxygen,

to loss of Service

Module power, Shortly

cryogenic to provide after the flight, environJr.;

loss of capability

to generate

in the Command/Service

anomaly, the Command/Service except for entry, was made mental control, guidance, J ames Lovell, Pilot (LMP), Apollo CMP, if so, Swigert, most mission arduous data when could and and are program (CDR), Capt. Lunar Module CMP the Rubella, A vigorous that even detailed Lovell, the for the prime and crew

Module was powered down the Lunar Module providing propulsion. Command Fred W. was feared Flight Module Haise, that affected function simulated in Tables Jr, for Mattingly completed with emergency 4. crew Pilot LCDR

and the remaining necessary power, were: Mr. officially K. possibly (CMP), Thomas John the Mattingly, contracted

members

Commander Swigert, backup II, auties. to ensure through Significant

Swigert, had

13 Mission,

substituted

it was was

be adversely Haise contained could

in performing prior unquestioned

his demanding to launch teamwork conditions.

simulation

successfully

time-critical

1 through

PRELAUNCH No when and 1 hour visibility problems occurred the However, ambient 10 miles, during space vehicle prelaunch S-IC Stage No. 2 liquid oxygen 1 hour 58 minutes. the at launch After valve, were: nitrogen Weather wind gas through conditions operations to impact the count(LOX) vent valve did not close cycling it was overcast the valve several closed feet, times at T minus successfully

down.

commanded flowing 21 minutes.

at T minus

at 20,000

10 knots.

M-932-70-

13

LAUNCH Apollo Space inserted orbit circular about seconds with

AND 13 was Center, the

EARTH successfully

PARKING launched

ORBIT on schedule from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy stages parking (loo-NM cut off 34 feet per was 1 .2 fps predicted. conditions

Florida, at 2:13 p.m. EST, 11 April S-IVB/Instrument Unit (IU)/ s p acecraft of During early than predicted. planned. longer vehicle probability S-IVB all time) for TLI. 100.2 causing nautical stage miles boost (NM) the second

1970. The combination and center a perigee engine

launch vehicle into an earth of of the 98.0 S-II NM

an apogee planned).

Stage

132 seconds longer

the remaining Space vehicle As a result, than predicted time of meeting burn

four engines to burn approximately velocity after S-II boost was 223 the with S-IVB cutoff orbital velocity injection 44 seconds insertion within longer (TLI) burn about than cutoff

second (fps) approximately of planned. A greater existed After minutes initiated conditions TRANSLUNAR The clearly about as well System ejection The S-IVB 04:18 GET than with orbital ground

lower than 9 seconds Total launch 3-sigma

was about translunar

remaining insertion, were made elapsed nominal COAST

propellants. launch vehicle Onboard 5.5 major and spacecraft television was minutes. circumlunar The systems operated systems initiated second were verified and at 01:35 GET (hour: S-IVB burn and was all end

preparations

for TLI . All

for about

on schedule were

satisfactorily

for a free-return

trajectory.

Command/Service 03:07GET. showed 04:Ol (SM was CSM and GET,

Module

(CSM)

separated

from

the

Lunar

Module

(LM)/IU/S-IVB and at

at about

Onboard television was “hard docking, ” ejection the interior All S-IVB and usage launch Auxiliary exterior for the vehicle

then initiated for about 72 minutes of the CSM/LM from the S-lVB/IU System Service activities APS LOX S-IVB ullage dump (APS) Module were burn was evasive Reaction docking, performed was initiated for lunar seconds

Propulsion scenes. separation, safing

maneuver Control and as scheduled. at GET

as spacecraft nominal. evasive was

RCS) propellant

transposition,

APS and

maneuver

by an 8-second completed. The The burn impact APS but reached point GET 28 fps. would S-IVB The first

initiated

successfully

at 04:39

and was also successfully impact was initiated at differential GET 3’5, nitrogen S-lVB/IU 19:17 velocity impacted GET, 4 to 5 fps. the indicated 3O’W. pressure a step No velocity that Therefore, dropped had input no longer the

accomplished. 06:OO GET. S-lVB/IU the second in the attitude in tracking have the lunar

APS burn was 217 information 30’53’W was not at platform

target

point
a

duration Tracking

producing the GET

of approximately

available versus required. 18:25

at 08:OO targeted The and gaseous the

at 6”53’S, (trim) inertial burn tumbling a velocity reason to the p.m.

IU ST-124-M3 control data been impact indicated

began

slowly. increase for this target. EST,

At approximately of approximately increase. The 14 April) S-lVB/IU at 2.4”S, The

conclusions altered surface

on the closer (08:09:40

change

lunar

at 77:56:40

4,‘20,‘70

Page

2

M-932-70-

13

27.9”W the the impact

and

the (see

seismometer “MISSION The actual

deployed SCIENCE”). impact

during The point radius. was

the Apollo 12 Mission targeted impact point 74 NM from the

successfully detected was 125 NM from well within

seismometer-. 189-NM

seismometer,

the desired The accur-acy l), GET

(350-kilometer) TLI for resulted with System of the maneuver in placing a predicted (SPS) burn was

of the scheduled and trajectory

such was the not

that

spacecraft on the were was normal. not

midcourse MCC-2 to the was moon desired,

correction performed non-free-return of 62 NM. Good was quality

NO. 1
as planned All

(MCCat 30:41

11:4 1 GET,

required. approach

spacecraft closest

circumlunar Service was such television 49 minutes that

Propulsion coverage beginning

parameters GET, and

The accuracy

of MCC-2 for

MCC-3,

scheduled at 30:13

for 55:26 GET.

performed. of MCC-2

preparations

performance

received

At approximately on the No. CSM Main fuel was pressure down GET, Module 2 and

55:55 cells made the

EST) the GET (lo:08 p.m. was rapidly lost Bus B. Pressure 1 and to abort CSM, 3 current the and dropped oxygen use the mission.

crew

reported

an undervoltage oxygen tank

alarm

in Service

Module

A decision decaying LM, power

to zero due The increased tank led for life was Indian

to loss of their oxygen supply. load on fuel cell 2 and to activate the support. performed Ocean by the south LM Descent the at

in the

remaining

to the decision

LM systems (MCC-4) in the

At 61:30 Propulsion Command approximately

a 38-fps (DPS) (CM) 152:00 COAST plus

midcourse to place would GET.

maneuver the spacecraft land

System

in a free-return

trajectory

on which of Mauritius

nominally

TRANSEARTH _--At pericynthion the return a differential point up and thermal only the systems The flight The first LM the LM were trip

2 hours

(79:28

GET),

a LM

DPS maneuver

was

performed

to shorten

time and move the earth landing velocity of 860.5 fps and resulted Ocean was established up. MCC-5 at at used and 142:53 for this the System GET. LM was (ECS) system

point. The 263.4-second in an initial predicted Both powered and LM guidance

burn produced earth landing were powered

in the

mid-Pacific pt-imary was kept

systems

maneuver.

control

Following the maneuver, passive down to conserve consumables; and telemetry

Envit-onmental powered used

Control

communications

DPS was produced angle was observed

to perform

l&5:19 7.8

GET. fps and

The

15-second

burn raised

(at the

10% entry

throttle)

a velocity to -6.52’. powered of S-band

change

of about

successfully

path CSM

partially receipt appeared

up for a check signal at lO1:53

of the GET.

thermal Thermal

conditions conditions

of the on all

CM

with

reported

CSM

systems

to be in order

for entry.

4/20,/‘70

Page

3

M-932-70-

13

Due

to the

unusual and

spacecraft correction

configuration, (MCC-7) jettison at entry of the

new simulations.

procedures The

leading resulting

to entry timeline

were called for

developed a final entry MCC-7 maneuver jettisoned that at of debris 141:30

verified hours,

in ground-based then

midcourse by the was at was GET. AND CM.

SM at El -4.5

interface (El) -5 LM at El -1 hour prior

hours, jettison of the to a normal atmospheric

successfully 138:02 panel hanging The GET. was out.

accomplished entry crew near CM The missing The

at viewed the was feet

137:40 path and

GET. angle high-gain up and at

The 22.4-second of -6.49”. the antenna then 142:41 the GET.

LM

RCS

resulted

in a predicted

flight

The SM was SM and and LM was reported deal jettisoned a great

photographed

an entire

S-band powered was

El at 400,000

reached

ENTRY Weather visibility parachutes 142:50 landing CM IWO ship

RECOVERY prime recovery &knot normally occurred 1 position was picked less than in the stable crew EST, ENE . area was as follows: Broken stratus clouds at 2000 feet;

in the

10 miles; deployed GET. point JIMA. Landing was in the The p.m.

winds; Visual at

and wave height I to 2 feet. Grogue and main contact with the spacecraft was reported at GET NM Ocean, (01:07:41 ately approxim from he licopter p.m. EST, I7 April). 2 l”40’5, 165O22’W. recovery .and was safe ship, aboard The The USS the

142:54:41 about 3.5 after

mid-Pacific

landed at 1:53

the-prime

up by a recovery an hour landing.

MISSION

SCIENCE

the moon 74 NM from the pounds, impacted The S-IVB Stage, weighing about 30,700 Apollo 12 seismometer at an angle of about 80” to the horizontal with a velocity of 8465 fps and an energy equivalency of 11.5 tons of TNT. These data compare with the Apollo angle 12 LM, of 3” which hit the moon and seismic at a distance an equivalent signal of 42 NM energy from the seismometer 1 ton impact at an of TNT. to the character horizontal, of the of approximately of the LM

The overall

is similar

to that

signal,

but the higher impact energy gave a seismic signal impact and 4 times longer in duration (approximately

20-30 times larger than the LM 4 hours vs I hour). The signal to

was so large

that

the gain

keep the recording components so that Thirty seconds seismometer; The signal peak arrival wave

of the seismometer A clear signal on scale. it is possible to distinguish between time occurred been the of impact

had to be reduced by ground command was recorded on the three long period each and later. of velocity laboratory. km/set which measurements The average compares event arrival with absolute certainty. wave at the of the seismic

elapsed

amplitude time had

7 minutes

predicted lunar

on the basis in the is 4.6

made velocity favorably

on the of the

Apollo seismic

11 and

I2 lunar through

sample

materials material

M-932-70-

13

with the result

the S-IVB

3.>km/sec impact that the

velocity signal outer

recorded shell of the

by the to be 20-40 moon,

LM

impact.

The

depth

of penetration

of

is believed

implies

km (vs 20 km for LM impact). to depths of at least 20-40 km,

This may be

formed a lower clear One

of the same crystalline rock material boundary to this material has been that it is too dense feature This of seismic data. hypotheses is that continuously the to form signal the entire is the

as found at the surface. found in the seismic signal, moon.

No evidence of although it is

puzzling

of the part waves

to its maximum. ,scattering LM impact alternate possibility signals The fact resulting that data

of the signal, in a rubble of signals under study, cloud across

unexpectedly rapid build-up from the beginning at least, cannot be satisfactorily explained by as was thought possible part of the have been impact from the earlier Several One signal. reached. seismic

material

Scattering are expanding

may explain the later but no firm conclusions of material the lunar from surface. the

produces

as it sweeps

that such precise targeting accuracy seismic signals were so large have future will 200 km. Ion Detector during S-IVB count frame dropped were Experiment impacts the can be extended provide means

was achieved for the S-IVB greatly encouraged scientists to ranges the of at least 500 of the structure

and that to believe that

the the

planned return

km and moon

for determining

to depths

approaching The

Suprathermal deployed after the the the ion fourth ions

(SIDE),

also recorded

part

of the a jump

ALSEP in the shadow

1 experiments number at the of ion time after of

package counts impact impact; ions, zero.

the Apollo 12 Mission, Since the instrument impact. essentially showed to a few 70 electron back in the zero. ions, A few of data a iump

was

in lunar

was

ions were

recorded

22 seconds

a second These

to 250 ions, then the count

the third jumped to 2500 fell back essentially to All of the counts were counts, the mass analyzer in the 50-80 mass unit

observed over a period of the instrument also range Two ranges particles SYSTEMS Saturn expected LOX tank (hydrogen possible that

of 70 seconds. recorded ions,

volt’energy In addition all

range. to the ion were

almost

of which

= 1 mass unit). mechanisms reach heights have generated been given for producing S-IVB also impact be ionized ions: could (1) temperatures produce by sunlight. ionization; in the (2)

6000-10,OOO”C

by the

of 60 km could

PERFORMANCE ignition, and holddown indications are arm that release, S-IC and systems the liftoff burn. were accomplished at or near

V S-IC limits

within
nominal.

performed

pressure

was as expected

throughout

4,‘20,‘70

Page

5

M-932-70-

13

All

S-II

Stage

systems

were

nominal

throughout

S-II

burn

until

the

center

J-2

engine

shut down approximately 132 seconds earlier than scheduled. LOW frequency oscillations (14 to 16 h er -t z ) ex p erienced on the S-II Stage resulted in a 132-second premature center engine occurred structural to a normal any All The from mately All off-nominal S-IVB first systems burn cutoff. observed was cutoff. due damage level Preliminary to large was analysis indicates Oscillations engine four expected than of the within (TLI) that in the cutoff. outboard limits predicted, vibration a “Thrust LOX system. stage and OK” No data pressure apparent does not switch engine indicate engines cutoff or decayed pressure incurred. center oscillations

in the

outboard

following performance operated 9.2 The second prior and

Preliminary engines. during both

the

first

and

second than

burns. deficit

seconds conditions.

longer

making was

up for the longer by the

velocity crew

at S-II

b urn was approximately A small burn cutoff. were satisfactory

5 seconds reported

predicted approxi-

orbital

90 seconds

to second

IU guidance

control

functions

and

all

systems

performed

as

expected. Performance of the CSM fuel cell and cryogenic systems was nominal until 55:53:36 GET when an unusual pressure rise was noted in oxygen tank No. 2. The pressure continued to rise to the relief valve crack pressure of 1004.1 psia (pounds per square inch absolute). One time second the tank later,at vent 55:54:45 valve GET, the pressure apparently opened. reacheda maximum of 1008.3 psia at which The last valid tank pressure reading prior to GET cell an undervoltage 3. Concurrent caution with the

loss of data was 995.7 light occurred on Main abrupt decrease about before removed the the loss of oxygen to about 18 minutes oxygen the from 373 after line.

At 55:54:54 psia at 55:54:53 GET. Bus B, which was powered by fuel tank psia the No. 2 pressure, in 87 seconds. Fuel anomaly.

oxygen tank No. 1 pressure showed a rapid Fuel cells 1 and 3 were removed from the line cell 2 remained in operation to 61 psia the and other CM and for about the fuel 2 hours cell down was and

pressure

in tank As a result the

1 had decreased No. of these occurrences, necessary power

was powered

LM was

configured

to supply

consumables.

Power package pounds passed. pounds

down were

of the

CSM total). water

began with The tank

at 58:40 primary residuals All SM were after

GET. 860 water were nominal

isolated

approximately

Th e surge tank and psi residual pressure system pounds and was left down after the 18.0

repressurization (approximately with with radiators tank anomaly and and heaters 37.5

6.5 by-

of oxygen Indicated in the

glycol were

in the waste

potable All changes

tank. took

RCS quads

powered

deactivated. configuration All LM systems control dioxide

SPS parameters place

before

no

the anomaly. in providing the for was would met not necessary lithium satisfy power and environand

performed to the from since the the

satisfactorily The spacecraft LM cartridges

mental carbon LM

spacecraft.

requirement alone

hydroxide the total

to remove of CM requirement.

atmosphere

by a combination

cartridges

4/‘20,/70

Page

6

M-932-70-

13

with The crewmen, cartridges to accept The the the tank LM burn, burst supercritical DPS firing. the disc range. attitude to a left was rate

instructions from the LM hoses. helium Prior at passive change rate increased The (SHe) to the

Mission

Control,

built

an adapter

from

the

CM

tank burn,

pressure the hour.

exhibited rise rate After mode SHe had the

an increased been third 1940 from any

rise

rate hour. the

after After the SHe by of

second

11 psi per psi, a right problem. within yaw

to 33 psi per 108:54 from GET the thermal of 3.0°/sec,

DPS maneuver, time was affected rate

ruptured rate

at a pressure control venting but

of about changing

expected a small 0.3O/sec The CSM

in use at the

yaw

did 101:53

not cause GET

partially

powered

up at about period 101:49 was

with S-band

the

following reception, at

results: solid

Telemetry telemetry Telemetry powered

- Following was up. received system

a brief from

of intermittent GET nominal to system throughout

power-down the time

102:03

GET.

performance

period

it was

Instrumentation timing at equipment accumulated 101:53

- A summary updated from the time

review correctly turn-on

indicated in resetting associated

no discrepancies. to 0 (zero) with the status and check

The

central CSM

indicating of the

GET. Power - All system the loads) nominal. load which anomaly, was was bus voltage AC entry three and inverter had performance powered been up. was Prior nominal. to open

Electrical Only Main instrumentation circuit (i.e., to that and consumed. following Battery Displays

Bus B, Battery power-up, no parasitic had Battery the fuel been under A, cell

Bus B, and since CSM

Bus 1 were batteries

on “true”

point

approximately 58:40 GET. All performance Main Bus B was powered up using Battery B Approximately to supplement recharged from CM the 2.5 power ampere-hours immediately batteries. were

performance

nominal. used was

LM ascent

B was also and Controls

recharged. - No - CM discrepancies RCS helium 4OF higher indicated tank than noted. temperatures predicted. satisfactory were SM passive approximately package control. A thermal as

Thermal/Propulsion predicted and with one RCS and

about

RCS engine

SPS temperatures

CSM RCS engine heat-up procedure was required prior to separating the LM/CM combination from the SM. Other data available indicated the CM RCS system remained nominal during the powered-down was nominal. All SPS pa rameters The oxidizer and fuel tank pressures decreased 6 psi each portion of the flight. which can be attributed to helium absorption. after the CSM was powered down,

4/20,‘70

Page

7

M-932-70-13

CREW The

PERFORMANCE 13 flight was their diligence nor team the their exhibited crew crew calm, performance precise and faltered was outstanding reaction to the maintaining throughout the the throughout emergency LM for safe the flight. and return Most their to earth.

Apollo

noteworthy subsequent

situation

in configuring spirits to a safe ever

Despite
operations and aiding

lack of adequate

sleep and the low temperature
outstanding return. performance

in the spacecraft,
flight. the Similarly, flight

neither
the in planning

their
flight

performance

throughout

All

information Manned

and Space

data

in this

report

are technical

preliminary reports.

and

subject

to revision

by the

normal

Flight

Center

4/20/70

Page

8

M-932-70-

13

TABLE APOLLO LAUNCH VEHICLE

1 13 OF EVENTS

SEQUENCE

Range

Zero I)

(02:13:00.0

p.m.

EST,

oo:oo:oo.

0

1 1 Apri Liftoff Pitch Roll S-IC and

Signal Roll Complete Center

(Timebase Start Engine Cutoff

1)

oo:oo:oo

.6

(TB-2

minus

00:02:

15.2

. 1 set) Begin Tilt S-IC S-II S-II S-II S-II S-IC/S-II Ignition Second Center

Arrest Engine (Command) Plane Engine . 1 set) Separation Separation Jettison Cutoff Cutoff (TB-4 Tower Engine Cutoff (TB-3) Separation

00:02:43.3 00:02:43.6

Outboard

Launch

Escape

00:03:20.0 00:05:30.6

Outboard minus

S-II/S-IVB S-IVB S-IVB Earth Begin Second Second Translunar CSM/S-IV6 Spacecraft S-IVB LOX S-IVB S-IVB APS Dump Ignition Cutoff Parking Restart

00:09:53.5 minus Insertion (TB-6) (TB-7 minus .2 set) .2 set) 00:09:56.9 00:12:29.8 00:12:39.8 02:26:08.1 02:41:37.2 02:41:47.2 from S-IVB 04:o 1:013.0 04: 18:OO. 5 04:39:19.3 for Lunar Impact 05:59:59.0 77:56:40.0

(TB-5 Orbit Ignition Cutoff Separation Ejection Evasive

Preparation

S-IVB S-IVB

Injection

Maneuver

APS Maneuver Lunar Impact

*Prelaunch

planned

times

are

based

on MSFC

launch

vehicle

operational

trajectory

4,‘20/70

Page

9

M-932-70-

13

TABLE

2

MISSION

APOLLO SEQUENCE

13 OF

EVENTS

EVENT

GROUND

ELAPSED

TIME

(HR:MIN:SEC) Range Earth Second Translunar CSM/S-IVB Spacecraft S-IVB APS S-IVB Liquid Midcourse S-IVB Lunar Pericynthion Midcourse Midcourse Service Lunar Entry Landing Midcourse Zero Parking S-IVB (02:13:00.0 Orbit Ignition Separation Ejection Evasive Correction Oxygen Tank Impact Plus 2 Hour Correction Correction Module Module Interface Jettison Jettison - 5 - 7 Maneuver Correction from S-IVB Maneuver for Lunar Impact Transfer) - 2 (Hybrid Anomaly - 4 Injection p.m. Insertion EST, 11 April) oo:oo:oo 00: 12:40 02:35:46 02:41:47 03:06:39 04:o 1:0,3 04:18:01 05: 59:59 30:40:50 55:54:53 6 1:29:43 77:56:40 79~27~39 lO5:l8:32 137:39:49 138:02:06 14 1:30:02 142 :40:47 142:54:4 1

APS Maneuver

4/20,‘70

Page

10

TABLE APOLLO 13 TRANSLUNAR
-T

3 MANEUVER SUMMARY

AND

TRANSEARTH

4WJEVEI

PRE-LAUN ‘1
REAL-TIME Not Available N.A. 11:41:23.5

GROLJNDELAPSEDTIMB (GET) AT IGNITION (hr:min:sec)
ACTUAL

BURNTIME (seconds) PRE1 LNlNcl

vELocITY.cHANGE feet per second - fyx) I‘Kmu Not. Ivailable N. P.
I

REAL TIME PLAN PLAN 346 N.A. 3.39 N.A.

ACTUAl

02:15:27.9 (S%B) KC-1

2:35:46.4

355.7 0.0 2.2 0.0

---'7:40:21.6 '7:15:00 -----. 57.3 '7:15:00 .-5x3-

77:5':17 ----__. 415.5 1 AvaiiaoLe . n'?pbLe -. -N.---- p. h. P. able 177:28:37 64.37

N. P. 30:40:50 N. P.

MCC-2 30:40:49.0 30:40:49.0 (SE) I .Mix-3 55:26:02 1 N.A. at this

4

3.37 N. P.

14.7 I 23.2 0.0 N.A.

23.1 N. P.

77:28:34 --------A,. 60.22

Nominal mission return to earth $CC-4 (DE) ?c+2 (DPS) ICC-5 DPS) N. A. N A '*

aborted

point-- remaining

maneuvers planned in real time for

Nm& -.- AL.2 --_ 3. A. ::. P. I GET entry illterface ('XI) ---------------. Velocity --------_----- (fps) at 21 Flight path arlgle at EI l-51:45:06 --151:45:27 ____

N. A.

51:29:42.8

N. A. 30.7

30.4

N. A.

38.0

37.8 N. A. N. A. l&2:38:52 142:3y:oo --a------s---m-_ N. A. 36 210.6 ---------m--L--- 36,209.6 N. A. -6.50 -6.53 ---m-M--N. A. --------m-w N. A. 2.9
are as determined shortly after maneuver. N. A.

79:27:38.3

79:27:39

N. A. 263.7 263.4

N. A.

E161.5

860.5

105:30:

00

105:18:32

1 A. N.

15:38 15:3tl

N. A.

7.8

,l,i
N. A. - Not Applicable

142:40:35 142:40:34 _.__ 36,211 36,210.61 _____ -6.51 -6.52

137:39:49.4

N. A.

23.2

22.4
*

N. A.
L Actual

3.1
values

A N. P. - Not Performed

M-932-70-

13

TABLE APOLLO

4 SUMMARY

13 DISCREPANCY

LAUNCH 1.

VEHICLE EARLY S-II

(SA-508) CENTER MODULE ENGINE CUTOFF/S-II LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS.

COMMAND/SERVICE 1. SUIT CABIN 2.

(CSM-109) READING APPROXIMATELY .5 PSI BELOW

PRESSURE

TRANSDUCER

PRESSURE. QUANTITY READING 20% AT APPROXIMATELY READING 22:42:50 ERRATIC. DROPPED GET, THEN RETURNED

POTABLE WATER APPROXIMATELY TO 100%.

3.

40:00 GET DEGREES IN OXYGEN GET, 47:42 CABIN GET.

OPTICS ZERO

COUPLING OPTICS MODE.

DISPLAY

UNIT

FLUCTUATING

0.16

4.

TANK

NO.

2 QUANTITY CONFIRMED OCCURRED

WENT AFTER

TO

OFF-SCALE HIGH

HIGH BY THE FANS

AT 46:45 CREW AT WERE

METER PROBLEM

AS OFF-SCALE

THE CRYOGENIC

ACTIVATED. 5. OXYGEN OXYGEN DROPPING LUNAR 1. MODULE TANK TANK 373 (LM-7) MALFUNCTION ON CAUTION AND WARNING AT NO. NO. PSI IN 2 PRESSURE 1 PRESSURE 1 MINUTE DROPPED BEGAN 14 SECONDS. TO TO ZERO DECAY PSI AT 55:54:52 AT THE SAME GET. TIME,

BATTERY 2 SENSOR 99:57 GET. PROPULSIVE CHANGE NO. NO. IN

2. 3.

SUPERCRITICAL SUPERCRITICAL 6.9 11.5 PSI,‘HR PSI/‘HR TO

HELIUM HELIUM 11.5 TO

TANK

VENT. RISE AFTER AGAIN DPS FIRING DPS FIRING

PRESSURE PSI,‘HR) AND

1 (FROM 2 (FROM

AFTER

33 PSI/HR).

4,‘20/70

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12

NASA-HQ