--

*

Prelaunch Mission Operation No. M-933-72-17 1972

Report

28 November MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: SUBJECT: A/Ad ministrator Program 17 Mission Director (AS-5 12)

M/Apollo Apollo

.

We last stay

plan

to launch no earlier lunar and the for surface

Apollo than landing mobility, Scientific

17 from and the added

Pad A of Launch 1972. third Lunar This will consecutive Module Module

Complex be the mission consumables

39 at the Apollo to carry lunar

Kennedy sixth Lunar

Space and Roving

Center Vehicle

6 December

Program’s the orbital for a longer

manned time,

surface science

Instrument

for extensive

investigations. Primary the moon; objectives and of this surface and in the three will about mission features and are selenological of surface tasks. and inspection, area survey, and sampling region of

of materials in-flight for selected coverage science The will

in a preselected

of the Taurus-Littrow

emplacement experiments periods include on the mission Ocean

activation and spacecraft controlled EVA

photographic

documentation

of operational remote

scientific

experiments; and the conduct of In addition to the standard photographic television coverage is planned activities, lunar surface. The activities lunar surface TV major of astronaut at each

on the viewing

station

traverses. with NM) the Command Module landing in the

12.7-day

be terminated 650 km (350

mid-Pacific

southeast

of Samoa

Islands.

~P*h
Rocco A.

Petrone

Manned

Space

Flight

NOTICE: Information Government

This Act

document (5 U.S.C.

may

be exempt Requests under the

from

public

disclosure of NASA

under Policy

the outside

Freedom the

of U.S.

552).

for its release provisions

to persons

should

be handled

Directive

1382.2.

Report

No.

M-933-72-

17

MISSION

OPERATION

REPORT

APOLLO

17 MISSION

4

OFFICEOFMANNED SPACEFLIGHT

FOREWORD

MISSION Management, 8610,1,

OPERATION as required effective

REPORTS

are

published

expressly

for the

use of NASA Instruction

Senior HQMI NASA mission

by the Administrator timely,

in NASAManagement

30 April with

SeniorManagement

1971 e The purpose of these complete, and definitive Mission Objectives which

reports is to provide information on flight provide the basis

and to establish official plans, ment of mission accomplishment, Prelaunch Following General NASA Primary The Office missions reports launch, Management Management distribution are prepared currently Instruction of these

for assess-

and (Post

issued Launch)

for each reports of definitive

flight for each

project mission mission

just are results

prior

to launch. to keep in

updating

issued

informed HQMI reports

as provided

8610.1. is intended for personnel in a highly series Press. having technical of reports program/proiect orientation. on NASA flight

management which

responsibilities of Publ ic Affairs are available

which publishes

sometimes

results to the

-

a comprehensive

for dissemination

APOLLO OPERATION

MISSION

OPERATION (MOR) ; was Th’ IS f ormat

REPORTS and the and designed

REPORT with

are published in two MISSION OPERATION to provide facility description

volumes: theMISSION REPORT, APOLLO document MOR, APOLLO reference equipin in the

SUPPLEMENT. the MOR, SUPPLEMENT.

a mission-oriented ’IS a program-oriented

supporting The MOR,

equipment APOLLO

SUPPLEMENT

document with a broad technical ment, the launch complex, and

descriptionof mission control

the space vehicle and associated and support facilities.

PROGRAM EXECUTIVE

and

SPECIAL

Published and Distributed by REPORTS DIVISION (AXP) - NASA HEADQUARTERS

SECRETARIAT

M-933-72-

17

CONTENTS Page Summary NASA Mission of Apol OMSF lo/Saturn FI ights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . for Apollo 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 4 5 In-Flight Demonstrations, and 23 ................... 32 35 36 39 40

Mission

Objectives ............................. Objectives, .............................. and

Operations. Detailed Tests Configuration Photographic Crew Data.

Experiments, Operational Mission TV and Flight Mission

Differences.

Equipment

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Responsi Acronyms bi I i ty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Management and

-

Abbreviations

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

_.

1 l/8/72

M-933-72-

17

LIST Figure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 No. Apol

OF Title

FIGURES Page 6 9 10 12 13 14 15 17 18 37

IO

17 Flight Landing 17Landing

Profile Events Site LRV Traverses

CSM/LM

Apollo

Taurus-Littrow Near LM Lunar

Surface

Activity

+oI IO
Apollo Apollo Apollo Apollo

17 ALSEP 17 EVA-1 17 EVA-2 17 EVA-3 17 Prime

Deployment Timeline Time1 ine Time1 ine Crew

1 l/8/72

ii

M-933-72-

17

LIST Table 1 2 No. Launch TV and

OF Title

TABLES Page 5 Equipment 35

Windows Photographic

1 l/8/72

... III

SUMMARY

OF APOLLO/SATURN

FLIGHTS

Mission AS-201

Launch 2/26/66

Date

Launch SA-20

Vehicle 1

Payload CSM-009 Launch CSM stration orbital vehicle subsystems of reentry conditions. vehicle of LH, vehicle and and

Description and CSM and adequacy development. vehicle. of the CM Test of Demonat earth

of the space

AS-203

7/5/66

S A-203

LH, S-IVB

in

Launch control Launch patibility propulsion

development. by continuous and of the entry of entry and CSM

Demonstration venting in orbit.

of

AS-202

8/25/66

SA-202

CSM-011

development. integrity by G&N meters

Test of CSM and system, per second. comof

subsystems

structural vehicle. control at 8689

of the space

Demonstration

Demonstration Apollo 4 1 l/9/67 SA-501 CSM-017 LTA1OR Launch and Apollo 5 l/22/68 SA-204 LMSLA-7 1 vehicle entry

spacecraft return

development. Vehicle velocity. of LM subsystems of orbital Evaluation performance

Demonstration of CM

of Saturn at lunar Verified and

V Launch

LM development, systems: (including LM staging. performance. ascent restart)

operation propulsion

descent

and

structures. of S-lVB/IU

Evaluation

Apollo

6

4/4/68

SA-502

CM-020 SM-014 LTA-2R SLA-9

Launch

vehicle

and

spacecraft

development. Vehicle

Demonstration performance.

of Saturn

V Launch

$i
4 10

Mission Apollo 7

Launch IO/l l/68

Date

Launch SA-205

Vehicle

Payload CM-101 SM-101 S LA-5 Manned CSM

Description operations. Duration 10 days 20 hours.

Apollo

8

12/2 l/68

SA-503

CMSMLTASLA-I

103 103 B 1

Lunar duration

orbital

mission. 3 hours.

Ten

lunar

orbits. CSM

Mission operations.

6 days

Manned

Apollo

9

3/3/69

SA-504

CM-104 SM-104 LM-3 SLA12 106

Earth

orbital

mission. 1 hour.

Manned

CSM/LM

operations.

Duration

10 days

B m m h,

Apollo

10

5/l

8/69

SA-505 a

CMLM-4

Lunar

orbital

mission. following 8 days.

Manned lunar

CSM/LM in cislunar landing

operations. and lunar profile.

SM-106 SLA-13

Evaluation environment, Mission First stay Miscion

of LM performance duration

Apollo

11

SA-506

CMLM-5 SLA-14 EASEP

107

manned time 21.6

lunar

landing One 3.3 8 days

mission. dual hours. EVA

Lunar

surface

SM-107

hours.

(5 man hours),

duration

Apollo

12

1 l/14/69

SA-507

CM-108 SMLM-6 SLA-15 ALSEP 108

Second of point Surveyor 31.5 Mission

manned landing Two

lunar

landing

mission. Deployment Lunar surface man (15.5 hours.

Demonstration of ALSEP stay hours). time I.

capability. dual EVAs 4.6

III investigation. duration 10 days

F g I

hours.

/

Mission Apollo 13

Launch 4/l l/70

Date

Launch SA-508

Vehicle

Pavl oad CMLM-7 SLA-16 ALSEP 109 Planned oxygen electrical 5 days 10 Third Mauro surface 22.9 manned third and lunar

DescriDtion landing. due Mission aborted at

SM-109

approximately power

56 hours consequent hours. lunar survey

to loss of SM cryogenic to generate duration Mission

loss of capability

and water.

Apollo

14

l/31/71

SA-509

CM-l SM-110 LM-8 SLA-17 ALSEP

landing Deployment 33.5 hours. duration landing and

mission.

Selenological of Fra Lunar (18.8

inspection, stay

and sampling

of materials of ALSEP. Two dual EVAs 9 days.

Formation. time Mission lunar

man hours). 12 Fourth manned

Apollo B ((3 (0
W

15

7/26/7

1

SA-510

CM-1 SM-112 LMLRV-1 ALSEP

mission. Deployment hours. direct EVAs. 27.9 km. duration mission.

Selenological of the of ALSEP. First voice dual 7.2 use of comEVAs hours.

inspection, Hadley-Apennine Increased Lunar traversed (37.1 munications

survey lunar stay

sampling to 66.9

of materials

10

Formation. time and during surface Mission landing and 71.2 EVAs. km. Three 11 days Vehicle to earth

SLA-19

Roving

TV and Total

distance

Subsatellite

on lunar

Three 12 days

man hours). manned lunar survey Formation. stay Vehicle during 26.7 time

Apollo

16

4/l

6/72

SA-5

11

CM-l SM-113 LM-11 S LA-20 ALSEP

13

Fifth

Selenological of the Lunar Lunar F s 4” $ : on lunar hours). surface. of ALSEP.

inspection, Descartes surface Roving to earth surface Mission

sampling Deployment hours. Total dual 1.8

of materials Use of second voice (40.5

and direct

TV and EVAs hours.

communications traversed man

distance

Use of Far UV duration

caners/spectroscope

on lunar

M-933-72-

17

NASA PRIMARY OBJECTIVES

OMSF

MISSION

OBJECTIVES

FOR APOLLO

17

.

Perform features Emplace Conduct

selenological inspection, survey, and sampling of materials in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region. and activate surface experiments experiments. and photographic tasks.

and

surface

. .

in-flight

Rocco Apollo

A.

Petrone Director

-Dale

Ali!!dhh
D. Myers Adminis Space Flight

Program

Associate Manned

Date:_ 22

#p&-k

/?T!

Date:

1 l/8/72

Page

4

M-933-72-

17

MISSION The following and or T+24 is shown paragraphs post-recovery hour launch, 1. in Figure contain there a brief will

OPERATIONS description For launch be a revised of the nominal launch, which Overall flight, may involve mission

recovery, a T-24 profile LAUNCH

operations.

opportunities flight plan.

WINDOWS planning related considerations for the launch phase of a lunar mission are, to a to launch windows. Launch windows are defined for two different a “daily window” has a duration of a few hours during a given 24-hour window” a given are vehicle tracking, 17%launch in Table 1. TABLE LAUNCH 1 based and consists month of a day cycle. limits of 72’ for the lunar landing to 100° and lunar (earth-fixed spacecraft sites. angles are heading performance, or days which meet the mission operational or lunar azimuth roll

.

The mission major time period; constraints Launch of the extent, periods:

a “monthly during windows launch

on flight on lighting and

at end of the

program), constraints

on booster

on insertion The Apollo presented

landing

windows

associated

sun elevation

WINDOWS

WINDOWS LAUNCH 6 December 7 December 4 January 5 January 6 January 3 February 4 February * Launch aximuth limits * DATE OPEN 2153 2 153 2150 202 1 2028 1847 1858 for 4 January are

(EST) CLOSE 0131 0131 2352 2351 2356 2213 2220

SUN ANGLE 13.3 16.9 6.8 10.2 20.3 13.3 13.3

ELEVATION (degrees)

- 19.1 - 11.1 - 22.4 - 15.5 15.5

84 to 100 degrees

LAUNCH The Space space

THROUGH vehicle The

TRANSLUNAR

INJECTION

Center.

will be launched from Pad A of launch complex 39 at the Kennedy boost into a 167 km (90 NM) earth parking orbit (EPO) will be burns and staging of the S-IC and S-II launch vehicle stages

accomplished

by sequential

1 l/8/72

APOLLO 17

FLIGHTPROFILE

Csn 111Km (60NM)

CM/SMSEPARATION

PARKINGORBIT

JE~SON (REV 54)
113 Km (61NM) (REV 12)

SIM DOOR JEITISON
EARTHORBTTINSERTION-

S-IVB 2ND BUR CUTOFF
ATLANTIC TRAl'iSLUNAR

INJECTIONu-u 1

109Km (15x59 NM)
(51x 171NM) i3 .b t

Sf C SEPARATIW TRANSPOSITION, DOCKING EJECTfOh I m:

.l”

nyr

TRAJECTORY

f

*

G MMERS ASSOCIATED YfTfl BMJOR LUNAR ORBIT EYEHTS INDICATEORDER WXiUdE OF
. 2 I r;

M-933-72-

17

and will first

a partial burn of the S-IVB stage. The S-lVB/instrument coast in a circular EPO for approximately 2 revolutions opportunity TLI Ocean. the service pericynthion control system S-IVB burn translunar is required. will system 2 hours injection Both (SPS) if lunar permit (TLI) b urn, injection opportunities

unit while are earth

(IU) and preparing to occur

spacecraft for the second the until A over

or 3 revolutions return

if the

opportunity Atlantic using reaction at least

TLI targeting propulsion plus (RCS)

an acceptable or LM descent orbit insertion to return

to be achieved

propulsion system (DPS) (LOI) is not performed. service module/lunar

capability

thecommand

module (CSM/LM) hours; for a CSM event auxiliary 46 hours propulsion GET.

combination only case the from system the (APS)

to an acceptable RCS capability S-IVB b urn permits

earth return exists to about RCS burn, an acceptable

exists to as great as 57 69 hours. In the unlikely LOX dump, return and as late as earth

of no separation

a combination

TRANSLUNAR -Within the 2 hours

COAST -after

THROUGH injection the transpose, the clear

LUNAR CSM will dock S-lVB/IU of the on the

ORBIT separate with

INSERTION ---from LM, the and trajectory. at 7oOO’S and 8OOO’W proS-lVB/lU eject the and maneuver spacecraftfrom to alter

LM adapter S-lVB/lU. its circumlunar The viding The (LOX) The insure S-band translunar Spacecraft (MCC) interrupted ment module to the spent

(SLA)

and will

the

LM/CSM

Subsequently, coast trajectory will

wi I I perform spacecraft lunar

an evasive

S-IVB/lU delta impact burn(s) maneuver

be impacted 12, (AV) will within

surface

a stimulus necessary desired and final

for the Apollo velocity trajectory of the S-IVB/ will occur for trajectory

14, 15, and 16 emplaced seismology experiments. q uired to alter re the S-lVB/lU circumlunar trajectory be derived about the from dumping system of residual (APS) and liquid ullage oxygen motors. an to propulsion

auxiliary tracking.

transponder against coast. passive opportunity (SIM)

10 hours of liftoff. A frequency bias and

The IU will have will be incorporated during

interference

between

S-lVB/IU

LM communications

thermal and bay LOI. will

control

will

be initiated throughout

after the

the

first

midcourse

correction phase unless instruabout

be maintained

translunar-coast

by subsequent

MCCs d oor will

and/or navigational be jettisoned shortly

activities. after the

The scientific MCC-4 point,

4.5 hours before
Multiple-operation thermal A LOI and

covers contamination SPS burn orbit,

over

the

SIM

bay

experiments they the remain are

and not

cameras in use. spacecraft

will

provide

protection will

whenever to place will

retrograde

be used where they

docked

into
two

a 95 x

317 km (51 x 171 NM) revolutions,

for approximately

1 l/8/72

Page

7

M -933 -72-l

7

DESCENT The descent place A “soft” probe executed the

ORBIT orbit CSM/LM undocking

INSERTION insertion

THROUGH (001-l) into

LANDING a SPS second retrograde orbit using burn, (Figure the docking will into the be a 100 x CSM the of will 2).

maneuver,

combination will SM RCS. orbut circular be made to reduce during orbit 13,170

a 28 x 109 km (15 x 59 NM) the twelfth AV. the revolution with which at about be used program maneuver coverage of 25O will manual revolution, Spacecraft CSM will

during the

capture

latches

imparted separation, the twelfth time (43,200

separation maneuver After 10’

by the NM)

Following at the meters

130 km (54 x 70 NM) 113 km (61 circularization pericynthian the landing During the will begin available pitching good Data

to achieve rendezvous. the LM

an approximate RCS to lower west

of CSM/LM feet)

maneuver, to about site with thirteenth approximately in the

DOI -2 will

be performed

wil I be about

PDI nominally commencing revolution the LM DPS will 26’ maneuvers. antenna altitude, A descent east of pericynthian. (LGC) A LM yaw path computer communications or to crew

17,200 meters (56,400 feet). for powered descent which profile be performed the Spaceflight high gate from model will be LM and unnecessary to ensure Tracking to about site landing

A terrain may with be used

LM guidance

to minimize

or thrusting LM steerable Network (200 feet) (STDN).

61 meters visibility. LANDING --Taurus-Littrow is located units of the

takeover,

to enhance

SITE

(LITTROW is designated

REGION) as the Taurus landing site for the of the about Apollo in a dark crater same the 17 Mission. deposit Littrow. distance This between site massif

on the

southeastern east

rim of Mare Mountains, 15 site

Serenitatis south and

southwestern

750 km (405 NM) Apollo 11 site. The blocks both massif during units and

of the Apollo

It is about north of the

of the Taurus in geologic after formation

Mountains age) of the

are which

believed were basin.

to be ancient by faulting However,

highland and a thin

crustal uplifting (because of

(pre-lmbrian

emplaced

Serenitatis

the base distances) may have mantled are common, surfaces. which massif materials. The dark deposit, units,

ejecta blanket from the some of the massif units. indicates large that landslide later both One

younger impacts of Crisium and lmbrium Fresh and blocky slopes in excess of 25O movements flow massif mate-ials have and exposed of the any the landing later origin site ejecta offers southwest

debris or debris the

an excellent

opportunity

to sample

which by a smooth

occupies

the

low-lands the lack and

between, youngest of large This

and lunar blocks

in a few surface

cases units.

the

tops

of the geologic

massif

is believed and earth-based

to be among radar

It is by photowith

characterized

appearance

as indicated is associated

analysis

studies.

deposit

11/8/‘72

Page

8

APOLLO 17

CSM/LM LANDING EVENTS
(DOI- AND PDi]
WI-2 (REV, 12) 13 x 111Km (7.2 x 6ONM) UNDOCKINGAND SEPARATION (REV. 12) .ARIZATION (REV. 12) CSN CIRCUL

100x 130Km (54x 70NM)

13) METERS (56,400FT.I
n -. a . IQ

EARTH

M-933-72-

17

numerous originated relatively thermal

dark deep young history

halo

craters the lunar

and moon.

is believed It offers, which

to be a volcanic therefore, may shed light

(pyroclastic) on the composition

mantle to sample

which a as

within volcanic of the site

an opportunity

material interior.

as well

The Taurus-Littrow apparently numerous geophysics the those inclination

is geologically

complex: and which on Apollo 17.

it offers probable vyill 17.

a number origin; The bay

of rock it also by the of the

types

which

vary in age, albedo, stratigraphic-structural to be carried of the for the orbital first

composition problems first time time suitable on Apollo tracks

portrays traverse site makes

be investigated location experiments,

for the SIM

especially

to be carried

for the

The and

planned 30°44’58”E

landing

coordinates (Figure

for the Taurus-Littrow 3). 17 LANDING

area

are

20’09’50”N

latitude

longitude

APOLLO

SITE

APOLLO

17

Fig. LUNAR The SURFACE ----stay OPERATIONS time on the lunar and surface is planned surface operational for about time

3

nominal crew surface

75 hours, relative Photographs

with

the

overall margins, lunar

objective duty will

of optimizing cycles, be taken

effective other through

science

to hardware of the

constraints.

extravehicular activity duration of each EVA

the LM cabin window for three periods (EVA) is pl anned period will be based upon real time

after landing. The nominal of up to 7 hours each. The assessment of the remaining

1 l/8/72

Page

10

M-933-72-

17

consumables. vehicle of the will high the (LRV) LM gain ground relay communications be provided

As in Apo!lo which will systems system. at each The maior

15 and carry both

16, contact

this

mission with the

will earth

employ when

the out

lunar of the

roving and independent line-of-sight

astronauts,

experiment will (Figure

equipment, and crew LRV.

for direct Voice major ground science

communication science stop controllers assembly stop,

be continuous 4) where the assume control on the mounted

color TV co’verage will align the TV through scientific A TV panorama

antenna. controlled at each

will (GCTA)

then

of the

television

is planned activities.

as well

as coverage

of the astronauts’

The back radius the EVA The

radius

of crew

operations capability, whichever will

will or the is less.

be constrained

by the

portable

life

support

system

(PLSS)

walkback capability, of operations in the

buddy secondary life If a walking traverse by the BSLSS

support system (BSLSS) ridemust be performed, the to return the crew to

be constrained

capability

LM

event

of a PLSS failure.

PERIODS activities to be performed during each EVA period are described below. Rest

periods are scheduled three traverses planned _ stops First The as indicated EVA first Period EVA will activities (300 a geology samples must event collected include profiling The feet) will and

prior to the for Apollo enclosed

second 17 are areas

and third designed shown along

EVAs and prior to LM liftoff. The for flexibility in selection of science traverses II and Ill (Figure 4).

by the

include: activation

LM

inspection,

LRV deployment lunar surface as possible deployment After ALSEP

and in this will

checkout, package period

and (ALSEP). for observation the crew will

deployment Television of crew 90 meters perform Lunar return in the been ALSEP transmitter seismic probe. measurement

of the Apollo on the LM of the (see will the (Figure Figure 5). 4).

experiments

be deployed near west traverse

LRV as soon 63.

ALSEP

be approximately

LM (Figure

activation

collected

be verbally during and (230 the

and EVA,

photographically sample but of the of the and only of lunar

documented. soil will soil if no other electrical readings, of the lunar in Figure sample

Sample be collected h3s than other

be assured; and the

therefore,

a contingency for return activation feet) east to earth.

of a contingency is available deployment 70 meters

Experiment surface LM, deployment

activities

properties of some of the a obtaining neutron 7.

at least

charges, of surface

obtaining some electric properties, for EVA-l

traverse activities

gravimeter emplacement is presented

planned

timeline

1 l/8/72

Puge

11

M-933-72-

17

1 l/8/72

Fig. Page 12

4

I

.

APOLLO 17

NEAR LM LUNAR SURFACEACTIVITY

LRV LOADING

-ALSEP

DEPLOY

r91 METERS FT.) (300
LRV OFFLO/AD

-ALSEPOFFLOAD \\ I -6' d5 -Y SURFACEELECTRICAL PROPERTIESTRANSMITTER

DEPLoyr91METERS (300

APOLLO 17

ALSEP DEPLOYMENT
LUNARc-~ 5EISMlC 'ROFILING ?EMOTE JNTENNA PROBEN_O.2 HEATFLOWEXPERIMENT PROBENO. 1 N t LUNAR ATMOSPHERIC E SUN

FLAG GEopit.

LM 2 91 METERS w (300 feet)

c!e METERS 18 = 5.5
25 = 7. 6 27.5= 8 4
n -. co

NO. 1

a .

30 = 9. I 37 =lL3 45 =13.7 88 =26.8 150 =45.7 260 =79.2

260’

I

FLAG

d
GEorL:04NE .

M-933-72o”, R

17

l

z-

_-

0 e-e >I

W

Fig. 1 l/8/72

7

M-933-72-

17

Second I_--Traverses maximize

and

Third

EVA second

Periods and third EVA periods of the stops Control and Center (Figures primary conducting (MCC) 8 and 9) are planned to

in the the

scientific

return

in support

objectives. experiments. to assist

be planned usage planning. The major will

for flexibility be monitored

in selecting at Mission

LRV sorties will Consumables time traverse

in real

portion and

of the third EVAs

lunar and

geology will and

investigation include with voice documented and descriptions

(S-059) of lurain samples,

will

be conducted documentation

during of

the second sample permit filling

photographic features. the

material the

as it is collected sample containers selected explosive surface and samples (S-203) the the traverse The second

crew

If time does not may fill the

containers with seismic profiling Readings trave;se tinued The ascent LUNAR The from stations. during LRV will and

for scientific interest. Deployment of the lunar charges will be completed on EVA-2 and 3. experiment properties EVAs. end of the EVA-3 interest. traverse to enable GCTA-monitored (S-199) will be taken (S-204) at specified will be conexperiment

gravimeter electrical third

be positioned other

at the

TV observations OPERATIONS is the storage lunar for the third

of scientific

ORBIT

Apollo

17 Mission in cryogenic

with stay

the modified increased time

Block orbit

II CSM duration and science

configuration. for the for their performance The operation period.

An SIM

increase of both in the in flight. After orbital covers lunar active times cameras and a lunar the will

provides

mission

an extended SM provides

surface mounting

and a lunar

of scientific

experiments

SIM

door tasks, Attitude and

is jettisoned selected to minimize changes deep space Orbital lunar

by pyrotechnic RCS thrusters contamination control from activities mission away of the for thermal (and science will

charges

and

until

completion sensors during

of lunar protective necessary with with the the

science

be inhibited of experiment and have experiment sunlight) been consist

or experiment alignment will planned of the be made operation 24-inch

be closed

RCS burns. surface

direct

RCS thrusters. throughout (35mm sounder, a 3-inch the Nikon, mapping),

at appropriate of five panoramic

phase

und

16mm data a color

acquisition, spectrometer,

70mm

Hassel blad,

TV camera,

a far ultraviolet Lunar Orbit

a laser altimeter, and infrared

a gamma ray spectrometer, scanning radiometer.

Pre-Rendezvous Orbital science

Science will be conducted during the 109 x 28 km (59 x 14 NM) science operations performed during the

operations

orbits after DOI-1, while in the will be stopped for the separation 1 l/8/72

docked configuration. and circularization

Orbital maneuvers

Page

16

APOLLO 17

EVA 2 TIMELINE
0 3 10 20 I I @EGRESS 30 I 40 I !a l+oo I I l LRV NAV INITIALIZE *DRIVE TO SEP SITE .NAV RESET *GO TO STATION 2 @WALKTO SEP SITE .SEP ON 4 .PLACE LSP CHARGE STATION 2 .ACTIVITIES 10 m 30 40 50
1

2+00

10

m

I

I

1

I

I

I

CDR DEPRESS

l SRC 2 UNPACK l TGE GRAV
. EGRESS

InfJ

.OFFLOAD ETB .LOAD LSP CHGS

0” ul
m T; CDR LUP

20

30

40

M

3+00

10

20

30

40

50

4+00

10

20

30

40

. GO TO STATION 3

-

STATION 4 . ACTIVITIES-

40

50 I

5+00 I

10 I

m

30

40

50

6+00

10

I

I

I

I

I

I

20 I

30 I

40

I

CDR

0 CLOSEOUT . GO TO STATION 5
l

50 I INGRESS.

7+00 3 & ?

n -. ccl
. Co LIP

PWRDN LRV DUST. . STATION 5 ACTIVITIES .GOTOL! . czS,?:c RAY 3E3'"V 1 L.,. REPRESS a

PLACE LSP CHARGE 1

*PLACE LSP CHARGE 8
l CLOSEOUT PACK ETB l SEP OFF

? T;

. INGRESS

APOLLO 17

EVA 3 TIMELINE
o+oo 10 20 30 40 50 l+OO 10 20 30 40 50 2+00 10 20

l

EGRESS
l

.DRIVE TO SEP SITE .NAV RESET GO TO @STATION 6 STATION 6 .ACTIVITIES GO TO STATION 7 STATION 70 -0ACTIVITlES

LOAD LSP CHARGES EGRESS
l

ODEPRESS

l

.WALK TO SEP SITE a SEP ON

LRV LOADUP

2
ccl
fD

20

30
I

40
I

50
I

340 I

10 I

20 I

30 I

40 I

50 I

4+00 I

10
I

20
I

30
I

40

co

CDR GO TO *STATION 9-

l

STATION 9 ACTIVITIES

40

50
I

5+00
1

10
I

20
I

30
I

40
I

50
I

6+00
I

lo
I

20
I

34
I

40
I

50
I

7+00

n -. ,^ l

PACK SAMPLES. SEP RCVROFF.

PLACE LSP CHARGE 30

G0 TO STATION 10

. STATION 10 ACTIVITIES

l GO TO Lfl

.INGRESS TURNOFF SEP XITR. RETRIEVE COSMICMY. DRIVE TO FINAL PARKINGPOSITION , REPRESSa . RETRIEVE NEUTRON FLUX .PLACE LSP CHARGE 2
l PACK ETB

.INGRESS

M-933-72-

17

12th launch, landing The LM

revolution, the will

then

restarted

after

CSM

circularization.

In the orbit

event prior

of a T-24 to lunar

additional day in the 111 x 26 km (60 x 14 NM) also be used for orbital science. timeline periods. work-rest has been Experiment cycles. and warmup photographic periods; Water tasks experiments and urine have developed 16-hour work activation in conjunction days cycles and are

experiments crew sleep on crew of orbital data

with concurrent designed

the

surface 8-hour

timeline CSM and minimum

to provide, impact Conduct of: and have CSM the STDN

as nearly

as possible,

to have

experiments standby, collection and

been dumps

planned and fuel

in consideration limitations; cell purges the at

outgassing, been planned will perform time of the

fields-ofuiew

requirements.

to avoid conflict with operation cycles. Prior a plane change maneuver to provide the desired rendezvous. and Jettison activities RCS will and ascent preparations, and

to LM liftoff, coplanar orbit

LM

LM Ascent, After stage CSM. The direct on Apollo is about The after total ascent

Rendezvous of lunar system

completion propulsion

surface (APS) and

the

LM ascent with the

be used

to launch

rendezvous

ascent 15 and 30 seconds stage

rendezvous 16 will and will The ascent

technique be performed.

initiated The to keep the

on Apollo LM ascent perilune stage

14 and liftoff above

subsequently window so that later-. 15 km (8 NM).

used duration an The 90

is constrained into (TPI) braking liftoff

be inserted initiation final stage

a 89 x 17 km (48 x 9 NM) be performed will final occur braking about maneuver

orbit

APS terminal insertion. time

phase from

b urn can maneuver to the

approximately 45 minutes will

38 minutes be about

minutes. Docking the films, The lunar impact Apollo Post-LM After CSM this two will LM and be accomplished crewmen designated stage will equipment. will be jettisoned a known stimulus and for 30’32.4’E and subsequently for the emplaced about 19’55.8’N deorbited seismic to impact experiment. from on the The the by the transfer CSM with SM with RCS maneuvers. lunar sample Once material, docked, exposed

to the

CSM

LM ascent surface will

to provide be targeted

9 km (5 NM)

17 ALSEP. Jettison LM ascent over period. Page 19 a 2-day tasks Lunar stage will Orbit jettison, take Science additional Conduct advantage scientific of the extended data will ground be obtained and both track by the during

period.

of the SIM

experiments

SM and-CM covera.ge

photographic

1 l/8/72

M-933-72-17

TRANSEARTH After time relation During the time will MCCs activities, completion

INJECTION of the to inject earth’s exceed

THROUGH post-rendezvous the CSM and onto the

LANDING CSM the return orbital transearth inclination activities, trajectory. will the SPS will The not exceed nominal 70° perform return with

a posigrade will not

burn to the

110 hours equator. phase there

the the

transearth spacecraft be made, will

will from

be continuous behind the moon period,

communications until including EVA TV and separate be in the shortly pre-

coverage prior and film to entry. post-EVA cassettes

from

appears if required.

A 6-hour

be planned

to perform

an in-flight

to retrieve

and

the lunar sounder tape from the SIM bay in the SM. be conducted during transearth coast. The CM will before nominal are the entry interface. approximately Earth touchdown days after will I y occur 12.7 launch.

photographic from the SM mid-Pacific landing

tasks will 15 minutes will coordinates

and

Targeted

17O54’S,

166OOO’W. OPERATIONS Recovery the will crew helicopter were event the recovery install will suits helicopter the flotation the return prior However, will hatch from drop swimmers on the CM, flight Texas, and crew life rafts the near life before

POST-LANDING FI ight Following the CM. raft, leaving ship via and Crew

splashdown, The swimmers pass fresh the life CM. raft and flight The

collar

attach to the

in through and will

for the

to don

be transferred

the spacecraft

recovery

to Houston, to Apollo biological crew illness.

for debriefing. the mobile will be

Quarantine quarantine available laboratory ship’s X-rays. CM --and Data

procedures facility will will be aboard medical for use in the

eliminated

15; therefore, isolation be used facilities The Skylab

not be used. prime

garments medical

of unexplained

post-flight

facilities.

recovery ship and will However, the ship’s

in lieu of the will be used for

Retrieval

Operations recover

An attempt will be made to
mission. order

the

earth

landing not

system

main

parachutes during the

on this landing in

In addition, the CM RCS propellants will to preclude possible damage to the parachutes. will

be vented

copter, the CM TICONDEROGA. near etc., craft

be retrieved and placed The CM RCS h e I‘ rum pressure wil I be vented and the CM wil I be stowed the ship’s elevator to insure adequate ventilation. Lunar samples, film, flight logs, will be retrieved for shipment to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). The spacewill be offloaded from the ship in San Diego and transported to an area where deof the propellant system will be accomplished. The CM will then be returned facilities. Page 20

After flight crew pickup by helion a dolly aboard the recovery ship, USS

activation to contractor 1 l/8/72

M-933-72-

17

ALTERNATE If an anomaly its nominal will provide Ocean.

MISSIONS occurs flight plan, after liftoff flight that crew would and prevent CM the space will in the vehicle be initiated. Atlantic from following An abort or Pacific

an abort

or an alternate

mission recovery

for acceptable

An alternate spacecraft,

mission or support

is a modified equipment

flight anomaly

plan that

that

results

from

a launch

vehicle, of the primary

precludes

accomplishment

mission objectives. and flight controllers flight The Apollo have alternate description Earth In case conducted quent the orbital deorbit trometer, surface camera recorder on the Lunar Lunar will film, last Orbit orbit missions day Pacific Orbit of no TLI to transfer Ocean. using two the

The purpose of the alternate with a plan by which the systems capabilities. missions and upon the status

mission is to provide the flight crew greatest benefit can be gained from the

remaining categories are and

general 17 Mission

of alternate orbital depend missions which

that nature

can orbital.

be performed Both anomaly CSM.

during leading A brief paragraphs.

the categories to the

(1) earth the resulting

(2) lunar

of these

several

variations of these

of the in the

mission

systems

of the

LM and

alternate

is contained

following

burn,

an earth

orbital benefit

mission from the to the

of up to about scientific CM, the the

6-l/2

days onboard.

will

be Subseinto

to obtain

maximum The

equipment LM will optimum orbit

of necessary

equipment be used

be deorbited

SPS will

to attain

for conducting

science and to increase the orbital inclination capability will be maintained at all times. and and IR scanning and radiometer for galactic film, and will selected be used observations. earth pan atmosphere be used mapping of the

up to 45’. A backup RCS The lunar sounder, far UV specto obtain The targets. film data mapping The will lunar on the earth’s and pan optical by EVA camera sounder

to photograph camera mission.

camera

be retrieved

of the SIM

following

types

will

be planned

if spacecraft

systems

will

enable accomplishment If the not possible. will the be retrieved nominal timeline to perform when the

of orbital science objectives in the event a lunar bay cameras and/or the lunar sounder are used, during transearth to minimize revolution coast. real will time An attempt flight be maintained. orbit LM will alternate be made mission in real should planning

landing is film cassettes to follow An SPS

by EVA

be made activities.

in order

capability Generally, retained.

TEI on any LM

is available on when

for a lunar the

it will time.

be

The decision

to jettison

1 l/8/72

Page

21

M-933-72-

17

ESM/LM The

(Operable

DPS) will until translunar LM DPS may orbit. maneuver be maintained LOI plus coast 2 hours that to be within in the event landing the a lunar to perform the DPS capability is not mission LOIcannot of an If the be performed, to put

translunar

trajectory earth return during

acceptable either CSM/LM prior the

LOI

performed.

it is determined into

SPS or the the

be used

1 maneuver

an appropriate LOl-1

to LOI,

In the event the SIM bay door will be performed with the SPS. LOl-2 maneuver and photographic orbit.

is not jettisoned The LOIthe be CSM/LM

maneuver will be performed with the SPS. The into a 111 km (60 NM) orbit. Orbital science performed for up to approximately e DPS LOI maneuver will in a 6 days in lunar

will place tasks will

CSM/LM -------m lnoperabl if, The per CSM In the maneuver can S IM bay science mately following CSM the will nominal

a nominal generally tasks will flight

it is determined to obtain NM) 11 1 km (60

that orbit.

the near

DPS is inoperable, nominal orbital science in the lunar and

an inclination. orbit

SPS circularization photographic

maneuver remain plan.

be performed

Orbital 6 days

be performed

for up to approximately

Alone event will door and 20°) the LM is not available the CSM the following a nominal such TLI burn, an SPS MCC-1 to earth if the orbital (approxiThe CSM be up to

place within cannot photographic inclination

on a trajectory

be achieved

SM RCS capability. will

that an acceptable return LOI will not be performed

be jettisoned. tasks but with NM)

If the SIM bay door has been jettisoned, be performed in an orbit of near nominal node shift of from in lunar 40’ orbit to 60’. will orbit. The d uration

an easterly

will remain approximately CSM -Alone

in a 111 km (60 6 days. (From -wLanding

Abort)science mission will and LM jettison. be accomThe total

In the event the lunar landing is aborted, an orbital plished by the CSM alone after rendezvous, docking, lunar orbit time will be approximately 6 days.

1 l/8/72

Page

22

M-933-72-

17

IN-FLIGHT The technical as experiments, Experiment engineering, to Apollo Space flight for Manned Detailed gation hardware lunar

EXPERIMENTS, DETAILED OBJECTIVES, DEMONSTRATIONS, AND OPERATIONAL to be performed objectives, in-flight on the Apollo demonstrations, that or other programs supports data and 17 Mission

TESTS are classified tests: or provides

investigations detailed -

or operational science in general

A technical technological, exploration

investigation medical or other

and

experience

for application by the Manned Administrator

is recommended

Experiments Space Flight -

Board (MSFEB) an d assigned by the Associate to the Apollo Program for flight. A scientific, data engineering, and experience to Apollo are SM detailed medical or operational

Objective that provides and/or though

investiof

important reviewed

for use in development missions. not assigned obiectives. of the capability unique conditions

procedures be processed -

for application as CM A technical to illustrate and

graphic tasks, ments and will In-flight apparatus

by the MSFEB,

Orbital photoas formal experi-

Demonstration and/or process with

demonstration or utilize the

of an of space

flight environment. interference basis performance, success. Operational technical is not does not not required affect Test data -

In-flight demonstration all other mission and of these

will be performed only on a nonmission-related activities. Utilization will in no way relate to mission

or completion

demonstrations

A technical objectives

investigation of the Apollo

that flight adds

provides equipment, mission. no payload

for the acquisition or facilities An operational weight, and does

of but test

or evaluates by the the the nominal

operational mission

techniques, timeline,

jeopardize

accomplishment

of primary

obiectives,

experiments,

or detailed

objectives. EXPERIMENTS The Apollo Lunar Lunar and Surface surface the Lunar are 17 Mission Experiments experiments Module so noted. Pilot are deployed EVA and activated periods. Those or conducted experiments by the which Commander are part of includes the following experiments:

during

the ALSEP

..

1 l/8/72

Page

23

M-933-72-

17

Lunar The

Heat heat

Flow

(S-037)

(ALSEP) is designed temperature conductivity (7 feet). holes drilled to measure in the of the lunar lunar the subsurface surface layer, subsurface vertical and material temperature the absolute to a depth

flow and

experiment brightness and thermal 2 meters in bore Meteorites and

gradients temperature

of approximately which Lunar The and are placed and

The experiment includes with the Apollo lunar (ALSEP) is designed impacts of meteorite

two sensor probes surface drill (ALSD).

Ejecta --lunar

(S-202)

ejecta ejecta

meteorites cosmic emanating the particles. (S-203)

experiment dust from direction, particle the sites

to measure impacts and

physical space, lunar the on the

parameters of lunar and surface, primary Lunar The

of primary It will

on sensors

in cislunar speed

measure

mass distribution,

of both

secondary Profiling -----

Seismic lunar

(ALSEP) is designed subsurface and near meteorite and the to obtain subsurface in the data and passive array explosive on physical monitoring mode, mode. listening will

seismic of the seismic

profiling lunar waves

experiment and and package EVA-l. in the surface

properties artificial and The

surface

by generating impacts

in the active

by detecting experiment

moonquakes electronics area during

four-geophone modules with

be deployed charges will

in the ALSEP

Transport

be mounted on the LRV for deployment during the EVA traverses within 2.5 km (1.3 NM) of ALSEP. Th e eight charges will be detonated remotely from earth subsequent Lunar The to iunor liftoff. Composition composition lunar is the from field atmosphere detection the surface (S-205) (ALSEP) is designed changes man-made with to obtain at the The thermionic data lunar due on surface. to is

Atmospheric ---lunar atmospheric of the goal sector of gasses

experiment of transient or from

composition A secondary emission a magnetic bombardment Lunar The Surface lunar

in mass range

T-1 10 AMU sources.

in composition

instrument electronic

mass spectrometer

a Nier-type

ion source. Gravimeter gravimeter (S-207) (ALSEP) to gather the following information:

surface

is designed

absolute relative between

lunar gravity, tidal changes in local gravity due to the change in position of celestial bodies, low level lunar gravity changes with periods 10 seconds and 20 minutes due to natural oscillations of the moon excited

I l/8/72

Page

24

M-933-72-

17

by gravity conclusions associated vertical Lunar The The and obtain There

waves, and vertical axis seismic may be drawn about the internal seismic component activity, of gravity and about the is measured (S-059) is designed of the out during The depth

activity. constitution existence in three

From this of the of gravity

information moon, about waves. The ranges.

different

frequency

Geology lunar geology of the utilize and two core are

Investigation --experiment geologic will astronaut sample major Samples

to provide moon camera battery in the the

data vicinity

for use in the of the lunar hand ALSD tools, will surface

intersite. tubes, to traverses

pretation will

history be carried containers.

landing drive be used (1 1 feet).

investigation

planned systems, powered

descriptions,

the ALSD,

samples

to a maximum aspects Rock will bags and of all as drive of the and

of approximately

3 meters

experiment: soil samples representing photographed, to earth. Descriptions and photographs of different and morphological in

Documented and petrological individual Geological the field Special for return Cosmic The

features

be described, for return

collected

pre-numbered Description relationships samples, to earth. Ray Detector 17 cosmic and heavier energy than sun conditions, such

Special accessible tube

Samples types samples,

of lunar features will be collected

will be obtained. and documented

(S-152) ray detector and hydrogen is designed of the to detect solar radon to measure and galactic from emissions range the elemental rays, lunar composition, with surface. emphasis All

Apollo

abundance on quiet elements will The

spectrum

cosmic from the

in the energy

1 kev/AMU

to 25 Mev/AMU

be detected. experiment will be in two sections, each about 5 x 10 cm (2 x 4 inches). platinum foil detector solar emissions. A second in the shade in

One section holding mica, glass, aluminum elements will be placed in the sun in order section, order Traverse The containing to detect in addition cosmic (S-199) experiment by the anomalies, will LRV. and also Lexan sheets, galactic rays and

foil and to detect will

be placed

radon

emission.

Gravimeter ---gravimeter traversed gravity The

traverse area

is designed

to measure

and

map

the

gravity and

in the features.

subsurface

The data can provide resolution their relationships to observed provide surface verification

of surface geological of Lunar Orbiter

experiment

1 l/8/72

Page

25

M-933-72-

17

gravity gravity. The

measurements field.

and It will

information also provide

on higher

harmonic

contents

of the and

lunar lunar

gravitational

a comparison

of terrestrial

instrument

mounted

on the

LRV uses a vibrating

string

accelerometer

to ground coverage

measure gravity fields by the crew. Stations and surface photos.

at the traverse stations. Data will be read to the will be accurately located by orbital stereo photo

Surface The the

Electrical -Ielectrical surface, the electrical

Properties properties to search

(S-204) experiment presence lunar powered (230 on the feet) EVAs tri-loop of the panel with is designed of water material transmitter from receiving while the to determine below in situ. and LM and antenna the LRV multiple 70 meters and data is in motion. frequency (230 feet) Six recorder the layering and in to

surface lunar

for the

surface,

measure

properties a solar

Instrumentation antenna from the mounted deployed ALSEP, on the

includes at least and LRV.

70 meters

a receiver It is utilized

frequencies ranging from 1 to 32 MHz allow probing of the subsurface from a few meters to several kilometers. The data recorder is to be returned to earth for analysis. Lunar The Neutron neutron Probe probe (S-229) is designed regolith. to calculate rock irradiation of neutron one and to measure neutron capture rates as a

experiment in the enables lunar

function The lunar

of depth dosage mixing

unambiguous regolith The

interpretation depths, probe and inserted

The dosage

neutron probe measurements errosion depths.

data will permit an on the lunar samples. and accretion rates,

regolith

experiment

is a two-section, into a core stem activity extravehicular

assembled,

2 meter (7 feet) rod which hole in the lunar surface deactivated, and

is activated during the early disassembled at

stages of extravehicular the end of the final of concentric with a plastic lined These with alpha tubes. track particles

and retrieved, activity.

a boron

One half of the inner detector. Half of the outer diameter film which emits alpha particles when leave traces in the plastic film

The two sections of the rod consist diameter of the outer tube is lined of the center tube struck by neutrons. the two films are is in

when

registration.

1 l/8/72

Page

26

M-933-72-

17

In-F1 ight In-flight performed module

Experiments experiments within (SIM) the located

may be conducted module I of the during (CM), service any phase of the mission, They are

command in sector

and from module

the scientific (SM).

instrument

S-band - --- Transponder The S-band gravity field gravitational The experiment for the are CSM and correlated transponder caused profiles data LM

(CSM/LM) experiment of the are

(S-164) is designed and tracks to detect deficiencies variations and in the to establish lunar

by mass concentrations ground

to the spacecraft. of the structure. S-band Doppler of the tracking data motion

obtained orbit.

by analysis Minute in the lunar

in lunar

pertubations

spacecraft

to mass anomalies (S-169) experiment for each region (1216& spatial

Far --------UV The far

Spectrometer UV and spectrometer scale

is designed constituent of 1175 xenon

to determine in the lunar with

the primary

atomic

composition, and to on

density, repeatedly hydrogen The

height

atmosphere,

scan Lyman

the spectral Alpha will

to 16758\ (1470&.

emphasis

and

instrument the the darkside,

detect and the the

and

temporal variations, emission, moon.

variations study and

in the and the the study

lunar ascent atomic

atmosphere, engines, on the hydrogen

measure measure lunar distribution

temporary UV albedo measure between Radiometer

atmosphere

created

by the

LM descent

its graphic UV galactic and the

fluorescence

earth (S- 171)

IR Scanning The high surface determine surface. from Lunar The other

IR scanning resolution thermal thermal Data lunar

radiometer temperature emissions from this conductivity,

experiment map along experiment spacecraft, of the bulk

is designed lunar density, will also surface. orbital and

to obtain It will track, specific

data and heat with

to construct lunar be used lunar obtained will data

a to

measure on the

the spacecraft

be correlated

orbiting (S-209)

Sounder lunar

sounder model

experiment of the lunar

is designed and interior

to obtain tectonic to a depth

lunar data

subsurface for development

and 1.3

near of a km (.7 NM).

subsurface geological

stratigraphic,

structural,

of approximately

1 l/8/72

Page

27

M-933-72-

17

The instrument utilizes three tranceivers 5 MHz), a VHF antenna, an HF antenna, will be linearly detected, film displayed cassette will photographed. The returned to earth. Passive Additional passive are are required Gamma -I__This crystal gamma package and to earth, ground Apollo The Experiments experiments discussed during the assigned in this mission to the Apollo only. to perform (S-160) basic S-160 experiment

(frequencies are and an optical recorder’s during

150 MHz, recorder. ray in-flight

15 MHz,

and

in the

cathode

Return ethos tube, and EVA and

be retrieved

17 Mission

which

are means

completely no crew activities

section

Completely passive these experiments.

Ray Spectrometer of the caused ray data collected CM

extension

is designed produced

to obtain with the

measurements Iodide of astronomical experiment scintillator, upon return the bc rck-

of background ray

by activation interaction, on the passive, for the by the crystal

products

Sodium

by cosmic

and is in support of the analysis Apollo 15 and 16 Missions. The consisting duration rate ray

is completely in the detector produced Meteoroid the counts Window

is stowed

count cosmic

of a Nal crystal and plastic of the mission. Immediately will be measured to determine flux interaction with the

crystal.

(S-176) a-

(CM) is designed The to obtain data on the ci sl unar

Apollo

window flux for meteoroid

meteoroid impacts data

exgoriment lo‘z grams.

meteoroid analyzed window calibration Soil The

of mass range The

by comparison analysis the

returned CM with a preflight be compared

window will be photomicroscopic with laboratory

map.

photomicroscopic to define (S-200)

will

velocity

mass of impacting

meteoroids.

Mechanics soil mechanics of the derived

Experiment experiment lunar from hand soil LM tools. (M-2 ---

is designed from the surface flight

to obtain to depths crew

data

on the

mechanical meters. debriefings, activities

properties Data using Biostack The kinds are

of several and

landing, analysis

observations samples, and

examination

of photographs,

of lunar

astronaut

the Apollo IIA

Experiment experiment space objects

11) to investigate Biostack subtilis consists spores, the biologic effects of several cucullus of cosmic selected cysts,

Biostack

is designed flight. The (Bacillus

radiation

during of biological

of layers Colpoda

1 l/8/72

Page

28

M-933-72-

17

Arabidopsis castaneum (nuclear cosmic damage experiment of special space Biocore The flight

thaliana eggs) emulsions,

seeds,

stacked

Vicia alternatively

faba

radiculae, Artemia salina eggs, Tribolium with different physical track detectors The biologic affects of galactic

plastics,

AgCI-crystals).

particles to nuclei

to genetic

under consideration are: molecular and cellular inactivation; and other sub-cellular systems; induction of mutations leading changes; and modification in growth and development of tissues. The is stowed in the CM for the duration of the mission. to the The research effects of is because of its possible relationship biologic

interest

on man. (M-212) is designed and to ascertain terminating Five of brain whether in the pocket lesions brain mice caused of the heavy and will particles eyes, by the will be used of cosmic produce to

Experiment experiment of known occurrence

Biocore

radiation establish

trajectory

morphologically

demonstratable

damage.

or nonoccurrence

particles. For a T-24

The experiment is stowed in the CM for the duration launch opportunity this experiment will not be flown. -DETAILED Following objectives Launch Impact nominal Post-flight and time OBJECTIVES ----is a brief planned Vehicle the description for this Detailed of each of the launch

mission.

vehicle

and

spacecraft

detailed

mission. Obiectives in a preselected to stimulate S-IVB/IU zone on the lunar surface under the ALSEP passive seismometers. p oint of impact within 5 km (2.7 NM),

expended profile

S-lVB/IU conditions

flight

determination of impact Detailed SM high data within

of actual 1 second.

Spacecraft Obtain and

Objectives panoramic orbit and to aid surface high in the features sources. and nearside lunar data. surface features and processes quality overall metric lunar surface of the and photographs moon. of low

resolution from lunar

altitude CM

exploration interest

Obtain brightness Record

photographs astronomical

of lunar and

of scientific

terrestrial of farside and other

visual

observations photographs

to complement

remote-sensed

1 l/8/72

Page

29

..- ^,‘--_c---^~_--

M-933-72-

17

Obtain

data

on whole

body for

metabolic food

gains compatibility

or losses,

together

with

associated

endocrinological

controls

assessment. pressure garment in counteracting

Obtain data on the effectiveness orthostatic intolerance. Obtain flashes. Obtain IN-FLIGHT m--w--___ Heat --This fluids Flow data on Apollo spacecraft more definitive information

of the

protective

on the

characteristics

and

causes

of visual

light

induced

contamination.

DEMONSTRATION and Convection --m-w--will be performed gradients information further to show at low on the the convective effects detected instability levels. existing 14 in

demonstration containing to obtain

temperature

acceleration

The demonstration in the Apollo

is designed demonstration.

OPERATIONAL ------__--_The Radar radiate, Force operational Skin Track

TESTS tests listed with The remaining (AFETR) below have been Radar are approved stated Skin passive. for conduct in connection in conjunction with Chapel tests the with

the Apollo

17 Mission, Test. the Range whereas

the qualification ETR 0.13 tests

ETR 0.13

Track Test and The operational or facilities are

Bell actively using the Air by

Eastern

Test

instrumentation

to be scheduled

the AFETR. Chapel -----we-The and DOD Bell (TEPEE) test OMSF Skin Chapel This approval Test in coordination with other OMSF Centers, the Bell test has been coordinated 17 Mission. between on previous centers Apollo and has

operational OMSF

received

approval.

has been

conducted

launches

has received Radar Pm--

for the Apollo

ETR 0.13 Subject AFETR launch factory Operations radio

Track

to certification will and radio will frequency operate orbital phases respond

by KSC, a research and of the interference to the

development FPQ-13, Certification mission. test. Network occur. The AFETR Controller

C-band radar during the will be based upon a satisSuperintendent and turn the of Range radar off if

frequency

MSC

interference

should

1 l/8/72

Page

30

M-933-72-17

Ionospheric v---4-This such test

Distrubances the

from Missiles -----e--propagation upper will be made from vehicle of acoustic and WY ves of continuous in the lower ionosphere radiation sources, at Grand at audio-

studies Island.

long-range in the

as rocket

vehicles,

atmosphere

Bahama frequencies

Observations expected to result

of electromagnetic flight.

Acoustic -------we---The noise

Measurement noise

of Missile of the rocket’s

Exhaust -_------exhaust

Noise is recorded at Cape Kennedy Air Force which are sheltered from wind analyses of the recorded data to to 80 km (43 NM)

acoustic by heavy

Station determine

by a cross-shaped vegetation. speed Test test and wind

array of nine microphones, The Air Force performs direction from sea level

Army Acoustic --v---m This DOD

operational OMSF Length approval

has been for Apollo System on selected length

conducted 17.

on previous

Apollo

launches

and

has

received Long Focal - - -----I Photographic AFETR, Sonic --

Optical

information a long focal

launch

and

orbital

operations

is collected

by the

using Boom

optical

system.

Measurement m---evehicle be used flight during launch to assist in sonic boom prewill

The sonic boom overpressure levels of the Apollo 17 space The data will be measured in Atlantic launch abort area. developing die tion Skylab The the ship’s protocol high-altitude, techniques. Medical Skylab crew Mobile Labora high-Mach number, accelerated

-e

Medical is recovered. changes will

M o b’lI e L a b ora t ory will The Skylab medical facilities, except above be implemented

be on board the prime recovery ship when laboratory will be used to replace the for shipboard the normal X-ray. Apollo No Program new medical requirements.

post-flight

medical

1 l/8/72 P--P

Page

31

M-933-72-

17

MISSION MISSION -v-vThe will Saturn HARDWARE -----V Launch AND Vehicle

CONFIGURATION --__1_I SOFTWARE and

AND CONFIGURATION Spacecraft

DIFFERENCES

the Apollo

for the

Apollo

17 Mission

be operational -CONFIGURATION --Pm Space Launch First Vehicle Vehicle Stage

configurations. DESIGNATION AS-512 SA-5 s-IC-12 S-II12 S-IVB-512 S-IU-512 SLA-2 1 LMVehicle LRV-3 SM-114 CM114 3 1G 17 ALSEP *. * 12 12 NUMBERS --

Second Stage Third Stage Instrument Spacecraft-LM Lunar Lunar Service Command Onboard Lunar Experiments Launch Module Roving Module Module Programs Module Package Unit Adapter

Command

colossus Luminary Apollo LC-39A

Module

Complex DIFFERENCES summarizes the significant Vehicle and the Apollo configuration 17 Mission:

CONFIGURATION The following AS-512 Space -Spacecraft Command/Service ---_ Added 5 micron Suit P gauge Added battery

differences

associated

with

the

Module filter in KS To prevent causing manifold relief valve To permit gasses closed particulate erroneous overboard manual a pressure equipment contamination pressure dumping vent readings. of battery valve is from

in event during

buildup. for lunar sounder

Added

lunar

sounder

booms

To provide experiment.

1 l/8/72

M-933-72-

17

Added

fuel

and

oxidizer

pressure

To provide system

redundant

fuel

and

oxidizer

transducers Crew Added Systems third EMU maintenance kit

pressure

measurements.

To provide amount flights.

additional

lubricant

due

to

of dust

encountered

on previous

Enlarged

PGA

bag

To preclude wrist connects.

dust

from

contaminating

Modified

OPS

purge

valve

To preclude locking pin.

inadvertant

pulling

of

Added

spare

OPS EVA

antenna Visor Stop in helmet

To provide To prevent eye shade.

spare difficulty

in event

of breakage. center

Eliminated

in retracting

LRV ---

..-

Added Lunar --------

fender Module

extension

fasteners

To preclude

loss of fender

extensions.

Modified S-band latch mechanism Removed panels Improved between tube Launch structural base thermal

steerable

antenna

To improve

unstow

capability.

paint

from

RCS

To preclude

peeling

during

space

flight

attachment and rack support panels

To preclude Ii ftoff

shearing

during

LM

lunar

heatshield

for aft

equipment

Vehicle

S-IVB Redesigned pressure block S-IVB transducer APS Helium mounting To reduce I ea kage possibility of internal system

1 l/8/72

Page

33

M-933-72-

17

Replaced fittings

APS and

Helium

bulkhead

seals stage Helium system with

To reduce leakage To provide APS Helium in event

possibility

of external

system

Interconnected repressurization Helium -IU Modified vide signals and Added IU/ESE start three and system

capability from leak of APS

to charge stage Helium

APS spheres

spheres

EDS distributor independent change Time logic path

to proliftoff Base one

To provide two out of three voting logic for start of Time Base one to eliminate single failure point

redundant interface

across power to liftoff control

To reduce shutdown

possibility after ignition

of S-IC

engine

to assure bus prior flow

to IU measuring Removed valve Added to Saturn and

modulating associated

Not

required.

In line

production

change.

circuitry devices To determine strike requirements magnitude ample of lightning data for retest

lightning launch

detection vehicle

to provide

J-2

Engine engine with ECA timers LOX purge dome control and gas valve To prevent slow engine excessive purge Helium control loss due valve closure to control assembly To eliminate providing single redundant failure circuits points by

Replaced (ECA) redundant Modified generator

incorporating

1 l/8/72

Page

34

M-933-72-

17

TV AND Standard and special-purpose

PHOTOGRAPHIC cameras,

EQUIPMENT will be carried to support Table 2 lists the TV and the

obiectives, experiments, and camera equipments and shows

I enses, and film operational requirements. their stowage locations. Table CSM 2 at LM at Launch 1 1 1

Nomenclature TV, with Color, CM Zoom System) 16mm Lens (Monitor

Launch 1 1 1 1 1 13 1 1 8

CM to LM

LM CM

to

CMc Entr? 1 1 1 1 1

Samera, Data Acquisition, Lens - lOmm Film zamera, Lens Cassette, :omem, lectric Lens Film lamera, lectric Lens Film amera, Film 18mm - 75mm Magazines 35mm Nikon 55mm 35mm

3

3

13 1 1 8 1 1 1 8

80mm 250mm

1 1 8

Magazines Hasselblad Data (Lunar Surface)

2 2 14 1 14 14 14

- 60mm Magazines Filter Panoramic (EVA (In SIM) Transfer) (SIM) 5-in Film (SIM) 1 1 1 1 1 24-in

Polarizing

Magazine

1 1

amera, 3-in Mapping Stellar Film Magazine Containing Mapping and (EVA Transfer) 35mm Stellar

Jnar Sounder Film Magazine (EVA Transfer)

1

1 l/8/72

Page

35

M-933-72-

17

FLIGHT PRIME CREW -II_------Commander: Space October Captain phases He also Captain Command Space April Flight 1963, Cernan of a lunar served Cernan Module e--ewas the LM Pilot for the the Gemini than final (Figure Eugene Experience: 10) A. Cernan Captain (Captain, Cernan

CREW

DATA ---

USN) was selected as an astronaut by NASA in

Apollo minutes

10 Mission, of an actual

which

included

all

mission

except for the

landing.

as pilot

9 Mission. 264 hours in space. USN) as a NASA astronaut in

has logged Pilot:

more Ronald

E. Evans

(Commander, was selected

FI ight 1966.

Experience:

Commander

Evans

He served and the

as a member backup command

of the pilot

astronaut for Apollo hours Schmitt

support 14.

crews

for the Apollo

7 and

11 flights

Commander Lunar m---eModule

Evans Pilot:

has flown Harrison

3400 H.

in iet aircraft. (Dr. Phd) as a scientist astronaut by NASA

Space FI ight Experience: in June 1965. He served as backup 1100 lunar hours

Dr.

Schmitt

was

selected

module

pilot

for Apollo

15.

He has logged

in iet aircraft.

1 l/8/72

Page

36

-.

M-933-72-

17

1 l/8/72

Page

37

M-933-72-

17

BACKUP ----Commander: -Space

CREW John W. Young (Captain, Young USN) was selected as an astronaut by NASA in

FI ight

Experience: 1962.

Captain

September Captain command He also Mission. Captain Command --Space April He was

Young module served

was

the

commander for the Apollo for the Gemini

for the

lunar

landing

Apollo

16 Mission

and

pilot as pilot

10 Mission. 3 Mission and commander of the Gemini 10

Yound Module

has logged Pilot:

more Stuart Lt.

than A.

533 Roosa

hours

in space. Colonel, USAF) by NASA in

(Lieutenant

FI ight 1966. the

Experience:

Colonel

Roosa

was selected

as an astronaut

command pilot

module for the

pilot Apollo

for the Apollo 16 Mission, .

14 lunar and

landing

mission, of the Apollo

backup 9

-

command Mission.

module

a member

He has logged Lunar Space April was the Module Flight 1966. lunar Duke

more Pilot:

than

2 16 hours M.

of space Duke, Duke lunar Jr.

flight. (Colonel, USAF) as an astronaut for the Apollo landing. from the U.S. Naval Academy by NASA 15 Mission in and

Charles

Experience: He served module has been pilot

Colonel as backup

was selected module pilot 16 lunar since hours

for the Apollo duty 267

Colonel in 1957.

on active more than

graduating in space.

He has logged

1 l/8/72

Page

38

M-933-72-

17

MISSION Title Director, Mission Saturn Apollo Director Program Manager Program

MANAGEMENT Name Dr. Capt. Mr. Mr. Rocco A.

RESPONSIBILITY Organization Petrone M. G. G. Lee, Smith Morris USN (Ret) OMSF OMSF MS FC MSC

Chester Richard Owen

Apollo Spacecraft Program Manager Apollo KSC Director Director Launch FI ight of Launch of Flight Operations Directors Operations Operations Manager Program Manager,

Mr.

Robert

C.

Hock

KSC

Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

Walter Howard Paul M. C. P.

J. W.

Kapryan Tindall, Jr.

KSC MSC KSC MSC MSC MSC

Donnelly Frank F. Kranz Griffin

Eugene Gerald

1 l/8/72

Page

39

M-933-72-

17

ABBREVIATIONS

AND

ACRONYMS

ALSEP AOS APS APS ARIA

CCATS

CPLEE CM CMP CSI CSM DAC DDAS DOD DOI DPS DS KY ECS El EMU EPO EST ETB EVA FM cs FDA I FTP GCTA GET GNCS GSFC HER HFE HTC IMU IU IVT KSC LBR LCC LCRU LDMK LEC LES LET LGC LH2 LiOH LM LMP LOI

Abort Guidance System Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package Acquisition of Signal Ascent Propulsion System (LM) Auxiliary Propulsion System (S-IVB) Apollo Range Instrumentation Aircraft Apollo,‘Sdturn Biological Isolation Garment Buddy Secondary Life Support System Communications, Commond, and Telemetry System Cold Cothode Gouge Experiment Commander Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment Command Module Command Module Pilot COnCentriC Sequence Initiation Command/Service Module Dota Acquisition Comero Digital Doto Acquisition System Department of Defense Descent Orbit Insertion Descent Propulsion System Display and Keybwrd Assembly E,.viro”mentol Control System Entry Interface Extrovehicvlor Mobility Unit Earth Parking Or&it Eoster” Stondord Time Equipment Transfer Bog Extravehicular Activity Frequency Modulation Feet Per Second Flipct Zrector Attitude lndicotor Full Throttle Position Ground Commanded Television Ground Elapsed Time Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (CSM) Goddard Space Flight Center High Bit Rote Heat NOW Experiment Hand Tool Carrier Inertial Measurement Unit nstrument Unit Introvehicular Transfer Kennedy Space Center Low Bit Rote Launch Control Center Lunar Communications Relay Unit .ondmark -““or Equipment Conveyor .ou”ch Escape System Launch Escape Tower LM Guidance Computer Liquid Hydrogen Lithium Hydroxide -~“or Module Lunar Module Pilot Lunar Orbit Insertion

MCC MCC MESA MHZ MOCR MOR MPL MSC MS FC MSFEB MSFN NASCOM NM OMSF 06 ORDEAL PCM PDI PGA PGNCS PLSS PSE PTC QUAD RCS RR RLS RTCC RTG s/c SEA STDN s-IC S-II S-IV0 SIDE SIM SLA SM SF5 SRC SSE SSR Sb swc TDBE TEC TEI TFI TLC TLI TLM TPF TPI T-time l-v USB USN USAF VAN VHF AV

Midcourse Correction Mission Control Center Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly Megahertz Mission Operations Control ROOM Mission Operations Report Mid-Pacific Line Manned Spocecroft Center Marshall Space Flight Center Manned Space Flight Experiment Board Manned Space Flight Network NASA Communications Network Nautical Mile Office of Manned Space Flight 0 xygen Purge System Orbital Rate Disploy Earth and CU”lX Pulse Code Modulation Powered Descent Initiation Pressure Garment Assembly Primary Guidance, Navigotio”, and Control System (LM) Portable Life Support System Passive Seismic Experiment Passive Thermal Control Quadrant Reaction Control System Rendezvous Rodor Radius Landing Site Real-Time Computer Complex Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Spocecroft Sun Elwotion Anolr Spoceflight Tracking and Doto N=t,,,o,k Saturn V First Srage Saturn V Second Stage Saturn V Third Stage Suprathermal Ion Detector E xperiment Scientific Instrument Module Spacecroft-LM Adapter Service Module Service Propulsion System Sample Return Container jinale Side Bnd Stoif Support Room Space Vehicle Solar Wind Composition Experiment Transposition, Docking ond LM Ejection Tranrearth Cwst Tronseorth Injection Time From Ignition Translumr Coast Tronslunor Injection Telemetry Terminal Phase Finalization Terminal Phase Initiation Countdown Time (referenced to liftoff time)

LOS LOX
LPO LR LRL LRRR LSM LV

Lossof

Signal

Television
Unified S-Bond United Stoter Navy United States Air Force Vanguard Very High Frequency Differential Velocity

Liquid Oxygen Lunar Parking Orbit Landing Radar Lunar Receiving Laboratory Loser Ranging Retro-Reflector Lunar Surface Magnetometer Launch Vehicle

1 l/8/72

Page

40
GPO 940.510

..

Pest Miss No,

Launch ion Operations

Report

i+933-72-17 19, 1972

December TO : FRDM: A/Acministrator MA/Apol Apol!o lo Program D i rector

SUBJECT:

17 Mission

(AS-512)

Post

M iss ion

Operat

iOfi

Report

No.

1

Space The Apollo 17 Imission was successfully launched from the Kennedy The mission was completed successCenter on Thursday, December 7, 1972. fully, with recovery on December 19, 1972. Initial review of the mission events indicates that all mission objectives were accomplished. Detailed analysis of al 1 data is continuing and appropriate Irefined results of the mission will be reported in the Manned Space F!ight Centers’ technical
i‘ .C?60 t- t 5 0

Attached is the Mission Director’s Summary Report for Apollo 17, which Also attached are is submitted as Post Launch Operations Report No. 1. the NASA OMSF Primary Objectives for Apol lo 170 The Apol lo 17 miss iOn ives and I judge has achieved all the assigned primary object it to be a success o

Assoc iate’b Manned Space F. t tachmen ts

strator ght

for

M-933-72-

17

NASA PRIMARY Perform features Emplace Conduct OBJECT IVES

OMSF

MlSSlON

OBJECTIVES

FOR APOLLO

17

e

selenological inspection, survey, and sampling of materials in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region. and activate surface experiments experiments, and photographic tasks.

and

surface

s

.

in-flight

Apollo

Program

Director Manned Date: Space r/ Flight

22

/%7z

ASSESSMENT Based dance upon with a review completed the of the assessed stated

OF

THE APOLLO

17 MlSSlON 17, launched a success 7 December in accor-

performance 1972,

of Apollo

1572 and

19 December

th’ IS mission

is adjudged

objectives

above.

Apollo Date:

Program

Director

1 2,/r 5/‘72

Page

2

._- . I.. ,.

“._, .._I

.--.

._--.- ..-“.I

--~“~~._“.--“--_l_-.-_l.

NAT1ONAL AERONAUTICS
i WASHINGTON,

ANlCESPACE ADMlNIZTRATiON

D.C. 20546

IA? REPLY

RFFE!?

TO:

MAC

Dec.ember

19,

1972

Ti’: FROM: SUBJECT:

Distr MA;Apol Mission

but lo

ion Miss ion Di rector Summary Report, Aoolto

3 i rector’s

17

_LNTRODUCT I ON Ti-rz Apollo 17 Mission was planned as a lurar landing mission to accomplish selenological inspection, survey, and sampling of mater.sls and surface features in a preselectec area of the Taurus-Littrow !,eqion of the moon; emplace and activate surface experiments; and Fl ight crew experiments and photographic tasks. k.i in-f 1 i ght members were Commander (CDR) Captain Eugene A. Cernan (USN), Command Module Pilot (CMP) Commander Ronald E, Evans (USN), Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) Dr. Harrison H. Schmitt (PhD). Significant detailed Initial review 15. information is contained in Tables 1 thro~igh indicates that al 1 primary mission objectives were accompl ished (reference Table 1). Table 2 lists the Apollo 17 achieslements.
.:.(.)i;duc-

WELAUNCH -.. The launch counl:down proceeded smoothly urtil T-3!? seconds, at which Subsecuent to a rec::cle and hold i in an autolmatlc cutoff occurred. : an additional hold was celled at r-8 m,nutes. at -;-2.2 minutes The d!!ration of the holds delayed the launch by 2 hours 40 minutes. The hold was caused when the Terminal Countdown Sequencer (TCS) failed to command pressurization of the S- IVB LOX tank. This command: (1.’ Closes the LOX tank vent; (2) Opens th? LOX tank pressurization v-3 ? f/P ; .trld (3) Arms the S- IVB LOX tank pressurized interlock, The tank ~a:; pri:ssurized manually. Satisfying (1) and (2) above. but the absence actuation Of the interlocr. in the S-IVE ready to launch cf (3) tirevented 1f:qic train, The result was automatic cutoff at T-30 seconds. The lailnch was accomplished with the interlock bypassed by a jumper, tnvestigation indicates cause of failure to ‘,e a defective diode on a printed c.ircuit card in the TCS. The ~::,rkaround to anil salisfactoriTy q!laqar Iy, ? decision jump the single failed function checked out on the breadboard was made to proceed with the was thoroughly analyzed at MSFC and, -subser countdown. The

-

Page 3
-. . . .-..-.,.. .._____--...--l__. -... ~----., .,--. “.Is__ .-.lll-l,--.l-.... --.-.-.___.l_-_-l~-_--,

M -933-72-17

countdown then proceeded smoothly. visibility 13 kilometers were clear, wirds 4 meters per second (mps) at 1200 meters (m) (4000 feet). LAUNCH, EARTH PARKING ORBIT,

(8

Launch (km)(7 knots))

day weather conditions nautical miles (nm)), and scattered cloud cover

AND TRANSLUNAR

INJECTION

Tne Apollo 17 space vehicle was successfully launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 2 hours 40 minutes late, at 00:33 EST, The S-iVB/IU/LM/CSM was inserted into an earth December 7, 1972. orbit of 170 x 168 km (92.5 x 91.2 nm) at 00:11:52 GET (hrs:min:sec). Following nominal checkout the Translunar Injection The maneuver occurred at of the space vehicle, the S-IVB performed Maneuver over the Atlantic Ocean as planned. ~3: Y2:3$ GET alld was nominal in all respects,

TRANSLUNAR

COAST

‘The CSM separated from the S-IVB/IU/LM at -3:42:29 GET, transpo;;ed, and then docked with the LM at 3:57:10 GET. However, during a talkback barberpole indicated a possible ring latch maldocking, i’ui~ct ion, Subsequent LM pressurizatio:l, hatch removal, and troublewere not locked. shooting revealed that latches 7, 9, and 10 handles Latch 10 handle was locked by pushing on the latch handle. Latches 7 and 9 were locked and manually fired to lock the handles and the system talkhack indicated normal, Following hatch replacement, the CSM/LM combination was successfully ejected -4:45:2O GET. The S-IVB coordinates lunar 7.0’S impact and maneuver ~.O’G! at targeted the stage about 87:05 GET. for impact at lunar

The spacecraft trajectory was such that midcourse correction (MCC) 1 was not performed. MCC-2 maneuver was performed on time at 35:29:59 The Service Propulsion System (SPS) was fired for 1.7 seconds,--_--. LJ rET. resulting in a velocity change of 3 mps (9.8’feet per Second rfpsr). This was 0.2 mps (0,7 fps) less than planned because tank pressures at the time of the maneuver were slightly lower than those used to predict the firing This residual was trimmed out manually to near zero using duration. the service module Reaction Control System (RCS). ihe Commander (CDR) and Lunar Module Pi lot (LMP) began IVT to the LM at approx imatel’j 40: 10 GET. At Sngresj, it was disc.overed that #4 doc.kiny latch was not properly latched. The CMP moved the latch handle about 30”-45’, disengaging the hook from the docking ring. After dis’ 1ir.5 inn between the ground controllers and the fl ight crew, it was decided to curtail further action on the latch until .the second IVT/LM The remaind,er of the LM housekeeping was Activation at 59:59 GET. nominal and the LM was closed out at 42: 11 GET.

M-933-72-1

7

The Heat Flow and Convection demonstrations were cond-lcted hs planned. The first demonstration was performed with the spacec-aft in attitude hold while the second run was accomPlished with the spacecraft in the The radial. 1 ineal and flow passive thermal c.ontrnl (PTC) mode. ’ pattern demonstrations produced satisfactory results. Since lVT/LM the spacecraft trajectory was near nominal, MCC-3 was not required.

housekeeping A!1 62: 16 GET. keeping pe!-iod, shooting on the IVT/LM (/ Following stroked latch $4 was Tef t in the

Qabout commenced about S,.., “3 GET and somqleted LM systems ch:$cks were ilomin-31. Duri:lg the LM house(Cb,?) performed troublethe Commaid Module Pi lot &cking 13tch #4 pro’bler.~ experienced during the first instructio.qs from khr: grrlilnd controllers, the CMP ir! cocking the latch. The latch handle a!~ d succeeded cocked pas it ion for CSM/iM rend.szvous.

was being ex3er’enced, the planned ::rajectory As the delay in 1 iftoff was continual ;y being modified to speed up the iralslanar coast so that the spacecraft would arrive at lunar orbit ‘nse;tl,on (LO!) at the same GMT time, Scbsec,dentiy, in o-der tc adjust :he GET t) al low for the delay in 1 iftoff, a 2-hour and 40-minute GET clock update was performed at 65:~~ GET, placing all events back o3 schedL le Jitn the fl ight plan. --~ -.-- _. -.--..-AC 68: 19 GET, a [-hour conducted by the crew, from bright to dull. The spacecraft 4 was not entered performer Visual The Light Flat-.h crew rePl,rtcd Pfsno,nenon Jbservation seeing 1 ight flashes was ranging

the

moon’s since

sphere the

of

influence tr; jet

at tory

about was

73~18 GET.
near

(MCC) normal. The that

spz -ecr:?ft

51M door the S!M ORBIT

was bay

successfully looked good. AND S-IVB

jettisonei

at

84: 12 GET,

The

crew

stated

-LUNAR

fNSERTiON

[MPACT

LOI was pej-formed with the service p-opi.Ision system (SPS) at 88:54:22 The 398”second maneuver produced c? velocity change (AV) of -910 mps GET. (-2988 fps) and inserted the CSM/LM intc, a 115 x 57 C.m (170.0 x 52.6 nm) The resultant o-bit was very close t.3 tie pre7aunch lunar orbit.

plsnned

orbit

of

317 x

95 km (171 x i;l

cm).

on the 1Jnar sur’ace oc:ur).ed i;: @I:33 GZT about 18 minutes S- I \IB impzit later than thL: prelaunch pred:ction. Impact cooroinates were 4O12’S and 1 20 t 8”$1 about 160 km (86 nm) northbest of the planned target point. The .v~nt‘ a~~. recorded hy the Apol IO 12: 14, 15, and 16 Apollo Lunar Surface Expe r imen t Packages (ALSEPs) . DESCENT ORBIT I_- ,-.-_c__ ~“--.--.L-.-7 l-i ;a G:i f-1 :iF’s

UNDOCK&O-POWERED

DESCENT,

AND

LANDING and produced
(59 x

c”

-60

mps

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ b~!r11 at 93: 11 GET was nominal (-?W Fps) and a resultant orbit of 109 x Page 5

a eV

27

km

14.6

nm),

4
I VT/Lb1 powered occurred act ivation up and al 1 systems at about 137:42 were nominal. GET (hr:m

M -933-72-17

in).

The

LM was

The CSM and LM performed the undocking and separation maneuver on schedule at l iO:27:55 GET. The CSM then performed the circularization maneuver a: 111d?28 GET which placed the CSM ineo a 129 x 100 km (70 x 54 nm) orbit. The Descent Orb it I nserr: Ion-2 maneuver occu -red a L 1 12:02:41 GET and inserted -the LM into a 111 x 11 km (59.6 x j.2 nm) orbit. Powered Descent ini-:iat ion LI-?S performed at 112:49: 52 (;ET and landing at Taurus-Littrow occurred at 113:01:58 GET. ;he la lding coordinates were 20o12.6’N and 3Oo45.Ole. LUNAR SURFACE

Extra-Vehic:itlar Actitvity (EVA)-1 commenced at ; i7:01:36 GET and terminated at 124:13:47 for a total duration of 7 hrs. 12 min. 11 sets. After deploying the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) and to traversing to the ALSEP site, the CDR inadvertently knocked prior The fender the right tear fender extension off of the LRV fender. extension was subsequently secured to t!?e fender rJitll tape. The ALSEY and the Cosmic Ray experiment were deployed. Steno Crater was used as Station IA in 1 ieu of the preplanned station (Emory Crater). The new station was selected because of the accumulated delay time in the EVA by completion of ALSEP deployment. During the traverse to Station lA, the fender extens ion came o?f and asid result, thg? crew and LRV experienced a great deal of dust. The Surface Eiectrical Properties (SEP) Transmitter was deployed near ihe end of the EVA. Sinze :he crew did net get far enough out to deploy the 1 .4 Ki?og,-am (KJ) (3~ p&d (lb)) ExPloslve Padxqe (EP) J only the 0.23 ~g (3 lb) a:)d 0,45 Kg (1 lb) EF”s we t-e deployed on EVp.?- 1 ,

-EVA-2 started and ended at 22 seconds,

at 140:34:118--GET, approximately 146: 12: 10 GET. Total EVA time

1 hour, 20 minutes late, 37 minutes, war; 7 hours,

the crew received instructions from Prior to starting the EVI\ traverse, the ground corltro?IerI; for improvising a replacement for the lost fender Of 4 chr-0nJpaque rlaps, taped togeti>er and held in ex tens ion y A rig positior, by two clamps from [‘ortable ut:lit\* 1 :gh;s, mad!? an excellent ;ub:;t i tute For the extenr. ion and the crew d’d not ex leri once the dust Problem a~ or EVA- 1 y 4 (Shorty), and 5 (Cailelot) were visited ?crr>rdinq Lo premission plan although station times were modified, An rz:rjditiorldi brief stop at Station 2A, 0,7 km at 71’ fron Station 2, was made in order to obtain an additional Traverse Gravimeter reading and sarilp 1es. add i t iona i During the traverse, the crew deployed the o-06 ~q (‘/S lb) 9 pa7 icq (6 112) <znd Q+ll Kg (& Ib) EPs, obtained photographs, Stat Icr.s 2 (Nansenj, 3 (Lara),
GilA cioi.~rin.rn ClL>ri (i -7:np 1 es ~

_

Page

c5

...I- _ _ . _,-.

- --.-

..-_.I-.“‘._. --~._.-,- ,I_.I. - __---. .I-.___,_ I”_.I.. ..-..--..” X.-.-^- .-_-._ _..

M-923-72-17 5
An orange colored material, bei ieved found at Station 4, The LMP revisited the EVA in order to verify that the was properly deployed and ieveled. approximately 19 km (!2 nm) o 5e of vzlcanic origin, was the ALSEP s i te at the end of Lb.rnar Surface Gravimeter (LSG) Total distance covered was to

EVA 3 was in it i ated at '163:32:35 GET about 50 tninutes late, and was 31 seconds later at !~0:48:06 GET. terminated 7 hours and 1 5 mi.lutes Exploration of the stations :das modified during the traverse. In 1 ieu (Sherlock) of travers in? Stat ions 6 (North Massif) !:hrotlgi7 )OB the crew was instructed to spend ?ess time at Station 7 as planned, stay t imt: ar Slat ion 6. (North Mass if) due to a longer Station 9 (Van Station iOB was deleted and Station 8A Serg) was explored as planned. (Sculptured Hi 1 Is) was added, Photographs and documented samples were obtained retrieved, The 1.4 to 0.11 at all and (3 (& stations, the LRV lb) lb) EP, and About t,-aversed ‘E‘eft over Kg 66 Kg a tota?

(14s pounds.)
of 1; ,6

o? km (4

samples nm] ,, in )‘

were

_

Kg Kg

c.o6

(l/8

From EVA-l, fb) EPs.

was deploqfed (See Tab’ie

addition

The total time for Ihe t!,r ee EVAs was 22 hours, -5 minutes, The total distance traveled in the lunar rover seconds. The combined weight of samples was about 115 kg 3 5 km . double cores and 1 deep dri I1 core. Surface photographs the three EVAs total at least 21:ZC, Good El/As. qua1 i-ty television transmission was received

4
was about (250 Ibs), plus taken during 2

thrc*ughout

the

three

Equipment Since the rendezvous, (9.2 fps)

jettison CSM orbit a trim burn for

#I

was

completed

at

171:53

GET, for CSM/LM GET. The 2.8

did not decay to the maneuver was initiated 30 seccnds produced a to The

pianned orbit at 181:34:01 124 x 115 Km

mps

(67,3

x 62.5

nm)orbit.
in

The Lunar Orbit Plane ;;hange occurred at 182:33:53 GET. incl inat ion t/i th a 6” 1” shift Equipmen;: Jettison d/i!. >ra

orient the CSM orbit for rendezvous maneuver produced a chaqge of 3.2’ in the 1Ine of nodes. at 186:34 GET.

completed

LM Ascent Stage lift-off occurred at 188:0l:36 GET. E, j mps (10 fps) tweak burn for ‘10 seionds at 188~12: 12 GET set up the LM orbit for a nominal r~~rld~zi.~oils~ 7he ‘Terminal Phase Initiate burn of 3,2 seconds was in a velocity change of 16.4 mps executed at 188: 5’;: 57 GET and resulted ar:d i3li ot,k>I “i of i19 x 90 Km (64.7 x 48.5 nm), CSM/LM docking (53 o 8 :FS) waq complet~p~ at lyl: 17r0.3 GET, Fol lowing equipment and crew transfer ?I, tie;- C-M, :.he i.P! /\sif~rit ?; tsqca Jettison and CSM Separation were corn-’ s rr p i f t F.d <? p t r^! il1” d * k:. r..er?t: S.tcige Deorb it was initiated at 195;38:13 GET ;I:.:,! lunar ‘;lfr *re‘c,i ~wxJ~?. or,-l.:rr~~d at 195:57: 18 GET. The event was observed

M-933-72-17 6
by the initial 30’3O’E.. four data Apollo 17 Gecphones and the indicated the impact point 4~110 location 12, to 14, 15, be at and 16 ALSEPs. 19O54’N and

The crew did to extension photographic

not obtsln of the re5t taskc we;e

photographs Feriod. pcl-i‘crn.eci

of Sclar Tt,e -azk ir:s planned.

bJ.33

Corona not

at 208:17 GET due rcsct-ieciul ed. Other

Explosive Package (i?P:* #6 O.hf’ K g (1 lb) was detonai.ed and EP #7 0.23 Kg (:z 1;)) ;‘t ?:5:2s:Oi (;E:T. F3oth everIt the Lunar Seis,nic P!ofil :rl:;: il.!.P) qcophoncz. The result from the EP #/ expjosio!~ was seen cn Ttle\zis icn, (See

at 2?2:55:35 GET were picked up by it-,? flash and dust Table 10).

The Ground Contro; le d Television A>sser,,b:y (G(T/,! ant’ Lunar Ccmmunications f a i l,<d lo ope~‘ate Relay Unit (LCRU) when ;.ttcmptc. were made to command the camera on at 221 : :‘.I) Gi’.T. /?dd it ionc i ;‘t: crnptc: hctbjeen 2j7:44 and 237:53 GET to commalnd the SYS i tTIlS C Ii b/t i-c i:rIsuccess-i‘L> i . it was later determined, the L(;F,U expc:rienced an ovcl.-tenlper6turc fa i 111r.e. fixplosive Package (FO) ?1; 0.06Kg (l/8 Jb) tletonaied ac 23;i:‘!5:L15 GET.

The Trapsearth The Service in velocity EP#l 2.7Kg

Injection Pt-opuls ion of 928 mps

(TEi) System

maneuver w&c performed (:,P:;) I~:.~J.~-sc:( ond turn

at 236:42:08 GET. pt-educed a change

(30q6..3

fps).

at

240:52:50

(6 lb) detonated GET Isee Taklc
r,igna!s

received Midcourse trajectory

strQng

i-1: 2:7:49: ?? Gf:T arid EPIf8 0.;’ Kg (l/4 lb) The l.klr.at. 5~ sm! r. Pro” i - ny geophones $0). ft-om EP:s 4, 1, and 8. wt.s ncit performed since .ihe sp?icecraft

Correct ion (MCC)-5 was near nominai. ieft the a velocity

The spacecraft traveling at

moor.‘s sphere l,f inf’uence 0C ‘Q.? mpr 13851 ;‘ps).

at

21;0:39:50

GET,

CYP in- fl i qht EVA comnenced a:. 257, j/+:24 GET The CMP “e’: ,-Tcved the Lunar , and HappintCamera c:ar;sc.t:es Sounder f i !m, Panc rF3i?!i C Carnc in three trips t-c the SIil ljay. TtIC CDll reportt3J thr: S:Ir I\;!); \~a?, irr good condiEVA terrnin#2tiorr i3c.i,i\ -red <I;. ::53:!t!:!i;? Gr:T for. a rotai 0-F 1 hour, t ion. 18 5econds. / minutes,,
i-2

~xp\~si~/e

Packages were The

#S

I .+

Y,s

(3

lb!:), were

#2 received

0, 11 Kg by

(t

;b!

9 dtld

#3

0.8&g

!?I?

Ibl

detonated

at 260:23:56,

261:52:02,

respectively. aeophones

detonations

and 264:14:zg Launar Surface

GET, Profil

ing

M-933-72-l 7
ENTRY AND LAND iNG

7

The CM separated from the SM at about 304:03:50 GET, 15 minutes before entry interface (El) at i21 ,920 m (400,000 feet). Drogue and main iandyng occurred in the mid-Pacific Ocean parachutes deployed nornld~ ly; 166~07% longitude and l7O53'S latitude. at 304:31:58 GET at approximately about 6.4 km (3.5 n.m.) from the The CM landed in a stable one position, and about 2.4 km (1 .3 n.m.) from the prime recover-y ship, USS Ticcnderoga, planned landing point. Weather in (10 miles), (3,000 feet) ASTRONAUT Visihii the prime recovery area was as foliows: scatte,-ed c:loud wind 130° at 5 m;>s (IO knots}, and wave height of .6 e* .9 IT: (2 -1 3 feet) x RECOVERY OPERAT I GINS -_I instal were fan CM led ity cover

18

km 914 m

Following C/l landing, the I ecovery he1 icopter dropped swiruners who and attached the. 1 i fe raft. the flotation collar Fresh fl ‘ght suits passed through the hatch for the fl ighr crew. The post ventilation was turned off, the CYI was powe:.ed down, the crew/ eclresscd, and the hatch was secured,

The he1 icopti?r r-tzcovered the astioilauts and transferred them to the recovery After landing on the recovery ship, ship, the astronatrts proceeded to the Biomed area for a series of examinations. Following the examinations the astronauts departed the USS Ticonderoga the next day for Samoa, were flown to Norton Air Force Base, California, and then to El1 ington Air Force Base, Texas. COMMAND MODULE RET!? I EVAL-- OPERATIONS

After astronaut pickup by the helicopter, the CM was retrieved and placed on a dolly aboard t.hc recovery ship. the CM had propellants onboard, Since it was stowed near the elevator shaft to insure adequate ventilation. All lunar samples 5 data, and equipment will be removed from the CM and subsequently returned to the Manned Spacecraft Center via Ellington Air Force Base, Texas. The CM wili be offloaded at :;an Uicgo, California, where deactivation of the CM propellant system wi 11 take place, SYSTEMS .*a--. PERFORMANCE ““..--near nornina! throuqhout occurred which had no the affect

Systems peri-orn!ance on Apollo 17 was very entire miss ion. Oisll’;r minor discrepancies on safety or miss ion objectives.

The Of

crew’s
SOVie OCCJ5

conditgon was good throughout C?tr?cTl (iii i?f>T d Iscomfort I due

the mission to gas.

with

the

exception

M-933-72-17
8
information All revision by the and data in this report are prel normal Manned Spacefl ight Center’s iminary and technical subject reports. to

Page 10

M 433-72-I 9 SURFACE SC I ENCE

7

the first surface science event was the S-IV6 As in previous missions, 18 minutes later S-IV6 impact occurred at 89:39:40 GET, about impact e than the prelaunch predict ion. The event was recorded by the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 passive seismometers. The best estimate of the impact point location is 4o 12’S and 12’ 18’~. The Apol lo 14 Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) and Suprathermal Ion Detector Experilocated approximately 85 nm from the impact point, recorded ment (S IDE), The Apollo 15 SIDE approximately 549 nm away did not record small events. As a result of initial analysis by the principal investigator the impact. for the passive seismometer some changes may be in order for the interpretation of the moon’s internal structure. There is a suggestion that the thickness of the lunar crust should be reduced by about one half of the previously held thickness, to approximately 25 KM. Seismic velocities in the moon’s mantle may also be less than previously estimated with the new velocity approximately 7.5 KM/Set. The LM touched down in the valley at Taurus-Littrow at 113:01:58 GET. Landing site landmarks were clearly visible during descent and the crew reported that they believed they were abeam of the western-most Trident Final estimates of the landing crater and about 10061 north of Popgy. Very little dust was noted point placed the LW at 20°10’N, 30 46’E. The surface at the landing site was described as unduladuring descent. ting and with a much higher abundance of blocks than anticipated. Many large blocks could be seen from the LM windows and it was estimated that LRV traversing would not be difficult. EVA-l commenced at 117:01:36. The Cosmic Ray Detector was deployed by the LMP pt-ior to removing the ALSEP from the SEQ Bay. During LRV deploythe Surface Electrical Properties (SEP) Receiver and the Traverse ment, Gravimeter Experiment (TGE) were mounted on the rear of the LRV. ALSEP removal was nominal but some difficulty was experienced removing the dome from the RTG fuel cask. This was finally accomplished by prying up the dome and then removing the fuel element. After carrying the ALSEP to, the general deployment area, LMP found it difficult to locate a large enough area, free of boulders, to carry out the deployment. The final area chosen included some boulders but it is not believed that they will effect any of ALSEP deployment was nominal. A deep core ( 2.8m) was the experiments. successfully drilled. Retraction from the hole was difficult but eventually completed. The Neutron Probe was inserted into the hole and covered with its thermal blanket. With various small delays encountered up to the end of ALSEP, deployment ,and Neutron Probe insertion, a new Station IA was selected at the crater LMP returned to the LM and carried the Surface Electrical ProperSteno, ties (SEP) transmitter to its deployment site east of the LM. The crew “hen rode to Stat ion IA. Dark mantle material and subfloor samples, described by the crew as a vesicular, gabbroic, basalt, were collected. A traverse gravimeter reading was taken at IA as well as several other points during EVA-I for a total of six readings. Closure back at the LM

.

^

._-..-_

..“______

--.---_.

.

.._.-

^I___

..l-.-.-l.--~-

._.

---.~“-.~x-x,.

l_l l-l_-.

M-933-72-l

7

The Explos igal. was within 1 mill Station IA and EP #7 approximately

i ve Package (EP) #6 was deployed ha If-way back to the LM.

at

Qn returning to the LM the SEP transmitter was deployed but not turned on. Back at the LM the samples collected were stowed. Approximately 15 Kg of -samples, including the deep core, were collected. Four hundred and fifteen Frames of black and white and color film were taken, Total duration of the at 124:13:47GET. EVA was 7h l2m 11s with the EVA terminating EVA-2 commenced at 140:34:48 GET, approximately I hour and 30 minutes late. The TGE was loaded aboaed and the crew returned to the SEP transmitter where the traverse started. traverse from the SEP to Station 2 (Nansen) went as planned. Along the way EP #4 was deployed just west of the ALSEP and three The SEP receiver was on throughout this leg of the LRV samples collected. being high, the receiver was turned traverse. At Station 2, temperatures At Station 2, bluegray breccias and porphyrit ic gabbros dominated the off. samples, The TGE reading at this station showed a large negative anomally, relative to the landing site, of approximately 38 milligals. Shortly after leaving Station 2 an unscheduled stop was made (Station 2A) to check the Gravity gradient between the south massif and the valley. This reading also r.hc-iced a negative anoqla!y (-28.8 mgal) and indicated a steep gravity gradient. Station 3, at the soil gray brecc ia, reading indicated While traversing LM. co1 lected. edge and that of Lee Scarp, was the next sampling stop. Here, bluea light colored gabbroic rock were collected. A TGE the local gravity was very close to the value at the between Station ‘3 and Station 4, two LRV samples were

or Station 4, Shorty, spectacular orange colored soil samples were collect.* ct. The first hypotheses are that these samples represent geothermal ::!teration associated with vulcanism. Final conclusions will await sample Giasses and basalts were also collected. return and analysis. The TGE r-czading showed a slight positive gravity anomaly at this station. Further analysis is required before it can be determined if this is significant. :he SEP receiver was turned on at Station 4 and was left in the receive :,ic>de unt i 1 the crew returned to the LM.

i

chart t.;!ke an

stop was made between I-RV sample. A second

Station 4 and Station LRV sample was taken

5 to further

deploy along

EP #l and the traverse.

J,i Station. 5: (Camelot) fresh, angular boulders were sampled along the rim. .i~ s icuiar, Soil samples were gabbroic basalt was the dominant rock type. slightly southwest .:i .;o co’; lecccd. Returning to the LM, EP #8 was deployed : *.p,i; Al”;! 2, l’nr &1;1> appeared to be a nominal deployment and turn-on, the Lunar SurSince this problem could be i:;ce Gravimeter (LSG) could not be nulled, :-c-used by the experiment being off-level, the LMP was asked to verify align.+-xr:t. at the end or‘ the EVA. -‘he LMP returned to the experiment and veri;i : i,$? i-ire k // i.,‘: r i g e !‘i i v,i;3‘; ! e ‘di-‘ 1 ~

M-933-72-l

7

EVA-2 traverse was the longest carried Approximately 36.4 Kg of samples were 833 photos were taken. The EVA ended time of 7 hours 37 minutes 2 seconds,

out on any mission, collected during the at 148:12:1~1 GET for the longest EVA ever

19.5 KM. traverse and a total EVA carried out.

The crew commenced EVA-3 at 163:32:35 GET. The Cosmic Ray Detector was retrieved prior to start of the traverse in order to avoid exposure to low energy solar protons from a small solar flare. Once again, the traverse started at the SEP transmitter. The SEP receiver was turned on at the beginning of the traverse. While driving north to Station 6 on the north mass if , two LRV sample stops were made. A large boulder was the primary sampling station at this stop. A depressed track, tracing the boulder’s path as it rolled down the mountain was evident. Samples included fine grained vesicular basalt, crushed anorthositic blue-gray breccias, rocks and soils. The TGE recorded a large negative anomaly, 26.9 milligal, Indicating that like the south massif, the north mass if is made up of lower density rocks than the valley. On arrival at this station, the SEP receiver was turned off and not used again. A short stop was made 5 ions and what appeared near to Station vesicular 7. Blue-gray anorthositic breccias gabbro with were white found. inclu-

tietween Station 7 and Station 8 one stop was made for an LRV sample. At Station 8, Sculptured Hills, glasses, basalts, and soil samples were taken. ho breccias were reported although they may be present. TGE reading at Station 8 shows the sculptured hilis to have the same approximate density as the north mass if. From Station 8 the traverse turned southwest to Station 5, Van Serg. Samples here were very variable. EP if5 was deployed on the southeast side of the i rater. TGE reading at this station still showed a -11 milligal value. (It should be noted that a I1 TGE readings have had a terrain correct ion iilade) . tjefore ieaving the station, the crew removed the SEP-DSEA tape recorder to prevent it from over-heating. Between Station 9 and LM, one LRV sample was taken. Back at the LM close::!,! t was accompl ished. The LMP returned to the ALSEP site to recover the t..NPE, complete photographic documentation and adjust the LSG. LSG operation :YSS still unsatisfactory with the level beam indicating off-scale high. ~.?lf attempted to shock the instrument so that the beam would be free. After c,l,p;ing a:ld rocking the experiment, no noticeable change was observed. The : I :ld i LWO k:i” S EP #3 and EP #2, were deployed near the SEP transmitter. ‘j il i’ i rJ3 t ii j 5 cr-JJerse of samples were collected. approximately 63.5 kg. i tJi,$ iec: t y ,ii::, weight are four core tubes and 1 SESC. A total of 952 :!Iack and white and color photos were taken. The EVA terminated at 170: ‘+I;:% GET after a total time of 7 hours 15 minutes 31 seconds on the lunar zurface.

:

‘3 L’

: 5

/:'72

Page

13

12 EXPERIMENT SUMMARY cant inue to equi 1 ibrate. is being measured in the lower ions appear normal. wet-e detonated and of the experiment covers are have nominal the are A gradient 1 meter

M-933-72-l

7

HFE - Probeotemperatures imately 1.2 c/meter A 11 experiment funct LSPE - All -..recorded a eight EP’s Ai 1 functions

of of the

approxholes.

LM ascent nominai.

and

LM

impact

dust LACE - Experiments mexperiment parameters near lunar sunset. dust LEAM - Instrument m be removed with in two days before sunset uncovered and scientific data LSG - Experiment todiscover corrective

been removed and bake-out and high voltages will

is underway. be turned on

covers remain on, Covers over the thermal next two days O A “noise” listening mode and continue for four days. Sensors will data recorded. still remains actions, if invalid. possible. Studies If status are still cannot

radiators will commence then be

underway be changed,

the Principle Investigator (P.l.) ,uj ,j . z r, r ., cd. This ,.J i consist .' '<I.:,:.
meter e

estimates primarily

that 30% of the scientific data could of using the instrument as a scismoClosure between was
reading

normal and 2 bias readings I-GE - Twenty A minor unknown is why there is T-z. instrument on the LRV vs. on ground. of temperature SEP - Because ‘=zTor-ded D The PI bei ieves CROE - The -,.-f3ur hours CRDE was short of exposed nominal. problems, id data a total expects

were taken. a difference

excelthe

val

(r:~ i.1 lhree will be on

traverse the tape

legs from

were these

legs. about

for PI

of 46 hours data to be

and 25 minutes, good.

in the core hole for 45 hours. LNPE - ‘The LNPE was deployed This was as Because of the extra deployment distance from the RTG vs. what planned. wa; planned, ti-1+3 PI expects to have excellent data. Deployment in a sl ight depression was also beneficial in shielding from the RTG.

i,i’ 1?,/7 2

Page 14

.

._.._ ---~. ..I..,--“m -.-..“l.l”.” ----...

__-l_..l ,..^,-_” ,.- --. .. _^I.. -... __,_.__ .

-1 ,..--I-_^,.. ----..-“_. -__, .---**

M -933-72-17
13

INFLIGHT

SCIENCE

The inflight science phase of the mission was initiated with the turn-on of the Far Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FUVS) at 86:06 GET and was terminated with the end of the FUVS operations at 302:OO GET, Except for the Panoramic Camera stereo before the end of the iast photographic problems occurred and all major orbital Panoramic Camera gimbal drive which pass no significant science objectives failed 8 minutes instrument were achieved.

Panoramic Camera (PC) operations in lunar orbit were initiated on Rev 1 and were terminated with the last PC pass on Rev 74. During the photographic pass on Rev 15, the PC V/H sensor became erratic and the V/H manual override was used for the duration of the mission. Operations of the PC was then nominal until the last 8 minutes of operation on Rev 74 when the stereo gimbal drive failed. The last 8 minutes of panoramic photography were then acquired in the monoscopic mode. A total of 1603 PC frames were exposed during the mission, of which 20 were acquired post-TEI. The PC film cassette was successfully retrieved by the CMP at 258:03 GET during the inflight EVA. Mapping Camera

Mapping Camera photographic operations were initiated on Rev 1 and the lunar orbit portion ended with the last MC pass on Rev 74. An additional 30 minutes of lunar photography was acquired post-TEI. All essential MC photography was acquired. The first MC extension sequence on Rev 1 was but the second extension on Rev 13 required 3 min 19 set versus nominal, the nominal 72 sec. The camera was left in the extended position until after operation on Rev 38 when retraction took 3 min 51 sec. Consequently, the camera was operated in the retracted position on Rev 49 with the resultant loss of stellar photography. Fifteen minutes of the north oblique photography scheduled for Rev 65 was not acquired when the camera was not turned-on by the CMP after failure to get a barber-pole at camera turn-on. This is a normal occurrence when the CSM is rolled 40°, The camera was turned-on after the CMP consulted with the MCC and the rest of the Rev 65 oblique photography was acquired. Throughout the light levels. elements were is expected to mission, the shutter open pulses were missing at the lower In addition, the temperature excursions of the front lens up to 7O outside nominal limits. Neither of these anomalies of the photography. cause an y degradation

.

. .

.

.

..-..

“-_l.--..--

---ll.ll--l.-“--.,l._--I-P--~_.--

-^.-

~“____

^.-~----.“_~~,.

M-933-72-l
14

7

A total of 3554 frames of MC photography were acquired during the mission. This photography covers 8.5% of the total lunar surface area, bringing to over 17% of the lunar surface photographed by the Mapping Cameras on Apollo. The MC film the influght Laser cassette EVA. was successfully retrieved at 258:16 by the CMP during

Altimeter the was when the maneuver

The performance of the Laser Altimeter (LA) was nominal throughout Operation was according to the flight plan except for: mission. 1) 2) the loss of 4 min of data inadvertently turned off on Rev 24 when the instrument

38 minutes of darkside altimetry on Rev 62 not acquired LA was turned off in order to allow a darkside attitude for the FUVS

3) A total

an additional 10.3 hrs (Revs 67-72) of LA data added to that above expectations. already scheduled since the LA was performing of 3769 shots were fired during the mission. on Revs 27-29 agree well 15 and indicate that: flat and are with

A preliminary analysis of the data acquired the Laser Altimeter data acquired on Apollo

1) 2)
3) 4)

profile of nearside with respect to the the farside appears nearside (consistent the farside extends at

basins are relatively surrounding terrae to be very mountainous with LA observations on Apollo

depressed

in comparison with the from previous missions) 15 at 26'S latitude

depression observed least to 20'S latitude

the bottom of the crater Reiner is 6 km below the cent highlands and the bottom of the crater Neper the adjacent highlands.

top of the adjais 7 km below

S-Band Transponder Preliminary annlysis of the doppler Apollo 15 S-Band Gravity Experiment 1) tracking data are consistent with observations and indicate that: the

the Taurus-Lattrow landing site is a gravity low (i.e., mass deficiency). The value obtained from S-band observations agrees well. with the value obtained by the Traverse Gravity Experiment.

1&‘19/72

Pctge 16

M-933-72-l
15 2) 3) 4) Infrared Copernicus is a gravity low (all tracking data have been obtained Sinus Aestum, Mare Serenitatis, is a relatively small craters over are gravity lows) and Mare Crisium flat gravity

7
which doppler highs

are gravity region.

Oceanus Procellarum Scanning Radiometer

The Infrared Scanning Radiometer (ISR) operated nominally throughout the In over 100 hrs of operation mission and attained all flight test objectives. in lunar orbit over one-third of the lunar surface was scanned and one hundred million temperature measurements were made to an accuracy of one degree. Temperatures temperatures as low as 80°K were observed just prior as high as 400°K were observed at lunar to lunar noon. sunrise and

Preliminary analysis of the abbreviated real-time data show that several thousand nighttime thermal anomalies (both hot and cold spots) have been Nighttime "hot spots" are generally associated with boulder fields detected. or exposed bedrock near fresh impact features and "cold spots" indicate the existence of areas covered by material with exceptionally low values of Tentatively identified "thermal anomalies" density and thermal conductivity. are: 1) 2) 3) f+) Kepler A, 10 days into the lunar night, on a broader enhancement corresponsing Kepler C, 11.6 days into the anomaly on a 94'K background the cgater of 98 K Reiner is lunar night, is seen as a sharp spike to its ejecta blanket is observed against as a 132'~ a background

seen as a 140°K anomaly

a "cold spot", lOoK colder than the surrounding terrain, is coincident with a cinder cone in Mare Orientale near the crater Hohman. for instrument data acquisition calibration terminated during TEC prior at 253:20 GET.

The ISR was operated for 4.3 hrs to the inflight EVA. Scientific

After the inflight EVA the ISR was used to obtain data on spacecraft contamination produced by RCS thruster firings, waste water dumps, and urine dumps. These data were collected for the Skylab Program. Lunar Sounder

Operation of the Lunar Sounder Coherent Synthetic Aperture Radar and Optical Recorder were nominal throughout the mission. problems were However, experienced with extending and retracting the high frequency (HF) antennas. These extension/retraction problems were attributed to both a faulty talkback indicator and to a low temperature of the extension/retraction mechanism. No data were :.o:st as a result of the dalays in the HF antenna extensions/ retractions.

12//l ?,‘72
I.._. I.. ..-. _.--___-_ -..-. ,-,.--__-.

Page 17
-l----ll_--~ ^_)-...___-

M-933-72-1
16

7

The Lunar Sounder (LS) data were acquired according to the flight plan except for the postponement of the HF pass scheduled for Rev 55 to Rev 56 due to a low temperature of the Optical Recorder film cassette. Ten hours 1) 2) 3) 31 set of LS data were recorded on film including:

two consecutive two consecutive specific targets

revs revs

in the HF active in the VHF active

mode mode

in both

the HF and VHF modes.

Since the prime LS data is recorded on film,successful attainment of the experimental objectives cannot be determined until the film is processed, (The LS film was successfuly retrieved at 257:54 GET by the CMP during the inflight EVA). Telemetry monitoring of average reflected power has yielded some information, however. In particular, there is a high correlation between the signature of the power trace and lunar features. Namely, 1) the highlands signatures and mare show distinctively different the spectral details of which the with

21
3)

the highlands show a low frequency structure, are well correlated with surface topography

the mare show a high frequency characteristic consistent with presence of subsurface str;lcture. The amplitude of this structure is highest in HPZ and least in VHF, also consistent the presence of subsurface structure.

The LS was also operated in the receive only mode simultaneously with transmissions from the Surface Electrical Properties Experiment (SEP), Monitoring of average reflected power by telemetry indicate that the SEP transmitter was observed over a narrower range of angles than had been expected. During operation of the LS in the receive only mode with the SEP transmitter off,a noise level much higher than anticipated was observed on the lunar Absence of this signal on the backside, frontside. as well as correlation of antenna orientation with noise level, indicates that the noise is of terrestrial origin. An experiment was carried out to determine the polarization state of the noise. The LS was also operated the levels of terrestrial Ear IJltravLolet for a 24 hr. noise. period during TEC to further determine

Spectrometer

The operation Of the ??aarUV Spectrometer (FUVS) was nominal throughout the lunar oribital phase and a total of 114.5 hrs. of data were acquired, A!]. the planned ohsersatio:!:; were accomplished, In addition, a fourth solar a!:mospheric observatior:,al mode was added during Rev 62.

,. mexpected1.y
of the W spectra

!aigl!

count was observed throughout the extent mc?,sur~~~dby the FmrS. This background has been tentatively
~,~i~~!~~~L~i~i~!~~

-

;_

-.

._

_x_.j_..-,

-_

.-_.

-.

___,.__..,

-

.-..,.-.

..-.^lll-.

-__

.__.^_

l,_l-__-

__._

-.--

..,,--.

Il”.._-..---L...

1.7

M-933-72-l

7

interpreted as due to cosmic rays. The background noise does not degrade the accuracy with which hydrogen measurement can be made but does obscure very weak signals. For example, the background noise limits the minimum level of detection for atomic oxygen to 100 atoms/cc vs. a pre-flight estimate of 25 atoms/cc. During FWS operation on Rev 38, an Aerobee was launched from the White Sands Missile Range to provide a solar IJV calibration concurrent with lunar orbital data acquisition. An earlier attempt to obtain a similar solar calibration was unsuccessful when the Aerobee payload viewing port failed to open after a successful rocket launch. Preliminary analysis of farside terminator data indicate that a lunar atmosphere of atomic hydrogen does exist but that its density is considless than had been predicted earlier. erably In fact, the FWS data indicate that if the total lunar atmospheric pressure at th surface determined by the Apollo 12 ALSEP/CCIG is correct (P = 10 -15 torr), then the hydrogen component is less than one percent of this total. Additionally, no atmospheric component detectable by the FUVS (H, 0, K-r, Xe, N, C) is present in concentrations as great as one percent of this amount. The FUT,7S also observed the lunar surface W albedo to be approximately 2% with the same angular dependence of reflectivity as the visible. A surface variation in the UV albedo was also observed which may be a measure of the mineralogical variation over the surface. During the TEC phase of the mission the FUVS was operated for 60 hrs. performing galactic scans and observing a number of galactic UV sources for extended periods. Observations were made to determine the extent of the earth's hydrogen gcotail and to determine the extent of the solar atmosphere. CM Photography All objectives accomplished. of CM photography of the lunar surface were successfully planned are on the hardware rescheduled

ten photographic strips were To supplement SIM Bay photography, Five of the strips with the Hasselblad camera and color film. nearside and 5 on the farside. No anomalies were noted and the Some of the film magazines had to be performance was nominal. because of additional crew option photography.

1Jnde-r near-terminator lighting conditions, eight targets were planned Two of the targets using c?le Hasselblad camera and black-and-white film. were on the farside and the remaining six targets on the nearside, All targets were acquired successfully and no anomalies were noted. the crew took photographs of In ad.dition to the sched.uled photography, Photographs were lunar surface features to document visual observations. t-akeri o-.7er th‘s .Apol.:..o 17 !anding site using a Polaroid filter, a red filter, ;) ; I >.L ,z:-; 'I, '; VLe _ ' : i-i. 1..

M-933-72-l
18 Dimlight Photography

7

The dimlight photography scheduled for Apollo 17 included photography of the solar corona and of the zodiacal light. The sunrise solar corona photography, scheduled for Rev 25, consisted of seven data frames from ten seconds to one-sixtieth second duration. The corona extending eastward beyond the lunar limb was photographed as the sun moved from threeand-one-half degrees below to ones-half degree below the limb. The CNP reported that this sequence was accomplished according to plan. The sunset solar corona period and non-availability was not photographed of the -X attitude because of lengthened sleep required for its performance.

The other dim light phenomenon photographed on this mission was the zodiacal light from fifty degrees eastward of the sun down to the solar corona region. This photography was carried out successfully three separate in red light on Rev 23, again in blue light times; first, on Rev 38, and finally in plane-polarized white light on Rev 49. The CMp noted that the a planned sixty-second exposure, was second photography in red light, underexposed because of inadvertent, early shutter closure. Visual Observation Prom Orbit

All the objectives of visual observations from lunar orbit were successfully accomplished. Ten targets were planned for visual study and excellent comments were made by the crew. These comments will help solve geologic problems that are hard to solve by other means. Among the salient findings are the following: that only relatively young craters on the farside are filled 1. Finding with mare material. Domes in the floor of the crater Aitken are probably extrusive calcite domes.
2.

Crisium,

Spotting of orange-colored in the landing site area

ejecta blankets of craters in Mare and on Western Mare Serenitatis. of lunar surface units in the extrapolation of of the rings of the basin have no topographic expression

Characterization of the actual colors 3. especially in the lunar maria. This will help ground truth and remotely-sensed data. 4. Arabia. Verification The swirls of the extensive nature

associated 5.
that

with

in and west of the basin them,
craters

Discovery of several volcanic were not characterized previously.

under

the

groundtracks

All onboard items carried in support of this task were found to be adequate, i;7cZuding the 10X binoculars. Only the color wheel was not used because its ?bolors did not correspond to the actual lunar colors,

M -933-72-T7

TABLE APOLLO PRIMARY The 0 fol OBJECT IVES lowing were the

1 AND EXPERIMENTS

17 OBJECTIVES

NASA OMSF Apol inspection, a preselected

lo

17 Primary and of

Objectives: sampling of materials the Taurus-Littrow

Perform selenological and surface features region. Emplace Conduct and in-f1 activate ight

in

survey, area

o o

surface experiments

experiments. and photographic tasks.

APPROVED The Apollo fol

EXPERIMENTS lowing Lunar Lunar Lunar Lunar Lunar Lunar experiments Surface were Experiments performed: Package (ALSEP)

s-037
s- 202

s-203
S-205 S-207 Lunar

Heat Flow Ejecta and Meteorites Seismic Prof i 1 ing Atmospheric Composition Surface Gravimeter

Surface Lunar Geology Investigation Cosmic Ray Detector Traverse Gravimeter Surface Electrical Properties Lunar Neutron Probe Long Term Lunar Surface Exposure as experiment) ight S-Band Transponder

s-059
s-153
s-199 S-204 s-229 “S

Tasks

(not

class

if ied

In-F1 S-164 S-169 S-171 s-203 m.. -w -.I “-

Far UV Spectrometer
IR Scanning Radiometer Lunar Sounder CM Photographic Tasks SM Orbital Photographic Tasks Skylab Contamination Study Visual Light Flash Phenomenon

M-933-72-l In-Flight Other s-160 S-176 s-200 M-21 1 M-212 Demonstration -DETAILED Heat Flow and Convection (Continued) (Passive) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Apollo Window Meteoroid Soi 1 Mechanics Biostack 1 IA B iocore

7

OBJECTIVES detailed objectives 17 Mission: were ass igned to and accomp 1 ished

The following on the Apol o o

lo

o
o o o o o o

CM Photographic Tasks SM Photographic Tasks Visual Observations from Lunar Orbit Spacecraft Contamination Study Visual Light Flash Phenomenon ‘Impact S-IVB on Lunar Surface Post Determination of S-IVB Impact Point Protective Pressure Garment Evaluation Body Metabolic Gains and Losses and Food

Compatibility

Assessment,

SUMMARY Fulfillment of the primary objectives cessful mission. The experiments and supported and expanded the scientific this miss ion were successful ly accompl qualifies Apollo detailed objectives and technological ished, 17 as a sucwhich return of

12/l

9/72

Page

22

M-933-72-J
TABLE APOLLO o o o o o o o o o o Sixth First Longest Longest Longest Longest Longest Longest Most Longest Manned Geologist Lunar single Total Lunar Total Apollo samples time Lunar Landing on Stay Surface Surface Lunar SurFace hours 59 min. 2

7

17 ACHIEVEMENTS

Astronaut Surface Lunar Lunar Distance Distance Mission returned in lunar to orbit

Time

(74

38 37

seconds) 22 seconds)

EVA Time EVA Time with with

(7

hours

minutes

(22:05:04) LRV on LRV minutes) (250 lbs)) minutes) One km EVA (22 (19 nm)) km (12 nm))

Traversed Traversed (301 hours

(35

51

Earth

(115

Kg

(147

hours,

48

J 2,‘J 9,‘72

Page 23

APOLLO 17
P&'J::RED FLIGJJT SEQUE:NCL; OF EVENTS
END OF MISS ION

M-933-72-J

7

TABLE

.3

Guidance Liftoff Pitch Roll S-IC Begin S-IC

Reference Signal

Release

(TB-1) Start '

and Roll
Complete

Center Tilt

Engine Arrest
Engine

Cutoff " Cutoff

(TJ3-2)

Outboard

(TB-3

S-IC/S-11 S-II S-II S-II S-II Ignition

Separation (Command)

Second Plane Separation -.__.- _._ ._ Center Outboard Engine Engine Cutoff Cutoff COMMAND

S-II/S-XVB S-IVB S-IVB ignition Cutoff

Separation

(TB-5)

;

Xnscrtion Resin Restart'Preps (TB-6)

Seronrq S-JVR Ignition Second S-IV5 Cutoff Injection (TB-7)'

Trranslunar

F‘a-~laurlch planned 11' 1131 Tr;ajc!&Ory.
I ?I” 9/72

times *

are based

on MSFC Launch

VcJlicle

Opera-

Page 24

TABLE

4
ION .

M-933-72-17

ARXLO 17MISSIW

SEQUD.KEOFEVENTS
PlJWED (GET) HR: NIN: SEC. 00:00:00.4 00:11:56 03:2:1:19 03:2?:L$ 04:X2:05 04:22:05 05:07:05 05:30:05 08:45:00 35:30:00 66:55:38 83:55:38
&L&:25:38 88:55:38

--iiT"AL (GET) HR: ClIN: SEC,
00:00:00.2

Translunar Injection ,YSN/S-IVB Separation, SLA Panel Jettison i GY/LM Docking i ;+acecraft Ejection From S-IVB Z-IVB APS Evasive Maneuver Xdcourse Correction-l Midcourse Correction-2 ?lidcourse Correction-3 ?Gdcourse Correction-4 SIM Door Jettison Lunar Orbit Insertion (Ignition) t Insertion 1 (Ignition) *

OO:11:52 03:12:36 03:x3:37 03:42: 29 03:57:10

04:45:20
05:03133
Not Performed

35:29:59
Nof Performed Not Performed 84:12:50

89:21:26
93:13:o9 10:27:55 10:27:55

CSM Circularization LiY Liescent Orbit Insertion 2 (Ignition) ?9-&wed Descent Initiate LM Lunar Landing begin EVA-1 Cabin Depress Terminate EVA-l Cabin Repress Begin EVA-2 Cabin Depress Terminate EVA-2 Repress ::egS.n EVA-3 Cabin Depress Terminate EVA-3 Cabin Repress Trim Burn (CSM) %LM Liftoff 1 34 Tweak Burn ] Terminal Phase Initiate Maneuver .i.A/CSM Docking ;iM Jettison :3 i -4 Separation .,I., 4srent Stage Deorbit I ASCF?I;+, Stage Lunar Impact 1 Yraasearth Injection i tf?'dcwrss Correction-5 i L?@ EUfl ijepress 1 (;;dF' F,T!:: i:~,ry:U% il:t < d .i i Ii ;:‘g:~/;~rse ;:2rrect-jon-6 TC~.deourse ':~orrection-r7 .> r M/‘-q .%w3.ra ti.on (400,000 ft) i k,‘!zy Inisrface

11:55:23 12:00:31, 12:4.9:38
13:01:38 16:40:00 23:4O:OO 39:lO:OO 46:lO:OO 62:40:00 s9:40:00

88: 5&:22 89:39:&O 93:11:37 .10:27:55 .10:27:55 .11:57:28 12:02:41 12~49: 52

13:01:58
.17:01:36 .24:n3:47 40:34:48 48:12:10 63:32:35 70:48:06 81:34:01
82:x.:53

ot Planned 32:35:45
38:03:15 .

)t Planned 38:57:32 ?0:00:00
?3:58:30 ?4:03:30 >5:39:12
15 :58:25

88:01:36 88:12:12 88:55:57 90:17:03 33:58:30 34:03:30

?5:38:13
35:57:18

36:39:sl 53:42:13 57: 22:oo 58:30:00
32: 13: 21

36:42:08
ot Performed 5-j’: 3”t: 24 58:41:42 ot Performed 01: 18: 00 .

- - )1:18:01
Ii+: 03': 01 14: 18: 01

0!+:03:50 04: 18:37 04:31:58

I

72

88: 54: 22

3g5.!+ I

398

398

2980

1

2988

/

2988

~>~---‘---

13.01.48
TRIM NA Not Appl icable

113.01.5 181:34:

81:34:01

---an-.-.,_ ---l__-

----I,,_

.

dnpc

n-+.

‘-elude

the

nominal

IO-

SeC

RCS ul lage

(21.8

fps),

Iu’

2

i I I-

a z

----.--.-I-..-,., .-. .~. ,I _- I.,,._, ” ..___. . -.- _.-^-I. ..--^II.. _. .._ ,_ -..--. ,,.. ---^I 1--e __.~ ___ ___” __

t

(.
: . 1 XMl&lABLE

APOLLO 17 CONSU!MBiES SUMhZARY M-yJJ-'L-'r . .. . TABLE 9 . %
, ’

-

-1 . - ..r --we . /.

d'

END OF MISSION

LAUNCH LOAD

FLIGHT PLAh'TJED ~REbIAIf~If~G ,

ACTUAL REWNING

w I ; . ..-. ..-._, __

.

LM Jettison LM Liftoff EVA-3

,

M-933-12-1

7

.5‘ 1
0 I. .N -3 .. c-v . . cc\ WN .-- u
i c-4 . . -CO . . r-Q mcu -v -I

m p? $ t-4 .*

9 L;’ N . .

5. 3” --Cd C-G-_I

I

h -0 . . Lo r-. ti -v

z . . u-h -T 3 -l-J f-J‘-. .

;o^ c-4 rY c-4 0 . . NO -.x0 hr-4 v--v

r; m M. . Ln m .. o.--t NC-I NV

is N. . LI, j ,. -7. ,:: he-4 -v
t a-

. e r h. . -: c

--P . . ti
rncc

I >. . n ..

Page 31

M -933-72-17

TABLE SA-512
0

11 DISCREPANCY Sequencer Open drop. Open replacement. Open Open SUMMARY (VATS) to initiate

LAUNCH

VEHICLE

Failure S- IVB S- IVB S-IC S-II S-IVB

of Vehicle Automatic Test prelaunch LOX pressurization. forward remote helium helium #2 digital injection bottle battery voltage

0

D

sub-multiplexer bottle pressure pressure deviation.

. .

decay. Open

12/l 9/‘72

M-933-72-l

7

TABLE COMMAND/SERVICE . 0
L)

12

MODULE Open other observed

114 DISCREPANCY

SUMMARY

Spurious Mission Spacecraft separation. H2 tank Fuel cell

master timer

alarms. behind

timers. before

Open and after CSM/SLA

fragments Open upper current tone pressure

e
m

limit

shifti.., Open Open

Open

oscillations. booster. pressure control

.

Inoperative Fuel Glycol tempera High suit interface

.
m

measurement valve

fluctuations. failure to maintain

Open glycol

temperature tu re . Open pressure; mapping sounder t i tude 2 boom

e

5.26 camera boom sensor deployment of

psi. extend

Open
time; switch data at

a

Excessive HF lunar Velocity/al HF antenna lnstrumentat at 1944:.22.

3 min,
failure. to 194: pan

21

sec. Open

Open

.
e

1 limit

improper slow severa

camera. Open two

Open

. D

18 GET.
for

ion dropout Open tone flow

1 parameters

minutes

. .

No CMP EVA warning Primary Open Radiation

at control

256:22

t0

257~22.
to

Open at 277:08 GET.

switched

secondary

12/l 9,‘72

Page

33

we-.------

M-933-72-l

7

TABLE LUNAR
0

13 SUMMARY at to 109:04. powered Open

MODULE drive

12 DISCREPANCY timer in error

Gimbal Three descent Battery Cabin

drive

actuator

0

guidance and initiations. 4 read pressure GET.

navigation Closed lower above

restarts

prior

0

0.5 volt
increase Open

than

battery A

3.
lockup

Open pressure at

regulator

*

163:3l

1?/19/72

Page

34

M-933-72-l

7

TABLE LUNAR ROVING VEHICLE

14 SUMMARY

3 DISCREPANCY

.

Left

rear

fender

extension

lost

on

EVA

10

Open

12/l 9/72

Page 35

M-933-72-l

7

TABLE APOLLO
D

15 SUMMARY excessive. outs. temperature Open Open

17 CREW/EQU I PMENT D ISCREPANCY
photomultiplier film motion electrical Open null tube exposure properties dark discrete receiver

UV spectrometer Mapping Excessive at start Lunar camera

current drop

0

of

surface EVA-2.

.
0

surface

gravimeter OPS regulated fluctuations tone at

failures. at

Open

Out-of-spec ALSEP

pressures in

171: 70 GET.
Open Open operation

Open

a

5 signal

down1 ink.

. .

No CMP EVA warning Panoramic

256: 22 to 257: 22.
ompensat ion ceased

233:52

GET.

camera mot ion Open

at

1&“19/72

Page 36

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