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"Seat-Watch 2018": Alabama's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Alabama currently has seven seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Alabama's 7th and 8th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Alabama's 7th and 8th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
AL 8th 482 485 488 489 493 495 500 501 502
AL 7th 421 423 422 422 424 428 428 433 434

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Alabama has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Alabama might lose its 7th seat
in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

510
500
490
480 AL 8th
470
AL 7th
460
450
440
430
435th
420
Seat
410
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Alaska's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Alaska currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Alaska's 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with Alaska.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Alaska's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
AK 2nd 585 583 580 579 582 590 588 591 589

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Alaska is growing at approximately the same pace as the whole
U. S., its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat is not improving. The trend line suggests that Alaska will have a single
Congressional District for the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

600

550
AK 2nd

500

450
435th
Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Arizona's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Arizona currently has nine seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Arizona's 9th and 10th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Arizona's 9th and 10th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
AZ 10th 458 459 455 454 451 447 445 440 432
AZ 9th 413 412 409 407 406 400 396 394 390

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Arizona has been growing moderately faster than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has increased somewhat since 2011. If the seat-rank trend continues, Arizona appears to have gained
its 10th seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

480
470
460 AZ 10th
450
440 AZ 9th
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
390
380
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Arkansas' Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Arkansas currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Arkansas' 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Arkansas' 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
AR 5th 474 474 476 477 479 482 484 484 487
AR 4th 369 371 373 374 375 378 377 377 378

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Arkansas has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. However, if the seat-rank trend continues, Arkansas will hold on
to its 4th seat for the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
AR 5th
475
AR 4th
450

425

400
435th
375
Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": California's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. California currently has 53 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of California's 52nd, 53rd and 54th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: California's 52nd, 53rd and 54th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
CA 54th 445 445 443 441 442 441 441 441 443
CA 53rd 434 434 434 433 432 432 431 431 435
CA 52nd 428 427 425 424 422 422 426 426 427

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. California's population growth (up 6.18% since 2010) is slightly faster than
the U. S. average (up 5.96%). However, the seat-rank trend seems to indicate a 'leveling off" of California's eligibility for a 54th seat, and
even the possibility of the loss of the 53rd District.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

460
CA 54th
450 CA 53rd

CA 52nd
440

430
435th
Seat
420
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Colorado's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Colorado currently has seven seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Colorado's 7th and 8th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Colorado's 7th and 8th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
CO 8th 459 458 454 450 446 444 437 434 431
CO 7th 399 397 392 390 389 386 381 380 375

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Colorado has been growing faster than other states, its eligibility
for an additional seat has increased somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Colorado is on track to gain its eighth
Congressional District in the 2020 Reapportionment. It appears to have become eligible for that seat in 2017.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

470
460
450
440
430
435th
420
Seat
410
400
390 CO 8th
380 CO 7th
370
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Connecticut's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Connecticut currently has five seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Connecticut's 5th and 6th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Connecticut's 5th and 6th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
CT 6th 475 476 481 482 486 491 496 498 503
CT 5th 388 390 391 394 399 402 408 408 411

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Connecticut has been growing moderately slower than other states,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Connecticut will likely retain its
5th seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

520
CT 6th
500
CT 5th
480
460
440
420
435th
400
Seat
380
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Delaware's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Delaware currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Delaware's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with Delaware.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Delaware's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
DE 2nd 488 487 485 486 482 481 479 479 479

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Delaware is growing just slightly faster than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat is improving slightly. However, the trend line suggests that Delaware will have
a single Congressional District for the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
490
480
470 DE 2nd
460
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Florida's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Florida currently has 27 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Florida's 27th, 28th and 29th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Florida's 27th, 28th and 29th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
FL 29th 467 466 464 463 456 454 447 444 439
FL 28th 450 447 446 444 441 434 430 427 424
FL 27th 431 431 430 428 423 421 416 412 408

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Florida has been growing faster than other states, its eligibility
for an additional seat has increased each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Florida will gain its 28th seat, and possibly its 29th, in
the 2020 Reapportionment. Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

470
460 435th
450 Seat

440
430
FL 29th
420
FL 28th
410
400 FL 27th
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Georgia's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Georgia currently has 14 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Georgia's 14th and 15th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Georgia's 14th and 15th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
GA 15th 465 462 461 461 458 457 455 454 450
GA 14th 429 428 427 427 425 423 424 425 420

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Georgia has been growing slightly faster than the average of
other states, its eligibility for an additional seat has increased a bit each year. But, unless the seat-rank trend accelerates, it is not likely
that Georgia would gain its 15th seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 GA 15th
470
460 GA 14th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Hawaii's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Hawaii currently has two seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Hawaii's 2nd and 3rd seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Hawaii's 2nd and 3rd Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
HI 3rd 551 548 544 542 541 542 544 549 550
HI 2nd 324 323 323 322 323 323 325 327 328

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Hawaii has been growing at a rate almost equal to the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has barely changed since 2010. The trend lines suggest that Hawaii will neither gain nor lose a
Congressional seat in the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

600

550 HI 3rd

500
HI 2nd
450

400
435th
350
Seat
300
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Idaho's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Idaho currently has two seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Idaho's 2nd and 3rd seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Idaho's 2nd and 3rd Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
ID 3rd 481 483 483 481 476 475 471 466 458
ID 2nd 282 281 281 281 282 280 279 276 266

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Idaho has been growing slightly faster than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has increased a bit since 2010. The trend lines suggest that Idaho's eligibility for a 3rd District
Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment might be a 'squeaker'.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
435th
450 Seat

400

350
ID 3rd
300
ID 2nd
250
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Illinois' Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Illinois currently has 18 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Illinois' 17th, 18th and 19th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Illinois' 17th, 18th and 19th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
IL 19th 446 449 452 455 459 463 468 472 475
IL 18th 423 425 428 430 434 437 443 447 447
IL 17th 397 402 407 408 411 412 418 421 425

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Illinois has been growing slower than the U. S. average, its eligibility
for an additional seat has decreased each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Illinois is certain to lose its 18th seat and may even lose
the 17th seat in the 2020 Reapportionment. Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

475
435th
Seat
450

425
IL 19th
400
IL 18th

375 IL 17th
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Indiana's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Indiana currently has nine seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Indiana's 9th and 10th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Indiana's 9th and 10th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
IN 10th 452 454 457 456 460 460 463 465 468
IN 9th 408 409 411 412 412 411 413 414 415

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Indiana has been growing moderately slower than many other states,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased somewhat since 2010. If the seat-rank trend continues, Indiana will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 IN 10th
470
460 IN 9th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Iowa's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Iowa currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Iowa's 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Iowa's 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
IA 5th 455 456 459 458 461 459 461 464 468
IA 4th 349 351 352 352 353 353 357 358 359

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Iowa has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. But, if the seat-rank trends continue, Iowa will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
475 IA 5th
IA 4th
450
425
400
375
435th
350 Seat
325
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Kansas' Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Kansas currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Kansas' 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Kansas' 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
KS 5th 484 486 486 488 492 493 499 502 504
KS 4th 379 380 380 382 384 388 390 391 392

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Kansas has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trends continue, Kansas will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

525
500 KS 5th
KS 4th
475
450
425
400
435th
375 Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Kentucky's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Kentucky currently has six seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Kentuck's 6th and 7th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Kentucky's 6th and 7th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
KY 7th 464 464 466 468 469 471 473 476 474
KY 6th 392 391 394 396 398 398 399 402 401

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Kentucky has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trends continue, Kentucky will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
KY 7th
475
KY 6th
450

425

400
435th
375
Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Louisiana's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Louisiana currently has six seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Louisiana's 6th and 7th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Louisiana's 6th and 7th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
LA 7th 441 440 442 443 444 445 448 450 455
LA 6th 376 377 377 377 379 380 382 386 387

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Louisiana has been growing moderately slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. If the seat-rank trends continue, Louisiana will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

500
LA 7th
475
LA 6th
450

425

400
435th
375
Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Maine's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Maine currently has two seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Maine's 2nd and 3rd seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Maine's 2nd and 3rd Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
ME 3rd 561 563 567 567 567 573 573 572 571
ME 2nd 332 332 336 337 340 344 345 345 345

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Maine has been growing at a rate almost equal to the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has barely changed since 2010. The trend line suggests that Maine will neither gain nor lose a
Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

600

550 ME 3rd

500
ME 2nd
450

400
435th
350
Seat
300
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Maryland's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Maryland currently has eight seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Maryland's 8th and 9th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Maryland's 8th and 9th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MD 9th 456 453 453 453 453 455 456 457 462
MD 8th 401 401 401 401 402 403 404 404 406

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Maryland has been growing slightly slower than the nation overall,
its eligibility for an additional seat has not changed since 2011. The trend line suggests that Maryland will neither gain nor lose a
Congressional seat in the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 MD 9th
470
460 MD 8th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Massachusetts' Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Massachusetts currently has nine seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Massachusetts' 9th and 10th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Massachusetts' 9th and 10th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MA 10th 448 448 447 448 450 451 452 449 448
MA 9th 402 403 403 405 405 405 405 405 403

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Massachusetts has been growing at the same rate as the nation
overall, its eligibility for an additional seat has barely changed since 2010. The trend line suggests that Massachusetts will neither gain nor
lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 MA 10th
470
460 MA 9th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Michigan's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Michigan currently has 14 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Michigan's 13th, 14th and 15th seats each year since 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Michigan's 14th and 15th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MI 15th 454 460 462 465 468 469 472 475 473
MI 14th 424 426 429 432 435 436 440 442 442
MI 13th 393 396 400 402 407 409 409 410 409

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Michigan has been growing slower than the U. S. average, its
eligibility for an additional seat has decreased each year. The state appeared to have lost its 14th seat in 2015, but the next two years
will tell.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
MI 15th
480
470 MI 14th
460 MI 13th
450
440
430
420
410 435th
400 Seat
390
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Minnesota's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Minnesota currently has eight seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Minnesota's 8th and 9th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Minnesota's 8th and 9th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MN 9th 494 495 497 498 496 500 498 495 494
MN 8th 435 436 436 437 437 438 438 437 437

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Minnesota has been growing at a slower rate than the nation overall,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased since 2010. Minnesota lost its "eligibility" for its 8th seat early in the decade; however,
the trend line hints at a possible restoration of that eligibility in time for the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 MN 9th
470
460 MN 8th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Mississippi's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Mississippi currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Mississippi's 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Mississippi's 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MS 5th 466 469 470 471 474 480 483 489 491
MS 4th 360 362 366 368 371 373 375 382 384

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Mississippi has been growing moderately slower than other states,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished somewhat each year. The trend line suggests that Mississippi will neither gain nor lose
a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
475 MS 5th
MS 4th
450
425
400
375
435th
350 Seat
325
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Missouri's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Missouri currently has eight seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Missouri's 8th and 9th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Missouri's 8th and 9th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MO 9th 437 438 444 445 447 450 451 453 453
MO 8th 385 389 389 392 394 396 397 400 400

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Missouri has been growing at a slower rate than the nation overall,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased since 2010. The trend line suggests that Missouri will neither gain nor lose a Congressional
seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

480
470
460
450 435th
440 Seat
430
420
410 MO 9th
400
390 MO 8th
380
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Montana's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Montana currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Montana's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with Montana.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Montana's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
MT 2nd 440 443 441 439 440 442 439 438 436

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Montana is growing at just about the same rate as the whole nation,
its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat is almost unchanged since 2010. However, the trend line suggests that Montana may have
a chance of picking up its second Congressional District in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480
470 MT 2nd
460
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Nebraska's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Nebraska currently has three seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Nebraska's 3rd and 4th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Nebraska's 3rd and 4th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NE 4th 575 575 574 571 568 564 565 562 562
NE 3rd 417 417 419 418 418 418 414 415 416

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Nebraska has been growing at about the same rate as the whole
nation, its eligibility for an additional seat has improved just slightly since 2010. If the seat-rank trend continues, Nebraska will neither
gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

600
575 NE 4th
550 NE 3rd
525
500
475
450
435th
425 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Nevada's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Nevada currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Nevada's 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Nevada's 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NV 5th 513 513 512 509 503 501 491 486 484
NV 4th 396 399 397 393 391 389 386 379 376

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Nevada has been growing a little faster than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has increased somewhat each year. However, if the seat-rank trend continues, Nevada will neither
gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

550
525 NV 5th
500 NV 4th
475
450
425
400
435th
375 Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": New Hampshire's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. New Hampshire currently has two seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of New Hampshire's 2nd and 3rd seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: New Hampshire's 2nd and 3rd Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NH 3rd 565 568 568 569 569 571 570 569 565
NH 2nd 333 337 338 340 342 343 343 341 338

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because New Hampshire has been growing at a rate almost equal to the
nation as a whole, its eligibility for an additional seat has barely changed since 2010. The trend line suggests that New Hampshire will neither
gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

600

550 NH 3rd

500
NH 2nd
450

400
435th
350
Seat
300
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": New Jersey's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. New Jersey currently has 12 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of New Jersey's 12th and 13th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: New Jersey's 12th and 13th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NJ 13th 439 441 445 446 448 449 454 452 460
NJ 12th 406 408 410 410 413 413 415 416 423

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because New Jersey has been growing a little slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased each year. This year's abrupt decrease in seat rank raises the possibility of the loss of
New Jersey's 12th Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 NJ 13th
470
460 NJ 12th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": New Mexico's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. New Mexico currently has three seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of New Mexico's 3rd and 4th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: New Mexico's 3rd and 4th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NM 4th 520 519 521 525 527 530 532 534 532
NM 3rd 370 370 374 375 377 381 385 387 386

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because New Mexico has been growing slightly slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has diminished slightly since 2010. However, if the seat-rank trend continues, New Mexico will
neither gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

550
525 NM 4th
500
NM 3rd
475
450
425
400
435th
375 Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": New York's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of equal
proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. New York currently has 27 seats in Congress. The table
below shows the ranking of New York's 26th, 27th and 28th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: New York's 26th, 27th and 28th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NY 28th 438 437 440 442 445 446 450 451 463
NY 27th 425 424 424 426 430 430 435 436 444
NY 26th 410 411 413 413 415 415 420 419 428

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because New York has been growing slower than the U. S. average, its
eligibility for an additional seat has decreased since 2011. New York appears to have lost its 27th seat in 2017, and if the trendlines continue,
may even lose the 26th Congressional District in the 2020 Reapportionment. Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat
rankings each year…stay tuned!

480
435th
470 Seat
460
450
440
430 NY 28th
420
NY 27th
410
400 NY 26th
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": North Carolina's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. North Carolina currently has 13 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of North Carolina's 13th and 14th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: North Carolina's 13th and 14th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
NC 14th 436 435 435 435 433 433 427 428 426
NC 13th 409 406 405 406 403 401 398 398 397

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. North Carolina has been growing at almost the same rate as the national average,
so its eligibility for an additional seat stayed almost constant early in the decade. Based on Census estimates, it was eligible to pick up its
14th Congressional seat in 2011. The trend line suggests that North Carolina will end the decade with that eligibility intact.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

480
470 NC 14th
460
450 NC 13th
440
430
420
410
400 435th
390 Seat
380
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": North Dakota's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. North Dakota currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of North Dakota's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with North Dakota.

Congressional Seat Rankings: North Dakota's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
ND 2nd 601 597 595 590 586 578 579 581 580

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. North Dakota's eligibility for a 2nd Congressional District slowed down in the
middle of the decade. The trend line suggests that North Dakota will not pick up a second Congressional District in the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

620

570
ND 2nd

520

435th
470 Seat

420
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Ohio's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Ohio currently has 16 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Ohio's 16th and 17th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Ohio's 16th and 17th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
OH 17th 443 446 448 452 454 458 459 462 464
OH 16th 418 421 421 423 426 429 429 432 433

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Ohio has been growing slower than the U. S. average, its eligibility
for an additional seat has decreased each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, there is a chance that Ohio will lose its 16th
Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 OH 17th
470
460 OH 16th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Oklahoma's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Oklahoma currently has five seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Oklahoma's 5th and 6th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Oklahoma's 5th and 6th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
OK 6th 451 450 450 451 452 452 453 455 454
OK 5th 371 372 372 370 369 369 372 373 373

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Oklahoma has been growing at almost the same rate as the national average,
so its eligibility for an additional seat has stayed almost constant so far this decade. If the seat-rank trend continues, Oklahoma will neither
gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

550
525 OK 6th
500 OK 5th
475
450
425
400
435th
375 Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Oregon's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Oregon currently has five seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Oregon's 5th and 6th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Oregon's 5th and 6th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
OR 6th 442 439 439 440 438 435 433 429 430
OR 5th 359 360 360 359 355 355 353 353 350

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Oregon has been growing slightly faster than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has improved. If the seat-rank trend continues, Oregon may pick up its 6th Congressional District
in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

480
460 OR 6th
OR 5th
440
420
400
380
435th
360 Seat
340
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Pennsylvania's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Pennsylvania currently has 18 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Pennsylvania's 18th and 19th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Pennsylvania's 18th and 19th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
PA 19th 449 452 456 459 464 467 469 471 471
PA 18th 427 429 432 434 436 440 444 446 446

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Pennsylvania has been growing slower than the U. S. average, its
eligibility for an additional seat has decreased each year. If the seat-rank trend continues, Pennsylvania is very likely to lose its 18th
Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 PA 19th
470
460 PA 18th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Rhode Island's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Rhode Island currently has two seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Rhode Island's 2nd and 3rd seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Rhode Island's 2nd and 3rd Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
RI 3rd 615 615 615 615 615 615 615 615 616
RI 2nd 419 422 423 425 428 431 434 435 438

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Rhode Island has been growing somewhat slower than the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional seat has been constantly out of reach since 2010. The trend line suggests that Rhode Island may even lose its
2nd Congressional seat, which it has held since 1930, in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

650

600 RI 3rd

550
RI 2nd
500

450
435th
400
Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": South Carolina's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. South Carolina currently has seven seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of South Carolina's 7th and 8th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: South Carolina's 7th and 8th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
SC 8th 499 499 498 497 495 492 488 485 482
SC 7th 430 432 431 429 427 425 423 423 418

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because South Carolina has been growing at a slightly faster rate than the nation
overall, its eligibility for an additional seat has increased slightly since 2010. However, the trend line suggests that South Carolina will neither
gain nor lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 SC 8th
470
460 SC 7th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": South Dakota's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. South Dakota currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of South Dakota's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with South Dakota.

Congressional Seat Rankings: South Dakota's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
SD 2nd 534 531 530 526 525 526 525 525 521

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of the seat's ranking. Because South Dakota's population growth rate is similar to the U. S. average,
its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat is unlikely.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

620

570
SD 2nd

520

435th
470 Seat

420
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Tennessee's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Tennessee currently has nine seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Tennessee's 9th and 10th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Tennessee's 9th and 10th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
TN 10th 462 463 463 464 463 461 460 461 459
TN 9th 416 416 415 416 416 414 412 413 412

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Tennessee has been growing at the same rate as the nation
overall, its eligibility for an additional seat has barely changed since 2010. The trend line suggests that Tennessee will neither gain nor
lose a Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 TN 10th
470
460 TN 9th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Texas' Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services calculates each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of equal
proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Texas currently has 36 seats in Congress. The table
below shows the ranking of Texas' 36th, 37th, 38th and 39th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
the seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Texas' 36th, 37th, 38th and 39th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
TX 39th 473 467 465 462 455 453 446 445 440
TX 38th 460 455 451 447 443 439 436 430 429
TX 37th 447 444 437 436 431 427 425 422 417
TX 36th 433 430 426 421 420 419 411 411 405

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Texas has been growing faster than most other states, its
eligibility for additional seats has increased each year. Already presumed eligible for its 37th and 38th seats, Texas might also gain its
39th seat in the 2020 Reapportionment. Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings every year…stay tuned!

475
TX 39th
TX 38th

450 TX 37th
TX 36th

425
435th
Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Utah's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Utah currently has four seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Utah's 4th and 5th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Utah's 4th and 5th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
UT 5th 502 496 492 487 485 478 475 470 466
UT 4th 389 386 386 381 380 372 370 362 357

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Utah has been growing moderately faster than many other states,
its eligibility for an additional seat has increased each year. However, if the seat-rank trend continues, Utah will probably not gain its
5th Congressional seat in the 2020 Reapportionment.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

550
525 UT 5th
500 UT 4th
475
450
425
400
435th
375 Seat
350
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Vermont's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Vermont currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Vermont's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with Vermont.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Vermont's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
VT 2nd 612 612 613 613 613 614 614 614 614

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of the seat's ranking. Because Vermont is growing at about the same pace as the rest of the U. S.,
its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat has stayed constant since 2010. Vermont is not likely to pick up its second
Congressional District in the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

620

570
VT 2nd

520

435th
470 Seat

420
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Virginia's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Virginia currently has 11 seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Virginia's 11th and 12th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Virginia's 11th and 12th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
VA 12th 444 442 438 438 439 443 442 443 441
VA 11th 407 405 404 404 404 406 406 406 404

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Virginia was growing a little faster than most other states at the beginning of
the decade, but its growth relative to other states has slowed. Virginia's eligibility for a 12th Congressional District is still 'up in the air',
but there is no chance of losing its 11th seat.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

460
VA 12th
450
VA 11th
440

430

420 435th
Seat
410

400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Washington's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Washington currently has ten seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Washington's 10th and 11th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Washington's 10th and 11th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
WA 11th 479 479 477 475 473 470 465 463 456
WA 10th 432 433 433 431 429 424 422 418 414

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Washington has been growing a little faster than most other states, so it is in
no danger of losing its 10th seat, but the state is not likely to gain an 11th Congressional District by the end of this decade.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 WA 11th
470
460 WA 10th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": West Virginia's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. West Virginia currently has three seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of West Virginia's 3rd and 4th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: West Virginia's 3rd and 4th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
WV 4th 567 571 573 575 577 579 584 590 590
WV 3rd 412 415 417 420 421 426 432 439 445

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because West Virginia has been growing at a slower rate than most other states,
its eligibility for a fourth seat is diminishing. In fact, the trend lines suggest that West Virginia will lose its third seat by the end of the decade.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

600

WV 4th
550

WV 3rd
500

450 435th
Seat

400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Wisconsin's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Lines

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Wisconsin currently has eight seats in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Wisconsin's 8th and 9th seats each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses the seat.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Wisconsin's 8th and 9th Seats since 2010, by year
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
WI 9th 463 465 467 469 470 473 476 477 478
WI 8th 411 413 414 417 417 420 421 424 421

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of each seat's ranking. Because Wisconsin has been growing at a slower rate than the nation overall,
its eligibility for an additional seat has decreased since 2010. The trend lines suggest that Wisconsin might escape losing its 8th seat
at the end of the decade.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

500
490
480 WI 9th
470
460 WI 8th
450
440
430
420 435th
410 Seat
400
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580
"Seat-Watch 2018": Wyoming's Congressional Reapportionment Trend Line

This analysis is based on a table of annual population estimates for states released by the U. S. Census Bureau every December.
Research Advisory Services has calculated each state's allocation of seats in Congress each year since 2010, using the "method of
equal proportions" reapportionment formula adopted and used by Congress since 1941. Wyoming currently has one seat in Congress.
The table below shows the ranking of Wyoming's potential 2nd seat each year since Census 2010. Once a seat is ranked 435th or lower,
that seat is awarded to the state after the next decennial census. If a current seat becomes ranked 436th or higher, the state loses
the seat, unless it is the only seat, as is the case with Wyoming.

Congressional Seat Rankings: Wyoming's 2nd Seat since 2010, by year


2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
WY 2nd 621 621 621 620 619 620 620 621 621

The graph below plots the "trajectory" of the seat's ranking. Because Wyoming is growing at about the same pace as the rest of the U. S.,
its eligibility for an additional Congressional seat has stayed constant since 2010. The trend line suggests that Wyoming will not
pick up its second Congressional District in the forseeable future.

Research Advisory Services will recalculate Congressional seat rankings each year…stay tuned!

620

570 WY 2nd

520 435th
Seat
470

420
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: Population Division, U. S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto
Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01). Release date: December 2018. Calculations of Congressional seat rankings
by Research Advisory Services, Inc., Phoenix (602) 230-9580