You are on page 1of 16

Whole Grains

“The act of putting into your mouth what the earth


has grown is perhaps your most direct interaction
with the earth.”
-Frances Moore Lappé-

1
MyPyramid: The Grain
Group
• What is included in the grain group?
• Any food made from wheat, rice, oats,
cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is
a grain product.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

*This slide is animated to show just one bullet per click of the mouse*
*click to reveal first bullet* What kinds of foods are included in the grain group?
What makes a food a “grain” food? (Wait for answers)
*click to reveal second bullet* The grain group consists of any food made from
wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain. Examples of grain
products include bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas and grits.

2
Two Types of Grains

• Whole Grains – contain the


entire grain kernel.
• Refined Grains – have been
milled to remove the bran and
the germ.
– Finer texture
– Increased shelf life
– Loss of nutrients (B vitamins, iron
and dietary fiber)

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

*this slide is animated to show just one bullet per click of the mouse*
*click to reveal first bullet* There are two types of grains: whole and refined.
Whole grains contain all three parts of the grain kernel: the bran, the germ and
the endosperm. This provides a good source of dietary fiber as well as vitamins
and minerals.
*click to reveal second bullet* Refined grains have been milled to remove the
bran and the germ. This process gives the grain a finer texture and a longer
shelf life, but it also removes most of the nutrients from the grain. Most refined
grains are enriched, which means that certain B vitamins as well as iron are
added back after processing. Fiber is not added back to refined grains.

3
How can I tell the difference?

• Whole Grains
– Labels use the word “whole.” For example
“whole grain” or “whole wheat.”
– Brown rice, oatmeal, popcorn, wild rice, etc.
• Refined Grains
– Labels may use the word “enriched.”
– Often found in grain foods
with the word “white”:
white rice, white bread,
white flour, etc.
Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

*this slide is animated to show just one bullet per click of the mouse*
There is a big difference between whole and refined grains, and the difference is
reflected in the nutrients and health benefits of each. How can the average
person tell the difference between whole and refined grain foods? (Wait for
answers… if individuals talk about the color of breads or rolls, point out that just
because a grain product is brown does not mean that it is whole grain. Breads
can be colored by ingredients like molasses, brown sugar, or even the addition
of food coloring. The best way to determine if a food is made from whole or
refined grains is to read the labels.)
*click to reveal first bullet* Before they are milled or refined, all grains are whole.
Look for words like “whole grain” or “whole wheat” when selecting whole grain
foods. Read the ingredient list; if whole grain is listed as the first ingredient,
you’ve made a good choice. Some whole grains, however, do not show the
word “whole” on the ingredient list. These whole grain foods include brown rice,
oatmeal, popcorn, and wild rice.
*click to reveal second bullet* Look for the word “enriched” when purchasing
foods made from refined grains. Read the ingredient list: “wheat flour”,
“enriched flour” and degerminated cornmeal are words that describe refined
grains. Examples of refined grain foods include white rice, white bread and
foods made from white or wheat flour.
Some foods contain both whole and refined grains. A food can be considered
whole grain if it contains 51% or more whole grains by weight.

4
Find the Whole Grain
Breads:

• Multi-grain • Cracked wheat


• Enriched white • Seven-grain
• Stone-ground • Whole wheat
• 100% wheat • Bran
• Whole grain • Enriched wheat

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

You are standing in the bread aisle of the grocery store. You see dozens of
different types of sliced bread, loaves and rolls in front of you. You are trying to
find products made from “whole grains.” Which labels would you choose?
(allow participants a minute or so to decide which are whole grain breads).
Multi-grain, stone-ground, 100% wheat, cracked wheat, seven-grain, bran,
whole grain, whole wheat, enriched wheat, enriched white.

5
Don’t Be Fooled!

• Multi-grain • Cracked wheat


• Enriched white • Seven-grain
• Stone-ground • Whole wheat
• 100% wheat • Bran
• Whole grain • Enriched wheat

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Don’t be fooled! The only breads that you can be sure are made from whole
grains are the ‘whole grain’ bread and the ‘whole wheat’ bread. Some of the
others may be made from whole grains, but you would have to check the
ingredients label. If ‘whole grain’ appears as the first ingredient, that food is
considered a whole grain food. How did you do? Remember: read labels and
look for the word ‘whole.’

6
How Much Should I
Consume?
• Half of the grains consumed should be
whole grains.
• The USDA’s recommended amounts vary
widely based on age, gender and level of
physical activity. For adult men and
women the recommendations range
between 5 and 8 ounce equivalents.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Most Americans actually consume enough grains each day. Unfortunately, most
of those grains are refined grains. MyPyramid encourages individuals to “make
half your grains whole”. The USDA’s recommended amounts vary widely based
on age, gender and level of physical activity. To determine the number of
servings that is right for you, visit the MyPyramid website (www.mypyramid.gov)
or consult with a nutritionist or your physician. For adult men and women, the
recommended number of servings ranges between 5 and 8 ounce equivalents.

7
Ounce Equivalents?!?!

• A sometimes-confusing new term for


a serving of food from the grain
group.
• In general, 1 ounce equivalent from
the grains group is:
– 1 slice of bread
– 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal
– ½ cup of cooked rice
– ½ cup of cooked pasta
– ½ cup of cooked cereal
Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Think about the last time you ate a pasta dish at a restaurant. Most restaurant
portions are significantly more than the ½ cup size listed as an ounce equivalent.
In fact, dinner-sized restaurant portions can provide up to 6 cups of cooked
pasta! That’s 12 ounce equivalents! It’s easy to see how quickly portions can
get out of control.

*Now would be a good time to do the suggested activity for this section.*

8
Fiber from Whole Grains

• Dietary Fiber – a non-digestible form of


complex carbohydrate that occurs
naturally in plant foods.
• Functional Fiber – isolated, non-digestible
carbohydrates added to foods and that
provide beneficial effects.
• Total fiber is the sum of both dietary and
functional fiber.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

*This slide is animated to show just one bullet per click of the mouse*
One of the greatest health benefits of whole grains comes from the fiber that this
food provides. There are 2 different types of fiber.
*click to reveal first bullet* The first, dietary fiber, is a non-digestible form of
complex carbohydrate that naturally occurs in plants. We eat dietary fiber in the
form of fruit and vegetable leaves, stems, skins, seeds and hulls.
*click to reveal second bullet* The second type of fiber is called functional fiber.
Functional fiber may be added to foods and provides specific health benefits to
people. A manufactured high-quality, concentrated ingredient added to ready-
to-eat cereal to increase fiber is an example of a functional fiber.
*click to reveal third bullet* Total fiber is the sum of both dietary fiber and
functional fiber found in a food.

9
Health Benefits: Fiber

• Fiber from whole grains:


– Reduces the risk of coronary heart disease.
– May reduce constipation.
– May help maintain a healthy weight:
• Increased feeling of fullness.
• Interfere with absorption of
dietary fat and cholesterol.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

•Fiber, found in whole grains, is one of the best-kept secrets for weight
management. Fiber is a substance that cannot be broken down by the body
during digestion. Because it cannot be digested, there are virtually no calories.
So why would you want to eat something that your body can’t digest? Fiber
adds bulk to your food and slows down the rate at which food leaves your
stomach. This means that you will feel full more quickly and will stay full longer.
Once in your digestive system, fiber absorbs excess cholesterol and acts like a
broom in your intestines.
•In addition to weight management, there are other reasons to include fiber in
the diet: it has been found to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and may
reduce constipation. Fiber is found in a number of foods, including foods made
from whole grains. Most of the fiber is lost during the refining process and is not
returned when foods are enriched. It is important to try and make half of the
grains that you eat whole grains in order to ensure that you are consuming
enough fiber.

10
Other Health Benefits

• Grains provide many nutrients:


– Several B vitamins including thiamin,
riboflavin, niacin and folate.
• Eating grains fortified with folate (folic acid) before
and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube
defects during fetal development.
– Iron
– Magnesium
– Selenium

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Grains provide a number of important nutrients. They provide several B


vitamins including thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folate. B Vitamins play a key
role in metabolism and help the body release energy from the foods people
consume. In addition, folate (also known as folic acid) helps make new cells in
the body. This is why folic acid is so important for pregnant women.

11
Are You Getting
Enough Fiber?
• Recommended: 20-35 grams
• Average American consumes: 15 grams
• How can I make sure I’m getting enough
fiber?
– 5 servings of fruits and vegetables
– 6 servings of grains

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Are you getting enough fiber?


•The recommended daily amount of fiber is 20-35 grams.
•The average American consumes about 15 grams of fiber each day.
•How can you be sure you’re getting enough? If you consume 5 servings of
fruits and vegetables (that’s 5 servings total… not 5 of fruits and 5 of vegetables)
and 6 servings of grains (3 of which are whole grains), you are very likely to
meet the recommended daily amount of fiber. If you already consume enough
fiber, keep it up! If, however, you find yourself in the same company as the
“Average Americans” who consume only about half of the fiber they should,
gradually increase your fiber intake over time. A sudden increase in the amount
of fiber a person consumes can lead to gastric distress.

12
RealAge® Benefits

Eating 25 grams or more of fiber each


day can lower a person’s RealAge®
by as much as 3 years!

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Eating 25 grams or more of fiber each day can lower a person’s RealAge® by as
much as 3 years! Whole grain foods, as well as fruits and vegetables, are good
sources of fiber. The health benefits of a high-fiber diet, mentioned earlier in this
presentation, translate into a younger body… up to 3 years younger. Now that’s
food for thought!

13
What Can I Do?

• For the next two weeks, focus on


consuming more whole grains. Try to
make half your grains whole.
• Find ways to substitute whole grain foods
for the refined grains you already eat.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

For the next two weeks, focus on consuming more whole grains. Try to make
half your grains whole. Find ways to substitute whole grain foods for the refined
grain foods you already eat. ADDING whole grain foods to your diet may also
add unnecessary calories, and could result in weight gain if these additional
calories are not expended. It is important that whole grain foods REPLACE
refined grain foods. Remember that most Americans already eat enough
servings from the grain group to meet the recommended amounts, so to make
the most of this food group try to consume more whole grains and fewer refined
grains.

14
Be a Healthy Role-Model

• If you eat breakfast or lunch with your


students, try to make choices that include
whole grains. If students ask about your
choices, talk to them about the importance
of choosing whole grains.
• Encourage parents to bring in whole grain
treats, like air-popped popcorn.

Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

•Be a healthy role-model to your students. If you eat breakfast or lunch with
your students, try to make choices that include whole grains. If students ask
about your choices, talk to them about the importance of choosing whole grains.
Many schools that make baked products from scratch add some whole grains to
those products even though you may not be able to see or taste them. Check
with your school to see if there are whole grains included in the foods they
prepare and share this information with your students.
•Encourage parents to bring in whole grain treats like air-popped popcorn for
class parties or celebrations.

15
Power Panther Professionals
School-Wide
• Get students involved by:
– Serving a whole grain snack in class (as part
of a class party, celebration, etc.).
– Doing a project/display/lesson focusing on
whole grains with your students.
– Making a bulletin board or other display about
whole grains. Post it where students can
read it.
– Giving whole grain “healthy facts” as a part of
the school’s morning announcements.
Child Nutrition & Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, 120 SE 10th Avenue, Topeka, KS 66612-1182

Optional Last Slide:


There are many ways to make Power Panther Professionals a school-wide
health initiative. Announce to students that for the next 2 weeks, school faculty
and staff will be recording their consumption of whole grains. You can get
students involved in a number of ways including: serving whole grain snacks as
part of a class party, celebration etc. (this food could come from parents or the
PTA), providing a lesson or project to classes about the grain group and
importance of consuming whole grains. You could also market whole grain
foods on bulletin boards, hall displays or over the morning announcements. If
you have chosen to make Power Panther Professionals a competition, you may
decide to give “bonus points” to teachers who take the extra step and involve
their students.

16