Lesson Plan #4 -- W540 | Lesson Plan | Financial Literacy

W540 Lesson Plan #4 Susan Sanders

Students as Contributors
Grade - 12 Course - Economics Length Six 45-minute periods (Over a two week period) Method of Assessment Contribution to a Team Glog Lesson Author Susan Sanders Lesson Overview Senior students in economics, will throughout the course of the semester, be introduced to personal finance issues related to various topics. For example, when discussing the decision making model and trade-offs, we will include how students determine what they are going to spend their money on. To culminate our discussion, students will be required to make a contribution to an overview of financial literacy. Students will be given a list of possible topics to choose from, but may go with their own idea after being teacher approved. Students will also be allowed to choose the product which will best display their information, but will be in a group that must utilize various methods of presentation. The audience will be recent high school graduates (within the last four years). The class will organize themselves into groups of four or five and post their resulting products into one presentation using a Glogster poster.

From Theory to Practice Providing an education that is relevant today, means teachers must change the structure of the delivery of that instruction. Students living in the 21st century are not engaged in the 19th century structured classrooms that they are being provided. Integrating technology into the classroom is one way in which to bridge this great divide, but we cannot simply infuse what we have always done with a computer. For students to be fully engaged, teachers must incorporate a variety of technological tools available, create relevant products, and allow students to contribute to and become responsible for their own education. The project described here will give students the opportunity to select their area of information to examine, as well as decide on the method of presentation best suited for their research findings. Furthermore, state standards, as well as ISTE standards, will be met. Indiana State Standards E 1.2 Explain how producers and consumers confront the condition of scarcity by making choices which involve opportunity costs and trade-offs. E 6.4 Explain how interests rates acts as an incentive to savers and borrowers. E 6.6 Compare and contrast credit, savings, and investment services available to the consumer from financial institutions. E 6.9 Analyze the difference in borrowing costs using various rates of interest when purchasing a major item, such as a car or house.

Page 2 of 9 ISTE National Standards 1. Creativity and Innovation students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, and processes. b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression. 2. Technology Operations and Concepts students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students: a. Understand and use technology systems. b. Select and use applications effectively and productively. c. Transfer current knowledge to using new technologies. Teacher Resource 1. Slideshow for using Glogster. http://www.slideshare.net/jmcgee/glog-on-presentation Materials and Technology 1. Classroom Computer and Projector 2. Classroom set of computers or use of lab. (Each student will need access to a computer during sessions 2 4, 9 & 10). 3. Hand out for requirements and rubric. 4. Video equipment for students who do not have access to their own. (My school has two cameras that I can check out. I require the students to make appointments with me to use these cameras since I am responsible for them.) 5. Text or other resources containing information on personal finance topics. Student Resources 1. Textbook with personal finance section. 2. http://www.bankrate.com/finance/financial-literacy/bankrate-s-guide-to-financial-literacy8110310.aspx Website sponsored by Edward Jones great links to many issues regarding financial literacy. 3. http://www.mymoney.gov/ Website sponsored by Financial Literacy Education Commission. STUDENT OBJECTIVES Students will 1. Demonstrate their understanding of the interest rate from the perspective of both the borrower and the saver. 2. Work collaboratively to create their group glog. 3. Evaluate and analyze the importance of various financial institutions. 4. Analyze and evaluate various forms of credit and the development of a credit score.

Prior to Session One 1. The class will have had previous discussions on all of the possible topics throughout the semester. This project will serve as a culminating activity in regards to personal finance. 2. Establish a free educational glogster account by going to www.glogster.com. You may want to wait and only register one student per group, once you see how they divide themselves.

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Session One 1. Begin the first period by sharing the student example and giving a quick overview of how to use Glogster. 2. Hand out Everything I Need to Know Now That I ve Graduated requirement sheet and rubric. Spend five minutes discussing and going over the requirements. 3. Tell students that their first important economic decision is to put themselves into groups. They should weigh the costs and benefits of their choices before making any hasty decisions. Then allow students to group themselves. Four or five students is ideal. Only allow smaller groups if they are high achieving, self-motivated students. Only larger if the class size dictates this to be the case. 4. The remainder of the first session should include time for the groups to select a team leader. This individual will be the one responsible for the organization of the final product, presentation of the poster to the class, and the glogster poster will be registered in their name. Then allow students to brainstorm and determine a plan of action. They should utilize the requirement list and the available resources to determine their course of action. 5. Groups may begin a sketch of their overall vision of their final project. (This will be shared with the teacher during session three.) Between Sessions One and Two 1. Register each of the team leaders with glogster, so groups may begin posting work as early as session two. Sessions Two - Four 1. Students will work with groups in the media center. Here they will have access to computers and may bring in their own equipment (ie video cameras, iPods) to utilize. 2. I will borrow microphones from our computer department for students who want to work on a podcast during these sessions. 3. Sometime during Session Three each group must bring a sketch of their overall vision and everyone s role in the final product to the teacher. The teacher does a quick evaluation of project, offering suggestions for group and individual contribution improvement. Students may not change their role after this session without the teacher s approval. Session Nine (In the computer lab) 1. Students will have one last opportunity to collaborate with their team during class. They should be using this for final adjustments. 2. Encourage the team leaders to rehearse their presentation with their group to gain their input and suggestions. Session Ten (In the computer lab) 1. Each student will be logged into a computer. I will be logged into the computer attached to the projection system. 2. Each team leader will present their poster and give the class the web address. After each group has presented, give the class five minutes to complete the peer evaluation form for that group s poster.

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Adaptations
Gifted and Talented Students 1. Will be asked to mentor an IEP or ESL student, as part of the group, for this project. 2. Peer evaluation form for these students will include an analysis question on the practical use of each final product for recent high school graduates. IEP Students 1. Ensure that students have equipment and understanding necessary to complete project. 2. Partner with a gifted and talented student as his/her mentor in the group. 3. Allow this student time in the resource room beyond the allotted work sessions given for the whole class. ESL Students 1. Initial handouts translated into student s native language. 2. Partner with a gifted and talented student as his/her mentor in the group. 3. Criterion on construct and use of English will be evaluated less stringently than for other students.

Student Sample
http://smgilles.edu.glogster.com/glog-personal-finance-5377/

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Everything That I Need to Know Now That I ve Graduated
Overview: Congratulations! You have just earned your high school diploma. What s next - military, college, the workplace, traveling the world? You are out on your own, but are you financially literate? What do you need to know in the area of personal finance? Using the list provided below, you and a group of your peers will decide exactly that what do you need to know? You will provide your collection of products on a glogster poster. Please note the requirements include both content and format for product delivery. Possible Topics to Cover: developing credit, credit history, credit cards, renting an apartment, purchasing a home (understanding mortgages), buying a new car, loans, insurance, interest rates, retirement planning, paying for college, emergency funds, taxes, identity theft, debit cards, checking accounts. Each team member should be responsible for a different topic and presentation element. Other topics may be handled by the whole or part of the team. A wide range of these topics should be covered, all though you will certainly not be able to cover them all. Topics outside of this list may be used, but must be approved by Mrs. Sanders. Required Elements on Poster: 1. Original video embedded 2. Non-original video embedded 3. Two links with description of what the site will include 4. Song that plays when the poster is opened 5. Podcast 6. Two lists detailing two separate topics 7. Two images Additional elements may be added to add to the overall effectiveness and creativity of the project. Project Schedule: Day One: Brainstorming. Select team and leader. Begin determining topic, design, and individual responsibilities. Day Two: Media Center group and/or individual work Day Three: Media Center group and/or individual work. Each team must meet with Mrs. Sanders today and provide a rough sketch of Glog, including individual responsibilities. Day Four: Media Center group and/or individual work. Day Nine: Media Center group and/or individual work. All members should view and approve final Glog today. Leader should rehearse presentation for all team members to give approval. Day Ten: Computer Lab - Team leader will present Glog and peers will complete an evaluation form.

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Glog Rubric
CATEGORY Required Elements Unacceptable, but Master - 4 Apprentice - 3 Novice - 2 project is complete -1 The Glog includes all All but 1 of the required All but 2-3 elements are More than 3 required required elements as well elements are included. included or content is elements are missing as additional information. Content is rich and not rich and from the Glog or content Content is rich and meaningful. meaningful. is not meaningful. meaningful.

All items of importance Almost all are clearly labeled items of with labels that can be importance read from at least 3 are clearly feet away. Some items of labeled and importance are clearly labels can be labeled and read from at labels can be read from at least 3 feet least 3 feet away. away. Target Audience - Graduates were clearly Graduates were the Recent High the target audience. target audience. School Graduates Labels

Few items of importance are labeled and labels are difficult to read.

Labels are too small to view or no important items were labeled.

Someone other than Glog does not appear to graduates appear to be target anyone. the target audience.

Graphics Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic and make the Glog easier to read and understand.

Almost all graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to read and understand. The Glog is attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness. There is 1 grammatical mechanical mistake on the Glog.

Some graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand. The Glog is fairly attractive, but a bit messy.

Few graphics relate to the topic.

Attractiveness

The Glog is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness. There are no grammatical mechanical mistakes on the Glog. Glog is a clear collaboration with meaningful contributions of all members and a cooperative attitude for duration of project.

The Glog is poorly designed and very messy.

Grammar

There are 2-3 grammatical mechanical mistakes.

There are 4 grammatical mechanical mistakes.

Collaboration

Glog is a collaboration Glog is a collaboration Team did not work of all members, some but not all members cooperatively and/or clearly doing more than contributed equally. Glog reflects efforts of others. Team worked Team had some only some members of well together. cooperation difficulties. the team.

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Individual Contribution to Glog Rubric
CATEGORY Master - 4 Apprentice - 3 Novice - 2 Unacceptable, but project is complete -1

Content

Collaboration

Individual Individual Individual Individual contribution is rich in contribution contains contribution contains contribution lacks meaningful content. meaningful content. some correct clear content. Value Could stand alone as Could stand alone as content. Project is not added to a meaningful project. a project. would lack meaning project with this without sum of Glog. contribution. Individual worked Individual worked Individual completed Individual did not well with group. well with group. portion of project, work well with group Leadership role was Leadership role was but did not make and/or did not taken on or clear not taken, but some important contribute content assistance was assistance was contributions to the responsible for. provided to leader. provided to leader. team. Individual contribution shows creative and appropriate use of technology which allowed its use in the Glog. There are no grammatical mechanical mistakes on the Glog. Individual contribution shows use of technology applicable to the Glog. Individual Individual contribution use contribution did not adequate technology utilize technology or but with some could not be technical difficulties included in the Glog. coordinating with the Glog. There are 2-3 grammatical mechanical mistakes. There are 4 grammatical mechanical mistakes.

Technology

Grammar

There is 1 grammatical mechanical mistake on the Glog.

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Peer Evaluation of Glog
CATEGORY Master - 4 Apprentice - 3 Novice - 2 Unacceptable, but project is complete -1

Target Audience Recent High School Graduates Labels

Graduates were clearly Graduates were the Someone other than Glog does not appear the target audience. target audience. graduates appear to to target anyone. be the target audience. Few items of importance are labeled and labels are difficult to read. Labels are too small to view or no important items were labeled.

All items of importance Almost all are clearly labeled items of with labels that can be importance read from at least 3 are clearly feet away. Some items labeled and of importance are labels can be clearly labeled and read from at labels can be read from least 3 feet at least 3 feet away. away. Attractiveness The Glog is The Glog is exceptionally attractive in attractive in terms of terms of design, layout, design, layout, and neatness. and neatness. Content High school graduates would find the content informative, relevant, and interesting. High school graduates would find some value in the content of this Glog.

The Glog is fairly attractive, but a bit messy.

The Glog is poorly designed and very messy.

High school High school graduates graduates would find will not find any value very little value in the in the content of this content of this Glog. Glog.

Page 9 of 9 References Glogster Rubric (2010). Retrieved from http://butlertech.wikispaces.com/file/view/Glogster+Rubric.pdf Federal Trade Commission (2003). Facts for consumers. Retrieved from http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/credit/cre32.shtm Jacobs, H. H. (2010). Curriculum 21: essential education for a changing world. Alexandria, VA: ASCD Reich, Justin, Daccord, Thomas. (2008) The Best Ideas for Teaching with Technology: A Practical Guide for Teachers, By Teachers. Armonk, N.Y.: M.E.Sharpe.

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