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Summer Training Project Report (14, Title Case, Bold)

On (14, Title Case, Bold)

Title of the Project Report (14, Title Case, Bold)

Submitted in Partial Fulfillment for the Award of the

Degree of Master in Business Administration 2010-2012
(14, Bold)

Under the Guidance of: (14, Bold) Submitted By: (14,
Bold)

Name of the Guide from Innstitute (14 size) Name of the
Student (14 size)

Designation (14 size) University Enrollment No.
(14 size)

Department of Management (14, Bold)

Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology (14, Bold)

Affiliated to Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi
(14 size)

PSP Area, Plot No. 1, Sector 22, Rohini, Delhi 110086
(14 size)

STUDENT DECLARATION

(On plain paper)

This is to certify that I have completed the Summer Project titled”(title of the

project)” in

“(name of the organization)” under the guidance of “(name of the Industry

guide)” in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of Degree of

Master of Business Administration at Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology,

Delhi. This is an original piece of work & I have not submitted it earlier

elsewhere.

Date: Signature:

Place: Name:

University Enrollment No.:

CERTIFICATE FROM THE COMPANY/ORGANISATION (On Company Letter Head) .

IF ANY. Delhi has successfully completed Summer Training Project in our organization on the topic titled. we found him/her hard working. “(Name of the topic)” from _____________ to_________200X. THE COMPANY CAN ISSUE IT ON OTHER FORMAT. sincere and diligent person and his/her behavior & conduct was very good during the project. We wish him/her success for his/her future endeavors. .This is to certify that (name of the student) son/daughter of (name of the father) pursuing MBA from Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology . Signature of the Issuing Authority : Name of the Issuing Authority : Designation of the Issuing Authority : Note: DESIRED FORMAT. During his / her project tenure in the organization/company.

To the best of my knowledge and belief the data & information presented by him/her in the project has not been submitted earlier. Signature : . CERTIFICATE FROM THE INSTITUTE GUIDE (On Institute’s Letter Head) This is to certify that the summer project titled “____________________” is an academic work done by “__________________” submitted in the partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the degree of Master Of Business Administration from Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology. Delhi. under my guidance & direction.

...................Name of the Faculty : Designation : TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive summary.............................3............................... Classification of consumer durables.............................1....... Introduction.................................................. ...................................1.... ........................... Overview.....2................................1...... Introduction.................. 4-19 2...................................................................................................................... 3 1... 3 2.............................1......................4........................................... Objective of the study........... 5 2...................... Hypothesis........1...3............. Nature of the problem.......................... 6 .... 4 2............................................Profile of the Industry and Organisation. 2 1. 1 1........................ Industry analysis 2... ................................. Sector outlook................. .........1......................................1.......................................2........................................................................... 1 Introduction.......4............. 1-3 1........ 4 2...................

2.1.5. Scope....................................................................................................... 7
2.1.6. Current scenario...................................................................................... 7
2.1.7. Future scenario....................................................................................... 7
2.1.8. List of companies................................................................................... 9
2.1.9. Top players............................................................................................ 11
2.2. Profile of the organisation.............................................................................
12
2.2.1. The Shriram group
history..................................................................... 12
2.2.2. The Siddharth shriram
group................................................................. 12
2.2.3. Joint
ventures......................................................................................... 13
2.2.4. Associates........................................................................................
...... 13
2.2.5. Mission of the
company........................................................................ 13
2.2.6. History of the
company......................................................................... 14
2.2.7. Divers product
portfolio........................................................................ 15
2.3. UIL’s Distribution network..........................................................................
16
2.3.1. Sales
force.............................................................................................. 16
2.3.2. Reach across
India................................................................................. 16
2.3.3. Supply chain
network............................................................................ 16
2.3.4. Sales management
practice.................................................................... 16

2.3.5. UIL fan market in
India......................................................................... 17
2.4. Product line of the company.........................................................................
19
3.Review of Literature.............................................................. 20-25
3.1. Review of literature.......................................................................................
20
3.2. Customer satisfaction....................................................................................
21
3.3. Measuring customer satisfaction.................................................................
22
3.3.1. Sub segments Vs sub
units.................................................................... 23
4.Research Methodology ......................................................... 26-29
4.1. Title of the study............................................................................................
26
4.2. Statement of the problem..............................................................................
26
4.3. Scope of the study..........................................................................................
26
4.4. Nature of the study........................................................................................
26
4.5. Research methodology..................................................................................
26
4.6. Universe..........................................................................................................
27
4.7. Population......................................................................................................
27
4.8. Sampling.........................................................................................................
27

4.9. Source of data collection..............................................................................
27
4.9.1. Primary
data.......................................................................................... 27
4.10. Tools used for the
study............................................................................. 28
4.11. Limitations of the
study............................................................................. 29
5.Analysis and Interpretations................................................. 30-40
6.Findings and Suggestions...................................................... 41-45
6.1. Findings..........................................................................................................
41
6.2. Suggestions.....................................................................................................
43
7.Conclusion.................................................................................... 46
Annexure..................................................................................... 47-52
1. Questionnaire......................................................................................... 47

2. Bibliography.......................................................................................... 51

In particular. manufacturer has to design long term oriented policies aimed both build up a growing potential customers’ awareness of company product a side. Channel satisfaction and its consequent impact on channel relationships has been an important concern of both practitioners as well as researchers during the last three decades. It is based on the hypothesis that in order to successfully support dealers. a manufacturer has to adopt a systematic approach aimed to foster market consensus on aside. These issues have been debated in then field of Distribution channel management. it has been remarked literature the central role played by communication. This is in reaction to a world wide trend towards building closer. In fact. researchers emphasised that manufactures cannot ignore in designing long term growth-oriented policies.. in the innovative and revolutionary high-tech industry. It is being realized that one of the major prerequisites for achieving effective integration of channel operations is the existence of high levels of commitment to the relationships. In particular.1 INTRODUCTION In today’s economy all manufacturers need to pay attention on how to build strong long-term relationships with their dealers’ chain. Furthermore.g. Also supporting dealers in promoting manufacturers’ products has been proved as a sustainable strategy in the long run. In fact.1. manufacturers in order to achieve the desired sales revenues cannot ignore the need to continuously promote activities aimed to both update dealers employees’ skills and motivation. strategies aimed dealers’ satisfaction. it has been demonstrated that short term policies aimed to provide dealers immediate benefits (e. researchers underlined the failure in channel communication is likely to affect the relationship between organizations and its own dealer structure Such remarks suggest that in order to effectively build a long term relationship with an own dealers’ chain. The focus of managerial . and more integrated relationships between manufacturers and channel intermediaries. and mutual benefits on the other side. price discount) may prevent the development of long term and fruitful relationships. and increase dealer’s employee skills and motivation on the other side. in order to successfully plan business growth. This research project conducted by the researcher with a manufacturer operating in the consumer durable Industry.

decisions with regard to channel management has thus shifted to a large extent on creating and maintaining relationship commitment. Social satisfaction on the other hand is defined as a channel member’s “evaluation of the psychological aspects of its relationship in that interactions with the exchange partner are fulfilling. they feel that. Geyskins and Steenkamp (2000) proposed a two way classification of channel satisfaction wherein satisfaction is defined in terms of its economic antecedents and social antecedents. does the organization have to do to gain not only the sale but also the loyalty of the customer. 1995).g. Gaski and Nevin 1985). We want to know the payoff of the transaction both in the short and long term. Fleiss2 and Feldman3 present examples of that delightfulness in their writings. In order to reduce this apparent variation in conceptualization. Economic satisfaction is described as “a channel member’s evaluation of the economic outcome that flows from the relationship with its partners such as sales volume. We want to know if customers are delighted and willing to come back. of course. Channel member satisfaction is defined as an overall positive affective state resulting from the appraisal of all aspects of a firm’s working relationship with another firm (e. margins and discounts”. we talk about creativity. Satisfaction. Drawing from studies from diverse domains such as marriage. We want to know what our customers want. Gill and Kale 1989. social exchange. organizational behavior etc. As Morgan and Hunt (1994) in their seminal work on channel commitment has put it “relationship commitment is central to all the relational exchanges between the firm and its various partners”. and so on. However. When we talk about customer service and/or satisfaction. Frazier. there exists considerable variation among channel theorists on the exact definition of channel satisfaction (Andaleeb. “Commitment and trust are very important because they encourage marketers to (1) work at preserving relationship investments by cooperating with existing partners (2) resist attractive short-term alternatives in favor of the expected long-term benefits of staying with existing partners and (3) view potentially high-risk actions as being prudent because of the belief that their partners will not act opportunistically”. gratifying and facile”. or rather what. Fleiss has written about Ben and Jerry’s ice cream and Feldman has discussed excellence in a cab ride. . means that what we delivered to a customer met the customer’s approval. We want to know if our customers are satisfied. Creativity allows us to handle or diffuse problems at hand or later on in the process of conducting the everyday business. We talk about how. Channel satisfaction is undoubtedly a major factor that could lead to greater levels of channel commitment.

and Rust 1997). some of us minimize it. and Lehmann 1994). Bolton 1998). Anderson. At this point. the key to building long-term customer satisfaction and retention and reaping the benefits these efforts can offer is to focus on the development of high quality products and services. Increasing customer satisfaction has been found to lead to higher future profitability (Anderson. A firm’s future profitability depends on satisfying customers in the present – retained customers should be viewed as revenue producing assets for the firm (Anderson and Sullivan 1993. Srivastava. Fornell. Customer satisfaction and retention that are bought through price promotions. Anderson and Mittal 2000). and loyalty are: • Employees must adhere to a rigid chain of command • Employees are closely supervised • Conflict—in whatever form—is not allowed • Rewards are based on carrot-and-stick principles • Wrong objectives are measured CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Customer satisfaction is a key and valued outcome of good marketing practice. Empirical studies have found evidence that improved customer satisfaction need not entail higher costs. Fornell. Fornell. However. All of this empirical evidence suggests that customer satisfaction is valuable from both a customer goodwill perspective and an organization’s financial perspective. rebates. increased buyer willingness to pay price premiums. has been found to lead to increases in future revenue (Fornell 1992. or even totally disregard it. and Lehmann 1994) and reductions in the cost of future transactions (Reichheld 1996. Fornell. Anderson and Mittal 2000). (Fornell 1992. According to Drucker (1954). Increasing loyalty. Some of the issues that will guarantee failure in sales. Anderson and Sullivan 1993. in fact.As important as delightfulness is. in turn. and other such means . the principle purpose of a business is to create satisfied customers. and use more of the product (Reichheld 1996. lower costs related to defective goods and services (Anderson. we fail. Reichheld 1996. product re-work. switching barriers. and higher levels of customer retention and loyalty (Fornell 1992. improved customer satisfaction may lower costs due to a reduction in defective goods. and Fahey 1998). Anderson. and Rust 1997). satisfaction. etc. provide referrals. Shervani.

Oliver 1993. Anderson. it is possible that attributes can have different satisfaction implications for different consumer and market segments – the usage context. that market and consumer segments should be important factors to consider when measuring customer satisfaction and its implications. consumers with similar satisfaction ratings. how to measure it is less clear. Thus. In addition. Their study. 1991). Customer satisfaction has been studied from the perspective of the individual customer and what drives their satisfaction (Oliver and Swan 1989. Johnson. Failure to take into account segment-specific variation may lead a firm to focus on the wrong aspect for a given set of consumers (Anderson and Mittal 2000). Odekerken-Schröder. 1996. Hallowell 1996. MEASURING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION While it seems clear that increasing customer satisfaction is beneficial to a marketing manager. and Zeithaml 1988. segment population. Loveman 1998) or across several organizations (DeWulf. Furthermore. while other research has examined customer satisfaction in a single organization (Schlesinger and Zornitsky 1991. and Lehmann 1994. including SERVQUAL (Parasuraman. however. Thus. and Everitt 1996). Fournier and Mick 1999) as well as from an industry-wide perspective to compare customer satisfaction scores across firms and industries (Fornell 1992. involved customers from only a single organization. yet different characteristics. Fornell. Fornell et al. specific tools for measuring customer satisfaction have been developed in the past.are unlikely to have the same long-run impact on profitability as when such attitudes and behaviors are won through superior products and services (Anderson and Mittal 2000). may exhibit different levels of repurchase behavior (Mittal and Kamakura 2001). Anderson. Mittal and Kamakura 2001). there exists an ample literature on which to draw when attempting to measure customer satisfaction. and Iacobucci 2001). It is clear. In attempting to measure customer satisfaction. and market environment can influence satisfaction and product use (Anderson and Mittal 2000). Cha. Berry. Garbarino and Johnson (1999) did consider segments in the customer base in their study of satisfaction where they analyzed the different role played by satisfaction between low relational and high relational customers. Our approach extends this work by studying customers from multiple . squeezing additional reliability out of a manufacturing or service delivery process may not increase perceived quality and customer satisfaction as much as tailoring goods and services to meet customer needs (Fornell. then.

Malthouse (2002) defines such a process as sub segmentation. Subunits Other authors have examined the heterogeneity of customer satisfaction effects. . however. It then sub segments these customers/end users from a market segment into smaller. and a single customer could be considered a subunit. our theoretical approach shares some similarities to Hutchison. An important conceptual question concerns when one approach should be preferred over the other. A firm has targeted a market segment and acquired customers/end users. Second. more homogeneous groups based on some criteria such as utility for aspects of the product in the case of Danher (1998). when this is not the case the organization should seek actions that can be implemented for sub segments of customers within a subunit. The present study makes a similar point and provides an analytical method for overcoming such a problem. and shares some similarities with Anderson and Sullivan (1993) with respect to the type of analysis and sampling methods. Sub segments vs. the pre-defined subunit approach to studying heterogeneity is more appropriate when the resulting managerial actions will be implemented at the subunit level. The goals of their research. We give several examples to illustrate these points. We make two points in response to this question. The basic point of their argument is that aggregation may create effects that do not exist in any segments. Danaher (1998) identifies segments of customers (end users) who place different emphasis on different service attributes. were to study the antecedents and consequences of customer satisfaction rather than investigate how different types of satisfaction may influence the overall measure of customer satisfaction. In addition. and Srinivasan (1995) examine heterogeneity of effects across individual customers of a single company using a random effect ordered profit model. Our work is different in that we assume pre- defined subunits – our concern is not to define segments that have different effects. These models are similar to the hierarchical linear models considered here. and Lynch (2000) who posited that unobserved heterogeneity is a problem for interpreting results from behavioral experiments.organizations. managerial actions implemented at the subunit level are most reasonable when there is homogeneity within a subunit and heterogeneity across subunits. the subunits already exist. Kamakura. Krishnan. For the problems examined here. First. Kekre. or may mask effects that do exist. Danaher (1998) shows how latent class regression can be used to segment customers and estimate regression effects by segment simultaneously.

Chintagunta. and might opt for more expensive locations in regions where “convenience” is more important. the message must be tailored to the subunit reached by the media. One might object by suggesting. etc. In addition. and Dube 2002). supermarkets. for example. for example. A third example is managerial actions that are most naturally applied at the subunit level of retail stores. etc. has multiple newspapers and wants to know whether to invest in improving either the service or the content of its individual papers. newspapers. that large metropolitan newspapers (which represent only a small percentage of U. car dealerships. billboards. for specialized customer service training programs. these actions would have to be taken at the subunit level.S. . Corporations often choose where to locate subunits. adding pages to existing sections.S. discussed in more detail below. newspapers) could improve content for specific suburban communities by hiring reporters and adding customized local sections. An owner in the U. television. The analysis was replicated in a second industry to confirm that the findings are not unique to a single industry. and bank branches. If a company is communicating a single message with. Investing in content could involve hiring additional reporters so that local news can be covered more thoroughly. For most newspapers in the U. We would argue that the suburban “zone” would be a subunit. A second example can be when actions primarily involve reach media.S.Of course. adding special-interest sections. See Danaher (1998) or Malthouse (2002) for further discussion and examples. as discussed previously.. but not all. pricing strategies often must be executed at the subunit level (Singh. The present research represents the first study of which we are aware to measure customer satisfaction from a representative sample of customers who are in turn from a representative sample of organizations in a single industry.Consider the case of a newspaper owner. there are numerous examples of situations where customer sub segmentations are more appropriate. A corporation could send employees of certain subunits.

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the penetration level of the consumer durables is still low in India. easy availability of finance. PROFILE 2. the government spending is very less on electrification programs in rural areas. the demand for consumer durables has increased significantly. Products like washing machines. exchange offers. Some of the entry barriers in consumer durables sector are distribution network. and hold over wide distribution network.1 OVERVIEW With the increase in income levels. discounts. their well-acknowledged brands. and ability to hire purchases. The market share of MNCs in consumer durables sector is 65%. For example. 2. increase in consumer awareness. Competition among players is on the basis of difference in prices and well-acknowledged brands.1. capital. Consumer durables sector is characterized by the emergence of MNCs. . Demand is seasonal and cyclical. 4.2. MNCs offer superior technology to the consumers. This factor discourages the consumer durables companies to market their products in rural areas. color televisions (CTVs) are no longer considered luxury items. air conditioners. microwave ovens. An important factor behind low penetration is poor government spending on infrastructure. and intense competition. MNC's major target is the growing middle class of India. 2.1 INDUSTRY ANALYSIS 2. and dishwashers. Bargaining power of suppliers in consumer durables sector is limited due to threat of imports and intense competition. However. and introduction of new models. whereas the Indian companies compete on the basis of firm grasp of the local market. there are still very few players in categories like vacuum cleaners. 3.2 Introduction Some Facts 1. However.1.

0 7.6 -7.100m 43.202m PAT Growth .1% 6. and Mexico. and color televisions (CTVs). country's fiscal policy has encouraged Indian consumer electronic industry. with the acquisition of Thomson Displays by Videocon in Poland. The company is going to invest $250 million in India by 2011 and is planning to establish a manufacturing facility in Pune. Videocon has acquired Electrolux brand in India. -4.3 Sector Outlook There has been strong competition between the major MNCs like Samsung. Also.6% 4. Ltd.4% 43. the company is marking its international presence. are now focusing on rural areas also. Indian consumers are now replacing their existing appliances with frost-free refrigerators. These companies import their premium end products from manufacturing facilities that are located outside India. LG Electronics India Ltd.3% -209.392m 2.019m 940m -1. has announced its extension plan in 2006. TABLE 2.2% Gross Profit Margin 10.331m 30. fully automatic washing machines.1 Sector Financials (In Rs) 31/03/2002 31/03/2003 31/03/2004 Sales 37. split air conditioners.7% 6.9% 23.787m 2.3% Profit After Tax (PAT) 1. -19. and LG Electronics India Ltd.2. TCL Corporation is also planning to establish a $22 million manufacturing facility in India. Some companies like Samsung Electronics Co. The reduction on import duty in the year 2005-06 has benefited many companies.5% Market Capitalization 1.9 Return on Capital Employed 13.359m P/E Ratio 7. such as Samsung. which are boosting the sales in these categories. These companies are introducing gift schemes and providing easy finance to capture the consumer base in rural areas.1. LG. and Sony. According to Isuppli Corporation (Applied Market Intelligence).096m Sales Growth . and Sony. The Indian companies like Videocon Industries and ONIDA are also planning to expand. China. LG.9% .

Consumer Electronics includes VCD/DVD. etc. cameras. Mobile Phones 2. microwaves. 3. personal care products. home theatre. music players. Clocks and Watches 5. Moulded Luggage includes plastics 4. India is the 4th largest economy in the world and is expected to overtake Japan in the near future to become the 3rd largest.1. refrigerators. Indian consumer .1. kitchen appliances. tumble dryer. air conditioners. washing machines. water heaters.4 Classification of Consumer Durables Consumer durables Sector can be classified as follows: 1. vacuum cleaners.5 Scope In terms of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP). color televisions (CTVs). non-kitchen appliances. portable audio. White Goods include dishwashers. 2. Hi-Fi. camcorders. etc. built-in appliances.2 Consumer Durables Growth Air Conditioner 20-25% Refrigerator 5-10% Microwave Ovens 25% Washing Machines 5-10% Color Televisions (CTVs) 15-20% Black & White Televisions -20% Clock 10% Watch 10% VCDs 30% Consumer Electronics (Overall) 9% 2.Growth in 2005-06 TABLE 2.

6 Current Scenario Rural sector offers huge scope for consumer durables industry. 2.5% for refrigerators and washing machines respectively. availability of disposable incomes. emergence of double-income families.400.2 million in 2007 as against 14.goods market is expected to reach $400 billion by 2010.800 a year. improvements in technology.1.6 million in 2000. and nearly 50 % is below 25. The upper-middle and high- income households in urban areas are expected to grow to 38. Rural areas have the penetration level of only 2% and 0. a good growth is projected in the future. The rural market is growing faster than the urban market. And there are 6 million rich households in India. growth in consumer base of rural sector. The urban market and the rural market are growing at the annual rates of 7%-10%and 25% respectively. The penetration level of consumer durables is very low in India. Nearly two. reduction in customs duty. For example. This translates into vast unrealized potential. too. the penetration level of various countries is: .1. 2. growth of media. rise in temperatures. The bottom line is that Indian market is changing rapidly and is showing unprecedented business opportunity. India has the youngest population amongst the major countries. Given these factors. The urban market has now largely become a product replacement market.US$ 21. as compared with other countries. fall in prices due to increased competition. government support.7 Future Scenario With easy availability of finance. There are a lot of young people in India in different income categories. who are earning US$ 4. as it accounts for 70% of the Indian population. the consumer durables industry is growing at a fast pace. in case of color televisions (CTVs). There are 56 million people in middle class.thirds of its population is below the age of 35.

.43 million 8.72 million 13.3 PENETRATION LEVEL IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES India 24% Brazil 11% China 98% US 333% France 235% Japan 250% TABLE 2. the demand for Electronic Appliances is projected to grow exponentially at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 30%.14 million 149 per 1.000 451 per 1.TABLE 2.000 319 per 1.4 Demand and Penetration Level of White Goods in India 1995-1996 2005-2006 2009-2010 Demand 3.000 Penetration level households households households In a study conducted by Frost & Sullivan and commissioned by India Semiconductor Association (ISA).

Electrolux-Kelvinator . Canon India 8.8 List of Companies Some of the companies in consumer durables sector are: 1. Daewoo India 10. AIWA 2. Carrier Aircon Ltd.1 2. 9. In billions FIGURE 2. Bose Corporation 6. BPL 7. 5.1. Blue Star Ltd. BenQ Corporation 4. Akai India 3.

Thomson Ltd. Toshiba Corporation 30. Hitachi Ltd. MIRC Electronics Ltd. 28. Videocon Industries 31. Mitsubishi Electronic Corporation 18. 16. Siemens 26. Sansui India 25.11. Whirlpool Appliances . 15. Panasonic 21. Titan Industries 29. Samtel 24. Samsung India 23. LG Electronics India Ltd. Godrej 12. Khaitan India Ltd. Philips India 22. Nokia India 19 Pace Micro Technology 20. Haier India 13. Sony India 27. 17. 14.

9 Top Players The top 10 players in consumer durables sector are: • Nokia India • LG Electronics India Ltd.2. • Philips India • Titan Industries • Samsung India Electronics • Whirlpool Appliances • Siemens • Sony India • Videocon Industries • Blue star .1.

2. The Group's principal activity is to manufacture and sale of home appliances and automotive components. USHA international is a company under the flagship of Siddhartha Shriram group. edible oils.2 PROFILE OF THE ORGANISATION Usha International Limited. It is the First Indian Company to be awarded ISO 9001:2000 for Marketing practices. water coolers.2 The Siddhartha Shriram group Siddhartha Shriram group is one of India’s renowned business groups with interests as diverse as sugar. pump sets and motors. The products include fans. auto components. power products. appliances. diesel engines. diesel engine parts and other automotive components. Engines. automotive components. the group expanded into textiles.1 The Shriram group history The group was incorporated by Lala Shriram (grandfather of Siddhartha Shriram) in 1889. home appliances and other kind of items. sewing machines. namely. automobiles. Over the next 100 years. fans. Auto products and others. engines. They have a large distribution network in core categories. . heavy chemicals (fertilizers/ chlor caustic). The Company export fans. sewing machines. 2. In 1989. edible oils and industrial chemicals to fans. appliances and automobile. sewing machines. It started in 1957 and marketing its products for over 50 years under the brand name USHA company majorly Manufacturing of Electric Fans and Fuel Injection Equipment.2. sugar. 2.2. rayon’s / nylon tyre cord. USHA international is one of the India’s known consumer durables marketing and distribution companies. engineering foundries. Consumer durables. the group was split amongst the descendants of Lala Shriram and the businesses that came to Siddhartha Shriram’s group have been mentioned below. Presently USHA have Over 50 million customers. chemicals. The Group operates in four segments.

3 Joint ventures Company has joint ventures with  Hunter Fan Company.4 Associates Company associates with  Honda Siel Power Products Ltd.2.  G. USA (Fans)  Janome Sewing Machine Company. China  NGK India  CIXI Three Circle Diesel Engine Company Ltd.2..2.Midea Environment Appliances Manufacturing Company Ltd. Thus. making it one of the leading .5 Mission of the company Usha International's mission is to pursue excellence in all its spheres of business activity. (Diesel Engines) 2.D. It believes in providing reasonable returns to its shareholders and adding value to the principal's business operations through effective marketing.2. Japan (Sewing Machines) 2.

providing them satisfaction thereby building their trust in the company and its products.marketing organisation in India. This must be achieved by meeting customer requirements. .

1979 Fuel Injection Equipment is introduced to the Usha Auto Components range. 1996 Introduces a new range of diesel engines for power generation. 1946 The first Indian Sewing Machine is exported. Company. 1994 Monoblock pumps followed by a complete range of water lifting equipment are launched. 1975 Usha becomes a Public Ltd. 1948 Fans are added to the product range. 1950 The first Indian Fan exported. . 2007 Appointed as super distributor for 2 and 3 wheeler spark plugs in India by NGK Spark Plug Company Limited. 2001 Tie-up with Hunter Fan Company of USA for marketing of premium Usha Hunter ceiling fans. Charat Ram appointed as Chairman of the board of UIL. 1966 Dr. 1994 Fourth generation fully automatic Sewing Machines in collaboration with Janome Sewing Machine Company of Japan is added to the product range. 2000 Commences marketing of Light Weight Kerosene pump sets powered by Honda engines. 2005 Purchase of Water Cooler factory from DAIPL. 1968 Diesel Engines are added to the Usha product range. 2008 Amalgamation of Usha International Limited and Shriram Fuel Injection Industries Limited with The Jay Engineering Works Limited. The new merged entity called Usha International Limited.2. 2. Japan. 1984 Launches a range of Home Appliances.6 History of the company 1934 India's first indigenous sewing machine marketed. 1982 Usha Sales is renamed to Usha International.

Electrical motors & Pump sets.2. Drinking water coolers & dispensers Generators Auto components.5 PRODUCT PORTFOLIO Electric Fans Sewing Machines Home Appliances Engines.7 Diverse product portfolio UIL is a multi product consumer durable marketing and distribution company with a diverse product portfolio that includes the following six product lines: TABLE 2.3 UIL’s DISTRIBUTION NETWORK .2. 2.

and warehouses) 2.3.000 Penetration in important modern retail outlets (Future Group.1 Sales force Separate sales force for 6 product lines and 3 different channels (traditional. modern retail and government sales) 16 Locational offices across India.3 Supply chain network 33 warehouses leased and managed in-house SAP enabled across all UIL locations (head office.2 Reach across India Dealerships in all urban centres with population greater than 20.3. with regional segregation of market Coverage of dealers by trained sales staff . 2.4 Sales management practices SBU led sales organization structure.3.3. Metro. 2.2. location offices. with a Location Head to ensure capture of synergies across product lines Strong experienced middle management in charge of sales. Reliance) Presence in rural India is contributing approximately 20% of the total sales.

the electrical fan market was more than Rs 1000 crores. At the top end. The market was dominated by the top 5 brands.2. Polar and Khaitan - who controlled 70% of the market. guest houses and air-conditioned houses. biggest ceiling manufacturer in the world.S. Orient. Crompton. Around eight models will be introduced in the first year. On the other hand in the plastic table and wall fans segment there may be a serious problem as China can make them much cheaper. The company will continue to focus on strategic tie ups only in fans.10.Usha. 5. The tie up has enabled Usha to enter and create a high-end premium category in the ceiling fans market. It will exclusively market the Hunter range of fans in India under the joint branding of Usha Hunter. Despite this Usha International had sold more last year and gained market share.-based Hunter Fan Company. auto components. the company has joined hands with the U. In the year 1993. air-conditioners and exports. The consumers can now look forward to super premium ceiling fans with wooden blades with an option of imported Belgian and Italian light fittings to enhance the decor of any room. bicycles and radio sets. However. The premium end ceiling fans costing Rs. It has no intention to get into white goods.000 . where the rapid growth of the unorganized sector (10% annually) was giving them stiff competition. The organized fan industry had witnessed a decline of 30 per cent in production last year because of competition from small scale units which escaped excise duty. 1. Fans were the 4th largest owned consumer durable after watches. . they were gradually losing market share in a low growth stagnating market. They also enjoyed 95% awareness in the market. company pointed out that there was duty protection of 40 per cent.5 UIL Fan market in India The fan market was a well developed and mature market.300-1.3. engines and motors.000 are meant for hotels.400 crores in value terms including the small scale sector and Usha's share is half of this. On import threat from China. small appliances. The size of the market is Rs. sewing machines.

Mist Air EX pedestal fan. 9. the largest consumer durable marketing company. Zipp. On the financial front. This year would witness marginal growth in the top line segment. Table fans range-Mist Air EX. 9. Pedestal Fans range-Mist Air ultra. Mist Air Pedestal remote fan. In an effort to expand its market share in the lower-end. Zipp table fan. besides the company will also launch 10 models in the home appliances segments. The company is preparing a new marketing strategy to enhance the market share in the domestic fan market by creating price points for targeted customers. The company last year had a turnover of Rs. .8 crores. Sonata Decorative. Without compromising on the quality. he added. Usha International is planning to launch low-cost fans christened ‘Zipp’. shortly.8 crores. the company is planning to offer a range of fans to suite to the needs and paying capacity of the customers. Ultimate. the company hopes to achieve a turnover of over Rs 500 crore in the current year as against Rs 400 crore turnovers reported in the last year. The models include: Ceiling fans range-Opera. This year would witness marginal growth in the top line segment.The company last year had a turnover of Rs. Company had launched 19 fan models between April and May 2003. Sea Breeze. 400 crores and a profit of Rs. 400 crores and a profit of Rs. Optima.

6 PRODUCT LINE Ceiling Fans Table Fans Pedestal Fans Wall Fans Exhaust Fans Other Fans .4 PRODUCT LINE OF THE COMPANY There are 6 types of fans marketed by the company: TABLE 2.2.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4. a fundamental issue. This structure involves different agents and distinct organizations that. . Attending their purpose of providing products and services for the use or consumption and satisfying the final market users – no matter if they are consumers or industry buyers – a large amount of the channel structure make use of brokers that execute some kind of role on the products and service distribution. despite the convergence in the objective to offer a certain product.2 NATURE OF THE PROBLEM The efficiency and success of many organizations may be strongly based on the distribution channels.4. Therefore it is obvious to keep the channel members satisfied and motivated to keep the momentum of the business going. may have conflicting interests. dividing these causes based on the demand and supply. It emphasize the importance of channels that link specific activities which are connected to the functions of distribution and final users necessity serving.1 TITLE OF THE STUDY A Study on DEALERS’ SATISFACTION of USHA INTERNATIONAL LTD ERNAKULAM 1. therefore. A marketing channel or distribution channel is a “set of interdependent organizations involved in the process of making a product or service available for use or consumption” and the members of the channel depend on each other to make their job (idem). Any disturbance on this may cause loss on the sales or even losing the channel member. The correct management of these agents is.

this study is to find out the satisfaction level of these dealers of UIL since nearly the 20% of the sales of UIL is from the rural market. the study was pertaining to the satisfaction of the dealers of Usha International Ltd who belongs to the class II and Class III towns.Considering this fact. . In many times the companies fail to give good service to those dealers because of the lack of resources or the reachability etc.

To know how effective are the employees in dealing with the dealers STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM The problem for the study was to estimate the dealers’ satisfaction of Usha International Limited and if not in which areas they are not satisfied with the service of the company. NATURE OF THE STUDY The type of research followed is mainly analytical and to a certain extent descriptive in nature.OBJECTIVES 1. 4. SCOPE OF THE STUDY This study covers respondents form the class II and Class III towns in Ernakulam district who are the dealers of Usha fans. The result of the study can be used as a support data for UIL’s comprehensive marketing programme. To find out how the dealers rate the promotional activities carried down by UIL 3.5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY . To find the dealers’ satisfaction of the Class II & Class III who deals with USHA fans 2. This analysis is used to arrive at new information and facts. To find out whether there is any co relation between the experience and the type of promotion they needed. 4. To know the impact of after sales service provided by UIL and the satisfaction level of the dealers 5. Analytical research is the method used to analyze and draw inference from a set of facts or collected data.

The data was collected from 50 dealers from Ernakulam district. . POPULATION 50 dealers from the universe were selected randomly for the survey. pie charts and statistical tools including percentage & chi-square analysis were used in the process of analysis and interpretations of the collected data. magazines and websites.The research design is the conceptual structure within which research is conducted. A scheduled questionnaire was used to collect primary data on the other hand. it constitutes the blueprint for the collection.604. The reliability test has given an Alpha value of 0. UNIVERSE The dealers of UIL in the entire district concertedly contributed to the universe. Graphical tools including bar diagrams. measurement and analysis of data. The questionnaire has been tested for its validity before the research is been conducted. secondary data was collected using books. The reliability statistics has been given below. SOURCE OF DATA COLLECTION Both primary and secondary data were used for the data collection PRIMARY DATA The primary data was generated through the questionnaire by soliciting the response of the dealers of UIL. SAMPLING Simple random sampling was the method adopted for the selection of sample from the above- mentioned universe.

1. Statistical tables.TOOLS USED FOR THE STUDY Various statistical tools have used for the study. Analysis being carried down by the help of statistical software like SPSS . Charts and Diagrams are used for the presentation of the data. 2.

 The study was confined to the Erankulam district.11 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY  Since the study was within a period of 8 weeks. Thus the accuracy of the survey and its findings depends a lot on the respondents and their responses.4. . time factor was a major constraint.  The study was based on the assumption that the respondents will always be truthful and correct. who are believed to be giving the right information.  The study depends upon responses of the respondents. so the results may not be the same in other parts of Kerala which are having different market conditions. But this assumption might not be true always.  This sample size cannot represent the features and characteristics of the universe to its entirety.

5 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS TABLE 5. of respondents 1 1 – 3 years 2 2 4 – 7 years 8 3 8 – 10 years 15 4 Above 10 years 25 TOTAL 50 FIGURE 5.1 INFERENCE: The experience of the dealers matters a lot in this analysis to find the degree of dealers’ satisfaction. Criteria No. Of about 50 dealers 50% of are having above ten years experience and 30% are in the business of about 8-10 years. The percentage analysis gives the percentage of their experience in their dealership and if it is higher the analysis have the higher value. Since the chart above shows the dealers have . The other 16% have 4-7 years of experience and the rest 4% of the dealers have 1-3 years experience.1 EXPERIENCE IN DEALERSHP Sl No.

2 QUALITY OF USHA FANS Sl No. No one reported on poor quality products from USHA. Most of the dealers said the quality of USHA is unbeatable. TABLE 5. Criteria No.2 INFERENCE: The chart above shows the degree of reliability on the quality of USHA products the dealers have. Around 48% dealers have the opinion that it is very good. considerable experience and their answers are valued much and their statements are very much helpful for the analysis to come effective. 36% of the dealers say the quality is good and only a mere 16% of them have the opinion Satisfactory. From this inference we can analyse the quality USHA offers to their customers. of respondents 1 VERY GOOD 24 2 GOOD 18 3 SATISFACTORY 8 4 POOR 0 TOTAL 50 FIGURE 5. .

TABLE 5. 36% of the dealers are very much satisfied about the credit period offered to them. Most of the dealers are satisfied with the credit period allowed. of respondents % of respondents No. . 44% of the dealers are voted “Good” and 20% of the dealers find no faults and almost satisfied with the credit period allowed. None of the dealer has reported that the credit period allowed is not matching with them. 1 VERY GOOD 18 36 2 GOOD 22 44 3 SATISFACTORY 10 20 4 POOR 0 0 TOTAL 50 100 FIGURE 5.3 INFERENCE: This table shows the degree of dealers’ satisfaction on the credit period allowed by USHA to them.3 CREDIT PERIOD ALLOWED Sl Criteria No.

TABLE 5. the promotion activities carried out by USHA is found to be satisfactory. From the analysis. one of the P’s of marketing is most important for the survival of any business concern.4 INFERENCE: The promotion. . 54% of the dealers are satisfied and the rest 10% of the dealers are reporting “poor”. Criteria No.4 RATING OF PROMOTION ACTIVITIES Sl No. According to them the competitors are giving good promotion for their products compared to Usha. service or production. of respondents 1 VERY GOOD 3 2 GOOD 15 3 SATISFACTORY 27 4 POOR 5 TOTAL 50 FIGURE 5. 6% of dealers found it extremely well and 30% of the dealers have reported as “Good”. be it public or private.

At any time. But when asked to a lot of customers the real fact is revealed. even it is maintained at a low cost.5 OPINION ABOUT PRICING Sl Criteria No. 32% of the dealers are satisfied with the price.TABLE 5. Among the 50 dealers. 20% of them reported that the product is priced the highest. Atom etc. And none of the dealers have reported that the price is lower and no problem to deal with that. To compete with the low cost products available in the market. 1 VERY HIGH 10 20 2 HIGH 24 48 3 AVERAGE 16 32 4 LOW 0 0 TOTAL 50 100 INFERENCE: This table shows the opinion of the dealers and customers about the price of the USHA products. because of the product’s quality. 48% of them are reporting it is higher but not the highest. . the price of a company’s product is always discussed. of respondents % of respondents No. the company has recently launched products like Zipp.

. 24% of the dealers are proud to be the dealers of USHA and 56 % are much satisfied.TABLE 5. of respondents % of respondents No. The friendly relation with the dealers helps much better for an organization to flourish. the replies depicts that they have understood this concept very well. maintaining good relationship with the dealers is essential. 1 HIGHLY SATISFIED 12 24 2 SATISFIED 28 56 3 MODERATE 10 20 4 DISSATISFIED 0 0 TOTAL 50 100 INFERENCE: In the pursuit of marketing. which is also a main factor affecting the dealership and their satisfaction.6 Employees relationship to dealers Sl Criteria No. Here. in the case of USHA. The employees of the firm should maintain a good rapport with the dealers in order to carry on their business in a smooth fashion. This table shows that no dealer has a trouble in dealing with the employees of USHA. 20 % produce average results and none of them have reported a poor relationship with the employees of the company.

the dealers are having problem with the after sales service which is unavoidable. because. Criteria No. hence they do use local mechanics for the sudden repair. From the above figure. no product will be of under-quality and a very few if found to be defective. is very much important for a manufacturing company to bloom. They say that it takes time for the product to get repaired and having comparatively less problems with the replacement.TABLE 5.5 INFERENCE: After sales-service. it is evident that from the after – sales service offered by the company 6 % and 20%. are replaced and repaired sooner. Usha finds a little problem with the dealers. In that matter. On observation. . They are quite satisfied.7 OPINION ABOUT AFTER SALES SERVICE Sl No. But 70 % of the dealers voted that the service is only moderate and 4% of the dealers find some problems in the after sales service. of respondents 1 HIGHLY SATISFIED 3 2 SATISFIED 10 3 MODERATE 35 4 DISSATISFIED 2 TOTAL 50 FIGURE 5. so totally 26 % of the dealers have no problem and they are satisfied well.

USHA already offering discounts and they are satisfied with it.TABLE 5. TABLE 5. Hence the 64 % of the dealers find no problem with the promotional activity and they get what they expect. 18% of the dealers expect offers when they purchase in bulk. It becomes essential for the manufacturing organization to satisfy its dealers by the way to sustain and compete. 1 DISCOUNT 32 64 2 GIFT 4 8 3 PRIZE 5 10 4 OTHER OFFERS 9 18 TOTAL 50 100 FIGURE 5. shown in the table.6 INFERENCE: Some dealers have the suggestions.8 DEALERS’ EXPECTATION ON PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITY Sl Criteria No.9 . and the suggestions about the promotional activities are. of respondents % of respondents No. 8% expect for the gift items and 10% expect prizes to be offered.

Though the dealers prefer margin. About 50% of the dealers are dealing with Usha products because of its Brand name.10 . Criteria No. they believe that it is the Brand name of the company and its products which are the main factors behind their promotion of the brand. TABLE 5. promotional schemes etc apart from the Brand name.7 INFERENCE: While talking with the dealers about the main factors which drive them to deal with USHA. 24 % of the dealers have voted for margin and 10% for the promotional schemes and 6% for the company policies. PROMOTING FACTOR Sl No. it came out that most of the dealers prefer on Brand name to be the first factor. of respondents 1 PROMOTION 5 2 BRAND NAME 25 3 COMPANY POLICY 3 4 MARGIN 12 5 SCHEMES 5 TOTAL 50 FIGURE 5.

Polar and many other local brands. Khaitan. This is because it is very essential for them to satisfy their various kinds of customers who have different brand and product preferences. Bajaj. DEALING WITH COMPETITORS Sl % of Criteria No. Most of them are dealing in products of companies like Crompton Greaves. of respondents No. Many of them are dominated by Crompton Greaves. . respondents 1 YES 50 100 2 NO 0 0 TOTAL 50 100 INFERENCE: Most of the dealers deal with the competitors also. Havell’s.

Here. Because the margin they are getting is less compared with the immediate competitors. They say that it takes time for the product to get repaired.FINDINGS  Usha have got an array of well established dealers. The dealers have a good track record of their business. it is found that there are complaints about the profitability and price of Usha products. This is because it is very essential for them to satisfy the customers who have different brand and product preferences.  Most of the dealers also deal with the competitors. some of the dealers are having problem with the after sales service which is unavoidable. None of the dealers said that the products are of poor quality.  It is found that the price is a little higher for the Usha products but when considering about the quality. The dealers are happy with the involvement of the employees of UIL.  The dealers are satisfied with the quality of the products which are offered by Usha. because of the product’s quality and none of the dealers reported that the price is lower so no problem to deal with that. the feedback depicts that they have understood this concept very well.  The friendly relation helps much better for an organization to flourish.  On observation. in the case of Usha. hence they do use local mechanics for the sudden repair but no problem faced on the replacement front. . the product is worth the price.  From the observation. Most of the dealers are satisfied with the price.

The company gives less credit period to the new dealers. it came out that most of the dealers prefer on Brand name to be the first factor other than the profitability. display aids etc. and most of the well experienced dealers are satisfied with the promotional activities given by the company such as hoardings.  There is a significant relation between the dealers’ experience and their Satisfaction Level on the Promotional Activities. name boards.  While talking with the dealers about the main factors which drive them to deal with USHA. When they prove to be good with their payment pattern. There is a significant relation between the dealers’ experience and their Satisfaction Level on the Credit Period allowed and most of the well experienced dealers are satisfied with the credit period. the company gives extension on the credit period and payment modes. .

The study has been successful in knowing the Dealers’ Satisfaction with Usha International Limited. The study is not entirely devoid of limitations. UIL should enter into all aspects of marketing activities to improve the product life in the future market. it has been demonstrated that manufacturers must give up decisions exclusively oriented to generate immediate benefits. From the survival point of view. . In order to successfully design long term policies aimed to foster manufacturers-dealers relationships. In fact such policies may disclose future company failure.. Future studies could look at different contexts as well as inclusion of other moderators. The company has mostly achieved in satisfying its dealers and as well as its customers. CONCLUSION Competing is the global brand and it is difficult one. It is evident from this study and UIL is advised to maintain its Quality on its products so as to retain this stage forever. The sampling methodology deviates substantially from a pure random sampling based methodology and therefore reduces the generalisability of the study.

especially Havell’s and Crompton Greaves  Most of the dealers are not highly satisfied with the after-sales service given by the company. based on the 4P’s of marketing are: PRODUCT  Usha fans are well known for their durability. but the imported Chinese fans called the Mist Air series are having a shorter life.  Periodic training programs should be conducted for the technicians as the company is extending the product line periodically. . It should be taken care of because it is the vital factor in every business. They should become familiarized with the technical specifications of the products for providing better after sales service.  Trendy designs should be adopted to have an aesthetical appeal which is lacking for Usha fans compared with the competitors’ products. the company can cater to the needs of a wide customer base across Kerala. The major towns like Kottayam. The company should be careful about these series fan. By opening service centers at these places. Alappuzha. Some of the suggestions. otherwise the brand name may be affected. and the effective measures can be taken. More complaints are arising from this imported Mist Air series. For this.  Opening more service centers across Kerala is needed for the better after sales programme. a Gap analysis can be done to find out where the company is lacking in delivering the after sales service activities.SUGGESTIONS The main objective of every analysis is to find the faults and road blocks of a business. and Palakkad are not having a service centre for the company at present.

The company is using road transport for the delivery of goods with the help of different transporting . to minimize the communication gap in the distribution process between the dealers and company people. Either by adding members to this channel or by using the existing Members the rural market can be captured. It is now merely 2%. existing trade discounts should be made in that way which should be motivating those dealers to do the business.  Cash discounts are offered to the dealers who are making advance payments. Zen and Atom etc.PRICE  The company is offering discounts and allowances in the form of trade discounts to the dealers. PLACE  The company should focus more on the rural market as it contributes nearly 20% of the total sales and is an untapped market too. The dealers in the class II and Class III towns may not be able to do that much volume.  The dealers have some complaints about the delivery of goods. Wind.  The company is having a different channel for the low end model like Zen.  It will be better to have a feedback from the dealers at regular intervals. But the existing trade discount packages are benefiting the dealers who are doing big volumes of business. In order to improve the rural sales. It can be beautifully done through the newly introduced low cost products like Zipp. Increasing that level may motivate the dealers for the cash purchase as they are getting this benefit other than the trade discounts.

PROMOTION  The company is now mainly focusing on the Push strategy for promotion. The billboards are to be more attractive. Presently Usha is not having a brand ambassador for the promotion.  The existing trade promotion schemes are not offering much to the small scale dealers. Since the competition is strengthening. So that the deliveries can be made in time.  Admissibility of brand ambassadors plays an important role in the advertising campaign. and repetitive advertising.  Billboards or hoardings can be used as an outdoor promotional method instead of the existing wall paintings. Pull strategy also can be used along with this. Studies revealed that nearly 70% of all buying decisions are made in the store. . Usha can take many short-term actions such as price promotions.  In store advertising can be designed to increase the number of spontaneous buying decision. It should be taken care of while selecting the transporter. companies. displays.  To encourage repeated purchases. coupons.  The immediate competitors are far ahead of Usha in using the Pull strategy. There should be good trade promotion schemes which support the smaller dealers too. Usha should concentrate more on advertising through Visual Media.

specify BRANDS CROMPTON HAVELLS USHA BAJAJ KHAITAN POLAR OTHERS 3. How do you feel about Quality of USHA products? Very Good Good Satisfactory Poor . Are you dealing with other companies? Yes No If Yes. How long you are dealing with USHA products? 1-3 years 4-7 years 8-10 years above 10 years 2.ANNEXURE A Study on DEALERS’ SATISFACTION of USHA INTERNATIONAL LTD ERNAKULAM with special reference to the class II & Class III towns in the Ernakulum district Questionnaire Name: Address: 1.

How do you rate Price of USHA products compared with the following competitors? BRANDS Very High High Average Low CROMPTON HAVELLS USHA BAJAJ KHAITAN POLAR 6. Whether the expected quantity of USHA products is supplied to you in time? . Which factor enables you to be the dealer of USHA products? Promotion Schemes Company Policy Margin Brand Name 5. What do you feel about credit period given by USHA? Very Good Good Satisfactory Poor 7. How do you rate the Promotional Activities given by USHA? Very Good Good Satisfactory Poor 8. What type of promotional activity do you prefer with USHA products? Discount Gift Prize Offers Others (Specify) …………….4. 9..

. What do you feel about the employees dealing with you in USHA? Highly Satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied 11. Yes No 10. Do you have any complaints about USHA products? Yes No If Yes. specify the reason. What are the factors that you expect from USHA? Promotional Sales follow-up Scheme Service Credit Facility Others 12. specify the reason. Delivery of goods Quality of products After sales service Pricing 13. Do you recommend your customers about USHA products? Yes No If No.

.14. Do you have any suggestions to improve the quality of USHA products? Yes No If Yes. What do you feel about after sales service given by USHA? Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderate Dissatisfied 15. specify.

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