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webcast event

Tuesday, November 3o • 2:00 Pm eT
regisTer: www.logisticsmgmt.com/wdcbenchmark2010 Figure 1A: Profile of Today’s Distribution Network
Buildings in distribution network Size of network in square feet

1 building 30% 2M+ 12%
1M to 1.99M 7%
2 buildings 20% 500K to 999K 11%
2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy

Brighter days ahead
250K to 499K 15%
3 building 12% 100K to 249K 21%
50K to 99K 14%
More than 3 buildings 38%
<50K 21%
TYPICAL PROFILE: Distribution network made up of more TYPICAL PROFILE: Total area of network: Less than
than 3 buildings 249,999 square feet

Most common clear height in feet
(for more than 3 buildings in network) Company description

Over 50 feet 10% Manufacturing 40%

40 to 49 feet 11% Distributor 25%

By Maida NapolitaNo, Contributing Editor 30 to 39 feet 31% 3PL 14%

T
20 to 29 feet 39% Retailer 9%
hings are finally looking up. In fact, the results of
Logistics Management’s 5th Annual Warehouse & <20 feet Other
9% 11%
Distribution Center (DC) Operations Survey are
showing clear signs of recovery. Inventory turns have TYPICAL PROFILE: Most common clear height: 20 to 29 feet TYPICAL PROFILE: DC supports a manufacturer
increased after three years of continued decline; Source: Peerless Media Research Group
companies report that more expansions are being
our 5th annual survey planned to distribution operations; and more managers are telling
reveals that inventory us that they’re re-installing incentive plans as company coffers are Figure 1B: Profile of Today’s Distribution Network
starting to slowly, but surely show signs of new life.
turns have increased, more Designed to gauge activities and trends in U.S.-operated ware- Area of service Number of employees
houses and DCs, our annual survey investigates how today’s man-
expansions are on the books, agers are currently running their distribution operation. In Sep-
Global 31% 300 or more 28%

and incentive programs are tember 2010, a survey was sent via email invitation to Logistics Entire U.S. 25% 200 to 299 10%
Management (LM) subscribers. A total of 521 qualified responses Multi-state region 22% 100 to 199 12%
finally being dusted off. it’s were received from CEOs to upper-level logistics and supply chain
managers who are personally involved in decisions regarding their Single metro area 13% 50 to 99 11%
time to dive into the results
company’s warehouse and DC operations. Western hemisphere 4% 25 to 49 15%
to see how your warehouse Most participating companies came from the manufacturing sec-
tor (40 percent), followed by distributors (25 percent), third-party “Half” of the U.S. 3% Less than 25 25%
and dC operations stack providers (14 percent), and retailers (9 percent). A wide assortment TYPICAL PROFILE: Global area of service TYPICAL PROFILE: Total people employed: 300 or more
up to some of the top of products handled in the DC was once again well represented,
with food and grocery leading the pack at 15 percent, followed
organizations in the country. closely by general merchandise at 11 percent, industrial/chemical Number of SKUs Annual inventory turns
at 9 percent, and electronics at 8 percent.
In an economic recovery tempered by a lack of consumer con- > than 75,000 9% 24 or greater 9%
fidence and spending, how have managers responded? Most are 50,000 to 74,000 3% 18.0 to 23.9 2%
sticking with conventional, low-cost, tried-and-true solutions for 20,000 to 49,999 9% 12.0 to 17.9 10%
their distribution problems. To realize transportation savings, many 10,000 to 19,999 9%
9.0 to 11.9 8%
are adding satellite DCs and renegotiating freight rates. And to keep 5,000 to 9,999 13%
7.0 to 8.9 11%
a lid on operational costs, a majority of respondents are improving 2,500 to 4,999 12%
1,000 to 2,499 12% 5.0 to 6.9 19%
warehouse processes, tightening inventory controls, and adopting
500 to 999 8% 3.0 to 4.9 27%
“lean and green” strategies.
100 to 499 12% 1.0 to 2.9 13%
Over the next few pages, we’ll share all of the detailed results on
99 or less 12% Less than 1.0 2%
how warehouse and DC operations have changed over the past year.
TYPICAL PROFILE: Number of SKUs: 5,000 to 9,999 TYPICAL PROFILE: Annual inventory turns: 3 to 4.9
Source: Peerless Media Research Group

42 LogistiCs ManagEM En t WWW.LO G I STI C S M G MT.C O M | november 2010 november 2010 | WWW.LO G I STI C S M G MT.C O M L ogi s t i Cs ManagEMEnt 43

industrial/chemical Number of SKUs Annual inventory turns at 9 percent. > than 75.S. it’s were received from CEOs to upper-level logistics and supply chain managers who are personally involved in decisions regarding their Single metro area 13% 50 to 99 11% time to dive into the results company’s warehouse and DC operations.0 to 23. turns have increased. TYPICAL PROFILE: Number of SKUs: 5. many 10.S. how have managers responded? Most are 50.000 to 9. Western hemisphere 4% 25 to 49 15% to see how your warehouse Most participating companies came from the manufacturing sec- tor (40 percent). 100 to 499 12% 1. A total of 521 qualified responses Multi-state region 22% 100 to 199 12% finally being dusted off.9 Source: Peerless Media Research Group 42 LogistiCs ManagEM En t WWW.999 TYPICAL PROFILE: Annual inventory turns: 3 to 4. and adopting 500 to 999 8% 3. and electronics at 8 percent. closely by general merchandise at 11 percent.9 10% their distribution problems. Contributing Editor 30 to 39 feet 31% 3PL 14% T 20 to 29 feet 39% Retailer 9% hings are finally looking up.000 to 9.9 13% Over the next few pages. third-party “Half” of the U. To realize transportation savings. a survey was sent via email invitation to Logistics Entire U. tried-and-true solutions for 20. In fact. we’ll share all of the detailed results on 99 or less 12% Less than 1. more Designed to gauge activities and trends in U.0 to 4.0 to 8. low-cost. and more managers are telling reveals that inventory us that they’re re-installing incentive plans as company coffers are Figure 1B: Profile of Today’s Distribution Network starting to slowly.9 19% warehouse processes.99M 7% 2 buildings 20% 500K to 999K 11% 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy Brighter days ahead 250K to 499K 15% 3 building 12% 100K to 249K 21% 50K to 99K 14% More than 3 buildings 38% <50K 21% TYPICAL PROFILE: Distribution network made up of more TYPICAL PROFILE: Total area of network: Less than than 3 buildings 249.999 13% 7. November 3o • 2:00 Pm eT regisTer: www.S. but surely show signs of new life. with food and grocery leading the pack at 15 percent.C O M | november 2010 november 2010 | WWW.0 2% how warehouse and DC operations have changed over the past year.0 to 6.0 to 17.000 to 74.499 12% 5.0 to 11. In Sep- Global 31% 300 or more 28% and incentive programs are tember 2010. 3% Less than 25 25% and dC operations stack providers (14 percent). our annual survey investigates how today’s man- expansions are on the books.9 8% are adding satellite DCs and renegotiating freight rates.000 3% 18. And to keep 5. Inventory turns have TYPICAL PROFILE: Most common clear height: 20 to 29 feet TYPICAL PROFILE: DC supports a manufacturer increased after three years of continued decline.000 9% 24 or greater 9% fidence and spending. 25% 200 to 299 10% Management (LM) subscribers.LO G I STI C S M G MT. and retailers (9 percent). webcast event Tuesday.999 9% 12. tightening inventory controls.C O M L ogi s t i Cs ManagEMEnt 43 .logisticsmgmt. Source: Peerless Media Research Group companies report that more expansions are being our 5th annual survey planned to distribution operations.000 to 49.999 12% 1. followed by distributors (25 percent).9 11% a lid on operational costs. A wide assortment TYPICAL PROFILE: Global area of service TYPICAL PROFILE: Total people employed: 300 or more up to some of the top of products handled in the DC was once again well represented.500 to 4.999 square feet Most common clear height in feet (for more than 3 buildings in network) Company description Over 50 feet 10% Manufacturing 40% 40 to 49 feet 11% Distributor 25% By Maida NapolitaNo.000 to 19.com/wdcbenchmark2010 Figure 1A: Profile of Today’s Distribution Network Buildings in distribution network Size of network in square feet 1 building 30% 2M+ 12% 1M to 1.9 27% “lean and green” strategies.-operated ware.999 9% 9.0 to 2. In an economic recovery tempered by a lack of consumer con. Area of service Number of employees houses and DCs. the results of Logistics Management’s 5th Annual Warehouse & <20 feet Other 9% 11% Distribution Center (DC) Operations Survey are showing clear signs of recovery. followed organizations in the country.000 to 2.9 2% sticking with conventional. agers are currently running their distribution operation. a majority of respondents are improving 2.LO G I STI C S M G MT.

the elimination of waste in the supply you can save seconds here and there.” says implementing any sort of changes such One of the clearest trends that Saenz. it’s quickly making its way into 2008 2009 2010 warehousing and distribution opera- Source: Peerless Media Research Group tions. “The cheapest thing to fix in be doing regularly—especially when Clear treNds your warehouse is your processes. Sorensen agrees and suggests you as opening satellite facilities or reduc- we’ve seen unfold over the past several start by looking at those steps that hap. Within the four walls. 32% as WMS management system age. ing warehouse processes” (Figure 4. and perhaps relieve storage issues 30% 30% 30% 28% in their main DCs. 33% 30% tribution point to multiple points closer to your customer base. see how your warehouse and DC opera. seasonal stor. of respondents say they are “improv. senior consultant for Tran- Systems. page 46). there’s plenty of avail- able. building networks On the flip side. one-facility net. other companies are consolidating and closing facilities Source: Peerless Media Research Group to reduce operating costs. Departure from one. About 1-out-of-5 distribution Increasing centers are still not using tage of this availability to add satellite use of ERP any form of warehouse facilities for temporary. but it also helps to cut down on transportation dollars. “While there are companies 2007 2008 2009 2010 looking to add DCs.” He adds systems in use that many companies are taking advan. 0 dent with TranSystems. Seventy-two percent over 60 percent of respondents have tions stack up to some of the top organi. and as a result. costs manageable. a hundred times a day.” says Derek Sorensen. building networks works are decreasing—from 39 percent 40% 39% 38% in 2007 to 30 percent in 2010. Full-featured Basic WMS ERP used as Labor planning None or lean has had considerable and proven WMS functions WMS functionality minimal success in manufacturing. Why does “lean” 5% 4% 5% remain so popular? According to Saenz. The number of Figure 2: Increase in multi-building networks networks with more than three DCs from 2007 to 2010 increased from 33 percent in 2007 to Trend towards multi- 38 percent in 2010. ing truckloads (Figure 5. It’s time to dive into the results to how they’ve been keeping operational To reduce transportation costs. 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy And with yet another year of results in can bring high-value savings through pen every day.” tified. a supply chain consulting firm 20% and LM’s partner for this survey. “There’s a trend to move away from a single dis. “If our database. “Not only does this move help achieve higher customer service levels in a competitive market. but also points three buildings to another phenomenon that’s enabling this trend. agrees with One building Two buildings Three buildings More than Sorensen’s assessment. inexpensive warehouse space in Figure 3: Warehouse management the real estate market today. that translates into real dollars without over the past five years can now be iden. definitive trends in ware. It’s also a low-cost approach that 44 LogistiCs ManagEM En t WWW. housing and supply chain management chain.” Norm Saenz.” says Saenz. “In years is an increase in the number of DCs that make up today’s distribution networks (Figure 2). Sorensen believes companies should page 46).C O M | november 2010 . we asked making a million dollar investment. “And as a result.LO G I STI C S M G MT. 25% Another clear trend has been the 21% 21% 18% 19% continued “leaning” of the supply chain 16% 17% as more respondents implemented this strategy—from 39 percent in 2009 to 44 percent in 2010. an assistant vice presi. re-negotiated freight rates—a task zations in the country.

In addition. Voice assisted with no scanning Senior Consultant.” gotten better at modifying their buying inventory practices to better match the 2007 9.315 marked increase in the deferred cus. up from percent in 2009 to 37 percent in 2010. “It’s marketing looking for “By deferring customization. “But the more shocking sta- 20% says Saenz.” their order accuracies and are cutting Using more rail including the magic bullet trying to figure out letting your customer specify exactly 16% piggyback/ TOFC/ COFC the next best thing. what they want. landscape of the new demand that’s out 2008 8. low-cost ronmental initiative (Figure 6). Saenz believes this tomization of products from 3 percent maintain the workforce they currently haps people are getting comfortable 17% often. Typical building size remains in Source: Peerless Media Research Group light-directed picking with no scan veri- the range between 100.000 to 249. even more conventional. “People want to moving together.” 37% says Saenz. and kitting incentive programs are how manag. Sorensen believes “Individually.0 14.” Using 3PL warehouses 13% and there. 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy such a dynamic business.” Grocery.000 SKUs.C O M L ogi s t i Cs ManagEMEnt 47 . paper-based. While Lighting fixtures and/or controls 66% jump picking. voice.C O M | november 2010 november 2010 | WWW. While trends Annual outbound ports dollars without increased demand from a recovering inventory Light assisted with no scanning 5% 6% Collaborate with companies closer to customer 9% making a million economy is partly the cause. 12% picking nature. have increased. trying to get sales up. there’s a considerable increase Fans to circulate cool or warm air 48% management system (WMS) of any 44% Improving information technology 36% in facilities that have implemented kind (Figure 3. tional packing (33 percent). that This year. in 2009 to 13 percent in 2010. “rather Figure 8: Picking technologies In use More local/regional sources 15% “if you can save petitive. trying to be com. can benefit greatly from Solar panels 3% voice technology as it keeps workers Figure 5: Actions taken to lower the 2010 dC Network 7% hands free as they assemble cases on a transportation costs While the number of buildings may LEED certification for new buildings 4% pallet for an order. but the over.” says Saenz.800 3% there.” he Despite a plethora of new tech- says. 2009 8. page 44). and 43). with managers keep.4 15. but Re-routing trucks/Using TMS 24% all mean of total SKUs continues to for production (29 percent). 60 percent last year). There’s a ers squeeze the last bit of juice from there’s something with those three increase—14.599 5% Other 5% TranSystems the Nature of operatioNs 2010 8. you’re come with that educated work force. page (Figure 8).” Benefiting the environment 15% voice is so low when manufacturing Other 3% Water run-off controls might be great. promo. but Saenz believes it is 12% and grocery is our highest percentage of Source: Peerless Media Research Group cost and utility savings that are driving 12% respondents.8 12. “but combined with motion 14% tistic to me is the fact that paper-based Using 3PL sensors they turn off when they’re not Metal and/or plastic pallets is still so high…and I’m wondering why 15% 15% needed.500 RF assisted with no scanning 4% 8% 5% closer to customer — Derek Sorensen. paper-based 53% Biggest Changing rack/layout configuration 43% Easy. At least one green initiative (NET) 90% nology. other properties of the 5% 2009 Sorensen points out another inter- distribution network have stayed essen.” he says. Packaging and/or packing materials 42% “Obviously. have because of the efficiencies that with their quality control initiatives and not logistics. warehouses still have no warehouse Reducing staff 36% operating costs tives list.” in automation because of the economy. can draw a definitive conclusion. in larger quantities SKU proliferation is a marketing push.” Paper-based 60% seconds here warehouse managers who want more 43% 64% items.600 in 2009 to 15. inventory turns are finally Figure 7: Distribution RF assisted with scan verification 37% translates into real on the upswing. Figure 6: Environmental initiatives implemented teChNology doldruMs Taken any action (NET) 97% date with your carriers as possible. occurrence. “Per- Request customer to order less in 2010 (Figure 7). Eighty-three percent of The tide has also turned with the giv. Radio frequency. 44% “lighting fixtures and/or controls (53 per. center size and scope Light assisted with scan verification 15% 18% Change inbound/ 9% ing less on hand (Figure 7). Sorensen agrees: “I doubt there are than building up inventory of items you hope they’re going to buy.315 Other 1% 2% The use of the DC for value-added Source: Peerless Media Research Group Source: Peerless Media Research Group Source: Peerless Media Research Group services continues to be a common 46 LogistiCs ManagEM En t WWW.999 fication have all grown slightly in the Re-negotiating freight rates 66% square feet with clear heights of 20 to past year while RF-assisted picking with 29 feet. I don’t know if we than 5.” Reusable shipping containers 37% Re-negotiating leases “These lights not only use less energy. with its full case Upgraded insulation the adoption of these initiatives. people are investing less Consolidating/closing warehouses 29% cent in 2009 to 66 percent in 2010). single-order choice with 92 percent of respondents Recycling 75% pick operation. 19 percent of methods to lower recycling remains at the top of the initia. Other 2% 2010 esting trend on picking technologies 2% Taken any action (NET) 89% tially the same (Figure 1A and 1B. more SKUs in their DCs.7 14. you would Figure 4: Actions taken to lower operating costs want to stay as current and as up-to. Sorensen also speculates that managers may have turns (mean) # of SKUs (mean) Voice assisted with scan verification 4% 5% 2009 2010 Adding internal with houses dollar investment. scanning has taken a tumble from 43 Shifting the mix of 28% Fifty-six percent of respondents respondents report doing some kind of ing of incentives (63 percent.LO G I STI C S M G MT.” says Sorensen. today’s DC remains a con- 92% Improving warehouse processes 72% “Green” initiatives remain a popular ventional.LO G I STI C S M G MT. This year there’s Improving inventory control 65% 72% having implemented some kind of envi. common/contract carriers report that they’re handling less special labeling (54 percent). a smaller workforce.

” he Despite a plethora of new tech- says.315 marked increase in the deferred cus. low-cost ronmental initiative (Figure 6). in 2009 to 13 percent in 2010. and kitting incentive programs are how manag. Voice assisted with no scanning Senior Consultant. but Saenz believes it is 12% and grocery is our highest percentage of Source: Peerless Media Research Group cost and utility savings that are driving 12% respondents.500 RF assisted with no scanning 4% 8% 5% closer to customer — Derek Sorensen. While trends Annual outbound ports dollars without increased demand from a recovering inventory Light assisted with no scanning 5% 6% Collaborate with companies closer to customer 9% making a million economy is partly the cause. with its full case Upgraded insulation the adoption of these initiatives.315 Other 1% 2% The use of the DC for value-added Source: Peerless Media Research Group Source: Peerless Media Research Group Source: Peerless Media Research Group services continues to be a common 46 LogistiCs ManagEM En t WWW. paper-based 53% Biggest Changing rack/layout configuration 43% Easy.” their order accuracies and are cutting Using more rail including the magic bullet trying to figure out letting your customer specify exactly 16% piggyback/ TOFC/ COFC the next best thing. today’s DC remains a con- 92% Improving warehouse processes 72% “Green” initiatives remain a popular ventional. I don’t know if we than 5. Sorensen also speculates that managers may have turns (mean) # of SKUs (mean) Voice assisted with scan verification 4% 5% 2009 2010 Adding internal with houses dollar investment. a smaller workforce. have increased. While Lighting fixtures and/or controls 66% jump picking. Sorensen agrees: “I doubt there are than building up inventory of items you hope they’re going to buy. Typical building size remains in Source: Peerless Media Research Group light-directed picking with no scan veri- the range between 100.” Using 3PL warehouses 13% and there. and 43).” says Saenz.0 14. promo. “But the more shocking sta- 20% says Saenz. “Per- Request customer to order less in 2010 (Figure 7). “It’s marketing looking for “By deferring customization.8 12. Radio frequency. Other 2% 2010 esting trend on picking technologies 2% Taken any action (NET) 89% tially the same (Figure 1A and 1B.7 14. Sorensen believes “Individually. “rather Figure 8: Picking technologies In use More local/regional sources 15% “if you can save petitive. people are investing less Consolidating/closing warehouses 29% cent in 2009 to 66 percent in 2010).LO G I STI C S M G MT. more SKUs in their DCs. you’re come with that educated work force.” in automation because of the economy.C O M | november 2010 november 2010 | WWW. paper-based. occurrence. landscape of the new demand that’s out 2008 8. there’s a considerable increase Fans to circulate cool or warm air 48% management system (WMS) of any 44% Improving information technology 36% in facilities that have implemented kind (Figure 3. Saenz believes this tomization of products from 3 percent maintain the workforce they currently haps people are getting comfortable 17% often. page 44). 2009 8. what they want.000 to 249.” Reusable shipping containers 37% Re-negotiating leases “These lights not only use less energy. 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy such a dynamic business. up from percent in 2009 to 37 percent in 2010.999 fication have all grown slightly in the Re-negotiating freight rates 66% square feet with clear heights of 20 to past year while RF-assisted picking with 29 feet. but the over.” he says. can benefit greatly from Solar panels 3% voice technology as it keeps workers Figure 5: Actions taken to lower the 2010 dC Network 7% hands free as they assemble cases on a transportation costs While the number of buildings may LEED certification for new buildings 4% pallet for an order. 60 percent last year).C O M L ogi s t i Cs ManagEMEnt 47 .” Grocery. single-order choice with 92 percent of respondents Recycling 75% pick operation. 44% “lighting fixtures and/or controls (53 per. inventory turns are finally Figure 7: Distribution RF assisted with scan verification 37% translates into real on the upswing. At least one green initiative (NET) 90% nology. even more conventional.4 15. scanning has taken a tumble from 43 Shifting the mix of 28% Fifty-six percent of respondents respondents report doing some kind of ing of incentives (63 percent. warehouses still have no warehouse Reducing staff 36% operating costs tives list.800 3% there. 12% picking nature. that This year.” gotten better at modifying their buying inventory practices to better match the 2007 9. but Re-routing trucks/Using TMS 24% all mean of total SKUs continues to for production (29 percent). can draw a definitive conclusion.600 in 2009 to 15. 19 percent of methods to lower recycling remains at the top of the initia. voice.” says Sorensen. “People want to moving together. “but combined with motion 14% tistic to me is the fact that paper-based Using 3PL sensors they turn off when they’re not Metal and/or plastic pallets is still so high…and I’m wondering why 15% 15% needed. other properties of the 5% 2009 Sorensen points out another inter- distribution network have stayed essen. trying to be com.” Benefiting the environment 15% voice is so low when manufacturing Other 3% Water run-off controls might be great. Figure 6: Environmental initiatives implemented teChNology doldruMs Taken any action (NET) 97% date with your carriers as possible. center size and scope Light assisted with scan verification 15% 18% Change inbound/ 9% ing less on hand (Figure 7). page (Figure 8). in larger quantities SKU proliferation is a marketing push. Eighty-three percent of The tide has also turned with the giv.” Paper-based 60% seconds here warehouse managers who want more 43% 64% items.LO G I STI C S M G MT. In addition. you would Figure 4: Actions taken to lower operating costs want to stay as current and as up-to. This year there’s Improving inventory control 65% 72% having implemented some kind of envi. trying to get sales up. There’s a ers squeeze the last bit of juice from there’s something with those three increase—14. have because of the efficiencies that with their quality control initiatives and not logistics. common/contract carriers report that they’re handling less special labeling (54 percent).599 5% Other 5% TranSystems the Nature of operatioNs 2010 8. Packaging and/or packing materials 42% “Obviously. tional packing (33 percent). with managers keep.” 37% says Saenz.000 SKUs.

“A lot reasons for this trend.” he There is no clearer sign for economic ity out of their workers by eliminating says.” the best-of-breed WMS are still much of respondents report that they are planning From a WMS standpoint. No 61% HOW? Newcastle Systems' mobile cart is integrated with its own long-life battery Yes power supply. More gration and the apparent cost control of up from 33 percent last year. Saenz sees this first hand.thereby IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY Planned areas of expansion Number of SKUs 54% Keep powered equipment within arms reach Overall square footage 53% ANYWHERE throughout your facility Number of buildings 48% Proven Applications Include: Number of employees 47%  Mobile On-Demand Label Printing Area of service 38% cart Typically  Warehouse Inventory & Cycle Counting Annual inventory turns 28% pays for itself  Shipping/Receiving & Cross Docking Height of buildings in < 4 months! 11% Other 8% READY TO SAVE? Visit www. “I’m not surprised at all…not that recovery than the increased plans for the need to scan—having them do one I agree that it’s the right route. on expanding in the next 12 months—that’s interesting trend is emerging.com Source: Peerless Media Research Group or call 781. I believe expansion (Figure 9).935. another better. “Additional Printer / PC Cart building space may be needed to deal with the purchasing department’s move to buy large quantities at a discounted SIGNIFICANT rate or with corporate management who’s in the middle of an acquisition and needing space for additional SKUs.” up 48 percent from 41 percent in 2009. 39%* Eliminate walking back & forth to fixed *Up from 33% in 2009 printers and other hardware . it’s best to look at the big picture and be set up as best as you can = LABOR to weather the storm. increasing number of SKUs (54 per- cent) and the overall square footage (53 percent). Either way. 2010 Warehouse/DC BenChmark stuDy out some of these double checks as a of companies are taking their entire ERP lookiNg ahead cost initiative to get more productiv. system and using it for everything.” M Maida Napolitano is a Contributing Editor to Logistics Management SAVINGS Figure 9: Likelihood of expansion in the next 12 months Planning to expand over next 12 months THAT'S RIGHT. A mobile powered cart by Newcastle Systems equals significant labor savings in your warehouse or DC.newcastlesys.” says Sorensen. Thirty-nine percent less step.” He speculates that ease of inte. the biggest percentage jump from last year is the “number of build- ings. companies are using their ERP as a having just one package are the top two Although most are expanding by WMS.3450 . “All these things are often inter- A Mobile Powered related.