Management Software

®

AT-S39

N
User’s Guide
FOR AT-8024 AND AT-8024GB FAST ETHERNET SWITCHES VERSION 1.3

PN 613-50245-00 Rev C

Copyright  2002 Allied Telesyn, Inc. 960 Stewart Drive Suite B, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 USA All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from Allied Telesyn, Inc. Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation, Netscape Navigator is a registered trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation. All other product names, company names, logos or other designations mentioned herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. Allied Telesyn, Inc. reserves the right to make changes in specifications and other information contained in this document without prior written notice. The information provided herein is subject to change without notice. In no event shall Allied Telesyn, Inc. be liable for any incidental, special, indirect, or consequential damages whatsoever, including but not limited to lost profits, arising out of or related to this manual or the information contained herein, even if Allied Telesyn, Inc. has been advised of, known, or should have known, the possibility of such damages.

Table of Contents

List of Figures ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 Preface ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................10 How This Guide is Organized ...........................................................................................................................................................................10 Document Conventions ....................................................................................................................................................................................11 Where to Find Web-based Guides .................................................................................................................................................................12 Contacting Allied Telesyn .................................................................................................................................................................................13 Sales or Corporate Information ..............................................................................................................................................................13 Management Software Updates ....................................................................................................................................................................14

Section I Overview

......................................................................................................................................................... 15

Chapter 1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................................16 Local Management Session ..............................................................................................................................................................................18 Telnet Management Session ............................................................................................................................................................................19 Web Browser Management Session ..............................................................................................................................................................20 SNMP Management Session ............................................................................................................................................................................21

Section II Local and Telnet Management ................................................................................................. 22
Chapter 2 Starting a Local or Telnet Management Session ................................................................................................................................23 Local Management Session ..............................................................................................................................................................................24 Starting a Local Management Session................................................................................................................................................. 25 Enhanced Stacking ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Quitting from a Local Session ................................................................................................................................................................. 28 Telnet Management Session ............................................................................................................................................................................29 Starting a Telnet Management Session .............................................................................................................................................. 29 Quitting from a Telnet Management Session................................................................................................................................... 30

3

Table of Contents

Chapter 3 Basic Switch Parameters ................................................................................................................................................................................ 31 When Does an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch Need an IP Address? ................................................................................................ 32 AT-8024 Switch............................................................................................................................................................................................ 32 AT-8024GB Switch ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 32 How Do You Assign an IP Address?...................................................................................................................................................... 33 Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name ........................................................................................................................................... 34 Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services ................................................................................................................................................. 37 Configuring SNMP Community Strings and Trap IP Addresses ......................................................................................................... 39 Activating the AT-S39 Software Default Values ....................................................................................................................................... 41 Resetting a Switch ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 Configuring the AT-S39 Software Security Features .............................................................................................................................. 43 Viewing the AT-S39 Version Number and Switch MAC Address ........................................................................................................ 45 Chapter 4 Enhanced Stacking ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 46 Enhanced Stacking Overview ......................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Guidelines...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Example.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Setting a Switch’s Enhanced Stacking Status ............................................................................................................................................ 50 Selecting a Switch in an Enhanced Stack ................................................................................................................................................... 52 Returning to the Master Switch............................................................................................................................................................. 53 Chapter 5 Port Parameters ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 54 Displaying Port Status ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 55 Configuring Port Parameters .......................................................................................................................................................................... 58 Displaying GBIC Information ........................................................................................................................................................................... 62 Chapter 6 Port Security ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 64 Port Security Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 65 Configuring Port Security ................................................................................................................................................................................. 67 Configuring the Limited Security Mode ...................................................................................................................................................... 69 Chapter 7 Port Trunking ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 72 Port Trunking Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................... 73 Creating a Port Trunk ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 75 Deleting a Port Trunk ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 77 Chapter 8 Port Mirroring ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 78 Port Mirroring Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................... 79 Creating a Port Mirror ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 80 Deleting a Port Mirror ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 82 Chapter 9 Spanning Tree Protocol ................................................................................................................................................................................. 83 STP Overview ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 84 Selecting a Root Bridge ............................................................................................................................................................................ 84 Finding and Resolving Redundant Paths........................................................................................................................................... 85 Handling Topology Changes.................................................................................................................................................................. 86 Communicating Between Bridges........................................................................................................................................................ 86 Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings ............................................................................................................................................................. 87 Configuring STP Port Settings ........................................................................................................................................................................ 89

4

...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Displaying Port Statistics ........................................................................................................................................................... 99 Tagged VLAN Overview ..................................................................................................... 137 Changing the Aging Time .................................................................................................................................................. 136 Deleting Static MAC Addresses .......................................................................................................................................................................... 132 Identifying a Port Number by MAC Address ..... 143 Activating IGMP Snooping ................. 153 Configuring the Maximum Broadcast Frame Count ........................ 124 Chapter 11 MAC Address Table ................................................. 142 IGMP Snooping Overview ................................................................. 103 Tagged VLAN Example ............................................................................. 118 Changing a PVID Value ................................................................................................................................... 140 Configuring CoS .................................................................... 151 Configuring the Interval Timer ........................................................................................................................................................................... 104 Basic VLAN Mode Overview ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 96 Drawbacks to Port-based VLANs .............................................................................................................................. 121 Enabling or Disabling All VLANs ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 126 MAC Address Overview ....................................... 113 Displaying VLAN Information ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 127 Displaying MAC Addresses ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 138 Chapter 12 Class of Service ..................................................... 149 Chapter 14 Broadcast Frame Control .............................................................................................. 135 Adding Static MAC Addresses ...............................................................................................................94 General Rules to Creating a Port-based VLAN . 101 General Rules to Creating a Tagged VLAN......................................................................................................................................................... 112 Modifying a VLAN .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 122 Enabling or Disabling Ingress Filtering ....................... 150 Broadcast Frame Control Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 141 Chapter 13 IGMP Snooping ...........................................................................................................Chapter 10 Virtual LANs ................... 107 Example of Creating a Port-based VLAN ........................................................................................................................... 116 Deleting All VLANs ....................................................................................91 VLAN Overview .................................................92 Port-based VLAN Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................... 106 Creating a Port-based or Tagged VLAN .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 157 Displaying Switch Statistics ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 155 Chapter 15 Ethernet Statistics ................................................................................................................ 148 Displaying a List of Multicast Routers .................................................................................................... 98 Port-based Example 2.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 97 Port-based Example 1..................... 160 5 ..... 134 Deleting All Dynamic MAC Addresses ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 145 Displaying a List of Host Nodes ... 139 Class of Service Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 111 Example of Creating a Tagged VLAN .............................................................................................................. 129 Viewing MAC Addresses by Port ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 115 Deleting a VLAN ................................................................................................................................. 119 Setting a Switch’s VLAN Mode ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 133 Viewing the MAC Addresses of a VLAN ......................................................................................................................

................................................175 Viewing System Information ..................193 Chapter 21 Port Trunks ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................210 Displaying VLANs .......................................................................................................213 6 .............................................................................................................................................................198 Chapter 23 Spanning Tree Protocol ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................163 Downloading New Management Software from a Local Management Session .....................................................................................................................................................................................171 Browser Tools.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................179 Configuring the SNMP Parameters and Trap IP Addresses .........................................................................................................................................................167 Example.................................................................................................187 Chapter 20 Port Security ..................................................................................................................200 Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings ..........168 Example....................................................................................................................192 Displaying the Port Security Level .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 167 Uploading a Configuration File ............................................................................................................. 173 Chapter 18 Basic Switch Parameters ..............170 Starting a Web Browser Management Session .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Table of Contents Chapter 16 Management Software Updates ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................201 Displaying a Bridge’s STP Settings ................. 169 Chapter 17 Starting a Web Browser Management Session ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 168 Section III Web Browser Management ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................203 Chapter 24 Virtual LANs ......183 Configuring Port Parameters ..............................................................................................................................................................................................174 Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................197 Creating or Deleting a Port Mirror .........................................................................................................164 Downloading a New Management Software Image Using TFTP .........................................................................................................................................................211 Setting the Switch’s VLAN Mode ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................162 Obtaining Software Updates ........................................................................................................................................................................................................209 Deleting a VLAN ...............204 Creating a VLAN ..............184 Displaying Port Status and Statistics ............... 172 Quitting from a Web Browser Management Session ......................................................................................181 Chapter 19 Port Parameters ...............194 Creating or Deleting a Port Trunk .....................................195 Chapter 22 Port Mirroring ...........................................212 Changing a PVID ..........................................................................205 Modifying a VLAN ..................

................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 216 Chapter 26 Class of Service ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 228 Index ........................................................................................................................... 230 7 .................................... 225 Configuring the Interval Timer ............ 220 Chapter 27 IGMP Snooping .................................................................................. 219 Configuring CoS .................................................................................................. 227 Appendix A AT-S39 Default Settings .................................................. 226 Setting the Maximum Number of Broadcast Frames .............................................................. 222 Chapter 28 Broadcast Frame Control ......................................................................... 221 Configuring IGMP Snooping ................Chapter 25 MAC Address Table ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 215 Viewing the MAC Address Table ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

99 Figure 28: Example of a Tagged VLAN ................................................. 40 Figure 7: Diagnostics Window ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 62 Figure 15: GBIC Information Window ................. 80 Figure 24: Spanning Tree Menu .................................. 38 Figure 5: Advanced Configuration Window ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 104 Figure 29: VLAN Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 67 Figure 17: Limited Security Mode Menu .............................................................................................. 74 Figure 20: Port Trunk Example 2 ................................................................................................................................................ 113 Figure 33: Show All VLANs Window ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 58 Figure 14: GBIC Information Window .......Example 1 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 107 Figure 30: Virtual LAN Definitions Menu .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 63 Figure 16: Port Security Menu ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Figure 4: System Configuration Menu .......................................................................................................................... 122 8 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 69 Figure 18: Set MAC Limit Menu ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 70 Figure 19: Port Trunk Example 1 .....................................................................................................................List of Figures Figure 1: Connecting a Terminal or PC to the RS232 Terminal Port ......................................................................................... 49 Figure 9: Enhanced Stacking Window ............................................. 75 Figure 22: Port Trunk Status Window ............................................................................................................................................ 120 Figure 37: Virtual LAN Support Menu ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 116 Figure 35: Port VLANs and Priorities Window ............................ 87 Figure 25: Config STP Port Settings Window ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Figure 3: Administration Menu ..................................... 39 Figure 6: SNMP Configuration Window ........................................................................................................ 45 Figure 8: Enhanced Stacking Example ........................................................................... 56 Figure 13: Port Configuration Window ..................................................... 98 Figure 27: Port-based VLAN .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 115 Figure 34: Delete a VLAN Menu ............................................................................... 74 Figure 21: Port Trunking Menu .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Example 2 ....................................................... 52 Figure 11: Port Menu ............................................................................................. 89 Figure 26: Port-based VLAN ....................................... 76 Figure 23: Port Trunking Menu ................................................................... 119 Figure 36: Port VLANs and Priorities Window ............................................................................................................................................. 108 Figure 32: Modifying a VLAN Menu ....................................................................................................................... 50 Figure 10: Enhanced Stacking Window ............ 55 Figure 12: Port Status Window ....................................... 25 Figure 2: Main Menu .............................................................. 107 Figure 31: Create a VLAN Window ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 58: Port Monitoring Page .................................................. Figure 51: Entering a Switch’s IP Address in the URL Field ....................... Figure 62: Port Trunking Window ......................................................................... Figure 71: IGMP Tab ...................................................... Figure 57: Settings for Port Window ..... Figure 53: General Tab ................................................................... Figure 67: Add VLAN Window .................. Figure 45: Broadcast Storm Control Window ...................... Figure 70: Forwarding Database Tab ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Figure 61: Port Security Menu ..........Configuration .............................................................. Figure 42: IGMP Snooping Configuration Window ....................................................................................................................... Figure 48: Display Port Statistics Window ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 68: VLAN Window .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Figure 50: Xmodem Downloads & Uploads Menu ............................................ Figure 65: Spanning Tree Window .............................................................................Monitoring ............................................................................................................................................ Figure 43: View Multicast Hosts List Window .................. Figure 55: SNMP Tab ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 122 125 129 130 145 148 149 153 157 157 158 160 165 171 172 176 179 181 184 185 187 188 190 193 195 198 201 203 205 206 211 213 216 222 9 ...................................................................... Figure 47: Port Statistics Menu .. Figure 59: Port Status Window ....................................................................................................................................... Figure 44: View Multicast Routers List Window ................................ Figure 39: Ingress Filtering Window ....................................................................................................................... Figure 56: Port Setting Configuration Tab ............................................................ Figure 60: Port Statistics Window ......................................................................................................................................................... Figure 49: Display Module Statistics Window ...................................................... Figure 64: Spanning Tree Window ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Figure 38: VLAN Support Window .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Figure 63: Port Mirroring Window ................................................ Figure 66: VLAN Window ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Figure 52: Home Page ........................................................ Figure 40: MAC Address Table Menu ............................................. Figure 46: Ethernet Statistics Menu ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Figure 41: Show All MAC Addresses Window ..... Figure 54: General Tab Window ................................................... Figure 69: CoS Setting Window ............................................................................................................................................................................

Preface

This guide contains instructions on how configure the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches using the AT-S39 management software.

How This Guide is Organized
This manual is divided into three sections. Section I: Overview This section has just one chapter. It reviews the different ways that you can access the AT-S39 management software on a switch. Section II: Local and Telnet Management The chapters in this section explain how to manage a switch from a local management session or a Telnet management session. A local management session is established by connecting a terminal or PC to the RS-232 Terminal Port on the front panel of the switch. A Telnet management session is established using the Telnet application protocol. This type of management session can be performed from any workstation on your network that has the application protocol. Section III: Web Browser Management The chapters in this section explain how to manage a switch using a web browser, such as Microsoft® Internet Explorer or Netscape® Navigator, from a workstation on your network.

10

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Document Conventions
This document uses the following conventions: Note Notes provide additional information. Warning Warnings inform you that performing or omitting a specific action may result in bodily injury. Caution Cautions inform you that performing or omitting a specific action may result in equipment damage or loss of data.

11

Preface

Where to Find Web-based Guides
The Allied Telesyn web site at www.alliedtelesyn.com contains PDF files of the installation and user guides for all Allied Telesyn products. The documents can be viewed on-line or downloaded onto a local workstation or server.

12

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Contacting Allied Telesyn
To contact Technical Support by phone, find your country or region in the table below. United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, South America, Puerto Rico Tel: 1 800 428 4835 (option 4) United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland (+44) 1-235-442560 Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Korea, Philippines, China, India, Hong Kong Tel: (++65) 3815-612 Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Israel Tel: (+39) 02-41-30-41 Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Eastern Europe Tel: (+49) 30-435-900-126 France, Belgium, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Middle East, Africa (+33) 1-60-92-15-25 Australia Tel: 1 800 000 880

Japan Tel: (+81) 3-3443-5640

You can also contact Technical Support on-line at: www.alliedtelesyn.com/allied/support/help.asp.

Sales or Corporate Information

Allied Telesyn, Inc. 19800 North Creek Parkway, Suite 200 Bothell, WA 98011 Tel:1 (425) 487-8880 Fax:1 (425) 489-9191

13

Preface Management Software Updates Allied Telesyn periodically updates the management software programs for our managed products.com. You can download new versions of our management software from our web site at www.alliedtelesyn. To use the FTP server.alliedtelesyn. enter ‘anonymous’ for the user name when you log in and your e-mail address for the password.com or our FTP server at ftp. 14 .

15 .Section I Overview The chapter in this section provides a brief overview of the AT-S39 management software. It explains some of the functions that you can perform with the management software and reviews the different methods for accessing the AT-S39 software on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch.

16 . and powering ON the device. Note The default settings for the management software can be found in Appendix A. The default settings may be adequate for some networks and may not need to be changed. If this is true for your network. You use the software to adjust the operating parameters of the switches. Some of the functions that you can perform with the software include: ❑ Enable and disable ports ❑ Configure port parameters. as explained in the hardware installation guide. AT-S39 Default Settings on page 228. such as port speed and duplex mode ❑ Create virtual LANs (VLANs) ❑ Create port trunks and port mirrors ❑ Assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address and subnet mask ❑ Activate and configure the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) ❑ Configure port security The AT-S39 management software comes pre-installed on the switch with default settings for all its operating parameters. then you can use the switch as an unmanaged switch by simply connecting the unit to your network.Chapter 1 Overview The AT-S39 management software is intended for the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches.

They are: ❑ Local Management Session ❑ Telnet Management Session ❑ Web Browser Management Session ❑ SNMP Management Session The following sections in this chapter briefly describe each type of management session. The methods are referred to as management sessions in this guide.AT-S39 User’s Guide To actively manage a switch. There are four different ways that you can access the management software on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switch. such as to change or adjust its operating parameters. 17 . It also has a special interface for managing a switch with a web browser. you must access the switch’s AT-S39 management software. The AT-S39 software has a menu interface that makes it very easy to use.

you will see a menu from which you can make selections to configure and monitor the switch. 18 . This type of management session is referred to as “local” because you must be physically close to the switch. refer to Starting a Local Management Session on page 25. such as in the wiring closet where the switch is located. You can configure all of a switch’s operating parameters from a local management session. using a straight-through RS-232 cable.Section I: Overview Local Management Session You establish a local management session with an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switch by connecting a terminal or a PC with a terminal emulator program to the RS232 Terminal port on the front panel of the switch. Note For instructions on starting a local management session. Once the session is started.

This section contains a brief discussion about when it makes sense to assign IP addresses to the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches in your network. This type of management session is referred to in this guide as a remote management session because you can manage the switch from any workstation on your network that has the application protocol. If you are just beginning to build your network and have not assigned any IP addresses to switches. you have complete management access to all other AT-8024GB switches in the same subnet. Note For instructions on how to start a Telnet management session. A Telnet management session gives you complete access to all of a switch’s operating parameters.AT-S39 User’s Guide Telnet Management Session Any management workstation on your network that has the Telnet application protocol can be used to manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch. Once you have established a Telnet management session with an AT-8024GB switch that has an IP address. You can perform all the same functions from a Telnet management session as you can from a local management session. Establishing a Telnet management session with an AT-8024 switch requires that the switch have an IP address. refer to Starting a Telnet Management Session on page 29. You cannot manage an AT-8024 switch remotely using the Telnet application protocol if it does not have an IP address. 19 . With AT-8024GB switches. only one switch in a subnet needs to have an IP address. refer to Enhanced Stacking Overview on page 47. which include the enhanced stacking feature. you might want to start by reading When Does an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch Need an IP Address? on page 32. Note For further information on enhanced stacking.

You cannot use the enhanced stacking feature of an AT-8024GB switch from a web browser management session. This too is a type of remote management.Section I: Overview Web Browser Management Session You can also use a web browser to manage a switch. Note For instructions on starting a web browser management session. They are: ❑ Enhanced stacking .You can view but not set the port security level of a switch. There are some management functions that you cannot perform from a a web browser management session. 20 . refer to Starting a Web Browser Management Session on page 171. as well as every AT-8024 switch. ❑ DHCP and BOOTP . Consequently. that you want to manage on your network using a web browser must have its own unique IP address. because you can use any workstation on your network that has a web browser to manage a switch. ❑ Port security level . every AT-8024GB switch. just like a Telnet management session.You cannot activate these protocols from a web browser management session.

AT-S39 User’s Guide SNMP Management Session Another way to remotely manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch is with an SNMP management program. The AT-S39 software supports the following MIBs: ❑ SNMP MIB-II (RFC 1213) ❑ Bridge MIB (RFC 1493) ❑ Interface Group MIB (RFC 1573) ❑ Ethernet MIB (RFC 1643) ❑ Remote Network MIB (RFC 1757) ❑ Allied Telesyn managed switch MIB You must download the Allied Telesyn managed switch MIB file from the Allied Telesyn web site and compile the file with your SNMP program. A familiarity with Management Information Base (MIB) objects is necessary to manage a switch with an SNMP management program. refer to your SNMP management documentation. Consequently. Note SNMP management does not utilize the enhanced stacking feature of the AT-8024GB switch. For instructions. 21 . you must assign an IP address to each switch to be managed with an SNMP program.

Section II Local and Telnet Management The chapters in this section explain how to manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switch from a local or Telnet management session. The chapters include: ❑ Chapter 2: Starting a Local or Telnet Management Session on page 23 ❑ Chapter 3: Basic Switch Parameters on page 31 ❑ Chapter 4: Enhanced Stacking on page 46 ❑ Chapter 5: Port Parameters on page 54 ❑ Chapter 6: Port Security on page 64 ❑ Chapter 7: Port Trunking on page 72 ❑ Chapter 8: Port Mirroring on page 78 ❑ Chapter 9: Spanning Tree Protocol on page 83 ❑ Chapter 10: Virtual LANs on page 91 ❑ Chapter 11: MAC Address Table on page 126 ❑ Chapter 12: Class of Service on page 139 ❑ Chapter 13: IGMP Snooping on page 142 ❑ Chapter 14: Broadcast Frame Control on page 150 ❑ Chapter 15: Ethernet Statistics on page 156 ❑ Chapter 16: Management Software Updates on page 162 22 .

Chapter 2 Starting a Local or Telnet Management Session This chapter contains the procedure for starting a local or Telnet management session on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch. The sections in the chapter are: ❑ Local Management Session on page 24 ❑ Telnet Management Session on page 29 23 .

When you start a local management session on an AT-8024 switch. Starting a local management session on a AT-8024GB switch that has been configured as a Master switch of an enhanced stack allows you to manage all the AT-8024GB switches in the subnet from the same local management session. to start this type of management session. refer to Enhanced Stacking Overview on page 47. This typically means that you must be in the wiring closet where the switch is located. To start a local management session on another AT-8024 switch. you must go to where that switch is located. A local management session is so named because you must be close to the switch. A switch does not need an IP address for you to manage it with a local management session. 24 . Starting a local management session on an AT-8024GB switch that is not part of an enhanced stack or that is a slave switch in a stack allows you to manage just that switch. This can simplify network management. You do not have to start a separate local management session for each AT-8024GB switch. you can manage just that switch. Additionally. usually within a few meters. You can start a local management session at any time on any AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch in your network. Note For information on enhanced stacking.Section II: Local or Telnet Management Local Management Session On the front panel of the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switch is a port labelled RS232 Terminal Port. running a local management session does not interfere with the flow of Ethernet traffic through the unit. You use this port to establish a local management session with the switch’s AT-S39 management software.

Connect one end of a straight-through RS232 cable with a DB-9 connector to the RS232 Terminal Port on the switch. Configure the terminal or terminal emulator program as follows: ❑ Baud rate: Auto-detect (default 115200. see Note below) ❑ Data bits: 8 ❑ Parity: None ❑ Stop bits: 1 ❑ Flow control: None 25 . POR TB DE LINK RS232 TER MIN AL P ORT MOD E FAU LT MAS TER PWR Figure 1 Connecting a Terminal or PC to the RS232 Terminal Port 2. perform the following procedure: 1.AT-S39 User’s Guide Starting a Local Management Session To start a local management session. 3. Connect the other end of the cable to an RS-232 port on a terminal or PC with a terminal emulator program.

You can use this feature by pressing any key on your keyboard within five seconds after powering on or resetting the switch.1 and above. simply type boot and press Return to start the switch. the switch uses a default baud rate of 115200 bits per second (bps). the switch displays the following prompt: Press any key to stop image loading and go to Boot Prompt. The switch responds by determining the speed of the terminal and automatically configuring the speed of the RS232 Terminal Port accordingly. 5. If prompted for a password. The switch maintains the terminal port speed until the system is again powered on or reset. The range of the port’s baud rate is 1200 to 115200 bps.Save Configuration Changes R . This message is intended for manufacturing purposes only. (The password is case-sensitive.) 4. or an equivalent terminal emulator program.) Note The port settings are for a DEC VT100 or ANSI terminal. (If you do inadvertently display the boot prompt (=>).Previous Menu Enter you selection: Figure 2 Main Menu 26 .) The Main Menu is displayed. Allied Telesyn AT-8024GB Ethernet Switch Main Menu 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Port Menu VLAN Menu Spanning Tree Menu Administration Menu System Config Menu MAC Address Tables Ethernet Statistics Diagnostics Enhanced Stacking S . Press the Return key twice.Section II: Local or Telnet Management Note The switch has an auto-detect feature that allows it to automatically determine the speed of the terminal. (This feature applies to Boot Loader Version 1. The default is “admin”. Note During boot up. enter the password for the management software. Otherwise.

refer to Chapter 4. Pressing the Esc key from a submenu or window returns you to the previous menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide To select a menu item. you can use the local management session to manage all other AT-8024GB switches in the subnet. Enhanced Stacking on page 46. It can also save you from having to go to the different wiring closets where the switches are located. 27 . Note Enhanced stacking is not supported on the AT-8024 switch. type the corresponding letter or number. Enhanced Stacking When you start a local management session on an AT-8024GB switch that has been designated as the Master switch of an enhanced stack. This can save you the time and trouble of having to start a separate local management session each time you want to manage a AT-8024GB switch in your network. For information on enhanced stacking and how to manage different switches from the same management session.

Section II: Local or Telnet Management Quitting from a Local Session To quit a local session. You should always exit from a management session when you are finished managing a switch. return to the Main Menu type Q for Quit. Note You cannot operate both a local management session and a Telnet management session on the same switch simultaneously. Failure to properly exit from a local or Telnet management session may block future management sessions. This can prevent unauthorized individuals from making changes to a switch’s configuration should you leave your management station unattended. 28 .

The default password is “admin”. Note You can run only one Telnet management session on a switch at a time. An AT-8024 switch without an IP address cannot be managed remotely. Additionally. 29 . You need to assign an IP address to only one of the AT-8024GB switches to have full Telnet management capability to all the other AT-8024GB switches in your network. refer to Enhanced Stacking Overview on page 47. All of the functions from a local management session are available to you from a Telnet management session. Enter the management software password when prompted. The menus also function the same. there are no differences between managing a switch locally through the RS232 Terminal Port and remotely with the Telnet application protocol. An AT-8024 switch must have an IP address for you to remotely manage it using the Telnet application protocol. Starting a Telnet Management Session To start a Telnet management session. type its corresponding number of letter. The Main Menu of a Telnet management session is the same menu that you see in a local management session. You see the same menu selections and have the same management capabilities. The AT-8024GB switch features enhanced stacking. Note For background information on enhanced stacking. specify the IP address of the switch in the Telnet application protocol. To return to a previous menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Telnet Management Session You can use the Telnet application protocol from a workstation on your network to manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch. This type of management is referred to as remote management because you do not have to be physically close to the switch to start the session. In terms of functionally. you cannot run both a Telnet management session and a local management session on the same switch at the same time. such as with a local management session. Any workstation on your network that has the application protocol can be used to manage the switch. type R or press ESC twice. as shown in Figure 2 on page 26. To make a selection.

type Q for Quit from the Main Menu.Section II: Local or Telnet Management Quitting from a Telnet Management Session To end a Telnet management session. 30 .

and more. activating the original switch default settings. There is a discussion on when to assign an IP address to a switch and the different ways that you can go about it. Sections in the chapter include: ❑ When Does an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch Need an IP Address? on page 32 ❑ Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 34 ❑ Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services on page 37 ❑ Configuring SNMP Community Strings and Trap IP Addresses on page 39 ❑ Activating the AT-S39 Software Default Values on page 41 ❑ Resetting a Switch on page 42 ❑ Configuring the AT-S39 Software Security Features on page 43 ❑ Viewing the AT-S39 Version Number and Switch MAC Address on page 45 31 . There are also procedures for resetting the switch.Chapter 3 Basic Switch Parameters This chapter contains a variety of information and procedures.

You use the address to identify the switch when you start a remote management session. First. This is because the AT-8024GB switch supports enhanced stacking. (The switch uses the subnet mask to determine which portion of an IP address represents the network address and which the node address. This feature has two primary benefits. You do not need to assign an IP address. it allows you to configure multiple switches through the same local or remote management session. subnet mask. This gateway address is the IP address of the router through which the switch and management station will communicate. AT-8024 Switch Every AT-8024 switch on your network that you want to manage remotely using the Telnet application protocol. The basic rule to follow is if you want to remotely manage the AT-8024GB switches in your network. Enhanced stacking allows multiple AT-8024GB switches to share the same IP address. or an SNMP management program must have a unique IP address. or gateway address if you do not intend to manage an AT-8024 switch remotely. you must assign at least one of them an IP address. You cannot remotely manage an AT-8024 switch if it does not have an IP address. AT-8024GB Switch The considerations to take into account on deciding whether to assign an IP address to an AT-8024GB switch are different than those for an AT-8024 switch. Starting either a local or a Telnet management session on a master switch allows you to manage all the other AT-8024GB switches that are in the same subnet. Second. all from the same management session. 32 . it helps to reduce the number of IP addresses that you need to assign to your network devices.) You must also assign the switch a gateway address if there is a router between the switch and the remote management workstation. The switch will function fine without these values and you can still configure all switch parameters through a local management session. The following two subsections help to explain how to go about making this decision.Section II: Local and Telnet Management When Does an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch Need an IP Address? One of your first tasks as you begin to build your network will be to determine which of the switches in your network should be assigned unique IP addresses. If you decide to assign an AT-8024 switch an IP address. you must also assign it a subnet mask. This switch will be the Master switch of the stack. a web browser.

then there is no need for you to assign any of them an IP address. This procedure is explained in Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services on page 37. refer to Enhanced Stacking Overview on page 47. How Do You Assign an IP Address? Once you have decided which. If you do not plan to remotely manage the AT-8024GB switches in your network. you have to access the AT-S39 software on the switches and assign the addresses.AT-S39 User’s Guide If your network consists of multiple subnets. You can do this two different ways. Initially assigning an IP address to a switch can only be done through a local management session. The procedure for this is explained in the next procedure. The first method is to assign the IP configuration information manually. The second method is by activating the BOOTP and DHCP services on the switch and have the switch automatically download its IP configuration information from a BOOTP or DHCP server on your network. switches on your network need an IP address. if any. The switches will operate fine without an IP address and you will still be able to manage them completely through local management sessions. you must assign a unique IP address to at least one AT-8024GB switch in each subnet. The switch with the IP address will be the Master switch of that subnet. Note For further information on enhanced stacking. 33 .

0.. The selection X ..Reset Switch X .Xmodem Downloads and Uploads is described in Downloading New Management Software from a Local Management Session on page 164 34 ...0..... Administrator .0. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Administration Menu 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 IP Address . 255. go to the procedure Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services on page 37...... (If you want the switch to obtain its IP configuration from a DHCP or BOOTP server on your network..Reset Port is described in Resetting a Switch on page 42.Xmodem Downloads & Uploads L . Change Password . 0..Save Configuration Changes R .0 System Name .) This procedure also explains how to assign a name to the switch.. Comments ..0. subnet mask. such as the name of the administrator responsible for maintaining the unit and the location of the switch..... type 4 to select Administration Menu.255. and gateway address to the switch from a local or Telnet management session.. From the Main Menu. 0...Release DHCP IP Address S ......Section II: Local and Telnet Management Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name The procedure in this section explains how to manually assign an IP address... To manually set a switch’s IP address.0.0 Default Gateway ...... 9 . along with other optional information.0 Subnet Mask . perform the following procedure: 1....... The Administration Menu in Figure 3 is displayed.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 3 Administration Menu Note The selection 9 ..

AT-S39 User’s Guide

2. Change the parameters as desired. The parameters in the IP Parameters window are described below: 1 - IP address This parameter specifies the IP address of the switch. You must specify an IP address if you intend to remotely manage the switch using a web browser, a Telnet utility, or an SNMP management program, or if you want an AT-8024GB switch to function as the Master switch of an enhanced stack. 2 - Subnet mask This parameter specifies the subnet mask for the switch. You must specify a subnet mask if you assigned an IP address to the switch. 3 - Gateway address This parameter specifies the default router’s IP address. This address is required if you intend to remotely manage the switch from a management station that is separated from the switch by a router. 4 - System Name This parameter specifies a name for the switch (for example, Sales Ethernet switch). This parameter is optional. Note It is advised that you assign each switch a name. The names can help you identify the various switches when you manage them, and can help you avoid performing configuration procedures on the wrong switch. 5 - Administrator This parameter specifies the name of the network administrator responsible for managing the switch. This parameter is optional. 6 - Comments This parameter specifies additional information about the Fast Ethernet switch, such as its location (for example, 4th Floor wiring closet 402B). This parameter is optional. 7 - Change Password This parameter is used to change the administrator’s login password for the switch. The password can be from 2 to 10 characters in length and can consist of alphanumeric characters (a to z, A to Z, and 1 to 9). The same password is used for both local and remote management sessions. The default password is “admin”. The password is case-sensitive.

35

Section II: Local and Telnet Management

Caution Do not include spaces or special characters, such as asterisks (*) or exclamation points (!), in a password. This is particularly important if you will be managing the switch from a web browser, because most web browsers cannot handle special characters in passwords. L - Release DHCP IP Address If you activate DHCP on the switch so that the unit obtains its IP address from a DHCP server on your network, you can use this selection prior to resetting or powering off the switch so that the IP address is released back to the DHCP server for assignment to another network device. 3. After you have set the parameters, type S to select Save Configuration Changes. Note A change to the IP address, subnet mask, or gateway address will not take effect until after you reset the switch. You can reset the device using selection 9 - Reset Switch in the Administration Menu or with the Reset button on the back panel of the unit.

36

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services
The BOOTP and DHCP application protocols were developed to simplify network management. They are used to automatically assign IP configuration information to the devices on your network, such as an IP address, subnet mask, and a default gateway address. The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches support these protocols and can obtain their IP configuration information from a BOOTP or DHCP server on your network. If you activate this feature, the switch will seek its IP address and other IP configuration information from a BOOTP or DHCP server on your network whenever you reset or power ON the device. Naturally, for this to work there must be a BOOTP or DHCP server residing on your network and you must configure the service by entering in the switch’s MAC address. BOOTP and DHCP services typically allow you to specify how the IP address is to be assigned to the switch. Choices are static and dynamic. If you choose static, the server will always assign the same IP address to the switch when the switch is reset or powered ON. This is the preferred configuration. Since the BOOTP and DHCP services always assigns the same IP address to a switch, you will always know which IP address to use when you need to remotely manage a particular switch. If you choose dynamic, the server will assign any unused IP address that it has not already assigned to another device. This means that a switch might have a different IP address each time you reset or power cycle the device, making it difficult for you to remotely manage the unit. Note The BOOTP and DHCP option is disabled by default on the switch. To activate or deactivate the BOOTP and DHCP protocols on the switch, perform the following procedure: 1. From the Main Menu, type 5 to select System Config Menu.

37

Section II: Local and Telnet Management

The System Configuration Menu in Figure 4 is displayed.
Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch System Config Menu 1 2 3 4 5 6 MAC Aging Time ................... Hash Count ....................... Switch Mode ...................... Console Discount Timer Interval .. BOOTP/DHCP........................ Web Server Status ................ 300 seconds 6 Tagged 10 minute(s) Disabled Enabled

7 - Advanced Configuration 8 - Reset to Factory Defaults S - Save Configuration Changes R - Previous Menu Enter your selection:

Figure 4 System Configuration Menu 2. Type 5 to select BOOTP/DHCP. The following prompt is displayed:
BOOTP/DHCP (E-Enabled, D-Disabled):

3. Type E to enable BOOTP and DHCP services on the switch or D to disable the services and press Return. The default is disabled. 4. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. 5. Reboot the switch using either the management software or the reset button on the back panel of the switch.

38

2. perform the following procedure: 1. From the Main Menu. From the Advanced Configuration window.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring SNMP Community Strings and Trap IP Addresses To configure the SNMP community strings for the switch and to assign up to four IP addresses of management stations to receive traps from the switch. From the System Configuration Menu. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration. type 5 to select System Config Menu. 39 . Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Advanced Configuration Menu 1 2 3 4 IGMP Snooping Configuration Broadcast Timers Setup SNMP Configuration GBIC Uplink Information R .Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 5 Advanced Configuration Window 3. The Advanced Configuration window in Figure 5 is displayed. type 3 to select SNMP Configuration.

. private 3 .0 S ..0..Trap Community .SET Community 3..0. 4 .. type its corresponding number and...Trap Receiver 1 5 ...0 0. ... public 2 .GET Community 2 .0. 0..Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 6 SNMP Configuration Window 4.....0.Trap Receiver 2 6 . 40 ..... ...... 5.. enter the new value.....Trap Receiver 3 7 . Adjust the parameters as desired. The parameters are described below..SET Community ... public 4 5 6 7 Trap Trap Trap Trap receiver receiver receiver receiver 1 2 3 4 .0 0. To change a value....Trap Receiver 4 Use these selections to specify the IP addresses of up to four management workstations on your network to receive traps from the switch....Save Configuration Changes R .........0 0.0..0...... when prompted......GET Community ..... Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch SNMP Configuration 1 .......... After making your changes.Trap Community Use these parameters to set a switch’s SNMP community strings. 1 . type S to select Save Configuration Changes.........Section II: Local and Telnet Management The SNMP Configuration window in Figure 6 is displayed.0.. ...0. Changes to the SNMP parameters are immediately activated on the switch.

Type Y for yes or N for no. From the System Configuration Menu. Type Y to reset the switch. perform the following procedure: 1. If you type Y for yes. Note The AT-S39 software default values can be found in Appendix A. The following prompt is displayed: Are you sure you want to reset to factory defaults (Y/N) -> 3. 41 . From the Main Menu. 4. You are prompted to reset the switch. AT-S39 Default Settings on page 228. 2. This procedure also deletes any VLANs that you have created on the switch. To return the AT-S39 management software to its default settings. type 5 to select System Config Menu. the parameter settings are reset to the factory default values. type 8 to select Reset to Factory Defaults.AT-S39 User’s Guide Activating the AT-S39 Software Default Values The procedure in this section returns all AT-S39 software parameters to their default values.

Section II: Local and Telnet Management Resetting a Switch To reset a switch. perform the following procedure: 1. type 9 to select Reset Switch. From the Administrator Menu. 2. Caution The switch will not forward traffic during the brief period required to reload its operating software. The switch immediately reloads its operating system. type 4 to select Administrator Menu. 42 . From the Main Menu. Some data traffic may be lost. a task requiring only a second or two to complete.

and so prevent individuals from managing the switch remotely using a web browser. type E to enable web access or D to disable web access. To configure web browser access. perform the procedure below. perform the procedure below. type 6 to select Web Server Access and. type 5 to select System Config Menu. (The password is case-sensitive. ❑ Console Timeout . the AT-S39 management software automatically ends a management session if it does not detect any activity from the local or remote management station after 2 minutes. type 4 to select Console Disconnect Timer Interval and. To configure the console timer and web access security features of the AT-S39 management software. To configure the console timer. 3.The management software prompts you for a password whenever you start a local or remote management session on a switch. For example. refer to Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 34. For instructions on how to change the AT-S39 password. ❑ Web Access . The default password is “admin”. For instructions on how to set this security feature. perform the following procedure: 1. For instructions on how to set this security feature. enter a value of from 1 to 60 minutes. These security features are: ❑ Password . The default for the console timeout value is 10 minutes.This parameter causes the management software to automatically end a management session if it does not detect any activity from the local or remote management station after the specified period of time. 2.You can also disable the web browser management feature on the switch. 43 . This security feature can prevent unauthorized individuals from using your management station should you step away from your system while configuring a switch. if you specify 2 minutes.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring the AT-S39 Software Security Features The AT-S39 software has three features that can help prevent unauthorized individuals from changing the parameter settings of the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches in your network. From the Main Menu. when prompted.) The switches in your network can have the same or different passwords. when prompted.

After you have made the desired changes.Section II: Local and Telnet Management For example. if you disable web access. 44 . Your changes are immediately activated on the switch. no one will be able to manage the switch remotely using a web browser. 4. type S to select Save Configuration Changes.

....... Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Diagnostics 1 2 3 4 Application Software Version .Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 7 Diagnostics Window The information in this window cannot be changed...00 R . Serial Number ....AT-S39 User’s Guide Viewing the AT-S39 Version Number and Switch MAC Address The procedure in this section displays the following switch information: ❑ AT-S39 version number ❑ Bootloader version number ❑ Serial number ❑ MAC Address To display the information...32.......3 ATI_LOADER1.. type 8 to select Diagnostics from the Main Menu. MAC Address .. Bootloader Version ... AT-S39 v1...17.... The Diagnostics window in Figure 7 is displayed.1 5456411 00.A0. 45 .......D2........

Chapter 4 Enhanced Stacking This chapter explains the enhanced stacking feature of the AT-8024GB switch. This feature is not supported on the AT-8024 switch. 46 . The sections in this chapter include: ❑ Enhanced Stacking Overview on page 47 ❑ Setting a Switch’s Enhanced Stacking Status on page 50 ❑ Selecting a Switch in an Enhanced Stack on page 52 Note This feature applies only to the AT-8024GB switch.

You must select a switch in your network to function as the master switch of the stack. This eliminates the need of having to initiate a separate management session for each switch in your network. should you remove a master switch from the network. ❑ The AT-8024GB switches can share the same IP address. ❑ Each subnet must have at least one master AT-8024GB switch. such as for maintenance. ❑ Remotely managing a new AT-8024GB switch in your network is simplified. Once connected to the network. It offers the following benefits: ❑ You can manage up to 24 AT-8024GB switches from one local or remote management session.AT-S39 User’s Guide Enhanced Stacking Overview The enhanced stacking feature can make it easier for you to manage the AT-8024GB switches in your network. you can begin to manage it immediately from any workstation in your network. You cannot have multiple enhanced stacks in a subnet. You can select any AT-8024GB switch to act as the master switch of an enhanced stack. ❑ You must change the master switch’s stacking status to Master. Guidelines There are a few guidelines to keep in mind when implementing enhanced stacking for your network: ❑ Each subnet in your network constitutes an enhanced stack. This reduces the number of IP addresses that you need to assign to your network devices for remote management. That way. There are three basic steps to implementing this feature on your network: 1. ❑ You must assign the master AT-8024GB switch an IP address and subnet mask. you can still manage the AT-8024GB switches in the subnet through the other master switch. It is advisable that there be at least two master switches in each enhanced stack. You simply connect it to your network. 47 . there must be at least one master switch in each subnet. If your network consists of more than one subnet.

you must assign each master switch a unique IP address. You must change the enhanced stacking status of the master switch to Master. refer to Activating the BOOTP and DHCP Services on page 37. do not. Note You can set the IP address manually or activate the BOOTP and DHCP services on a master switch and have the master switch obtain its IP information from a BOOTP or DHCP server on your network. The other AT-8024GB switches in an enhanced stack. For instructions on activating the BOOTP and DHCP services. refer to Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 34. If an enhanced stack will have more than one master switch. 3. You must assign the master switch an IP address and subnet mask. For instructions on how to set the IP address manually. 48 . referred to as slave switches. Initially assigning an IP address or activating the BOOTP and DHCP services can only be performed through a local management session. A master switch must have an IP address and subnet mask. This is explained in the procedure Setting a Switch’s Enhanced Stacking Status on page 50.Section II: Local and Telnet Management 2.

and each has been assigned a unique IP address.32.16 RS-232 TERMINAL PORT FAULT MASTER PWR Router Subnet B Master 1 IP Address 149. Subnet A Master 1 IP Address 149.32. you could start a local management session or a remote Telnet management session with one of the master switches in the subnet. To manage the AT-8024GB switches of a subnet.32.09.22 Master 2 IP Address 149.AT-S39 User’s Guide Example Figure 8 is an example of the enhanced stacking feature.18 Master 2 IP Address 149. You would then have management access to all the AT-8024GB switches in the same subnet. Each subnet has eight AT-8024GB switches.11. 49 . Two AT-8024GB switches in each subnet have been selected as the master switches of their respective subnets.09.11.32.24 Figure 8 Enhanced Stacking Example The example consists of a network of two subnets interconnected with a router.

type 9 to select Enhanced Stacking. or unavailable.. you can access and manage all the AT8024GB switches in the subnet. ❑ Slave switch . Once you have established a local or remote management session with the Master switch of a stack. The Enhanced Stacking window in Figure 9 is displayed.A slave switch can be remotely managed through a master switch. It does not need an IP address or subnet mask.Previous Menu Figure 9 Enhanced Stacking Window 50 . A switch with this designation can be managed locally. Note The default setting for a switch is Slave.A master switch of a stack can be used to manage all the AT-8024GB switches in a subnet. a switch with an unavailable stacking status must be assigned a unique IP address. A master switch must have a unique IP address. You can manually assign a master switch an IP address or activate the BOOTP and DHCP services on the switch. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Enhanced Stacking 1 .Save Configuration Changes R . Each status is described below: ❑ Master switch . ❑ Unavailable ..Enhanced Stacking Services S .A switch with an unavailable stacking status cannot be remotely managed through a master switch. Master 2 .Switch State-(M)aster/(S)lave/(U)navailable.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Setting a Switch’s Enhanced Stacking Status The enhanced stacking status of an AT-8024GB switch can be master switch. From the Main Menu. perform the following procedure: 1. To adjust a switch’s enhanced stacking status.. To be managed remotely. slave switch.

type 1 to select Switch State. To change a switch’s status.” For example. Enter new setup (M/S/U) -> 3. The following prompt is displayed. Type M to change the switch to a master switch. Press Return. the switch’s current status in the figure above is Master. 4.Enhanced Stacking Services” selection in the window is available only on master switches. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes.AT-S39 User’s Guide The window displays the current status of the switch at the end of selection “1 . S to make it a slave switch. 2. Note The “2 . 51 .Switch State. A change to the status is immediately activated on the switch. or U to make the switch unavailable.

When you start a management session on the master switch of a subnet. type 2 to select Enhanced Stacking Services. you are by default addressing that particular switch.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 10 Enhanced Stacking Window 52 .Section II: Local and Telnet Management Selecting a Switch in an Enhanced Stack The first thing that you should do before performing any procedure on an AT-8024GB switch in an enhanced stack is check to be sure that you are performing it on the correct switch.Get/Refresh List of Switches A . The window in Figure 10 is displayed. 2. you need to select it from the management software. type 9 to select Enhanced Stacking. The name of the switch being managed is always displayed at the top of every management window. then it is very easy. To select a switch to manage in an enhanced stack.Access Switch R . If you assigned system names to your switches. The management tasks that you perform effect only the master switch. perform the following procedure: 1. Allied Telesyn AT-8024GB Ethernet Switch Sales Switch Enhanced Stacking Services Switch Software Switch Num MAC Address Name Mode Version Model ------------------------------------------------------------G . From the Enhanced Stacking window. From the Main Menu. To manage a slave switch or other master switch in the subnet.

The password is case-sensitive. The master switch polls the network for all AT-8024GB slave and master switches in the subnet and displays a list of the switches in the Enhanced Stacking window. Any management tasks you perform effect only the selected switch. 6. 4. A prompt similar to the following is displayed: Enter the switch number -> [1 to 24} 5. return to the Main Menu of the slave switch and type Q for Quit. The Main Menu of the slave switch is displayed. Once you see that window. Type G to select Get/Refresh List of Switches. Nor are any switches with an enhanced stacking status of Unavailable. you are again addressing the Master switch from which you started the management session. Type A to select Access Switch. A prompt is displayed if the switch has been assigned a password.AT-S39 User’s Guide 3. This returns you to the Master switch screen listing the switches in the subnet. Note The Master switch on which you started the management session is not included in the list. Returning to the Master Switch When you have finished managing a slave switch and want to manage another switch in the subnet. 53 . Type the number of the switch you want to manage. The default password is “admin”. You now can manage the selected switch. if you want to manage the Master switch. return to the master switch’s Main Menu by typing R twice. Enter the switch’s password and press Return. You can either select another switch in the list to manage or.

Chapter 5 Port Parameters The chapter contains procedures for viewing and changing the parameter settings for the individual ports on a switch. This chapter contains the following procedures: ❑ Displaying Port Status on page 55 ❑ Configuring Port Parameters on page 58 ❑ Displaying GBIC Information on page 62 54 .

Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Menu 1 2 3 4 5 Port Port Port Port Port Configuration Mirroring Trunking Status Security C .AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying Port Status To display the status of the ports on the switch. type 1 to select Port Menu. 55 . The Port Menu in Figure 11 is displayed.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 11 Port Menu 2. perform the following procedure: 1.Accept changes & update flash R . type 4 to select Port Status. From the Main Menu. From the Port Menu.

Section II: Local and Telnet Management The Port Status window is displayed.indicates that a valid link exists between the port and the end node.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 12 Port Status Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. Neg The status of Auto-Negotiation on the port. Possible values are: Auto .Next Page U . Down . Manual . Possible values are: Up . Link The status of the link between the port and the end node connected to the port.indicates that the port and the end node have not established a valid link. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Status Prt Link Neg MDI Spd Dplx Vlan Flow State --------------------------------------------------------------------001 Up Auto MDI 10 Half 1 Disabled Forwarding 002 Up Auto MDI 100 Full 1 Disabled Forwarding 003 Up Auto MDI 100 Full 1 Disabled Forwarding 004 Up Auto MDI 100 Full 1 Disabled Forwarding 005 Up Auto MDI 10 Half 1 Disabled Forwarding 006 Up Auto MDI 100 Full 1 Disabled Forwarding 007 Up Auto MDI 100 Full 1 Disabled Forwarding 008 Up Auto MDI 10 Half 1 Disabled Forwarding N . Figure 12 is an example of the window.Update Display R .Indicates that the port is using Auto-Negotiation to set operating speed and duplex mode. 56 . The columns in the window are described below: Prt The port number.Indicates that the operating speed and duplex mode have been set manually.

Both . Spd The operating speed of the port.Flow control only on as packets are being received on the port.1000 Mbps (AT-8024GB switch only) Dplx The duplex mode of the port. Disabled . Possible values are: None . Transmit . Possible values are: 10 . Possible values are half-duplex and full-duplex. Vlan The VID of the VLAN in which the port is an untagged member. Possible values are: Forwarding . Receive .Flow control only as packets are being transmitted out the port. Flow The flow control setting for the port.The port is sending and receiving Ethernet frames.The port has been manually disabled.AT-S39 User’s Guide MDI The operating configuration of the port.No flow control on the port.10 Mbps 100 . State The current operating status of the port. 57 . This column will not include the VIDs of the VLANs where the port is a tagged member. Possible values are MDI and MDI-X.Flow control for both packets entering and leaving the port.100 Mbps 1000 .

.... Enter the number of the port you want to configure and press Return....... Advertise 10HDX . Advertise 100FDX . type 1 to select Port Menu.. 2. Broadcast Control .. enter the first port of the range. From the Port Menu. enter the last port number in the range....... Advertise 10FDX ....... Negotiation . To configure a range of ports.. The following prompt is displayed: Starting Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 3. To configure a range of ports.......... The following prompt is displayed: Ending Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 4... From the Main Menu..No Broadcast Control Save Configuration Changes Force Renegotiation Reset Port Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 13 Port Configuration Window 58 ... perform the following procedure: 1.. To configure only one port. The Port Configuration window in Figure 13 is displayed.... type 1 to select Port Configuration. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Configuration Configuring Ports 4 to 4 0 1 4 5 6 7 8 9 B C F X R Status .Section II: Local and Telnet Management Configuring Port Parameters To configure the parameter settings for a port on the switch.... MDI/MDIX Mode ... Forwarding Auto None Yes Yes Yes Yes AUTO 0 .. enter the same port number here as you entered in Step 3 and press Return. Advertise 100HDX .. Flow Control .

10 Mbps 0100 . Disabled . which is the default....The port will receive and forward packets...Duplex are Full-duplex and Halfduplex.. The possible settings for the 2 .. the switch will set both speed and duplex mode for the port automatically...Speed selection are: 0010 .. 59 . You can also disable an unused port to secure it from unauthorized connections.. The window for a GBIC module in an AT-8024GB switch will contain a subset of the parameters....Duplex ... Possible settings are: Forwarding . 0 . You might want to disable a port and prevent packets from being forwarded if a problem occurs with the node or cable connected to the port..Full-Duplex You use these two selections to set the port’s speed and duplex mode.AT-S39 User’s Guide Note The Port Configuration window in the figure above is for a 10/100 Mbps twisted pair port. 0100 3 . When disabled. You adjust a parameter by typing its number.The port will not receive or forward packets.1000 Mbps (AT-8024GB switch only) The possible settings for 3 . If you select Auto for Auto-Negotiation. two additional selections are displayed in the window: 2 ..100 Mbps 1000 . 5..Negotiation You use this selection to configure a port for Auto-Negotiation or to manually set a port’s speed and duplex mode. The parameters are described below. you can enable the port again to resume normal operation. a port will not receive or transmit frames.... If you select Manual.... Adjust the port parameters as desired.Status You use this selection to enable or disable a port..Speed . 1 . This toggles the parameter through its possible settings. This is the default setting. Once the problem has been fixed.

you can set the wiring configuration manually by selecting either MDI or MDIX. which is the default setting. Receive . a switch port determines the appropriate speed and duplex mode by advertising its capabilities to the end node connected to it. which in the case of a port on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch are 10 or 100 Mbps speed and half. You can use these four selections to limit the capabilities a switch port will advertise during Auto-Negotiation. The switch uses a special pause packet to stop the end node from sending frames. 60 . if you set the selection 8 . By default. The pause packet notifies the end node to stop transmitting for a specified period of time. For example. a switch port will advertise its full capabilities.Advertise 100HDX These selections are used for ports configured for AutoNegotiation.Advertise 10FDX 6 . Note In most network environments you should leave all AutoNegotiation advertisements activated. If you set this to Auto. If desired. Transmit . which is the default setting.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Flow Control Flow control applies only to ports operating in full-duplex mode. 5 . half-duplex operation.Advertise 100FDX 8 .Broadcast Control For background information on this selection and instructions on how to set the option. Possible settings are: None .or full-duplex mode.MDI/MDIX Mode Use this selection to set the wiring configuration of the port. 9 .Flow control for both packets entering and leaving the port. the switch port will not advertise that it is capable of 100 Mbps. B . the port will configure itself automatically according to the end node connected to it.Flow control only as packets are being transmitted out the port.No flow control on the port.Advertise 10HDX 7 . During Auto-Negotiation.Flow control only on as packets are being received on the port. Both .Advertise 100HDX to No. refer to Broadcast Frame Control Overview on page 151 and Configuring the Maximum Broadcast Frame Count on page 155.

prompts the port to Auto-Negotiate with the end node. This can be helpful if you believe that a port and end node are not operating at the same speed and duplex mode. The window also has a Force Renegotiation selection. You can use this option to reset the selected port. Once you have set the port parameters. when selected. 61 . This can prove useful in situations where a port is experiencing a problem making a valid connection to the end node. Configuration changes are immediately activated on a port.AT-S39 User’s Guide 6. type S to select Save Configuration Changes. which. The Port configuration window features a Reset Port selection.

Type 1 to select GBIC Information. Type either 24 or 25. type 4 to select GBIC Uplink Information. To display GBIC information.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Displaying GBIC Information The AT-S39 management software can display basic manufacturer information about a GBIC module in an AT-8024GB switch. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch GBIC Information Menu 1 .Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 14 GBIC Information Window 4. 2. these are the port numbers for GBIC modules in an AT-8024GB switch. perform the following procedure: 1. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration. From the Main Menu. The GBIC Information window in Figure 14 is displayed. From the Advanced Configuration window. 3.GBIC Information R . 62 . type 5 to select System Config Menu. The following prompt is displayed: Enter Uplink Port number -> [25 to 26] 5. From the System Configuration Menu.

.... Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch GBIC Information Menu Port Number ... You cannot change this information......... Type of Serial Interface ... 63 ..................... Length 62.... (10k) ...AT-S39 User’s Guide The management software displays a window containing basic information about the GBIC module...Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: 24 GBIC Module Not Defined FC SC connector 1000Base-SX 8B10B 0 0 50 22 Figure 15 GBIC Information Window The information in the window is for viewing purposes only.. (100m) .................Next Page R ....... Connector Type . Shortwave laser w/o OFC M5 M6 100 MBytes/sec Serial Encoding ... Elect/Opt Transceiver . Extended Serial Transceiver ... (k) ......5/125 um Fib. (10m) ............. Figure 15 is an example of the window..... Length 9/125 mm Fib. N . Length 50/125 um Fib........... Length 9/125 um Fib.

64 . You cannot set port security from a Telnet management session. The sections in this chapter include: ❑ Port Security Overview on page 65 ❑ Configuring Port Security on page 67 ❑ Configuring the Limited Security Mode on page 69 Note Port security does not apply to ports on GBIC modules in an AT-8024GB switch. Note Port security can only be set through a local management session.Chapter 6 Port Security This chapter contains the procedures for setting port security.

the switch deletes all MAC addresses in the dynamic MAC address table and immediately begins learning new addresses. and so control the number of network devices that can forward frames through the switch. it discards frames that ingress the port with source MAC addresses not already stored in the MAC address table. Automatic This operating mode disables port security. adding them to the dynamic MAC address table for each port until it reaches the port’s maximum limit. Once this mode is activated. Once a port has learned its maximum limit of MAC addresses. 65 . Only one security level can be active on a switch at a time. Once a dynamic MAC address has been learned on a port and added to the MAC address table. There are four levels of port security. You can use the feature to control the number of MAC addresses learned on the ports. The MAC aging time is disabled under this security level. even when the end node is inactive. it remains in the table and is never purged. You can continue to add static MAC addresses to a port even if the port has already learned its maximum number of dynamic MAC addresses. Limited You can use this security level to manually specify a maximum number of dynamic MAC addresses each port on the switch can learn. Note Static MAC addresses are retained by the switch and are not included in the count of maximum addresses that can be learned by a port.AT-S39 User’s Guide Port Security Overview The port security feature can enhance the security of your network. The switch continues to learn MAC addresses so long as there is space in the MAC address table and deletes inactive MAC addresses. The switch learns and adds addresses to its dynamic MAC address table as it receives frames on the ports. Note The Automatic security mode is the default security level for the switch.

the switch deletes all dynamic MAC addresses and disables the MAC address table so that no new addresses can be learned. The switch forwards frames based on the dynamic MAC addresses that it has already learned and any static MAC addresses that the network administrator has entered. 66 . The switch also deletes any addresses in the static MAC address table. The MAC aging time is disabled in this security level. The switch will forward frames only from those nodes whose MAC addresses you enter in the static MAC address table. Note For background information on MAC addresses and aging time. you must enter the static MAC addresses of the nodes whose frames the switch should forward.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Secure This security level instructs the switch to forward frames based solely on static MAC addresses. even those belonging to inactive end nodes. When this security level is activated. Once you have activated this security level. no dynamic MAC addresses are deleted from the MAC address table. refer to MAC Address Overview on page 127. Any node whose MAC address is not in the static MAC address table will not be able to send frames through the switch. Lock All Ports This security level causes the switch to immediately stop learning new dynamic MAC addresses.

For instructions on how to add static MAC addresses. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Security The current mode is AUTOMATIC. type 1 to select Port Menu.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 16 Port Security Menu 3. you must enter the static MAC addresses of the nodes with frames the switch is to forward. The switch continues to learn addresses so long as there is available space in the MAC address table. type 2 to select Limited mode. After activating this security mode. To set a switch’s port security level. type 5 to select Port Security. 67 . Select the desired security level: ❑ To disable port security on the switch. 1 2 3 4 Automatic mode (default mode) Limited mode Secured mode Lock all the ports now R . refer to Adding Static MAC Addresses on page 136. From the Main Menu. 2. You cannot set port security from a Telnet management session. perform the following procedure: 1. perform the procedure in Configuring the Limited Security Mode on page 69. ❑ To forward frames based solely on static MAC addresses. type 1 to select Automatic mode. A switch operating in Automatic mode does not restrict the number of MAC addresses learned by the ports. type 3 to select the Secured mode. ❑ To specify a maximum number of MAC addresses each port can learn.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring Port Security Note Port security can only be set through a local management session. This is the default setting. To specify the limits. From the Port Menu. The Port Security menu in Figure 16 is displayed.

type 4 to select Lock all the ports now. Note Only one security level can be active on a switch at a time. A change to the security level is immediately activated on the switch. 68 .Section II: Local and Telnet Management ❑ To stop the switch from learning new dynamic MAC addresses and have it forward frames based only on static MAC addresses and on those dynamic addresses that it has already learned.

You can assign the same limit to all ports or different limits to different ports.Set MAC limit per port 3 .AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring the Limited Security Mode The Limited security mode lets you set a maximum number of dynamic MAC addresses each port on a switch can learn. perform the following procedure: 1.Configure port security limited mode R . 3. From the Port Security menu. Static MAC addresses are not deleted from the static MAC address table.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 17 Limited Security Mode Menu 69 . frames with new source MAC addresses are discarded and are not forwarded. The Limited Security Mode menu in Figure 17 is displayed. The Port Security menu in Figure 16 on page 67 is displayed. Once the maximum number of MAC addresses have been learned by a port. To configure Limited security mode. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Security Limited Mode Menu 1 .Display MAC limit per port 2 . You can continue to add static MAC addresses even after a port has learned its maximum number of dynamic MAC addresses. From the Main Menu. type 2 to select Limited security. type 5 to select Port Security. 2. the switch deletes all MAC addresses in the dynamic MAC address table and immediately begins to learn new addresses as frames are received on the ports. type 1 to select Port Menu. When you activate this security level. Static MAC addresses are not included in the count of the maximum MAC addresses a port can learn. From the Port Menu.

Once you have set the MAC address limits on the desired ports. The Set MAC Limit Menu in Figure 18 is displayed again. The Set MAC Limit Menu in Figure 18 is displayed again. Type 2 to choose Select a port.Section II: Local and Telnet Management 4. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a number of MAC limit: [1 to 150] -> 8. type 3 to select Configure port security limited mode.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 18 Set MAC Limit Menu 5. Enter the maximum number of dynamic MAC addresses you want the port to be able to learn and press Return. The Set MAC Limit Menu in Figure 18 is displayed. Enter the number of the port you want to configure and press Return. This applies the limit to the port. 7. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Set MAC Limit Menu 1 2 3 4 Enter a threshold Select a port Set MAC limit for selected port Apply this MAC limit to all ports R . 12. The range is 1 to 150 addresses. 11. repeat Steps 5 through 9. 10. The Limited Security Mode menu in Figure 17 is displayed again. To set MAC address limits for the other ports on the switch. Type 3 to select Set MAC limit for selected port. 9. From the Port Security Limited Mode Menu. Type 1 to select Enter a threshold. 70 . 13. Type 2 to select Set MAC limits per port. If you want to apply this MAC address limit to all ports on the switch. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a port number: [1 to 24] -> 6. type R to select Return to previous menu. type 4 to select Apply this MAC limit to all ports.

16. If necessary. Type 1 to select Display MAC limit per port.AT-S39 User’s Guide The dynamic MAC address limits are applied to the ports on the switch. 14. Type R to select Return to the Previous Menu. repeat this procedure to change any MAC address limits. If you assigned different values to different ports. 15. The current MAC address limits for all the ports are displayed. be sure that the different values apply to the correct ports. 71 . Examine the MAC limits. Check to be sure that they are correct. Limited security has now been configured on the switch.

Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Port Trunking Overview on page 73 ❑ Creating a Port Trunk on page 75 ❑ Deleting a Port Trunk on page 77 72 .Chapter 7 Port Trunking This chapter contains the procedures for creating and deleting port trunks.

speed. 15 for the trunk. The port trunk always sends packets from a particular source to a particular destination over the same link within the trunk. or 4 ports that have been grouped together to function as one logical path to an end node. and 7). 13. workstation. and 24. ❑ When cabling a trunk. ❑ The ports of a trunk must be consecutive (for example. router. ❑ The duplex mode. port 13 to port 22. The lowest numbered port in a trunk on the switch should be connected to the lowest numbered port of the trunk on the other device. you would connect port 12 on the first AT-8024 switch to port 21 on the second AT-8024. and flow control settings must be the same for all the ports in a trunk. or another Ethernet switch. 3. A single link is designated for flooding broadcasts and packets of unknown destination. such as a server. A port trunk is 2. On the first AT-8024 switch you had chosen ports 12.AT-S39 User’s Guide Port Trunking Overview Port trunking is an economical way for you to increase the bandwidth between an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch and another network device. For example. Observe the following guidelines when creating a port trunk: ❑ An AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch can support only one port trunk at a time. A port trunk increases the bandwidth between a switch and a network node and can be useful in situations where a single physical data link between a switch and a node is insufficient to handle the traffic load. 6. 3. 23. ❑ A port trunk can consist of 2. the next lowest numbered port on the switch should be connected to the next lowest numbered port on the other device. 73 . On the second AT8024 switch you had chosen ports 21. Despite the software configuration and physical connections. the order of the connections should be maintained on both nodes. assume that you are connecting a trunk between two AT-8024 switches. they can be all twisted pair ports or all fiber optic ports. To maintain the order of the port connections. and so on. 5. and so on. or 4 ports. ❑ The ports of a port trunk must be of the same medium type. ports 4. there are no data loops in aggregated links because of load balancing. 14. 22. For example.

❑ You can create a port trunk of optional GBIC modules installed in the Port A and Port B slots of an AT-8024GB switch.❑ The ports of a port trunk must be members of the same VLAN. AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER Figure 20 Port Trunk Example 2 74 . AT-8024GB Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT DO NOT STARE INTO BEAM RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PORT A PORT B FAULT LINK LINK MASTER PWR MODE MODE Figure 19 Port Trunk Example 1 You can also use port trunks to increase the bandwidth between switches. A port trunk cannot consist of ports from different VLANs. The example in Figure 20 shows a port trunk of four data links between two AT-8024 switches. The server is connected to the switch with four data links. The links are connected to ports 1 through 4 on the switch. Figure 19 shows an example of a port trunk between an AT-8024 switch and a network server.

type 3 to select Port Trunking. examine the parameter settings of the ports that will make up the trunk. The Port Trunking menu in Figure 21 is displayed.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 21 Port Trunking Menu 75 . such as speed and duplex mode. Check to be sure that the settings.AT-S39 User’s Guide Creating a Port Trunk This section contains the procedure for creating a port trunk on the switch. are the same for all the ports of the trunk. From the Main Menu. Connecting the cables before configuring the software will create a loop in your network topology.Delete Trunk 3 . Note Before creating a port trunk. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Trunking 1 . perform the following procedure: 1. To create a port trunk. 2. Be sure to review the guidelines in Port Trunking Overview on page 73 before performing the procedure.Save Configuration Changes R . type 1 to select Port Menu.Add ports to trunk 2 . You should also check to be sure that the ports are members of the same VLAN. Caution Do not connect the cables to the trunk ports on the switch until after you have configured the trunk with the management software. From the Port Menu. Data loops can result in broadcast storms and poor network performance.Show port trunking status S .

Type 1 to select Add ports to trunk. type 3 to display the status of the trunk..g. 7-10). 1. Configure the ports on the remote end node for port trunking. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Trunking Trunk Ports -----------------------------------------------------------------1-4 R . You can specify the ports individually (e. 6.g. Enter new value -> 4. To confirm the creation of the port trunk. 76 . Connect the cables to the ports of the trunk on the switch. 8. Figure 22 shows an example of the Port Trunking status window.3.2. The following prompt is displayed.4) or as a range (e.Previous Menu Figure 22 Port Trunk Status Window 7.3. The port trunk is ready for network operations.. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. Refer to the instructions included with the node for directions on how to create a port trunk. Enter the ports that will constitute the port trunk and press Return. 5.

4. From the Port Menu. type 3 to display the Port Trunking status window. The window should now show that there are no port trunks on the switch. To confirm the deletion. Data loops can result in broadcast storms and poor network performance. The port trunk is deleted from the switch. The Port Trunking menu in Figure 21 on page 75 is displayed. 3. Type 2 to select Delete trunk. 77 . To delete a port trunk from the switch. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. Deleting a port trunk without first disconnecting the cables can create loops in your network topology. perform the following procedure: 1. 2. type 1 to select Port Menu. 5. From the Main Menu. type 3 to select Port Trunking.AT-S39 User’s Guide Deleting a Port Trunk Caution Disconnect the cables from the port trunk on the switch before performing the following procedure.

Chapter 8 Port Mirroring This chapter contains the procedures for creating and deleting a port mirror. Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Port Mirroring Overview on page 79 ❑ Creating a Port Mirror on page 80 ❑ Deleting a Port Mirror on page 82 78 .

Observe the following guidelines when creating a port trunk: ❑ You can mirror from one to 23 ports on a switch at a time. the less likely the mirroring port will be able to handle all the traffic. 79 . ❑ The ports to be mirrored and the mirroring port must be located on the same switch. ❑ The ports to be mirrored and the mirroring port must be operating at the same speed. if you mirror the traffic of six heavily active ports.AT-S39 User’s Guide Port Mirroring Overview The port mirroring feature allows you to unobtrusively monitor the traffic being received and transmitted on one or more ports on a switch by having the traffic copied to another switch port. You can connect a network analyzer to the port where the traffic is being copied and monitor the traffic on the other ports without impacting network performance or speed. For example. meaning that it will not provide an accurate mirror of the traffic of the other six ports. you cannot use a 10/100 Mbps port to mirror traffic on a 1000 Mbps GBIC port. However. the mirror port is likely to drop packets. For example. the more ports you mirror.

You can specify only one mirror port.Show Port Mirror Status S .. Enter the number of the port whose traffic is to be mirrored. type 1 to select Port Menu. enter the same port number here as you did in the previous step. The following prompt is displayed. the port to where the traffic will be copied).. To mirror a range of ports. To mirror the traffic of only one port. No 3 . The following prompt is displayed.Delete ports from mirror 5 . 2.Save Configuration Changes R . Please enter a port number [0 to 24] -> 4. Press Return.Creating a Port Mirror To create a port mirror.CPU Attached . If you want to mirror a range or ports.. Enter the number of the port to function as the mirror port (that is.. Type 1 to select Mirroring Port. 5. type 2 to select Port Mirroring. Starting port number [1 to 24] -> 6. From the Port Menu.. 80 . From the Main Menu. enter the first port of the range. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port Mirroring 1 .. The Port Mirroring menu in Figure 23 is displayed. The following prompt is displayed. Ending port number [1 to 24] -> 7. perform the following procedure: 1. enter the last port in the range.. 0 2 ..Mirroring Port ...Add ports to mirror 4 ..Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 23 Port Trunking Menu 3... Type 3 to select Add ports to mirror..

9.AT-S39 User’s Guide 8. 10. Press Esc to return to the Port Mirroring menu. The management software displays the number of the mirror port and the port(s) whose traffic is to be mirrored. To confirm the creation of the port mirror. The port mirror is now functional. 81 . Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. type 5 to select Show Port Mirror Status.

type 1 to select Port Menu. From the Port Menu. From the Main Menu. The Port Mirroring menu in Figure 23 on page 80 is displayed. 3. The port that was functioning as the port mirror is now available for normal network operations. The following prompt is displayed. 5. Enter 0 and press Return. type 2 to select Port Mirroring. 82 . The port mirror on the switch is deleted. perform the following procedure: 1. Type 1 to select Mirroring Port.Deleting a Port Mirror To delete a port mirror. Please enter a port number [0 to 24] -> 4. 2. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes.

refer to Section 4 of IEEE Std 802.Chapter 9 Spanning Tree Protocol This chapter provides introductory information on the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and explains how to adjust the STP bridge and port parameters. The sections in this chapter include: ❑ STP Overview on page 84 ❑ Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings on page 87 ❑ Configuring STP Port Settings on page 89 Note For detailed information on the Spanning Tree Protocol. 83 . ISO/IEC 10038: 1993.1D.

STP places the extra paths in a standby or blocking mode. The bridge with the lowest bridge priority number in the network is selected as the root bridge. A root bridge is selected by a combination of a bridge’s priority number. You should probably also consider which bridge should function as a backup in the event you need to take the primary root bridge off-line. also referred to as the bridge identifier. of those bridges the one with the lowest MAC address is designated as the root bridge.1D standard. Data packets can become caught in repeating cycles. exist in the network topology.Section II: Local and Telnet Management STP Overview The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches support the Spanning Tree Protocol. So not only does STP guard against multiple links between end nodes. and sometimes its MAC address. STP can be an important part of large networks where loops. leaving only one main active path. referred to as broadcast storms. 84 . The bridge priority number is adjustable on the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Switches. that needlessly consume network bandwidth and often significantly reduce network performance. The root bridge is used by the other bridges to determine if there are redundant paths in the network. Selecting a Root Bridge The first task that bridges perform when STP is activated on a network is the selection of a root bridge. STP prevents data loops from forming in your network by ensuring that only one path exists between the end nodes in your network. but it can also activate backup redundant paths in case a main link fails. If two or more bridges have the same bridge priority number. and assign that bridge the second lowest bridge identifier number. By adjusting the value. either planned or unplanned. as specified in the IEEE 802. A loop exists when two or more nodes on your network can transmit data to each other over more than one data link. A network loop can pose a danger to network performance and operability. Where multiple paths exist. you can designate which switch on your network you want as the root bridge by giving it the lowest bridge priority number. The redundant paths can be activated by STP if the main path goes down. The root bridge also distributes network topology information to the other network bridges.

blocking mode. Where there is only one path between a bridge and a root bridge. The port costs of the ports on the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches are adjustable through the management software. Table 1 Port Costs for AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Switches Port Speed 10 Mbps 100 Mbps 1000 Mbps Port Cost 100 10 4 The cost of a path is cumulative. they must select a preferred path while placing the redundant paths in a backup or blocking state. where all ports have a port cost of 0. The cost of a port on a bridge is typically based on port speed. the final cost of a path is the value of all ports between a bridge and the root bridge.AT-S39 User’s Guide Finding and Resolving Redundant Paths Once the Root Bridge has been selected. the preferred path is selected through port priority. if one is found. The faster the port. If two paths have the same port cost. the bridges must determine if the network contains redundant paths and. the lower the port cost. The path offering the lowest cost to the root bridge becomes the primary path and all other redundant paths are placed into blocking state. 85 . The exception to this is the ports on the root bridge. If redundant paths exist. Below are the default values. the bridge is referred to as the designated bridge and the port through which the bridge is communicating with the root bridge is referred to as the designated port. This is accomplished by an evaluation of port costs. the bridges that are a part of the paths must determine which path will be the primary. Every port on a bridge participating in STP has a cost associated with it. This too is a value that you can adjust on a per port basis on the switch. active path. and which path(s) will be placed in the standby.

The appropriate value for this parameter will depend on a number of variables. Consequently. if an AT-8024 or an AT-8024GB Switch is selected as the Root Bridge of a spanning tree domain. 86 . which could result in the delay or loss of some data packets. This value states the amount of time that a port spends in the listening and learning states prior to changing to the forwarding state. For small networks. For large networks. whether it has the lowest bridge priority number of all the bridges and should therefore become the root bridge. or addition of any active components. The interval is measured in seconds and the default is 2 seconds.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Handling Topology Changes If there is a change in the network topology due to a failure. it will issue a BPDU in order to determine whether a root bridge has already been selected on the network. The Forwarding Delay value is adjustable on the AT-8024 and AT8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches through the management software. you should specify a value large enough to allow the root bridge sufficient time to propagate a topology change throughout the entire network. it will transmit a BPDU every two seconds. The root bridge will periodically transmit a BPDU to determine whether there have been any changes to the network topology and to inform other bridges of topology changes. Communicating Between Bridges The bridges that are part of a spanning tree domain communicate with each other using a bridge broadcast frame that contains a special section devoted to carrying STP information. When a bridge is brought on-line. If a topology change is made before all bridges have been notified. you should not specify a value so large that a topology change is unnecessarily delayed. and that could adversely impact network performance. especially if it is a large network. removal. a change in a port state is not activated immediately. before it begins to forward frames. the active topology also changes. and if not. listening and learning. This may trigger a change in the state of some blocked ports. a port designated to change from blocking to forwarding passes through two additional states. a temporary data loop could occur. with the size of your network being a primary factor. It might take time for the root bridge to notify all bridges that a topology change has occurred. However. This is a value that you can set on the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches. The amount of time a port spends in these states is set by the Forwarding Delay value. This portion of the frame is referred to as the Bridge Packet Data Unit (BPDU). The frequency with which the root bridge sends out a BPDU is called the Hello Time. To forestall the formation of temporarily data loops during topology changes.

Display STP Port Settings 9 ...... the bridge provides default STP parameters that are adequate for most networks.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings This section contains the procedure for configuring a bridge’s STP settings. Bridge Max Age .Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 24 Spanning Tree Menu 2.... The parameters are described below.. Changing them without prior experience and an understanding of how STP works might have a negative effect on your network. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Spanning Tree Menu 1 2 3 4 5 6 Enable/Disable . Bridge Hello Time .. Bridge Forwarding . Caution STP on a bridge is disabled by default.. The default setting is disabled. Bridge Identifier ..1d standard before changing any of the STP parameters.Enable/Disable Enables and disables STP on the switch. Adjust the bridge STP settings as needed.... 1 .. You should consult the IEEE 802... 1. Bridge Priority ..Config STP Port Settings 8 . The Spanning Tree Menu in is displayed. From the Main Menu.Reset STP to Defaults R . type 3 to select Spanning Tree Menu.. 87 . Disabled 00:A8:22:34:C1:2D 65535 2 15 20 7 . If you enable STP.

This parameter can be from 1 to 10 seconds.Bridge Priority The priority number for the bridge. The Bridge Identifier cannot be changed. The bridge with the lowest priority number is selected as the root bridge. not all links may have yet adapted to the change. If the bridge transitions too soon. 3 . All bridges in a bridged LAN use this aging time to test the age of stored configuration messages called bridge protocol data units (BPDUs). resulting in network loops. type S to select Save Configuration Changes.535. If two or more bridges have the same priority value. for example. Note The aging time for BPDUs is different from the aging time used by the MAC address table. 6 . After you have made the desired changes. if you use the default 20. The default is 20 seconds. 3. becomes the new root bridge after the topology changes. The default is 15 seconds. with 0 being the highest priority.Section II: Local and Telnet Management 2 . This parameter can be from 0 (zero) to 65. This number is used in determining the root bridge for STP. all bridges delete current configuration messages after 20 seconds.Bridge Max Age The length of time after which stored bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) are deleted by the bridge. For example.Bridge Forwarding Delay The waiting period before a bridge changes to a new state. This parameter can be from 6 to 40 seconds.Bridge Identifier The MAC address of the bridge. the bridge with the numerically lowest MAC address becomes the root bridge. 4 . The bridge identifier is used as a tie breaker when selecting the root bridge if two or more bridges have the same bridge priority value.Bridge Hello Time The time interval between generating and sending configuration messages by the bridge. 5 . When a root bridge goes off-line. the bridge with the next priority number automatically takes over as the root bridge. 88 . The default is 2 seconds.

perform the following procedure: 1. The following prompt is displayed: Starting Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 3. The STP Port Configuration window in Figure 25 is displayed.... The following prompt is displayed: Ending Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 4. enter the same port number here as you entered in the previous step... Path Cost .... 89 ... enter the first port of the range.. The parameters are described below..... enter the last port of the range. Root Bridge . 2. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Config STP Port Settings Configuring Ports 4 to 4 1 2 3 4 5 Participating ... type 3 to select Spanning Tree Menu.. Yes 10 128 2 00:A8:22:34:C1:2D R .. Port Priority ... To configure just one port. To configure a range of ports. To configure a range of ports. Enter the number of the port you want to configure. type 7 to select Config STP port settings.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 25 Config STP Port Settings Window 5. 1 . From the Spanning Tree menu.. Adjust the settings as desired.. Bridge Hello Time . From the Main Menu. This value cannot be changed..Participating This parameter indicates whether the port is participating in the spanning tree domain...AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring STP Port Settings To adjust STP port parameters..

The default value for priority is 128.Path Cost The spanning tree algorithm uses the cost parameter to decide which port provides the lowest cost path to the root bridge for that LAN. 3 . 4 .Bridge Hello Time The time interval between generating and sending configuration messages by the bridge. The default is 2 seconds. To change this value.Section II: Local and Telnet Management 2 . The range is 0-255. refer to the previous procedure. This value is for display purposes only and cannot be changed. This value cannot be changed from this window. The range is 1 to 65535.Root Bridge The MAC address of the bridge functioning as the root bridge in the spanning tree domain. and 4 for a 1 Gbps port. 90 .Priority This parameter is used as a tie breaker when two or more ports are determined to have equal costs to the root bridge. 5 . The default values for this parameter are 100 for a 10 Mbps port. 10 for a 100 Mbps port.

This chapter also describes the Basic VLAN mode and how you can change a switch’s VLAN operating mode.Chapter 10 Virtual LANs This chapter contains basic information about virtual LANs (VLANs). and deleting VLANs from a local or Telnet management session. This chapter contains the following sections: ❑ VLAN Overview on page 92 ❑ Port-based VLAN Overview on page 94 ❑ Tagged VLAN Overview on page 101 ❑ Basic VLAN Mode Overview on page 106 ❑ Creating a Port-based or Tagged VLAN on page 107 ❑ Example of Creating a Port-based VLAN on page 111 ❑ Modifying a VLAN on page 113 ❑ Displaying VLAN Information on page 115 ❑ Deleting a VLAN on page 116 ❑ Deleting All VLANs on page 118 ❑ Changing a PVID Value on page 119 ❑ Setting a Switch’s VLAN Mode on page 121 ❑ Enabling or Disabling All VLANs on page 122 ❑ Enabling or Disabling Ingress Filtering on page 124 91 . It also contains the procedures for creating. modifying.

VLANs improve network perform because VLAN data traffic stays within the VLAN. The ports of a VLAN form an independent broadcast domain where the traffic generated by the nodes of a VLAN remains within the VLAN. such as one for Sales and another for Accounting. logical LAN segments. This reduces the need for nodes to handle traffic not destined for them. For example.Section II: Local and Telnet Management VLAN Overview A VLAN is a group of ports on an Ethernet switch that form a logical Ethernet segment. 92 . you could create separate VLANs for the different departments in your company. VLANs can be used to control the flow of data in your network and prevent data from flowing to unauthorized end nodes. Additionally. For example. These VLAN groupings can be based on similar data needs or security requirements. The more nodes on each LAN segment vying for bandwidth. It also frees up bandwidth within all the logical workgroups. ❑ Simplified network management VLANs can also simplify network management. changing the employee’s LAN segment assignment might require a change to the wiring at the switches. you can segment your network through the switch’s management software and so be able to group nodes with related functions into their own separate. Before the advent of VLANs. broadcast traffic remains within the VLAN. This too can improve overall network performance. if an employee changed departments. With VLANs. ❑ Increased security Since data traffic generated by a node in a VLAN is restricted only to the other nodes of the same VLAN. VLANs offer several important benefits: ❑ Improved network performance Network performance often suffers as networks grow in size and as data traffic increases. since each VLAN constitutes a separate broadcast domain. physical changes to the network often had to been made at the switches in the wiring closets. The nodes of a VLAN receive traffic only from nodes of the same VLAN. the greater the likelihood overall network performance will decrease.

AT-S39 User’s Guide But with VLANS. This means that the end nodes of a VLAN do not need to be connected to the same switch and so are not restricted to being in the same physical location. 93 . Additionally. or having to change group memberships by moving cables from one switch port to another. you can change the LAN segment assignment of an end node connected to the switch through the switch’s AT-S39 management software. a virtual LAN can span more than one switch. VLAN memberships can be changed any time through the management software without moving the workstations physically. The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switches support the following types of VLANs: ❑ Port-based VLANs ❑ Tagged VLANs These VLANs are described in the following sections.

The parts that make up a port-based VLAN are: ❑ VLAN name ❑ VLAN Identifier ❑ Untagged ports ❑ Port VLAN Identifier VLAN Name To create a port-based VLAN. or just a few ports. The name should reflect the function of the network devices that are be members of the VLAN. This number uniquely identifies a VLAN in the switch and the network. Traffic generated by the end nodes of a VLAN remains within the VLAN and does not cross over to the end nodes of other VLANs unless there is an interconnection device. VLAN Identifier Each VLAN in a network must have a unique number assigned to it. Each port of a port-based VLAN can belong to only one VLAN at a time. 94 . A port-based VLAN also can span switches and consist of ports from multiple Ethernet switches. Examples include Sales. All ports on the switch are members of this VLAN. and Engineering.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Port-based VLAN Overview As explained in the VLAN Overview section earlier in this chapter. Production. A port-based VLAN can have as many or as few ports as needed. such as a router or Layer 3 switch. you would assign it a VID unique from all other VLANs in your network. a VLAN consists of a group of ports on one or more Ethernet switches that form an independent broadcast domain. This number is called the VLAN identifier (VID). Note The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches are preconfigured with one port-based VLAN. A port-based VLAN is a group of ports on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch that form a logical Ethernet segment. you must give it a name. called the Default VLAN. If a VLAN consists only of ports located on one physical switch in your network. The VLAN can consist of all the ports on an Ethernet switch.

The names derive from the fact that the frames received on a port will not contain any information that indicates VLAN membership. unique VLAN. all ports of a port-based VLAN must have the same PVID. (There is another type of VLAN where VLAN membership is determined by information within the frames themselves. Ports in a port-based VLAN are referred to as untagged ports and the frames received on the ports as untagged frames. This is acceptable when you are creating a new. Port VLAN Identifier Each port in a port-based VLAN must have a port VLAN identifier (PVID). If you are creating a VLAN on an AT-8024 that will be part of a larger VLAN that spans several switch. and that VLAN membership will be determined solely by the port’s PVID. You can assign this number manually or allow the management software to do it automatically. then the VID for the VLAN on the different switches must be the same. the switches are able to recognize and forward frames belonging to the same VLAN even though the VLAN spans multiple switches. The switch associates a frame to a port-based VLAN by the PVID assigned to the port on which the frame is received. Additionally. it will simply select the next available VID. This type of VLAN is explained in Tagged VLAN Overview on page 101. then you will need to assign the number yourself so that the VLAN has the same VID on all switches. Untagged Ports Naturally. Consequently. and forwards the frame only to those ports with the same PVID. rather than by a port’s PVID. you would assign the Marketing VLAN on each switch the same VID.AT-S39 User’s Guide If a VLAN spans multiple switches. In this manner. If you allow the management software to do it automatically. you need to specify which ports on the switch are to be members of a port-based VLAN. An untagged port cannot be assigned to two port-based VLANs simultaneously. 95 . the PVID of the ports in a VLAN must match the VLAN’s VID.) A port on a switch can be an untagged member of only one port-based VLAN at a time. For example. if you had a port-based VLAN titled Marketing that spanned three AT-8024 switches.

Section II: Local and Telnet Management For example. Consequently. each part of the VLAN on the different switches must be assigned the same VID. ❑ If there are end nodes in different VLANs that need to communicate with each other. Some switches and switch management programs require that you assign the PVID value for each port manually. General Rules to Creating a Port-based VLAN Below is a summary of the general rules to observe when creating a portbased VLAN. a router or Layer 3 switch is required to interconnect the VLANs. the PVID for each port in the VLAN would need to be assigned the value 5. ❑ Each port must be assigned a PVID. However. If a particular VLAN spans multiples switches. ❑ A port can be an untagged member of only one port-based VLAN at a time. 96 . assume that you were creating a port-based VLAN on a switch and you had assigned the VLAN the VID 5. making it identical to the VID of the VLAN to which the port is a member. ❑ Each port-based VLAN must be assigned a unique VID. the AT-S39 management software performs this task automatically. The software automatically assigns a PVID to a port. This value is assigned automatically by the AT-S39 management software. This value must be the same for all ports in a port-based VLAN and it must match the VLAN’s VID. ❑ A port-based VLAN that spans multiple switches requires a port on each switch where the VLAN is located to function as an interconnection between the switches where the various parts of the VLAN reside.

❑ The introduction of a router into your network could create security issues from unauthorized access to your network. such as servers and printers.AT-S39 User’s Guide Drawbacks to Port-based VLANs There are several drawbacks to port-based VLANs: ❑ It is not easy to share network resources. ❑ A VLAN that spans several switches will require a port on each switch for the interconnection of the various parts of the VLAN. a VLAN that spans three switches would require one port on each switch to interconnect the various sections of the VLAN. In network configurations where there are many individual VLANs that span switches. across multiple VLANs. many ports can end up being used ineffectively just to interconnect the various VLANs. For example. 97 . A router or Layer 3 switch must be added to the network to provide a means for interconnecting the port-based VLANs.

13 (PVID 3) Production VLAN (VID 4) Ports 21 .Example 1 The table below lists the port assignments for the Sales. A PVID is the same as the VID to which the port is an untagged member. You assign this number when you create a VLAN.) Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Sales VLAN (VID 2) Production VLAN (VID 4) AT-8024 Ethernet Switch AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER Port 4 Port 12 Port 22 WAN Router Figure 26 Port-based VLAN . 98 .24 (PVID 4) Each VLAN has been assigned a unique VID. Engineering. the Default VLAN is not shown. 11 . Sales VLAN (VID 2) AT-8024 Switch (top) Ports 1 . and Production VLANs on the switch.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Port-based Example 1 Figure 26 illustrates an example of one AT-8024 Fast Ethernet Switch with three port-based VLANs.4 (PVID 2) Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Ports 9. The ports have been assigned PVID values. A port’s PVID is assigned automatically by the management software when you create the VLAN. (For purposes of the following examples.

In this example.AT-S39 User’s Guide In the example. The router interconnects the various VLANs and functions as a gateway to the WAN.Example 2 99 . two VLANs span more than one Ethernet switch. Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Sales VLAN (VID 2) Production VLAN (VID 4) AT-8024 Ethernet Switch AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER WAN AT-8024 Ethernet Switch AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER Sales VLAN (VID 2) Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Figure 27 Port-based VLAN . each VLAN has one port connected to the router. Port-based Example 2 Figure 27 illustrates more port-based VLANs.

it needs a direct connection between its various parts to provide a communications path. Port 18 on the top switch connects to the router. The two parts of the VLAN are interconnected by a direct link from Port 6 on the top switch to Port 5 on the bottom switch. 100 . It has the VLAN of 4 and its ports have been assigned the PVID also of 4. The nodes of this VLAN are connected to only the top switch. So this VLAN does not require a direct connection to the bottom VLAN. However. 19-24 (PVID 3) Production VLAN (VID 4) Ports 21 . It has a VID value of 2 and consists of seven untagged ports on the top switch and six untagged ports on the bottom switch. 20 (PVID 3) Ports 13. This port allows the Sales VLAN to exchanged Ethernet frames with the other VLANs and to access the WAN. ❑ Engineering VLAN . This VLAN uses Port 20 on the top switch as a connection to the router and the WAN.This VLAN spans both switches. ❑ Production VLAN . and Production VLANs on the switches: Sales VLAN (VID 2) AT-8024 Switch (top) Ports 1 .This port-based VLAN uses Ports 9 to 11 on the top switch and Ports 19 to 24 on the bottom switch as connections to the workstations of the VLAN. This direct link allows the two parts of the Sales VLAN to function as one logical LAN segment. 18 (PVID 2) Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Ports 9 .11.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The table below lists the port assignments for the Sales.6. This is provided in the example with a direct connection from Port 14 on the top switch and Port 13 on the bottom switch.6 (PVID 2) none ❑ Sales VLAN . Engineering. Since this VLAN spans multiple switches. 14.24 (PVID 4) AT-8024 Switch (bottom) Ports 1 .This is the final VLAN in the example. it uses Port 22 as a connection to the router.

VLAN membership in a tagged VLAN is determined by information within the frames that are received on a port. A tag. You can use one port per switch for connecting all VLANs on the switch to another switch. The IEEE 802. A port to receive or transmit tagged frames is referred to as a tagged port.1Q standard deals with how this tagging information is used to forward the traffic throughout the switch. 101 . If the frame’s VID does not match any of the VLANs that the port is a member of. Any network device connected to a tagged port must be IEEE 802. This contrasts to a port-based VLAN. where the PVIDs assigned to the ports determine VLAN membership. referred to as a tagged frame.AT-S39 User’s Guide Tagged VLAN Overview The second type of VLAN supported by the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Switches is a tagged VLAN. This is the standard that outlines the requirements and standards for tagging. contains the VID of the VLAN to which the frame belongs (IEEE 802. The benefit of a tagged VLAN is that the tagged ports within the VLAN can belong to more than one VLAN at one time. For example. the frame will be discarded. a server can be configured to accept and return packets from many different VLANs simultaneously. Tagged VLANs are also useful where multiple VLANs span across switches. This can greatly simplify the task of adding shared devices to the network.1Q-compliant. the switch forwards the frame only to those ports that share the same VID. The VLAN information within an Ethernet frame is referred to as a tag or tagged header. the frame will be accepted and forwarded to the appropriate ports. this number uniquely identifies each VLAN in a network.3ac standard). The device must be able to process the tagged information on received frames and add tagged information to transmitted frames. The handling of frames tagged with VIDs coming into a port is straightforward. When a switch receives a frame with a VLAN tag. If the incoming frame’s VID tag matches one of the VIDs of a VLAN that the port is a tagged member of. which follows the source and destination addresses in a frame. As explained earlier in this chapter in VLAN Identifier on page 94.

Tagged and Untagged Ports You need to specify which ports will be members of the VLAN. there would seem to be no need for a PVID. In the case of a tagged VLAN. They are: ❑ VLAN Name ❑ VLAN Identifier ❑ Tagged and Untagged Ports ❑ Port VLAN Identifier Note For explanations of VLAN name and VLAN identifier. and that in a port-based VLAN packets are forwarded based on the PVID. the PVID of a port is ignored on a tagged port. The PVID is always identical to the VLAN’s VID. the management software automatically assigns a PVID to each port when a port is made a member of a VLAN. Port VLAN Identifier As explained earlier in the discussion on port-based VLANs.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The parts of a tagged VLAN are much the same as those for a port-based VLAN. But actually there is. Since a tagged port determines VLAN membership by examining the tagged header within the frames that it receives. A port can also be an untagged member of one VLAN and a tagged member of different VLANs. can be in only one VLAN at a time. You specify which ports will be tagged and which untagged when you create the VLAN. Otherwise. a tagged port can be a member of more than one VLAN. But this is only in cases where untagged frames arrive on tagged ports. refer back to VLAN Name and VLAN Identifier on page 94. simultaneously. whether a member of a port-based VLAN or a tagged VLAN. it will usually be a combination of both untagged ports and tagged ports. However. a frame without any tagged information). The PVID is used if a tagged port receives an untagged frame (that is. 102 . The port will forward the frame based on the port’s PVID. An untagged port.

103 . ❑ Each tagged VLAN must be assigned a unique VID. If a particular VLAN spans multiple switches or stacks. each part of the VLAN on the different switches or stacks must be assigned the same VID. ❑ An AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch can support up to 32 tagged VLANS.AT-S39 User’s Guide General Rules to Creating a Tagged VLAN Below is a summary of the rules to observe when creating a tagged VLAN. ❑ An untagged port can be an untagged member of only one VLAN at a time. ❑ A tagged port can be a member of multiple VLANs.

Section II: Local and Telnet Management Tagged VLAN Example Figure 28 illustrates how tagged ports can be used to interconnect IEEE 802.1Q-based products. Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Legacy Server Sales VLAN (VID 2) Production VLAN (VID 4) AT-8024 Ethernet Switch AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER WAN IEEE 802.1Q Compliant Server AT-8024 Link Mode Link Mode 10Base-T / 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet Switch AT-8024 Ethernet Switch RS-232 TERMINAL PORT MODE COL 100 FULL ACT PWR FAULT MASTER Sales VLAN (VID 2) Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Figure 28 Example of a Tagged VLAN 104 .

105 . when received by the switch. These ports have been made tagged members of the Sales and Engineering VLANs. In the Port-based Example 2 on page 99. meaning the server can handle frames from multiple VLANs. you can use one data link to carry data traffic from several VLANs. But with tagged ports. Two other tagged ports are used to simplify network design in the example. The tagged frames.1Q-compliant server. It is connected to an IEEE 802. They provide a connection between the different parts of these two VLANs. while still maintaining data separation and security. 18 (PVID 2) 8. are delivered only to those ports that belong to the VLAN from which the tagged frame originated. 16 Engineering VLAN (VID 3) Untagged Ports Tagged Ports 9 to 11.AT-S39 User’s Guide The port assignments for the VLANs are as follows: Sales VLAN (VID 2) Untagged Ports Tagged Ports AT-8024 Switch (top) AT-8024 Switch (bottom) 1 to 5. 16 Production VLAN (VID 4) Untagged Ports Tagged Ports 21 to 24 (PVID 4) 8 1 to 5 (PVID 2) 15 19 to 24 (PVID 3) 15 none none This example is nearly identical to the Port-based Example 2 on page 99. Tagged ports have been added to simplify network implementation and management. This port has been made a tagged member of the three VLANs. 20 (PVID 3) 8. Now all three VLANs can access the server without having to go through a router or other interconnection device. It is important to note that even though the server is accepting frames from and transmitting frames to more than one VLAN. They are Port 16 on the top switch and Port 15 on the bottom switch. One of the tagged ports is Port 8 on the top switch. each VLAN had to have its own data link between the switches to connect the different parts of the VLANs. data separation and security remain.

106 . All VLAN information. ❑ Any pre-existing port-based or tagged VLANs are retained in the event you later disabled Basic VLAN Mode. Packets are passed through the switch unchanged. You should be aware of the following before you activate the Basic VLAN mode: ❑ You cannot create or modify port-based or tagged VLANs when the Basic VLAN Mode is activated. either tagged or untagged.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Basic VLAN Mode Overview The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches support a special VLAN configuration referred to as Basic VLAN Mode. is ignored. regardless of the type of ports on which the frames are received and transmitted. Tagged and untagged frames exit the switch the same as they entered. including PVIDs assigned to ports and VLAN tags in tagged frames. Note For instructions on how to activate the Basic VLAN mode. When the Basic VLAN Mode is activated. Tagged frames are analyzed only for priority level. refer to Setting a Switch’s VLAN Mode on page 121. but the VLANs are not used. frames are forwarded based solely on MAC addresses.

type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. perform the following procedure: 1. type 2 to select VLAN Menu.Virtual LAN Support 2 . From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu. The VLAN Menu in Figure 29 is displayed. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Virtual LAN Definitions 1 2 3 4 5 Create a VLAN Modify a VLAN Delete a VLAN Show All VLANs Clear All VLANs S .Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 30 Virtual LAN Definitions Menu 3.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 29 VLAN Menu 2.AT-S39 User’s Guide Creating a Port-based or Tagged VLAN To create a new port-based or tagged VLAN. 107 .Virtual LAN Definitions 3 . From the VLAN Menu. The Virtual LAN Definitions menu in Figure 30 is displayed.Save Configuration Changes R . From the Main Menu. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch VLAN Menu 1 .Port VLANs & Priorities R . type 1 to select Create a VLAN.

If this will be a unique VLAN in your network.. If the VLAN will be unique in your network. you must assign the Sales VLAN on each of the switches the same VID value. such as asterisks (*) or exclamation points (!). The name can contain spaces. if you are creating a VLAN called Sales that will span three switches.. The name should reflect the function of the nodes that will be a part of the VLAN (for example. The permitted range of the VID value is 2 to 4096.........Create VLAN R .. then its VID must also be unique.. but not special characters..... 0 Send to CPU (Y/N) ..Section II: Local and Telnet Management The Create a VLAN window in Figure 31 is displayed. Type 2 to select VLAN ID (VID) and enter a VID value for the new VLAN.. 0 Tagged Ports ... The name can be from one to ten characters in length. For example. If the VLAN will be part of a larger VLAN that spans multiple switches.. Type 1 to select VLAN Name and enter a name for the new VLAN.. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Create a VLAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 VLAN Name . 5..... then the name for the VLAN should be the same on each switch where nodes of the VLAN are connected.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 31 Create a VLAN Window 4... Mirroring Port ... VLAN ID (VID) . then the name should be unique as well. than the VID value for the VLAN should be the same on each switch...... If this VLAN will be part of a larger VLAN that spans multiple switches.. 108 .. C ... Sales or Accounting)... The management software will use the next available VID number on the switch as the default value. Untagged Ports .

2. A value of 0 means that the VLAN traffic will not be mirrored.g. Type 4 to select Untagged Ports and specify the ports on the switch to function as untagged ports in the VLAN. 10.5). 12.. leave this field empty. Press any key. Note In most cases. type 4 to select Show All VLANs. 13. either do not select this option or select it and type N for no.g. Check to see that the VLAN was created correctly and that it contains the appropriate ports.3. Type C to select Create VLAN. as a range (e. You can specify the ports individually (e.) Note In most situations you should not activate this feature.. type 5 to select Mirroring Port and enter a port number when prompted.7-9).7-9) 7. If the VLAN will contain tagged ports. 7-9). For more information on port mirroring. 14.Press any key to continue. 2. or both (e. This feature is useful when troubleshooting a VLAN. 7-9). you will see the following message: SUCCESS . 2. The Virtual LAN Definitions menu in Figure 30 is displayed. 9. 11. type 6 and Y for yes.(If you do not to activate this feature. If this VLAN will not contain any tagged ports. If the switch is successful in creating the new VLAN.g. refer to Port Mirroring Overview on page 79.5. 109 .g..AT-S39 User’s Guide 6. If you want all received traffic on the ports of the VLAN to be mirrored to another port on the switch. By placing a packet sniffer on the mirroring port. as a range (e. 8. To verify that the VLAN was created correctly. If you want all traffic received on the ports of the VLAN to be sent to the switch’s CPU. you can analyze the VLAN traffic.g. If this VLAN will not contain any untagged ports.5.. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes.. leave this field empty.g.5). type 3 to select Tagged Ports and specify the ports. or both (e.. 2. You can specify the ports individually (e.3. this parameter should be left with its default value of 0.

Tagged ports are not removed from any current VLAN assignments because tagged ports can belong to more than one VLAN at a time.Section II: Local and Telnet Management 15. You can repeat this procedure to create additional VLANs. 110 . if you are creating a new VLAN on a switch that contains only the Default VLAN. the ports that you specify as untagged ports of the new VLAN are automatically removed from the Default VLAN. For example. Press Esc or type R to return to the Virtual LAN Definitions menu. Note When you create a new VLAN. ports designated as untagged ports of the new VLAN are automatically removed from their current VLAN assignment.

5. nor will it be sent to the switch’s CPU. To create the example Sales VLAN. press any key. From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. 3. 9. After the switch displays the prompt notifying you that it created the VLAN. Type C to select Create VLAN. Type 1 to select VLAN Name and enter “Sales”. These are the untagged ports of the VLAN. From the Main Menu. Ports 1 to 4. This is the VID value for the new VLAN. 111 . 6. The VLAN traffic will not be mirrored on another port. Type 2 to select VLAN ID (VID) and enter “2”. 7. This VLAN will be assigned a VID of 2 and will consist of four untagged ports. Type 4 to select Untagged Ports and enter “1-4”. type 1 to select Create a VLAN. The new Sales VLAN has now been created. 8. 2.AT-S39 User’s Guide Example of Creating a Port-based VLAN The following procedure creates the Sales VLAN illustrated in Portbased Example 1 on page 98. perform the following procedure: 1. Press Return. The VLAN will not contain any tagged ports. 4. From the VLAN Menu. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. type 2 to select VLAN Menu.

Type 3 to select Tagged Ports and enter “8. 9. 8. 5. 20”. The VLAN traffic will not be mirrored on another port. Press Return. Type 1 to select VLAN Name and enter “Engineering”.10. These are the untagged ports of the VLAN. type 2 to select VLAN Menu. Type 4 to select Untagged Ports and enter “9. 10. From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu. After the switch displays the prompt notifying you that it created the VLAN. These are the tagged ports of the VLAN. Ports 8 and 16. 3. Type C to select Create VLAN. and 12. The new Engineering VLAN has now been created. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. 6. From the VLAN Menu. nor will it be sent to the switch’s CPU. From the Main Menu.11. 2. perform the following procedure: 1.16”. This is the VID value for the new VLAN. It will consist of three untagged ports. 4. 112 . To create the example Engineering VLAN. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. This VLAN will be assigned a VID of 3. 7. Ports 9. 11.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Example of Creating a Tagged VLAN The following procedure creates the Engineering VLAN in the top switch illustrated in Tagged VLAN Example on page 104. and two untagged ports. Type 2 to select VLAN ID (VID) and enter “3”. press any key. type 1 to select Create a VLAN.

From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu... The following prompt is displayed: Enter new value -> [2 to 4096] -> 5. perform the following procedure: 1.. To modify a VLAN. The switch displays the following prompt after modifying the VLAN: SUCCESS . Type 1 to select VLAN ID (VID). For a description of the parameters. 7. type M to select Modify VLAN.. The Modify a VLAN window for the selected VLAN is displayed. type 2 to select Modify a VLAN.VLAN ID (VID) .. R . Change the VLAN’s information as desired. 6. The Modify a VLAN window in Figure 34 is displayed. 3.. 113 . 2. To obtain a VLAN’s VID.Press any key to continue. refer to Step 4 through Step 9 in the procedure Creating a Port-based or Tagged VLAN on page 107. After making the desired changes. Enter the VID of the VLAN you want to modify.Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 32 Modifying a VLAN Menu 4. From the VLAN Menu. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Modify a VLAN 1 . From the Main Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Modifying a VLAN Note You need to know the VID of the VLAN you want to modify to perform this procedure. type 2 to select VLAN Menu. This window contains all relevant information about the VLAN.. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. refer to the procedure Displaying VLAN Information on page 115.

10. The VLAN has been modified. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The modified VLAN is now ready for network operations. Repeat this procedure starting with Step 3 to modify other VLANs. 8. 11. The Virtual LAN Definitions menu in Figure 30 is displayed. 114 . Press any key. 9. Type R to select Return to Previous Menu.

type 2 to select VLAN Menu. From the Main Menu. An example of the window is shown in Figure 33.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying VLAN Information To view the names.10-19 T: 7 2 Sales 3 Production R . perform the following procedure: 1. 3. From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu.9 U: 8. and member ports of all the VLANs on a switch. Show All VLANs VID VLAN Name Untagged (U) / Tagged (T) ---------------------------------------------------------------1 Default VLAN U: 20-24 T: 7. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 33 Show All VLANs Window 115 . type 4 to select View All VLANs. From the VLAN Menu.9 U: 1-6 T: 7. VID numbers. The Show All VLANs window is displayed. 2.

2. 6. Use this window to confirm that you are deleting the correct VLAN. Enter the VID of the VLAN you want to delete and press Return. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. The following prompt is displayed: Enter new value -> [2 to 4096] -> 5. Type 1 to select VLAN ID (VID).. type D. The specifications of the selected VLAN are displayed. refer to the procedure Displaying VLAN Information on page 115. From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Deleting a VLAN Note You need to know the VID of the VLAN you want to delete to perform this procedure.. perform the following procedure: 1. 3. which has a VID of 1..Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 34 Delete a VLAN Menu 4.. To obtain a VLAN’s VID. To delete the VLAN. A confirmation prompt is displayed. 116 . type 2 to select VLAN Menu..VLAN ID (VID) . R .. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Delete a VLAN 1 . From the VLAN Menu.. Note You cannot delete the Default VLAN. From the Main Menu. To delete a VLAN. type 3 to select Delete a VLAN. The Delete a VLAN menu in Figure 34 is displayed.

The VLAN has been deleted.Press any key to continue. both tagged and untagged. 9. The switch displays the following prompt after deleting the VLAN: SUCCESS . The Virtual LAN Definitions menu in Figure 30 on page 107 is displayed. Type Y to delete the VLAN or N to cancel the procedure. 117 . Type R to select Return to Previous Menu. Repeat this procedure starting with Step 3 to delete other VLANs. 10. 8. All ports in the deleted VLAN. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. are returned to the Default VLAN as untagged ports.AT-S39 User’s Guide 7.

5. The Virtual LAN Definitions menu is displayed again. type 2 to select Virtual LAN Definitions. From the VLAN Menu. A confirmation message is displayed. 2. All VLANs are deleted and their tagged and untagged ports are returned to the Default VLAN as untagged ports. 118 . To delete all VLANs on a switch. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. Type Y to delete all VLANs or N to cancel the procedure.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Deleting All VLANs This section contains the procedure for deleting all VLANs. type 5 to select Clear All VLANs. 4. To delete selected VLANs. 3. perform the following procedure: 1. perform the procedure Deleting a VLAN on page 116. From the Virtual LAN Definitions menu. on a switch. From the Main Menu. Press Return. type 2 to select VLAN Menu. except the Default VLAN.

As explained in Port-based VLAN Overview on page 94. For example. if you assign Port 4 on the switch as an untagged port to a VLAN with a VID of 7. From the VLAN Menu. type 3 to select Port VLANS & Priorities. But the AT-S39 software does allow you to adjust the value if you deem it necessary. From the Main Menu. The Port VLANS & Priorities window in Figure 35 is displayed. Enter the number of the port on the switch whose PVID you want to change.Port Number R . Type 1 to select Port Number. Press Return. type 2 to select VLAN Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Changing a PVID Value The procedure in this section explains how to change a PVID value for a port. There should be little need or reason for you to manually change a PVID yourself. a port receives a PVID when it is assigned as an untagged port to a VLAN. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port VLANs & Priorities 1 . The assignment of PVIDs is performed automatically by the AT-S39 software when you create a VLAN. A port’s PVID will be the same as the VLAN’s VID to which it has been assigned.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 35 Port VLANs and Priorities Window 3. 2. 119 . To change a PVID for a port. The following prompt is displayed: Enter new value -> [1 to 26] -> 4. perform the following procedure: 1. then the port will be assigned a PVID also of 7.

Accept changes & update flash R .. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Port VLANs & Priorities 1 2 3 4 Port Number .. Specify the new PVID value for the port.... 120 . You can repeat this procedure to assign new PVIDs to other ports on the switch... 1 1 0 N U .. Port VLAN ID ..... Type U to select Update Changes to Chip.... Type 2 to select Port VLAN ID.... The port now has a new PVID. The switch displays the following prompt: SUCCESS ...... 9. Override Priority (Y/N) .. Press Return... Priority (0-7) 0=Low 7=High .... 7....Press any key to continue...... The following prompt is displayed: Enter new value -> [1 to 4096] -> 6. Return to the Main Menu. 8.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 36 Port VLANs and Priorities Window 5.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The Port VLANS & Priorities window in Figure 36 is displayed....Update Changes to Chip C .... Type S to select Save Configuration Changes.

perform the following procedure: 1. 4. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. The following prompt is displayed: Enter switch mode (T-Tagged. type 5 to select System Config Menu. or B to configure the switch for the Basic VLAN Mode. From the Main Menu. Port-based and tagged VLANs and the Basic VLAN mode are all described in earlier sections in this chapter. 121 . 5. The default is Tagged mode. Type T in order to create your own port-based and tagged VLANs. Press Return. You can configure a switch to support port-based and tagged VLANs or to operate in the Basic VLAN mode. To configure a switch’s VLAN mode.AT-S39 User’s Guide Setting a Switch’s VLAN Mode This section contains the procedure for setting a switch’s VLAN mode. Type 3 to select Switch Mode. 2. Reset the switch using the Reset Switch option in the Administration Menu or the reset button on the back of the unit. B-Basic): 3.

type 2 to select VLAN Menu. If you activate the Basic VLAN Mode using the previous procedure.Enable/Disable VLANs 2 . The difference between the two procedures has to do with ingress filtering. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Virtual LAN Support 1 . 2. perform the following procedure: 1. ingress filtering is disabled. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch VLAN Support ** VLANs are globally Disabled ** E .Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 37 Virtual LAN Support Menu 3.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Enabling or Disabling All VLANs This procedure performs almost exactly the same function as the previous procedure. The VLAN Support window in Figure 38 is displayed.Previous Menu Figure 38 VLAN Support Window 122 . The Virtual LAN Support menu in Figure 37 is displayed.Enable VLANs Globally D . When VLANs are enabled. From the Main Menu.Disable VLANs Globally R . From the VLAN Menu. To configure a switch’s VLAN mode. Type 1 to select Enable/Disable VLANs. the switch supports port-based and tagged VLANs. type 1 to select Virtual LAN Support. Performing this procedure does not change the current setting of ingress filtering. When VLANs are disabled.Accept changes & update flash R . the switch supports the Basic VLAN mode. It sets a switch’s VLAN mode.Enable/Disable Ingress Filtering C .

5. 4. 123 . Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. A change to the status of the VLANs is activated immediately on the switch. Type R to select Return to Previous Menu. Type E to enable the VLANs or D to activate the Basic VLAN Mode.AT-S39 User’s Guide The prompt enclosed in asterisks gives the current status of the VLANs. 6.

Assume that a tagged frame with a VID of 4 is received on a port that is a member of a VLAN also with a VID of 4. this discussion on ingress filtering need only review the rules as they apply to tagged frames. If they belong to the same VLAN. It does not matter whether the frame and the port belong to the same or different VLANs. a tagged frame is an Ethernet frame that contains a tagged header. tagged or untagged. If there is. So how do the egress rules apply when ingress filtering is disabled? First. nor to any frames. assuming that the destination node’s MAC address is in the MAC address table. the port accepts the frame. There are rules for frames as they enter a port (called ingress rules) and rules for when a frame is transmitted out a port (called egress rules). just as a reminder. There are quite a few ingress and egress rules for Fast Ethernet switches. the switch examines the tagged header and determines if the VID in the header corresponds to any VLANs on the switch. Let’s first examine how the ingress rules are applied to tagged frames when ingress filtering is activated. the port discards the frame. Once the tagged frame is received. any tagged frame is accepted on any port on the switch. If there isn’t a corresponding VLAN. Fortunately. What the switch does is it examines the tagged header of each tagged frame that enters a port and determines whether the tagged frame and the port that received the frame are members of the same VLAN. the port accepts the frame. 124 . or floods the port to all ports on the VLAN if the MAC address is not in the table. the switch transmits the frame out the port to the destination node. If the frame and port had belonged to different VLANs. when the switch is operating in the Basic VLAN Mode. For further information. Ingress filtering does not apply to untagged frames. because both the frame and the port belong to the same VLAN. If they belong to different VLANs. Here is an example. refer to Tagged VLAN Overview on page 101.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Enabling or Disabling Ingress Filtering There are certain rules a switch follows as it receives and forwards an Ethernet frame. The header contains the VID of the VLAN to which the frame originated. the switch discards the frame. First. the frame is discarded. A switch will not accept and forward a frame unless the frame passes the ingress and egress rules. In this case.

2. type 2 to select VLAN Menu.Enable Ingress Filtering Globally D . Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch VLAN Support ** Ingress Filtering is Globally Enabled ** E . Activating or deactivating ingress filtering has no effect on the switch’s handling of priority tags. A change to the status of ingress filtering is immediately activated on the switch. You cannot set this per port. which is the default. To enable or disable ingress filtering. The Ingress Filtering window in Figure 39 is displayed.Disable Ingress Filtering Globally R . 125 . type 1 to select Virtual LAN Support. In most cases. you will probably want to leave ingress filtering activated on the switch. Each tagged frame has a priority tag in it that instructs the switch as to the importance of the frame. perform the following procedure: 1. A switch will always examine a priority tag in a tagged frame. type 2 to select Enable/Disable Ingress Filtering. 4. regardless of the status of ingress filtering. From the Virtual LAN Support menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide There is one other thing that should be mentioned about ingress filtering and tagged packets. Frames with a high priority are handled ahead of frames with a low priority. From the Main Menu. Type E to activate ingress filtering or D to disable the feature on the switch.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 39 Ingress Filtering Window 5. The Virtual LAN Support menu in Figure 37 on page 122 is displayed 3. You can enable or disable ingress filtering on a per switch basis. From the VLAN Menu. and that is the priority tag.

The sections in this chapter include: ❑ MAC Address Overview on page 127 ❑ Displaying MAC Addresses on page 129 ❑ Viewing MAC Addresses by Port on page 132 ❑ Identifying a Port Number by MAC Address on page 133 ❑ Viewing the MAC Addresses of a VLAN on page 134 ❑ Deleting All Dynamic MAC Addresses on page 135 ❑ Adding Static MAC Addresses on page 136 ❑ Deleting Static MAC Addresses on page 137 ❑ Changing the Aging Time on page 138 126 .Chapter 11 MAC Address Table The chapter contains the procedures for viewing the static and dynamic MAC address table.

This increases network bandwidth by limiting each frame to the appropriate port when the intended end node is located. When the switch receives a packet. This prevents packets from being forwarded onto inappropriate LAN segments and increases network security. along with the port number on which each address was learned. the switch adds its MAC address and port number to the table. If the switch receives a packet with a destination address that is on the same port on which the packet was received. When the destination node responds. It adds the address and port on which the packet was received to the MAC table if the address has not already been entered in the table. it floods the packet to all the ports on the switch. The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switches contain a 4 kilobyte MAC address table. there is no reason for the switch to forward the packet. The switch learns the MAC addresses of the end nodes by examining the source address of each packet received on a port. and the port number where each address was learned. determines the port where the destination node is connected.AT-S39 User’s Guide MAC Address Overview Every hardware device that you connect to your network has a unique MAC address associated with it. A MAC address is assigned to a device by the device’s manufacturer. It then forwards the packet to the appropriate port and on to the end node. If the ports have been grouped into virtual LANs. the switch floods the packet only to those ports which belong to the same VLAN as the port on which the packet was received. This too increases network performance by preventing frames from being forwarded unnecessarily to other network devices. Since both the source node and the destination node for the packet are located on the same port on the switch. every network interface card that you use to connect your computers to your network has a MAC address assigned to it by the adapter’s manufacturer. The result is a table that contains all the MAC addresses of the devices that are connected to the switch’s ports. freeing the other switch ports for receiving and transmitting data. it also examines the destination address and. it discards the packet without forwarding it on to any port. 127 . For example. by referring to its MAC address table. The switch uses the table to store the MAC addresses of the network nodes connected to its ports. If the switch receives a packet with a destination address that is not in the MAC address table.

The switch deletes a dynamic MAC address from the table if it does not receive any frames from the node over a specified period of time. The switch assumes that the node with that MAC address is no longer active and that its MAC address can be purged from the table. This prevents the MAC address table from becoming filled with addresses of nodes that are no longer active. This value is adjustable on the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Switches. You might need to enter static MAC addresses of end nodes the switch will not learn in its normal dynamic learning process. The period of time that the switch waits before purging an inactive dynamic MAC address is called the aging timer. The MAC address table can also store static MAC addresses. 128 . even when the end node is inactive. Dynamic MAC addresses are not stored indefinitely in the MAC address table. refer to Changing the Aging Time on page 138.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The type of MAC address described above is referred to as a dynamic MAC address. Dynamic MAC addresses are addresses that the switch learns by examining the source MAC addresses of the frames received on the ports. remains in the table indefinitely and is never deleted. even when the end node is inactive. For instructions on changing the aging timer. The default value is 300 seconds (5 minutes). A static MAC address. or if you want a MAC address to remain permanently in the table. once entered in the table.

Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 40 MAC Address Table Menu 2. type 6 to select MAC Address Tables. To display the MAC address table. One selection displays both the static and dynamic MAC addresses while the other displays just the static addresses. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch MAC Address Tables 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A Show all MAC Addresses Add static MAC Address Delete Static MAC Address Delete all dynamic MAC Addresses Show all static MAC addresses View MAC addresses by port View the port of MAC address View MAC addresses by VLAN ID View Multicast MAC Addresses View MAC addresses on base ports (Port 1 to 24) R . The second selection is useful if you are managing an AT8024GB switch with GBIC modules installed. 129 . The MAC Address Table menu in Figure 40 is displayed. To display only static MAC addresses. just the base ports. type 1 to select Show All MAC Addresses or A to select View MAC Addresses on Base Ports. To display both static and dynamic MAC addresses. type 5 to select Show All Static MAC Addresses. perform the following procedure: 1. From the Main Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying MAC Addresses The management software has two menu selections for displaying the MAC addresses of a switch. and you do not want to view the MAC addresses learned on the GBIC ports. 3.

Figure 41 is an example of the Show All MAC Addresses window. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Show All MAC Addresses MAC Port PMAP CPU MIR EMP VlanID Type --------------------------------------------------------------------01:80:C1:00:02:01 0 00000000 Yes Yes Yes 0 Static (fixed. (The abbreviation PMAP is derived from “port mapping.”) Each “0” is a hexadecimal value for the binary value “0000”. non-aging) 00:a0:d2:18:1a:c8 1 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:c4:16:3b:80 2 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:12:c2:10:c6 3 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:c2:09:10:d8 4 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:33:43:a1:87 5 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:12:a7:14:68 6 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:d2:22:15:10 7 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic 00:a0:d4:18:a6:89 8 00000000 No No No 1 Dynamic N .Accept changes & update flash U .Update Display R . which displays both static and dynamic MAC addresses. PMAP The ports on the switch that are members of a multicast group. The columns in the window are defined below. 130 . MAC The MAC address of the node connected to the switch. This column is useful in determining which ports belong to different multicast groups because it maps ports to multicast groups.Section II: Local and Telnet Management The management software displays the MAC addresses. except for the title and the fact that it displays only static MAC addresses. Each binary “0” represents a port on the switch. The static MAC address window is exactly the same. Port The port on the switch where the MAC address was learned. A binary “0” means that the port is not a member of a multicast group while a “1” means that it is.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 41 Show All MAC Addresses Window The information is for viewing purposes only.

Yes indicates that the traffic is being sent to the CPU while No indicates it is not. Another example is “000020F. Multicast packets are forwarded only by ports in the forwarding state. This feature is not supported at this time. 131 . assume that ports 1 through 4 on the switch were members of the same multicast group. This column will indicate “No” for all multicast addresses. This would be represented in the column as follows: “0000000F”. Type The MAC address type. This example would indicate that ports 1 to 4 and port 10 on the switch were members of the same multicast group. Yes means the traffic is being mirrored while No indicates that it is not. MIR Indicates whether the traffic on the port is being mirrored. except for the switch’s MAC address. The type can be either static or dynamic. VLANID The VID of the VLAN to which the port is an untagged member. As an example.AT-S39 User’s Guide The port numbering scheme is from right to left. CPU Indicates whether the traffic received on the port is sent to the switch’s CPU. EMP Indicates whether multicast packets are being forwarded by ports in the blocking state.

132 . From the Main Menu. From the MAC Address Table menu. You can also use this procedure to view any static MAC addresses that have been assigned to a port. The columns in the window and the definitions of the columns are the same as for the Show All MAC Addresses window on page 130. type 6 to select MAC Address Table. 1. Enter the number of the port whose static and dynamic MAC addresses you want to view and press Return. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter port number -> [1 to 26] -> 3.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Viewing MAC Addresses by Port This section contains the procedure for viewing the dynamic MAC addresses that have been learned on a particular port. 2. A window is displayed with the MAC addresses of the nodes on the port. The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. type 6 to select View MAC Addresses by Port Menu.

But if the switch is part of a large network.AT-S39 User’s Guide Identifying a Port Number by MAC Address In some situations. You could display the MAC address table and scroll through the list looking for the MAC address. or to which the address was assigned. You can specify the MAC address and let the management software automatically locate the port on the switch where the device is connected. 1. 2. type 7 to select View the Port of MAC Address. for a static address. From the MAC Address Table menu. if the address was learned dynamically. Enter the MAC address of the node in the following format and press Return: XXXXXX XXXXXX The management software displays a prompt containing the port number on the switch to which the node is connected. you might want to know which port a particular MAC address was learned. finding the address could prove difficult. From the Main Menu. type 6 to select MAC Address Table. 133 . The procedure in this section offers an easier way. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter MAC address: 3.

The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a VLAN ID: [1 to 4095] -> 3. To obtain a VLAN’s VID. type 6 to select MAC Address Table. Enter the VID of the desired VLAN and press Return. (This procedure is not of much value if the switch contains only the Default VLAN. as explained earlier in this chapter. The management software displays a window with a list of the MAC addresses of the nodes in the VLAN.) Note To perform this procedure. type 8 to select View MAC Addresses by VLAN Menu. 1. To view the MAC addresses of a VLAN on the switch. perform the following procedure. refer to the Show All MAC Addresses window on page 130. From the MAC Address Table menu. in which case displaying the entire MAC address table. From the Main Menu. produces the same result. 134 . For an example of the window and for definitions of the columns. you need to know the VID number of the VLAN whose MAC addresses you want to view. 2. refer to Displaying VLAN Information on page 115.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Viewing the MAC Addresses of a VLAN The procedure in this section can be useful if you created VLANs on the switch and want to view the MAC addresses of the nodes of a particular VLAN.

From the Main Menu. A confirmation prompt is displayed. The switch immediately begins to relearn the addresses and to add them to the table. 1. type 4 to select Delete All Dynamic MAC Addresses. the switch immediately begins to relearn the MAC addresses as frames are received on the ports. the dynamic MAC addresses are deleted from the MAC address table. 135 . Note This procedure does not delete static MAC addresses. Type Y for yes to delete the dynamic MAC addresses or N for no to cancel the procedure. If you type Y for yes.AT-S39 User’s Guide Deleting All Dynamic MAC Addresses The management software allows you to purge the MAC address table of all dynamic MAC addresses. 2. From the MAC Address Table menu. type 6 to select MAC Address Table. perform the following procedure. To delete all dynamic MAC addresses from the MAC address table. Once the table has been purged. 3.

From the MAC Address Table menu. Enter the static MAC address in the following format: XXXXXX XXXXXX Once you have specified the MAC address. Enter the number of the port on the switch to which the device is connected. the following prompt is displayed: Please enter a port number: [1 to 24] -> 4. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a MAC address: 3. The management software adds the static address to the MAC address table. perform the following procedure: 1. To add a static address to the MAC address table. 2.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Adding Static MAC Addresses The management software allows you to assign up to 255 static MAC addresses per port on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch. From the Main Menu. 136 . type 2 to select Add Static MAC Address. 5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 to enter additional static MAC addresses. type 6 to select MAC Address Table.

Enter the static MAC address to be deleted in the following format: XXXXXX XXXXXX The static MAC address is immediately deleted from the switch’s MAC address table. 4. type 6 to select MAC Address Table. Repeat the procedure to delete additional static MAC addresses. 137 . From the Main Menu. From the MAC Address Table menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Deleting Static MAC Addresses To delete a static MAC address. perform the following procedure: 1. type 3 to select Delete MAC Address. 2. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a MAC address: 3.

To adjust the aging time. The following prompt is displayed: Enter your new value -> [1 to 1048575] 3. the switch deletes the address. Enter a new value in seconds. From the Main Menu. 2. type 1 to select MAC Aging Time. 138 . type 5 to select System Config Menu. From the System Config Menu. The management software activates the new aging time value on the switch. perform the following procedure: 1.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Changing the Aging Time The switch uses the aging time to delete inactive dynamic MAC addresses from the MAC address table. This prevents the table from becoming full of addresses of nodes that are no longer active. The default setting for the aging time is 300 seconds (5 minutes). When the switch detects that no packets have been sent to or received from a particular MAC address in the table after the period specified by the aging time.

Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Class of Service Overview on page 140 ❑ Configuring CoS on page 141 139 .Chapter 12 Class of Service This chapter contains the procedures for configuring the Class of Service (CoS) feature of the AT-S39 software.

But you can configure CoS on a port so that all untagged frames received on the port are directed to the high priority queue. For example. untagged frames (i. But with the introduction of time-critical applications.1p and 802. CoS can be important in network environments where there are time-critical applications. the switch responds by placing the packet into one of the two queues according to following assignments: IEEE 802.1Q standards. CoS was designed to address this problem. that can be adversely affected by packet transfer delays. frames without VLAN or priority level information) are automatically assigned to the low priority buffer. transfer delays of voice transmission can result in poor audio quality. These priority-to-queue assignments can be overridden using the AT-S39 management software on a per port basis. You can also use CoS to control which priority queue handles untagged frames that ingress a port. The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches have two priority queues.1p standard outlines eight levels of priority.1p Priority Levels 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 AT-8024 and AT-8024GB Queue high high high high low low low low For example. The 802. such as voice transmission or video conferencing. Prior to CoS.e. but were mostly transparent to network users. 0 to 7. By default. a tagged packet with a priority tag of 6 is placed in the high priority queue. network traffic was handled in a best-effort manner. while a packet with a priority tag of 1 is placed in the low priority queue.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Class of Service Overview The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches support CoS as specified in the IEEE 802. low and high. File transfer delays did occur. packet transfer delays can prove problematic.. 140 . When a tagged packet enters a switch port. with 0 the lowest priority and 7 the highest.

) If you want all frames received on the port to go to the high priority queue. type 4 to select Override Priority and type Y. 5. 141 . If you want all tagged and untagged frames received on the port to go to the low priority queue. 9. enter a value from 0 to 3. it does not matter which number it is so long as it is from 4 to 7. 6. If you are configuring a tagged port and you want the switch to ignore the priority tag in the tagged frames that ingress the port. Enter new value -> [1 to 26] -> 4. The default for this parameter is No. Enter the number of the port on the switch where you want to configure CoS. From the Main Menu. From the VLAN Menu.7). A tagged frame leaves a switch with the same priority level that it had when it entered. perform the following procedure: 1. Press Return. 2. The Port VLANS & Priorities window in Figure 36 on page 120 is displayed.) 7. 10. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. 8. Return to the Main Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring CoS To configure CoS for a port. (It does not matter which value you enter so long as it’s from 0 to 3. All tagged frames will be directed to either the low or high priority queue as specified in Step 6. Type 3 to select Priority (0 . meaning that the priority level of tagged frames is determined by the priority level specified in the frame itself. 3. type 3 to select Port VLANS & Priorities. Note The tagged information in a frame is not changed as the frame traverses the switch. enter a value from 4 to 7. type 2 to select VLAN Menu. Type 1 to select Port Number. Repeat this procedure to configure CoS on other ports on the switch. (Again. Type U to select Update Changes to Chip. 11.

Chapter 13 IGMP Snooping This chapter explains how to activate and configure the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping feature on the switch. Sections in the chapter include: ❑ IGMP Snooping Overview on page 143 ❑ Activating IGMP Snooping on page 145 ❑ Displaying a List of Host Nodes on page 148 ❑ Displaying a List of Multicast Routers on page 149 142 .

AT-S39 User’s Guide IGMP Snooping Overview IGMP snooping is best explained by first defining IGMP. the router does not send multicast packets out the port. If a particular port on the router has no nodes that want to be members of multicast groups. If a router does not receive a report from a host node after a predefined length of time. and removes it from the membership list of the multicast group. A node wanting to become a member of a particular multicast group responds to a query by sending a report. IGMP snooping enables the Fast Ethernet switch to monitor the flow of queries from a router and reports from host nodes to build its own multicast membership lists. referred to as a time-out value. In Version 1. Once the router has received a report from a host node. It uses the lists to forward multicast packets only to switch ports where there are host nodes that are members of multicast groups. referred to as Version 1 and Version 2. This improves switch performance and network security by restricting the flow of multicast packets only to those switch ports connected to host nodes. Nodes that join a multicast group are referred to as host nodes. There are two versions of IGMP. it simply stops sending reports. (A multicast group is a group of end nodes that want to receive multicast packets from a multicast application. Once a host node has been made a member of a multicast group. a host node exits from a multicast group by sending a leave request.) The router creates a multicast membership list by periodically sending out queries to the local area networks connected to its ports. One of the differences between the two versions is how a host node indicates that it no longer wants to be a member of a multicast group. This improves network performance by restricting multicast packets only to router ports where host nodes are located. it removes the node from appropriate membership list. This protocol enables routers to create lists of nodes that are members of multicast groups. Any multicast packets belonging to that multicast group are then forwarded by the router out the port. 143 . The router will also stop sending out multicast packets out the port to which the node is connected if it determines there are no further host nodes on the port. it assumes that the host node no longer wants to receive multicast frames. A report indicates an end node’s intention to become a member of a multicast group. In Version 2. Once a router receives a leave request from a host node. it notes the multicast group that the host node wants to join and the port on the router where the node is located. it must continue to periodically issue reports to remain a member.

a switch would have to flood multicast packets out all of its ports. except the port on which it received the packet.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Without IGMP snooping. 144 . which controls how frequently they expect to see reports from end nodes that want to remain members of multicast groups. Such flooding of packets can negatively impact switch and network performance. The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches support both IGMP Version 1 and Version 2. IGMP snooping is disabled on the switch. The switches maintain their multicast groups through an adjustable time-out value. Note By default. and by processing leave requests.

.. perform the following procedure: 1. 2 .. The IGMP Snooping Configuration window in Figure 42 is displayed.AT-S39 User’s Guide Activating IGMP Snooping To activate or deactivate IGMP snooping on the switch and to configure IGMP snooping parameters. type E to enable or D to disable this feature. Host/Router Timeout Interval . View Multicast Hosts List View Multicast Router List Disabled Single-Host/Port (Edge) 260 seconds 256 Auto Detect S . Maximum Multicast Groups . type 5 to select System Config Menu... 2... The Single-Host/Port setting is appropriate when there is only one host node connected to each port on the switch.. From the Main Menu......Multicast Host Topology Defines whether there is only one host node per switch port or multiple host nodes per port.... Multicast Host Topology .. type 1 to select IGMP Snooping Configuration. After selecting this option. Multicast Router Port(s) ...Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 42 IGMP Snooping Configuration Window The options in the window are defined below: 1 .IGMP Snooping Status Enables and disables IGMP snooping on the switch. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration. 3.. Possible settings are SingleHost/Port (Edge) and Multi-Host/Port (Intermediate). Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch IGMP Snooping Configuration 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 IGMP Snooping Status . From the System Configuration Menu. From the Advanced Configuration window.Save Configuration Changes R .. This setting causes the switch to immediately stop sending multicast packets out a switch port when a host node signals its desire to leave a 145 .

The default is 256 multicast groups. such as when a port is connected to an Ethernet hub to which multiple host nodes are connected. An inactive host node is a node that has not sent an IGMP report during the specified time interval.Multicast Router Port(s) Specifies the port on the switch to which the multicast router is detected. The range is 1 address to 2048 addresses. If the switch does not detect any queries from a multicast router during the specified time interval. it assumes that the router is no longer active on the port. that is. The range is from 1 second to 86. The switch responds by immediately ceasing the transmission of further multicast packets out the port where the host node is connected. 4 . 5 . This parameter is useful with networks that contain a large number of multicast groups. The default is 256 multicast addresses.400 seconds (24 hours). You can use the parameter to prevent the switch’s MAC address table from filling up with multicast addresses.Section II: Local and Telnet Management multicast group by sending a leave request or when the host node stops sending reports. The switch makes the determination by watching for queries from the router. With this setting selected the switch continues sending multicast packets out a port even after it receives a leave request from a host node on the port.Host/Router Timeout Interval Specifies the time period in seconds after which the switch determines that a host node has become inactive. 3 . you should select the Multi-Host Port (Intermediate) selection. The default is 260 seconds. Only after all the host nodes connected to a switch port have transmitted leave requests (or have timed out) will the switch stop sending multicast packets out the port. This ensures that the remaining active host nodes on the port will continue to receive the multicast packets. This parameter also specifies the time interval used by the switch in determining whether a multicast router is still active. The range is 1 to 2048 groups.Maximum Multicast Groups Specifies the maximum number of multicast groups the switch will learn. The Multi-Host setting is appropriate if there is more than one host node connected to a switch port. If a switch has a mixture of host nodes. You can let the switch determine this automatically by 146 . leaving no room for dynamic or static MAC addresses. some connected directly to the switch and others through an Ethernet hub.

or you can specify the port yourself by entering a port number. type S to select Save Configuration Changes. 4. After making the desired changes. To select Auto Detect. enter “0” (zero) for this parameter. Note Selections 6 and 7 in the menu are discussed later in this chapter. Your changes are activated immediately on the switch.AT-S39 User’s Guide selecting Auto Detect. 147 .

perform the following procedure: 1.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Displaying a List of Host Nodes You can use the AT-S39 software to display a list of the multicast groups on a switch. Host IP The IP address(es) of the host node(s) connected to the port. 4.Update Display R . Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch View Multicast Hosts List Multicast Group Member Port VLAN Host IP --------------------------------------------U . The IGMP Snooping Configuration window in Figure 42 is displayed. From the System Configuration Menu. VLAN The VID of the VLAN in which the port is an untagged member. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration. From the IGMP Snooping Configuration window. The View Multicast Host List in Figure 43 is displayed. type 6 to select View Multicast Host List. as well as the host nodes. type 1 to select IGMP Snooping Configuration. To display the list. 148 . 2. From the Main Menu. 3. Membership Port The port(s) on the switch to which one or more host nodes of the multicast group are connected. type 5 to select System Config Menu.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 43 View Multicast Hosts List Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. The columns are defined below: Multicast Group The multicast address of the group. From the Advanced Configuration window.

The IGMP Snooping Configuration window in Figure 42 is displayed. From the System Configuration Menu.Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 44 View Multicast Routers List Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only.Update Display R . From the IGMP Snooping Configuration window. From the Main Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying a List of Multicast Routers A multicast router is a router that is receiving multicast packets from a multicast application and transmitting the packets to host nodes. 3. The View Multicast Router List in Figure 43 is displayed. perform the following procedure: 1. type 5 to select System Config Menu. 4. From the Advanced Configuration window. You can use the AT-S39 software to display a list of the multicast routers that are connected to the switch. The columns are defined below: Port The port on the switch where the multicast router is connected. VLAN The VID of the VLAN in which the port is an untagged member. 2. type 1 to select IGMP Snooping Configuration. type 7 to select View Multicast Router List. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch View Multicast Router List Port VLAN Router IP --------------------------------------------U . 149 . To display a list of the multicast routers. Router IP The IP address of the multicast router. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration.

Chapter 14 Broadcast Frame Control This chapter contains the procedures for configuring the broadcast frame control feature of the AT-S39 management software. Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Broadcast Frame Control Overview on page 151 ❑ Configuring the Interval Timer on page 153 ❑ Configuring the Maximum Broadcast Frame Count on page 155 150 .

You can specify a different value for 10 Mbps. When a node sends out a broadcast frame. The maximum broadcast frame limit specifies the maximum number of broadcast frames the switch will allow on a port during the specified timer interval. 151 . In order to use this feature. The interval timer defines the time period used in counting the number of broadcast frames on a port. the node sends the file in unicast Ethernet frames containing the destination address of the server where the file is to be stored. You can specify a different maximum for each port on the switch. the node sending a unicast frame intends the frame for a particular node on the network. The timer interval for 1000 Mbps ports is measured in microseconds. The timer interval for 10 and 100 Mbps ports is measured in milliseconds.AT-S39 User’s Guide Broadcast Frame Control Overview Most frames on an Ethernet network are unicast frames. you can use the AT-S39 management software to limit the number of broadcast frames passing through the switch and so limit the number of broadcast frames on your network. For example. Broadcast packets can perform a variety of functions in an Ethernet network. some network operating systems use broadcast frames to announce the presence of devices on the network. That is. Should the performance of your network has been diminished by heavy broadcast traffic. For example. A time interval setting applies to all corresponding ports on the switch. Broadcast frames are different. Broadcast frames received once the maximum has been exceeded are discarded by the port and are not forwarded. you must set two values: the interval timer and the maximum broadcast frame limit. the frame is directed to all nodes on the network or all nodes within a particular virtual LAN. 100 Mbps and 1000 Mbps ports on the switch. A unicast frame is sent to a single destination. when a node needs to send a file to a network server for storage. The problem with broadcast frames is that too many of them traversing the network can impact network performance.

the port will accept up to 200 broadcast frames every 100 milliseconds. the broadcast frames over the limit are discarded by the port and are not forwarded by the switch. Note The AT-S39 default setting is no broadcast frame control on the switch. At these settings.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Here’s an example. Let’s assume that you sent the timer interval for 100 Mbps ports to 100 milliseconds and the maximum broadcast frame limit for a particular 100 Mbps port on the switch to 200 broadcast frames. If the maximum is exceeded during the specified time interval. 152 .

The Broadcast Storm Control window in Figure 45 is displayed. 100.. 2.Timer for 1000 MB ports . From the System Configuration Menu. type 7 to select Advanced Configuration.. The value for 1000 Mbps ports is in microseconds.100x 153 ...) A value for an interval timer applies to all ports operating at that corresponding speed... From the Main Menu..AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring the Interval Timer To set the interval timer for the broadcast frame control feature. The management software will multiple your value as follows: ❑ 10 Mbps . Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Broadcast Storm Control 1 . 0 milli sec 3 . 0 milli sec 2 . The values for 10 and 100 Mbps ports are in milliseconds. Type 1. or 3 and enter a value when prompted. and 1000 Mbps. 3. type 2 to select Broadcast Timers Setup. perform the following procedure: 1. You can enter a different interval timer for each possible port speed on the switch: 10. From the Advanced Configuration Menu. (1000 Mbps applies only to GBIC modules in an AT-8024GB switch..Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection? Figure 45 Broadcast Storm Control Window 4.Save Configuration Changes R .. 2. type 5 to select System Config Menu.10x ❑ 100 Mbps . 0 micro sec C .Timer for 100 MB ports .1x ❑ 1000 Mbps .Timer for 10 MB ports .

if you enter “20” for the interval timer for 10 Mbps ports.Section II: Local and Telnet Management For example. Note The 1000 Mbps speed applies only to GBIC modules in an AT-8024GB switch. 6. A value of “0” disables the broadcast frame control feature for ports operating at the corresponding timer speed. type S to select Save Configuration Changes. Go to the next procedure and specify the maximum number of broadcast frames the ports on the switch can receive. 5. 154 . the management software multiples the value by 10. Your changes are immediately activated on the switch. The default value is “0” for all timers. The result would be an interval timer of 200 milliseconds for ports operating at 10 Mbps. Once you have set the desired timer intervals.

2. To configure a range of ports. The following prompt is displayed: Ending Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 4. Enter the number of the port you want to configure and press Return. enter the same port number here as you entered in Step 3 and press Return. To configure a range of ports. Your changes are immediately activated on the switch. For example.> Specify the maximum number of broadcast frames the port can receive during the timer interval. 5. and you specified a 10 millisecond interval timer for 100 Mbps ports. enter the first port of the range. From the Main Menu. 155 . assume that you are specifying the maximum broadcast frame count for a port operating at 100 Mbps. If more than 200 broadcast frames are received during the time interval. The Port Configuration window in Figure 13 on page 58 is displayed.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring the Maximum Broadcast Frame Count To specify the maximum number of broadcast frames a port on the switch can receive and forward. type 1 to select Port Configuration. 6. Type S to select Save Configuration Changes. all broadcast frames over 200 are discarded by the switch and are not forwarded. From the Port Menu. Type B to select Broadcast Control. type 1 to select Port Menu. The following prompt is displayed: Starting Port to Configure [1 to 24] -> 3. perform the following procedure: 1. the switch will allow a maximum of 200 broadcast frames on the port every 10 milliseconds. enter the last port number in the range. Broadcasts (0 -> No limit) : [0 to 1023] . If you entered a value of 200 at the prompt. To configure only one port. The following prompt is displayed: Enter Max.

Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Displaying Port Statistics on page 157 ❑ Displaying Switch Statistics on page 160 156 .Chapter 15 Ethernet Statistics This chapter contains the procedures for displaying data traffic statistics.

Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 47 Port Statistics Menu 3. Type 3 to select Display Port Statistics. Enter the number of the port whose statistics you want to view. From the Ethernet Statistics menu.Clear Port Statistics 3 .Select a Port 2 .Port Statistics Menu 2 . perform the following procedure: 1.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying Port Statistics To display Ethernet port statistics. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Ethernet Statistics 1 .Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: Figure 46 Ethernet Statistics Menu 2. The Ethernet Statistics menu in Figure 46 is displayed. The following prompt is displayed: Please enter a port number [1 to 26] -> 4. type 1 to select Port Statistics Menu.Clear Module Statistics 3 . The Port Statistics Menu in Figure 47 is displayed Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Ethernet Statistics 1 . 5. Type 1 to choose Select a Port. type 7 to select Ethernet Statistics. From the Main Menu.Display Port Statistics R . 157 . Press Return.Display Module Statistics R .

.. TX_COUNT ........... shown in Figure 48... RX_MLTCAST ................................ Received Packets Number of bytes received on the port. RX_BRDCAST ........... OVERSIZE ...... CRC_ERROR ........... Received Broadcast Number of broadcast packets received on the port...... The statistics are defined below: Total Count Number of bytes received and transmitted on the port.............. Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Display Port Statistics Ethernet statistics for port #1 TOTAL_COUNT ..Section II: Local and Telnet Management The statistics for the port are displayed in the Display Port Statistics window..... UNDERSIZE ..... Transmit Packets Number of bytes transmitted out the port. RX_COUNT ......Update Display R ............ CRC Error Number of packets with a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) error but with the proper length (64-1518 bytes) received on the port. Received Overflow Number of times the capacity of the port’s buffer has been exceeded........ PORT_IN_DISCARDS ............................. 158 . RX_OVERFLOW ....Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Figure 48 Display Port Statistics Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only.......... Received Multicast Number of multicast packets received on the port. FRAGMENT ...................... RX_UNICAST ........... U ................

If you want to clear the counters on the port and return them to “0”.3 (64 bytes including the CRC) received on the port.3 (1518 bytes including the CRC) received on the port. packets with alignment errors.AT-S39 User’s Guide Undersize Packets Number of packets that were less than the minimum length specified by IEEE 802. Oversize Packets Number of packets exceeding the maximum specified by IEEE 802. 159 .Clear Port Statistics” from the Port Statistics Menu. but discarded and not forwarded. Fragmented Packets Number of undersized packets. and packets with FCS errors (CRC errors) received on the port. select the option “2 . Port in Discards Number of frames successfully received and buffered by the port.

... RX_UNICAST .... Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Display Module Statistics Ethernet statistics for this module TOTAL_COUNT .... 2.. The statistics for the port are displayed in the Display Port Statistics window........... TX_COUNT ........................................... Received Packets Number of packets received by the switch..... Transmit Packets Number of packets transmitted from the switch... perform the following procedure: 1... RX_OVERFLOW ... type 7 to select Ethernet Statistics.. RX_BRDCAST ........... type 3 to select Display Module Statistics..... FRAGMENT ...... shown in Figure 48... 160 ...Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Figure 49 Display Module Statistics Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only.............. From the Ethernet Statistics menu............... Received Overflow Number of times the capacity of the port buffers have been exceeded.....Update Display R ... RX_COUNT ....... CRC_ERROR ..... The statistics are defined below: Total Count Number of valid packets received and transmitted by the switch.....Section II: Local and Telnet Management Displaying Switch Statistics To display Ethernet statistics for an entire switch.............. RX_MLTCAST ...................... U ..................... UNDERSIZE ...... OVERSIZE . PORT_IN_DISCARDS ..... From the Main Menu.

If you want to clear the counters on the switch and return them to “0”. Received Multicast Number of multicast packets received on the switch. Undersize Packets Number of packets that were less than the minimum length specified by IEEE 802. Fragmented Packets Number of undersized packets. and packets with FCS errors (CRC errors) received on the switch. Port in Discards Number of frames successful received and buffered by the switch. Oversize Packets Number of packets exceeding the maximum specified by IEEE 802. 161 . packets with alignment errors.3 (64 bytes including the CRC) received on the switch. select the option “2 . but discarded and not forwarded. CRC Error Number of packets with a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) error but with the proper length (64-1518 bytes) received by the switch.3 (1518 bytes including the CRC) received on the switch.Clear Module Statistics” from the Ethernet Statistics Menu.AT-S39 User’s Guide Received Broadcast Number of broadcast packets received on the switch.

Chapter 16

Management Software Updates

This chapter explains how to obtain new versions of the AT-S39 management software and how to download the software onto an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch. You can download new management software onto a switch using either of the following methods: ❑ Local management session ❑ Trivial File Transfer Protocol Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Obtaining Software Updates on page 163 ❑ Downloading New Management Software from a Local Management Session on page 164 ❑ Downloading a New Management Software Image Using TFTP on page 167

162

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Obtaining Software Updates
New releases of the AT-S39 management software are available from the Allied Telesyn web site at www.alliedtelesyn.com and from our FTP server at ftp.alliedtelesyn.com. To log on to the FTP server, enter “anonymous” for the user name and your email address for the password. Management software for the AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches will have “S39” as part of the filename. Note The AT-8024 and AT-8024GB switches use the same management software image.

163

Section II: Local and Telnet Management

Downloading New Management Software from a Local Management Session
This section contains the procedure for downloading a new version of the AT-S39 management software onto a switch. You can also use this procedure to download a new boot loader file onto the switch or a configuration file. Note You cannot perform this procedure from a Telnet or web browser management session. Caution The switch will not forward Ethernet traffic during the software download and initialization process. Note The current configuration of the switch (e.g., IP address, subnet mask, and virtual LANs) is maintained when you install a new software image on the switch. If you want to return a switch to its default configuration, refer to Activating the AT-S39 Software Default Values on page 41. The following procedure assumes that you have already obtained the new version of management software and have stored it on the computer from which you will be performing the procedure. To download a new software image onto an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch using Xmodem, perform the following procedure: 1. Establish a local management session on the switch where you intend to download the new management software. For instructions, refer to Starting a Local Management Session on page 25. 2. From the Main Menu, type 4 to select Administration menu. 3. From the Administration Menu, type X to select Xmodem Download & Uploads.

164

AT-S39 User’s Guide

The following menu is displayed:
Allied Telesyn AT-8024 Ethernet Switch Xmodem Downloads & Uploads 1 - Xmodem Image Download 2 - Xmodem Config Download 3 - Xmodem Boot Loader Download R - Return to Previous Menu Enter your selection:

Figure 50 Xmodem Downloads & Uploads Menu Note This version of the management software does not allow you to upload a configuration file from a workstation to a switch using the management software. Uploading configuration files is possible using TFTP, as explained in Uploading a Configuration File on page 168. 4. Type the appropriate number to select the desired action. The following prompt is displayed:
Enter filename -

5. Enter one of the following: ❑ To load a new management software image, type ats39.img. ❑ To load a new boot loader file, type ats39.ldr. ❑ To load a configuration file, type ats39.cfg. Note The actual filename of the software image, loader file, or configuration file to be downloaded onto the switch does not have to match the corresponding filename above, so long as the suffix is correct (.img, .ldr, or .cfg). The following prompt is displayed:
You are going to invoke the Xmodem download utility. Do you wish to continue? [Yes/No]

6. Type Y for Yes. The prompt “Downloading” is displayed.

165

Section II: Local and Telnet Management 7. Do not reboot the switch. Note Do not interrupt the initialization process. Once the management software is initialized. the switch will begin initialize the software after it is installed. If you are installing a new management image. a process that takes approximately 1 minute to complete. the switch automatically resets. Begin the file transfer of the new management software image. 166 . Note The transfer protocol must be Xmodem.

The path and filename of the file that is to be downloaded onto the switch. You need to provide the following information when using the TFTP client software to download a file: Host .AT-S39 User’s Guide Downloading a New Management Software Image Using TFTP The AT-S39 software comes with TFTP server software.img 167 .1 put c:\ats39.1. This may necessitate renaming the file. loader file.This is the IP address of the AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch to which you are downloading the new software image. tftp -i 149.The Put command is used to download a new software image file to the switch. A command line version is included in most UNIX variants and in Windows NT.35.35.1. Binary . If your network is using the TCP/IP protocol and there is a workstation on your network with TFTP client software. or configuration file to be downloaded onto the switch must match the corresponding filename above. The filename must be one of the following: ❑ “ATS39. Source file . you can use the client software to download the following files onto the switch: ❑ A new AT-S39 software image ❑ A new boot loader file ❑ A configuration file TFTP software is available from various sources and is included in SNMPc which is can be purchased through Allied Telesyn. Put .cfg for a configuration file Note The filename of the software image. Example The following example downloads a new management software image onto a switch with an IP address of 149.1. Please consult the documentation or the manufacturer of the software used on the proper use of the software.ldr for a new boot loader ❑ “ATS39.You must specify binary mode for the file transfer.img” for a new software image ❑ “ATS39.

This file can then be used to restore the configuration information to the same switch or can be uploaded to other switches of the same family that need to be configured identically.35.1 get ats39. as explained in the previous section.The path and filename where you want to store the configuration file.Section II: Local and Telnet Management Uploading a Configuration File The switch configuration information can be uploaded and saved to a file on a workstation. Source file .img Once the file is stored on a local drive.1. Get . Note The switch configuration file created with these procedures cannot be edited.You must specify binary mode for the file transfer.cfg”. The basic TFTP parameters for uploading a switch configuration file to a workstation are as follows: Host . it can be downloaded to another switch using TFTP.35.This is the IP address of the switch that you are uploading the configuration file from. 168 .The source file name is “ATS39.1 to local drive C: of the workstation.img c:\ats39. Binary .1. Example The following example uploads the configuration file from a switch with an IP address of 149.The Get command is used to upload the configuration file to the workstation. Destination file . tftp -i 149.

MAC Address Table on page 215 ❑ Chapter 26. IGMP Snooping on page 221 ❑ Chapter 28. Virtual LANs on page 204 ❑ Chapter 25. Class of Service on page 219 ❑ Chapter 27. Port Security on page 192 ❑ Chapter 21. Spanning Tree Protocol on page 200 ❑ Chapter 24. The chapters include: ❑ Chapter 17. Starting a Web Browser Management Session on page 170 ❑ Chapter 18. Basic Switch Parameters on page 174 ❑ Chapter 19. Port Mirroring on page 197 ❑ Chapter 23. Port Parameters on page 183 ❑ Chapter 20. Broadcast Frame Control on page 225 169 .Section III Web Browser Management The chapters in this section explain how to manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switch using a web browser. Port Trunks on page 194 ❑ Chapter 22.

Chapter 17 Starting a Web Browser Management Session This chapter contains the procedure for starting a management session on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch using a web browser. such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator. 170 .

perform the following procedure: 1. Note In order for you to manage an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch using a web browser. as shown in Figure 51. Note If your PC with the web browser is connected directly to the switch to be managed or is on the same side of a firewall as the switch. Consequently. 171 . To start a web browser management session. For instructions. refer to Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 34.) The user name cannot be changed. the enhanced stacking feature of the AT-8024GB switch is not supported from a web browser management session. enter the user name and password. Additionally.AT-S39 User’s Guide Starting a Web Browser Management Session This section explains how to start a web browser management session. To change the password. Initially assigning an IP address to a switch can only be done through a local management session. When prompted. you must configure your browser’s network options not to use proxies. you must establish a separate management session on each switch to be managed. Switch’s IP Address Figure 51 Entering a Switch’s IP Address in the URL Field 3. Start your web browser. 2. (The password is case-sensitive. The default user name is “manager” and the default password is “admin”. refer to Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 175. Enter the IP address of the switch you want to manage in the URL field of the browser. the switch must have an IP address. Consult your web browser’s documentation on how to configure the switch’s web browser not to use proxies.

The window shown in Figure 52 is displayed. Figure 52 Home Page This is the Home page of the management software. In the left portion of the Home page is the main menu: ❑ Configuration ❑ Monitoring ❑ Exit Note A web browser management session remains active even if you link to other sites. Browser Tools You can use the browser tools to move around the Omega menus. You can return to the management web pages anytime as long as you do not quit the browser. 172 . You can also use the browser’s bookmark feature on frequently-used Omega menus and windows. Selecting Back on your browser’s toolbar returns you to the previous display.

AT-S39 User’s Guide Quitting from a Web Browser Management Session To exit from a web browser management session. select Exit from any AT-S39 management page. 173 .

Chapter 18 Basic Switch Parameters The procedure in this chapter explains how to set the following switch parameters: ❑ Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 175 ❑ Viewing System Information on page 179 ❑ Configuring the SNMP Parameters and Trap IP Addresses on page 181 174 .

perform the following procedure: 1. To set the basic switch parameters for an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet switch. refer to When Does an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Switch Need an IP Address? on page 32. and gateway address to an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB switch. subnet address. The Configuration window is displayed with the System option selected by default. From the Home Page. If the System menu option is not selected. 175 . select Configuration.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name Note For guidelines on when to assign an IP address. 2. select it and then select the General tab.

Figure 53 General Tab Note This procedure describes the parameters in the Administration section of the window. Entering a value for this parameter is optional. 3. Change the parameters as desired. 176 . The parameters are described below: System Name This parameter specifies a name for the switch (for example.Section III: Web Browser Management The General tab in Figure 53 is displayed. The parameters in the Configuration and Broadcast Storm Control sections are discussed later in this guide. Sales Ethernet switch).

IP address This parameter specifies the IP address of the switch. This can help you avoid performing a configuration procedure on the wrong switch.AT-S39 User’s Guide Note You should assign each switch a name. Caution The password should not contain any spaces or special characters. The names can help you identify the various switches in your network. The password can be from 2 to 10 characters in length. Comments This parameter specifies additional information about the Fast Ethernet switch. The default password is “admin”. a Telnet utility. Administrator This parameter specifies the name of the network administrator responsible for managing the switch.. Gateway address This parameter specifies the default router’s IP address.g. This is particularly important if you will be managing the switch from a web browser. Wiring closet 402B). 177 . You must specify an IP address if you intend to remotely manage the switch using a web browser. such as asterisks (*) or exclamation points (!). Your changes are not stored to flash in the switch until you select Apply. After you have set the parameters. or an SNMP management program. Password Confirm Password These parameters are used to change the administrator’s login password for the switch. This address is required if you intend to remotely manage the switch from a management station that is separated from the switch by a router. The same password is used for both local and remote management sessions. such as its location (e. Entering a value for this parameter is optional. Subnet mask This parameter specifies the subnet mask for the switch. To create a new password. Most web browsers cannot handle special characters in passwords. enter the new password into both fields. Entering a value for this parameter is optional. click Apply. You must specify a subnet mask if you assigned an IP address to the switch. 4. Floor 4.

178 . you must reset the switch to activate your change. or by using the Reset button on the switch. or gateway address. If you made a change to the IP address.Section III: Web Browser Management 5. You can reset a switch from a local or a Telnet session. You cannot reset a switch from a web browser management session. subnet mask.

The General tab window in Figure 54 on page 179 is displayed. 3. From the Configuration Menu. The Monitoring window is displayed. select the General tab. 2. If it is not already selected. Figure 54 General Tab Window 179 . select System Status.AT-S39 User’s Guide Viewing System Information To view basic information about the switch. perform the following procedure: 1. select Monitoring. From the Home page.

refer to Setting the Switch’s VLAN Mode on page 212.” the switch is operating in the Basic VLAN Mode. 180 . If this parameter displays “Tagged. Virtual LANs on page 91. The default is 300 seconds (5 minutes). This value cannot be changed. The sections in the window are defined below. which also explains how to change the parameters. including the IP address of the switch and the system name. Configuration This section contains the following items: ❑ MAC Aging . These parameters are defined in the procedure Configuring an IP Address and Switch Name on page 175. You cannot change any of the values from this window. For instructions on how to set the switch VLAN mode from a web browser management session. Administration This section contains a variety of information. refer to the overview sections in Chapter 10.Defines the switch’s current VLAN mode. For information about VLANs. For background information about MAC addresses. If this parameter displays “Basic. These values cannot be changed.” the switch supports port-based and tagged VLANs.Defines the strategy used by the switch in locating addresses in the MAC address table.Defines how long a dynamic MAC address can remain inactive in the MAC address table before it is deleted. refer to MAC Address Overview on page 127. ❑ Hash Count .Section III: Web Browser Management This window is for viewing purposes only. ❑ Switch Mode . General This section displays the switch’s serial number and the switch’s MAC address.

select System. 2. perform the following procedure: 1.AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring the SNMP Parameters and Trap IP Addresses To change the switch’s SNMP community strings or to specify the IP addresses of management stations to receive traps from the switch. Select the SNMP tab. The parameters are described below. 181 . From the Configuration menu. select Configuration. 3. Figure 55 SNMP Tab 4. GET Community SET Community Trap Community Use these parameters to set a switch’s SNMP community strings. Adjust the parameters as desired. The SNMP window in Figure 55 is displayed. From the Home page.

Changes are immediately activated on the switch.Section III: Web Browser Management Trap Receiver 1 Trap Receiver 2 Trap Receiver 3 Trap Receiver 4 Use these selections to specify the IP addresses of up to four management workstations on your network to receive traps from the switch. 5. Click Apply to save your changes to the switch. 182 .

Chapter 19 Port Parameters The procedures in this chapter allow you to view and change the parameter settings for the individual ports on a switch. Examples of port parameters that you can adjust include duplex mode and port speed. This chapter contains the following procedures: ❑ Configuring Port Parameters on page 184 ❑ Displaying Port Status and Statistics on page 187 183 .

select Layer 1. (To deselect a port. 184 . Click the port in the graphical switch image that you want to configure.) 5. The Port Setting tab is shown in Figure 56. click it again. Click Modify. From the Configuration page. 2. Select the Port Setting tab. Figure 56 Port Setting Configuration Tab 4.Section III: Web Browser Management Configuring Port Parameters To configure the parameter settings for a port on a switch. select Configuration. 3. You can select only one port at a time. The selected port turns white. From the Home page. perform the following procedure: 1.

An example of the window is shown in Figure 57. Figure 57 Settings for Port Window 6. Flow Control The flow control setting for the port.AT-S39 User’s Guide The Settings for Port window is displayed.Flow control for both packets entering and leaving the port. Both . Transmit . refer to Setting the Maximum Number of Broadcast Frames on page 227. any additional broadcast packets received on the port are discarded by the switch. Broadcast Storm Control The maximum number of broadcast packets the port can receive within a specified period of time. Possible values are: None .Flow control only on packets being transmitted out of the port. The parameters are described below.Flow control only on packets being received on the port. For background information on this feature.No flow control on the port. For instructions on how to set this value. Adjust the port parameters as desired. If the threshold is reach. Receive . 185 . refer to Broadcast Frame Control Overview on page 151.

7.Full Duplex ❑ 100Mbps . ❑ 10Mbps . AT-S39 Default Settings on page 228. Once you have made the desired changes.Half Duplex ❑ 100Mbps . 186 .Half Duplex ❑ 10Mbps . A disabled port will not accept or transmit frames.Full Duplex Disable Port You can use this check box to enable or disable a port. This is the default. Default values are listed in Appendix A. Possible settings for this parameter are: ❑ Auto-Negotiate: The port will Auto-Negotiate both speed and duplex mode. click Apply. The default for this port parameter is enabled. Note Clicking Default returns the port settings to the default values. The switch immediately activates the parameter changes on the port.Section III: Web Browser Management Speed and Mode The operating speed and duplex mode of the port.

and more. 2.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying Port Status and Statistics The procedure in this section displays the operating status of the ports on a switch and port statistics. You can also view the operating status of any GBIC modules installed in an AT-8024GB. Ports with valid links to end nodes have a green light. click it again. From the Monitoring page. The Layer 1 option is shown in Figure 58. MDI/MDI-X configuration. select Monitoring. duplex mode. Click Status to display the port’s operating status or Statistics to display port statistics. From the Home page. You can select only one port at a time. 3. You can view a port’s operating speed. To display the status or statistics of a switch port. (To deselect a port. perform the following procedure: 1. Click a port. Figure 58 Port Monitoring Page This page displays a graphical image of the front of the switch. select Layer 1.) 4. 187 . The selected port turns white.

Section III: Web Browser Management

If you select port status, the Port Status window in Figure 59 is displayed.

Figure 59 Port Status Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. To adjust port parameters, refer to Configuring Port Parameters on page 184. The columns in the window are described below: Link State The status of the link between the port and the end node connected to the port. Possible values are: Up - indicates that a valid link exists between the port and the end node. Down - indicates that the port and the end node have not established a valid link.

188

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Flow Control The port’s flow control setting. Possible values are: None - No flow control on the port. Transmit - Flow control only on packets being transmitted out the port. Receive - Flow control only on packets being received on the port. Both - Flow control for both packets entering and leaving the port. MDI Mode The operating configuration of the port. Possible values are MDI and MDI-X. Negotiation The status of Auto-Negotiation on the port. Possible values are: Auto - Indicates that the port is using Auto-Negotiation to set operating speed and duplex mode. Manual - Indicates that the operating speed and duplex mode are set manually. Actual Speed The operating speed and duplex mode of the port. Possible values are: 0010 - 10 Mbps 0100 - 100 Mbps 1000 - 1000 Mbps Port VLAN ID The VID of the VLAN where the port is an untagged member. Override Priority The status of the override priority feature. If the status is Yes, tagged and untagged packets entering the port are directed to either to low or high priority queue as specified in CoS. If the status is No, tagged frames entering the port are directed to the low or high queue according to the priority levels specified in the tagged packets. For further information on this feature, refer to Class of Service Overview on page 140. Priority The priority queue to which untagged packets are directed when received on the port. A value of 1 to 3 directs untagged packets to the low priority queue while a value of 4 to 7 directs packets to the high priority queue. If the override priority feature has been activated on the port, tagged packets will be directed to the priority queue reflected by this status parameter. For further information on this feature, refer to Class of Service Overview on page 140.

189

Section III: Web Browser Management

If you select Statistics, the Statistics window in Figure 60 is displayed.

Figure 60 Port Statistics Window The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. The statistics are defined below: Transmit Packets Number of packets transmitted out the port. Received Packets Number of packets received on the port. Received Overflow Number of times frames entering the port have exceeded the capacity of the port’s buffer. Received Broadcast Number of broadcast packets received on the port. Received Multicast Number of multicast packets received on the port. CRC Error Number of packets with a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) error but with the proper length (64-1518 bytes) received on the port Total Packets Number of packets received and transmitted on the port.

190

AT-S39 User’s Guide

Undersize Packets Number of packets that were less than the minimum length specified by IEEE 802.3 (64 bytes including the CRC) received on the port. Fragmented Packets Number of undersized packets, packets with alignment errors, and packets with FCS errors (CRC errors) received on the port. Oversize Packets Number of packets exceeding the maximum specified by IEEE 802.3 (1518 bytes including the CRC) received on the port. Port in Discards Number of frames successfully received and buffered by the port, but discarded and not forwarded.

191

Note For background information on port security.Chapter 20 Port Security This chapter explains how to display the current port security level on the switch from a web browser management session. Note A switch’s port security level can be changed only from a local management session. refer to Port Security Overview on page 65. 192 .

From the Home page. The current security level is displayed. 3. From the Configuration page.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying the Port Security Level To display the switch’s port security level. 2. perform the following procedure: 1. Figure 61 Port Security Menu 193 . From the Layer 2 page. select Layer 2. select Monitoring. select the Port Security tab.

refer to Port Trunking Overview on page 73.Chapter 21 Port Trunks This chapter contains the procedure for creating or deleting a port trunk using a web browser management session. Note For background information on port trunking. 194 .

2. From the Configuration page. The management software displays the Port Trunking window in Figure 62. If there is a port trunk. which can adversely effect the operations of your network. perform the following procedure: 1. Loops can result in broadcast storms. select Layer 1.AT-S39 User’s Guide Creating or Deleting a Port Trunk Caution Do not connect the cables of a port trunk to the ports on the switch until after you have configured the ports on both the switch and the end node. Select the Port Trunking tab. To create or delete a port trunk. 3. If you are deleting a port trunk. which can produce broadcast storms. select Configuration. Connecting the cables prior to configuring the ports can create loops in your network topology. From the Home page. Figure 62 Port Trunking Window If the switch does not contain a port trunk. Deleting the trunk without first disconnecting the data cables can create a loop in your network topology. the ports of the trunk will be white. disconnect the cables from the ports before you delete the trunk. 195 . all ports in the switch image will be black.

The port trunk is immediately deleted from the switch. The new port trunk is immediately activated on the switch. A selected port changes to white. To delete a port trunk. You can now connect the data cables to the ports of the trunk on the switch. 5. 196 . To create a port trunk. or 4 ports. An unselected port is black.Section III: Web Browser Management 4. b. A port trunk can contain 2. 3. Click the ports that will make up the port trunk. click Remove. Click Apply. do the following: a.

197 . Note For background information on port mirroring.Chapter 22 Port Mirroring This chapter contains the procedure for creating or deleting a port mirror. refer to Port Mirroring Overview on page 79.

The management software displays the Port Mirroring window in Figure 63. From the Configuration page. To create a port mirror. 3. select Layer 1. select Configuration. From the Home page. Click Apply. select “—“ from the Mirroring Port pull-down menu and click Apply. Figure 63 Port Mirroring Window 4. You can now connect a data analyzer to the mirror port to monitor the traffic on the selected ports. 5. b. Use the pull-down menu from Mirroring Port to select the port to function as the port mirror. You can select from 1 to 23 ports. The port mirror is immediately activated on the switch. do the following: a. 198 . Select the Port Mirroring tab. c.Section III: Web Browser Management Creating or Deleting a Port Mirror To create or delete a port mirror. perform the following procedure: 1. Click the port(s) in the graphical switch image whose traffic is to be copied to the mirror port. 2. To delete an existing port mirror.

The port that was functioning as the mirror port can now be used for normal network operations.AT-S39 User’s Guide The port mirror is deleted. 199 .

200 . Note You cannot set STP port parameters from a web browser management session. Sections in the chapter include: ❑ Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings on page 201 ❑ Displaying a Bridge’s STP Settings on page 203 Note For background information on STP. refer to STP Overview on page 84.Chapter 23 Spanning Tree Protocol This chapter explains how to configure the STP bridge parameters on an AT-8024 or AT-8024GB Fast Ethernet Switch from a web browser management session. Setting port parameters is only possible from a local or Telnet management session.

select Configuration. Changing them without prior experience and an understanding of how STP works might have a negative effect on your network. From the Home page. 3. 2. To configure a bridge’s STP parameters. the bridge provides default STP parameters that are adequate for most networks. You should consult the IEEE 802. Figure 64 Spanning Tree Window . 201 .AT-S39 User’s Guide Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings Caution STP on a bridge is disabled by default.Configuration 4. Adjust the bridge STP settings as needed. From the Configuration menu. The Spanning Tree window in Figure 64 is displayed. From the Layer 2 window. If you enable STP.1d standard before changing any of the STP parameters. select Layer 2. The parameters are described below. perform the following procedure: 1. select the Spanning Tree tab.

not all links may have yet adapted to the change. Bridge Priority The priority number for the bridge. For example. Note The aging time for BPDUs is different from the aging time used by the MAC address table.Section III: Web Browser Management Bridge Identifier The MAC address of the bridge. This parameter can be from 1 to 10 seconds. Enable STP Enables and disables STP on the switch. After you have made the desired changes. The default is 20 seconds. The default is 2 seconds. the bridge with the numerically lowest MAC address becomes the root bridge. This parameter can be from 6 to 40 seconds. The default setting is disabled. This number is used in determining the root bridge for STP. If two or more bridges have the same priority value. Bridge Max Age The length of time after which stored bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) are deleted by the bridge. When a root bridge goes off-line. if you use the default 20. Bridge Hello Time The time interval between generating and sending configuration messages by the bridge.535. The bridge with the lowest priority number is selected as the root bridge. 202 . This value cannot be changed. If the bridge transitions too soon. 5. becomes the new root bridge after the topology changes. click Apply. with 0 being the highest priority. Bridge Forwarding Delay The waiting period before a bridge changes to a new state. The default is 15 seconds. all bridges delete current configuration messages after 20 seconds. the bridge with the next priority number automatically takes over as the root bridge. This parameter can be from 0 (zero) to 65. The bridge identifier is used as a tie breaker in the selection of the root bridge when two or more bridges have the same bridge priority value. All bridges in a bridged LAN use this aging time to test the age of stored configuration messages called bridge protocol data units (BPDUs). for example. Changes are immediately activated on the switch. possibly resulting in a network loop.

From the Home page. To change the parameters or for definitions of the parameters. The Spanning Tree window in Figure 65 is displayed. select Layer 2. 2. select Monitoring.AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying a Bridge’s STP Settings To display the STP settings. From the Monitoring menu.Monitoring 203 . select the Spanning Tree tab. The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. refer to Configuring a Bridge’s STP Settings on page 201. Figure 65 Spanning Tree Window . 3. From the Layer 2 page. perform the following procedure: 1.

modify. This chapter also explains how to change a switch’s VLAN operating mode. Virtual LANs.Chapter 24 Virtual LANs This chapter explains how to create. Note For background information on VLANs and on the Basic VLAN mode. This chapter contains the following sections: ❑ Creating a VLAN on page 205 ❑ Modifying a VLAN on page 209 ❑ Deleting a VLAN on page 210 ❑ Displaying VLANs on page 211 ❑ Setting the Switch’s VLAN Mode on page 212 ❑ Changing a PVID on page 213 204 . refer to Chapter 10. and delete VLANs from a web browser management session.

From the Layer 2 window. Figure 66 VLAN Window 205 . The VLAN window in Figure 66 is displayed. perform the following procedure: 1. From the Configuration menu. 2. 3. select Layer 2.AT-S39 User’s Guide Creating a VLAN To create a new VLAN. From the Home page. select Configuration. select the VLAN tab.

The name can be from one to 10 characters in length.Section III: Web Browser Management 4. its VID must be unique as well. If the VLAN will be part of a larger VLAN that spans multiple switches. 206 . Figure 67 Add VLAN Window 5. The Add VLAN window in Figure 67 is displayed. Click Add. Sales or Accounting). Select the Name field and enter a name for the new VLAN. If the VLAN will be unique in your network. 6. The name can contain spaces but not special characters. Select the VID field and enter a VID value for the new VLAN. If this will be a unique VLAN in your network. the name should be unique as well. The name should reflect the function of the nodes of the VLAN (for example. the name for the VLAN should be the same on each switch where nodes of the VLAN are connected. such as asterisks (*) or exclamation points (!).

The range of the VID value is 2 to 4096. refer to Port Mirroring Overview on page 79. To select ports for the VLAN. Note In most situations you should not activate this feature for a VLAN. Click Apply. 207 . 9. select the mirroring port from the Mirroring Port pull-down menu. Note For background information on port mirroring.AT-S39 User’s Guide If the VLAN will be part of a larger VLAN that spans multiple switches. its VID value should be the same on each switch. If you want all traffic received on the ports of the VLAN to be sent to the switch’s CPU. This value disables port mirroring. or a tagged port. Clicking repeatedly on a port toggles the port through the following possible settings: Untagged port Tagged port Port not a member of the VLAN A port can be an untagged port of a VLAN. click Send to CPU. in which case it can belong to only one VLAN at a time. in which case it can belong to multiple VLANs simultaneously. click on the appropriate ports in the switch image. 8. This feature is useful when troubleshooting a VLAN. 10. if you are creating a VLAN called Sales that will span three switches. In most cases. For example. If you want all received traffic on the ports of the VLAN to be mirrored to another port on the switch. you must assign the same VID value to each Sales VLAN on the three switches. 7. you should not change this parameter’s default value of “—“. You can analyze the VLAN traffic by placing a network analyzer on the mirroring port.

Section III: Web Browser Management Note The untagged ports that you assign to the new VLAN are automatically removed from their current VLAN assignment. The VLAN is now ready for network operations. 208 .

they are returned to the Default VLAN. 3. 4. From the Layer 2 window. Modify the VLAN parameters by referring to Step 5 to Step 9 in the previous procedure. After making the desired changes. From the Home page. select the VLAN tab. 5. The configuration window for the VLAN is displayed. click Apply. the ports are automatically removed from their current VLAN assignment. The VLAN window in Figure 66 on page 205 is displayed. select Configuration. 209 . select Layer 2. 7. 6. perform the following procedure: 1. Click the circle next to the name of the VLAN you want to modify. The modified VLAN is now ready for network operations. 2. Click Modify.AT-S39 User’s Guide Modifying a VLAN To modify a VLAN. If you remove untagged ports from the VLAN. From the Configuration menu. Creating a VLAN. Note If you add untagged ports to the VLAN.

Section III: Web Browser Management Deleting a VLAN To delete a VLAN from the switch. From the Layer 2 window. From the Home page. 5. From the Configuration menu. Note You cannot delete the Default VLAN. 210 . 2. Click the circle next to the name of the VLAN you want to delete. Click Remove. select Configuration. select the VLAN tab. perform the following procedure: 1. 4. select Layer 2. The VLAN is deleted from the switch. The VLAN window in Figure 66 on page 205 is displayed. 3. The ports in the VLAN are returned to the Default VLAN as untagged ports.

select the VLAN tab. select Monitoring. perform the following procedure: 1. From the Monitoring page. The information in this window is for viewing purposes only. Figure 68 VLAN Window 211 .AT-S39 User’s Guide Displaying VLANs To display all the existing VLANs on a switch. select Layer 2. From the Layer 2 page. 3. From the Home page. The management software displays the window in Figure 68. 2.

To set the switch’s VLAN mode. the switch will support both port-based VLANs and tagged VLANs. the switch will operate in the Basic VLAN mode. 3.Section III: Web Browser Management Setting the Switch’s VLAN Mode This section contains the procedure for setting a switch’s VLAN mode. for descriptions of port-based and tagged VLANs and the Basic VLAN mode. You cannot reset the switch from a web browser management session. 212 . click either Tagged or Basic. perform the following procedure: 1. which is the default. 4. Virtual LANs. If you select Basic. 5. Select the General tab. Note Refer to Chapter 10. select Configuration. If you select Tagged. 2. You can reset the unit through a local or Telnet session or with the reset button on the back panel of the device. From the Home Page. From the Configuration menu. choose System. In the Switch Mode section of the window. You can configure a switch to support port-based and tagged VLANs or to operate in the Basic VLAN mode. Reset the switch.

2. click it again. The CoS Setting window in Figure 69 is displayed. As explained in Port-based VLAN Overview on page 94. For example. A graphical image of the switch is displayed. A selected port turns white. select Configuration. Click the port whose PVID you want to configure. perform the following procedure: 1. From the Home page. select CoS. 5. But the AT-S39 software does allow you to adjust the value if necessary. From the Configuration page. To deselect a port. 3. Click Apply. There should be little need for you to manually change a PVID yourself. The assignment of PVIDs is performed automatically by the AT-S39 software. 4. the port is assigned a PVID also of 7.AT-S39 User’s Guide Changing a PVID The procedure in this section explains how to change a PVID value for a port. select Layer 2. if you assign Port 4 on the switch as an untagged port to a VLAN with a VID of 7. You can select only one port at a time. Figure 69 CoS Setting Window 213 . From the Layer 2 page. To change a PVID for a port. A port’s PVID will be the same as the VLAN’s VID to which it has been assigned. a port receives a PVID when it is assigned as an untagged port to a VLAN.

Note The Priority and Override Priority selections in the CoS Setting window are explained in Chapter 26. Use the pull-down menu from the Port VLAN ID selection to specify the new PVID value for the port. The new value is immediately activated on the port. Class of Service on page 219. The pull-down menu displays the VIDs of the VLANs existing on the switch.Section III: Web Browser Management 6. 7. Click Apply. 214 .

refer to MAC Address Overview on page 127.Chapter 25 MAC Address Table This chapter contains instructions on how to view the dynamic and static addresses in the MAC address table of the switch. This chapter contains the following procedure: ❑ Viewing the MAC Address Table on page 216 Note For background information on the MAC address table. 215 .

For instructions. perform the following procedure: 1. Static MAC addresses can only be entered from a local or Telnet management session. Static Selecting this option displays only static MAC addresses. select Layer 2. Static MAC addresses are addresses that you entered manually into the MAC address table. From the Monitoring page.Section III: Web Browser Management Viewing the MAC Address Table To view the MAC address table. Note You cannot enter static addresses into the MAC address table from a web browser management session. 216 . refer to Adding Static MAC Addresses on page 136. From the Home page. select the Forwarding Database tab. The options are described below. 2. From the Layer 2 page. You can also restrict the addresses to a particular port or VLAN. select Monitoring. The Forwarding Database window in Figure 70 is displayed. Figure 70 Forwarding Database Tab You can use the options in the window to display all the MAC addresses that have been learned by the switch or to restrict the addresses to either static or dynamic addresses. 3.

Port The port on the switch where the MAC address was learned. (The abbreviation PMAP is derived from “port mapping. click View.”) Each “0” is a hexadecimal value for the binary value “0000”. The columns in the window are defined below: MAC The MAC address of the node connected to the switch. This would be represented in the column as follows: “0000000F”. The port numbering scheme is from right to left. This column is useful in determining which ports belong to different multicast groups because it maps ports to multicast groups.AT-S39 User’s Guide Dynamic Selecting this option displays only dynamic MAC address. Both This option displays both static and dynamic MAC addresses. A binary “0” means that the port is not a member of a multicast group while a “1” means that it is. 4. PMAP The ports on the switch that are members of a multicast group. Port The pull-down menu with this option is used to display the MAC addresses learned on a particular port. As an example. CPU Indicates whether the traffic received on the port is sent to the switch’s CPU. Each binary “0” represents a port on the switch. This example would indicate that ports 1 to 4 and port 10 on the switch were members of the same multicast group. 217 . Once you have configured the options. Multicast MAC Addresses This option displays the multicast MAC addresses. Dynamic MAC addresses are addresses that the switch has learned by examining the source addresses of frames received on the ports. You specify the VLAN by its VID. VLAN This option displays the MAC addresses learned by a particular VLAN on the switch. The MAC addresses are displayed in a window. Yes indicates that the traffic is being sent to the CPU while No indicates it is not. Another example is “000020F. assume that ports 1 through 4 on the switch were members of the same multicast group.

Section III: Web Browser Management MIR Indicates whether the traffic on the port is being mirrored. This feature is not supported at this time. EMP Indicates whether multicast packets are being forwarded by ports in the blocking state. Yes means the traffic is being mirrored while No indicates that it is not. This column will indicate “No” for all multicast addresses. Multicast packets are forwarded only by ports in the forwarding state. Type The MAC address type. 218 . VLANID The VID of the VLAN to which the port is an untagged member. The type can be either static or dynamic. except for the switch’s MAC address.

219 . refer to Class of Service Overview on page 140. This chapter contains the following procedure: ❑ Configuring CoS on page 220 Note For background information on CoS.Chapter 26 Class of Service This chapter contains instructions on how to configure CoS.

From the Configuration page. select any level from Level 0 to Level 3 from the Priority pull-down menu. If you are configuring a tagged port and you want the switch to ignore the priority tag in the tagged frames entering the port. 3. A selected port turns white. select the CoS tab. 4. Click the port where you want to configure CoS. If you want all tagged and untagged frames received on the port to go to the low priority queue. select Layer 2. From the Layer 2 page.) If you want all frames received on the port to go to the high priority queue. select any level from Level 4 to Level 7. The default for this parameter is No. A graphical image of the switch is displayed. click it again.) 7. click the Override Priority option. The CoS Settings window in Figure 69 on page 213 is displayed. Click Apply. Configuration changes are immediately activated on the switch. select Configuration. From the Home page. You can select only one port at a time. 2. (Again.Section III: Web Browser Management Configuring CoS To configure CoS.) 5. A tagged frame exits the switch with the same priority level that it had when it entered. perform the following procedure: 1. All tagged frames will be directed to either the low or high priority queue specified in Step 5. 220 . meaning that the priority level of tagged frames is determined by the priority level specified in the frame itself. it does not matter which of these levels you select. Click Modify. (To deselect a port. (It does not matter which of these levels you select. 6. Note The tagged information in a frame is not changed as the frame traverses the switch. 8.

221 .Chapter 27 IGMP Snooping This chapter contains instructions on how to configure the IGMP snooping feature on the switch. Note For background information on this feature. refer to IGMP Snooping Overview on page 143.

The values for 1000 Mbps ports are in microseconds. Select the IGMP tab. perform the following procedure: 1. Enable IGMP Snooping Status Enables and disables IGMP snooping on the switch. From the Home page. 222 . Snoop Topology Defines whether there is only one host node per switch port or multiple host nodes per port. select System. Possible settings are Edge (SingleHost/Port) and Intermediate (Multi-Host/Port). The IGMP tab in Figure 71 is displayed. Figure 71 IGMP Tab The values for 10 and 100 Mbps ports are in milliseconds. select Configuration.Section III: Web Browser Management Configuring IGMP Snooping To configure IGMP snooping from a web browser management session. 2. 3. A check in the box indicates that IGMP is enabled. From the Configuration menu.

AT-S39 User’s Guide The Edge (Single-Host/Port) setting is appropriate when there is only one host node connected to each port on the switch. You can use the parameter to prevent the switch’s MAC address table from filling up with 223 . This parameter also specifies the time interval used by the switch in determining whether a multicast router is still active. that is. The range is from 1 second to 86. This parameter is useful with networks that contain a large number of multicast groups. such as when a port is connected to an Ethernet hub to which multiple host nodes are connected. The switch forwards the leave request to the router and simultaneously ceases transmission of any further multicast packets out the port where the host node is connected. If the switch does not detect any queries from a multicast router during the specified time interval. The range is 1 to 2048 groups. The switch makes the determination by watching for queries from the router. With this setting selected the switch continues sending multicast packets out a port even after it receives a leave request from a host node on the port. The Intermediate (Multi-Host) setting is appropriate if there is more than one host node connected to a switch port. it assumes that the router is no longer active on the port. If a switch has a mixture of host nodes. some connected directly to the switch and others through an Ethernet hub. Only after all of the host nodes connected to a switch port have transmitted leave requests (or have timed out) will the switch stop sending multicast packets out the port. An inactive host node is a node that has not sent an IGMP report during the specified time interval. This setting causes the switch to immediately stop sending multicast packets out a switch port when a host node signals its desire to leave a multicast group by sending a leave request or when the host node stops sending reports and times-out. you should select the Intermediate Multi-Host Port selection. Maximum Multicast Groups Specifies the maximum number of multicast groups the switch will learn.400 seconds (24 hours). Host/Router Timeout Interval Specifies the time period in seconds after which the switch determines that a host node has become inactive. This ensures that the remaining active host nodes on the port will continue to receive the multicast packets. The default is 256 multicast groups. The default is 260 seconds.

The default is 256 multicast addresses.Section III: Web Browser Management multicast addresses. or you can specify the port yourself by clicking on the ports in the graphical image. You can let the switch determine this automatically by selecting Auto Detect. The range is 1 address to 2048 addresses. leaving no room for dynamic or static MAC addresses. A white port indicates a multicast router port. 224 . Multicast Router Port(s) Specifies the port on the switch to which the multicast router is detected.

refer to Broadcast Frame Control Overview on page 151.Chapter 28 Broadcast Frame Control This chapter contains instructions on how to configure the broadcast frame control feature on the switch. Note For background information on this feature. 225 .

3. click Apply.) A value for an interval timer applies to all ports operating at the corresponding speed. The values for 10 and 100 Mbps ports are in milliseconds. The default value is “0” for all timers. The result would be an interval timer of 200 milliseconds for ports operating at 10 Mbps. From the Home page. Broadcast frames exceeding the maximum number during the specified timer interval are discarded by the port and are not forwarded by the switch. select them now. A value of “0” disables the broadcast frame control feature for ports operating at the corresponding timer speed. Go to the next procedure to set values for the maximum number of broadcast frames the ports on the switch will accept. The management software will multiple your value as follows: ❑ 10 Mbps . 2. After you have entered your values. (1000 Mbps applies only to GBIC modules in an AT-8024GB switch.10x ❑ 100 Mbps . 4. The System menu option is selected by default along with the General tab when you open the Configuration page. You can enter a different interval timer for each possible port speed on the switch: 10. If they are not already selected. To specify an interval timer. 226 . The values for 1000 Mbps ports are in microseconds. and 1000 Mbps. select Configuration.100x For example. the management software multiples the value by 10. enter values for the three interval timers.1x ❑ 1000 Mbps . In the Broadcast Storm Control section of the window tab.Section III: Web Browser Management Configuring the Interval Timer The interval timer defines the time period used in counting the number of broadcast packets on a port. 100. if you enter “20” for the interval timer for 10 Mbps ports. perform the following procedure: 1. You can specify a different interval timer for different port speeds.

From the Configuration page. 5. select it now. click a port where you want to specify the maximum number of broadcast frames. Also assume that the port is operating at 100 Mbps and that you specified an interval timer of 100 milliseconds for 100 Mbps ports. the Port Settings tab is selected by default. 227 . Click Apply. If it is not selected. The range is 0 to 1023 broadcast frames. Click Modify. perform the following procedure: 1. 7. the extra broadcast frames would be discarded by the port and would not be forwarded by the switch. As an example. The result would be that the port would accept up to 300 broadcast frames every 100 milliseconds. select Configuration. 2. From the Home page. In the Broadcast Storm Control section of the window. assume that you enter a value of 300 as the maximum number of broadcast frames for a port. In the graphical switch image. Repeat this procedure to set the maximum number of broadcast frames for other ports on the switch. You can select only one port at a time. enter the maximum number of broadcast packets you want the port to accept. If it received more than 300 broadcast frames during a 100 millisecond period.AT-S39 User’s Guide Setting the Maximum Number of Broadcast Frames To set the maximum number of broadcast frames you want the ports on the switch to forward. The selected port turns white. 6. 3. The current settings for the port are displayed in the Port Configuration window. Specifying a value of “0” disables broadcast frame control on the port. The port will accept all broadcast frames. select Layer 1. click it again. When you open the Layer 1 page. 4. To deselect a port.

0.Appendix A AT-S39 Default Settings This appendix lists the AT-S39 factory default settings. Settings IP Address Subnet Mask Gateway Address System Name MAC Aging Time Community Strings Get Community String Set Community String Trap Community String Spanning Tree Protocol Status Bridge Priority Bridge Max Age Time Bridge Hello Time Bridge Forwarding Delay IGMP Snooping Status Topology Host/Router Time-out Interval Maximum Multicast Groups Default 0.0.0 255.0.0.0.0 None 300 seconds public private public Disabled 32768 20 2 15 Disabled Single Host/ Port (Edge) 260 seconds 256 228 .255.0 0.

) 229 .AT-S39 User’s Guide Settings Management Interface Password User Name (web browser session only) Time Out Value Twisted Pair Ports Status Duplex Mode Speed Flow Control Broadcast Packets Security VLANs Default VLAN Name VID Basic Mode Broadcast Frame Control 10 Mbps Interval Timer 100 Mbps Interval Timer 1000 Mbps Interval Timer RS232 Port Data Bits Stop Bits Parity Flow Control Data Rate Default admin (case-sensitive) manager 10 minutes Enabled Auto-negotiation Auto-negotiation Disabled Forwarded Automatic Default VLAN (all ports) 1 Disabled 0 milliseconds 0 milliseconds 0 microseconds 8 1 None Full-duplex Auto-detect (default 115200 bps) (Boot Loader Version 1.1 and above only.

88. 202 bridge protocol data unit (BPDU). 60.Index A aging time changing. 220 defined. 88. 138 defined. 141. 186 B Basic VLAN mode defined. 212 BOOTP activating. 88. 35. 106 setting. 41. 52 defined. 27. 225 defined. 150. 177 H hello time. 12 E enhanced stacking changing switches. 37 defined. 128 AT-S39 default settings. 228 DHCP activating. 202 broadcast frame control configuring. 185 forwarding delay. 36 documentation. 45 Auto-Negotiation. 37 releasing IP address. 202 bridge identifier. AT-S39. 164 downloading via TFTP. 50 F flow control. configuring. 90 host nodes 230 . 41. 84. 227 browser tools. 88. 47 guidelines. 37 BPDU. 172 C Class of Service configuring. 60. 121. 202 bridge hello time parameter. 43 conventions. used in this guide. 84. 88 G gateway address. 47 setting switch status. 163 AT-S39 version number. 86. 167 obtaining. 86. 140 console timeout. 228 AT-S39 software updates downloading from a local session. see bridge protocol data unit bridge forwarding delay parameter. 11 D default values. 202 bridge priority. 155. 202 bridge max age parameter. 151 broadcast frames maximum number. 37 defined.

213 defined. 18 quitting. 226 defined. 210 displaying. 190 port cost defined. 90 port mirroring creating. 201 IGMP snooping configuring. 186 statistics. 186 displaying status. 80. 195 defined. 143 ingress filtering. 223 I IEEE 802. 35. 124 Internet Protocol (IP) address. displaying. 157 port trunking creating. 173 R resetting a switch. defined. 223 multicast router. 85 setting. 107. 82. 193 port statistics. 77. 35. 118 deleting. 50 returning to. 116. 30 web browser session.1d standard. 151 L limited security mode configuring. 66 serial number. 73 port VLAN identifier (PVID) changing. 59. 211 modifying. 177 interval timer configuring. 148 host/router timeout interval. 119. 55.AT-S39 User’s Guide defined. 115. 28 starting. 75. 111. 222 defined. 32. 171 port configuring parameters. port security. switch. 84 RS232 port. 69 defined. 143 displaying. 177 default. 195 guidelines. 65 displaying. 73 deleting. 209 priority queues. 45 Management Information Base (MIB). switch. 65 local management session defined. 87. 94 deleting all. 45 slave switch. 39. 140 priority. 145. 26. 184 disable. 146. default settings. 145. 42 root bridge. 58. 60 multicast groups. 113. 198 port security configuring. 146. 181 SNMP management session. 25 S Secure level. 126. 198 defined. 21 master switch defined. 216 MAC address. 53 MDI/MDIX mode. 205 defined. 28 Telnet session. 79 deleting. See Port VLAN identifier Q quitting local session. 29. 187 speed. 67 defined. 222 231 . 95. 149 P password changing. 50 SNMP community strings. 90 PVID. 59. maximum. 102 port-based VLAN creating. 21 snoop topology. 153. 24 M MAC address table.

171 232 . 160 system name. default. 19 quitting. 173 starting. 167 obtaining. 118 deleting. 108 VLAN identifier. 211 modifying. 45 virtual LAN creating. 122 mode. 50 user name. 137 displaying. 90 viewing bridge parameters. 87. 163 Spanning Tree Protocol configuring bridge parameters. 171 V version number. 112. 176 T tagged VLAN creating. 94. 129 statistics port. 101 VLAN identifier (VID). 107. 211 enabling. 160 STP. 30 starting. 205 defined. 209 Telnet management session defined.Index software updates downloading from a local session. 43 limitations. 177 switch statistics. 206 VLAN. 115. 212 modifying. 92 deleting all. 101 deleting all. 118 deleting. 20 quitting. 209 port-based. See Spanning Tree Protocol subnet mask. 113. defined. 136 deleting. 167 U unavailable status. 115. AT-S39. 24 Telnet. 29 web browser. defined. 111. changing. 121. 35. 210 disabling. 190 switch. 94 tagged. 116. defined. 122 displaying. 116. 113. See virtual LAN W web browser management session disabling. 201 configuring port parameters. 112. 89 defined. 84 port cost. 205 defined. 85. 107. 203 starting session local. 164 downloading via TFTP. 29 TFTP. 210 displaying. 171 static MAC address adding. 35. downloading software updates. 157.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful