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SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

TABLE OF CONTENTS
LESSON 1: Differentiate and Create................................................................................................................................... 1
Bio Data ............................................................................................................................................................................ 1
Resume ............................................................................................................................................................................. 2
Curriculum Vitae ................................................................................................................................................................ 4

LESSON 2: Proper Posture and Attire ............................................................................................................................... 5


Proper Posture .................................................................................................................................................................. 5
Correct Standing Posture .............................................................................................................................................. 5
Correct Sitting Posture .................................................................................................................................................. 6
Proper Business Attire ....................................................................................................................................................... 6
For Men......................................................................................................................................................................... 6
For Women ................................................................................................................................................................... 7

LESSON 3: Job Interview .................................................................................................................................................... 8


Things to do before, during, and after a job interview......................................................................................................... 8
Do's and Don’ts in a Job Interview ................................................................................................................................... 10

LESSON 4: Familiarizing the Workplace .......................................................................................................................... 11


Professions and their Task Assignment/s ........................................................................................................................ 11
Health.......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Technology.................................................................................................................................................................. 12
Engineering ................................................................................................................................................................. 13

LESSON 5: Work Ethics .................................................................................................................................................... 14


Characteristics of a Good Employee................................................................................................................................ 14
Workplace Behavior ........................................................................................................................................................ 15
8 Types of Employees ................................................................................................................................................. 15
The ‘Terrible 10’ Behaviors in the Workplace .............................................................................................................. 16
Workplace rights and responsibilities ............................................................................................................................... 16
Confidentiality in the Workplace ....................................................................................................................................... 17
Casual Definition ......................................................................................................................................................... 17
Legal Definition ........................................................................................................................................................... 17

APPENDICES ..................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Appendix A: List of Subject Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 19
Appendix B: Mock Interview Evaluation Form ................................................................................................................. 20
Appendix C: Seminar Evaluation Form ........................................................................................................................... 21
Appendix D: Work Simulation Form ................................................................................................................................. 22
Appendix E: Weekly Accomplishment Report ................................................................................................................. 23
Appendix F: In-campus Work Immersion Report ............................................................................................................. 24
Appendix G: Off-campus Work Immersion Report ........................................................................................................... 25
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LESSON 1
Differentiate and Create

People use the words RESUME, CV, Bio Data interchangeably for the document highlighting skills, education, and experience that
a candidate submits when applying a job. On the surface level, all three mean the same. However, there are intricate differences.

BIO DATA
Bio Data, short form for Biographical Data, is an old-fashioned term for Resume or C.V. A biodata is like a biography of person where
the focus is on personal particulars like date of birth, gender, religion, race, nationality, residence, marital status, and the like. Biodata
makes it easy to collect such data as they are simple in format and can be easily checked either manually or with the help of a computer.

The term bio-data is mostly used in India when people apply for government jobs, or for research grants where one has to submit
descriptive essays. Bio Datas are not common in the international markets where personal information is not required to be submitted by
candidates.

Structure
1. Maximum of 2 pages
2. Personal Information such as name, address, contact information, religion, etc.
3. List of Skills, other Talents, etc.
4. Educational Background
5. A Chronological listing of Work Experiences

Example:

Prepared by:
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Faculty, College of Computer Studies
1
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

RÉSUMÉ
Résumé is a French word meaning “summary”, it is a summary of one’s education, skills and employment when applying for a new
job. A resume is usually written in the third person to give it an objective and formal tone. A resume would be ideally suited when
experience people apply for specific positions where certain specific skills are more important than education. The goal of a résumé is to
represent the skills and experience necessary to succeed in the position from all areas—job-related, volunteer, and extracurricular
activities.

It is generally used in industry due to the convenience of skimming through details and identifying the right candidate for further
stages of qualification in the shortest span of time. Often, recruiters and HR people receive several applications for a job position. They
just look through the résumés faster and create a pool of shortlisted candidates.

Unlike CV, it has lots of option for formatting and it is customized according to the requirement of the job position. It is usually used
by applicants who already have job experiences and are currently hunting for another job. Résumé means summary and it is the shortest
of all the formats. Thus, résumés are usually 1 or – at maximum – 2 pages long.

Structure
1. A Brief Profile of the Candidate
This includes the photo, name, address, contact information, and the objective of the applicant. Other information not
essential to the job – like religion, emergency contact, etc – is not included in the resumé. Remember that the goal of the resume
is to represent the skills and experience of an applicant. The said information must be placed at the top portion where it can be
easily seen.

Example:

JUAN DELA CRUZ


Formal Photo
123 ABC ST., BRGY. DEF, QUEZON CITY (Usually 1x1, or 2x2)

09123456789 ▪ jdelacruz@yahoo.com ▪ 987-65-43

Objective
To contribute to the company as Software Developer using the skills I have acquired.

2. Summary of Qualifications
Most recruiters look for the summary of qualifications first thing after receiving the résumé. This part immediately gives
them an idea if the applicant fits on the job or not. Skills related for the job are listed here, starting to the most applicable skill
for the position applied. Applicants may also include professional affiliations here, such as being a member of an organization
relevant to the position applied.

Example:
Skills
 Proficient in programming languages such as C, C++, Visual Basic.NET, and Java
 Knowledgeable in database management systems such as Oracle, R, and MySQL
 Adept in creating mobile applications in Android and iOS
 Expert in creating webpages with PHP, CSS, and JavaScript

Professional Affiliations
 Junior Philippine Computer Society
Quezon City Chapter
Adviser, 2016-2017

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Faculty, College of Computer Studies
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SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

3. Professional Experience
Focus is on the most recent experiences (with responsibilities and accomplishments), and previous experiences are only
presented as a summary. The content aims at providing the reader a balance of responsibilities and accomplishments for each
position. This part should indicate the name of the company, its address, employment period, position and brief job description.
Begin from the latest to the earliest employment date.

Example:
Professional Experience
 Website Developer (June 2016 – January 2018)
XYZ Company – 456 St., Makati City
Responsible in designing, fixing, managing, and maintaining the company website’s front-end.

4. Educational Background
Indicate schools attended from elementary, high school and college. Honors and awards received should be mentioned in
the appropriate school level. The enumeration should begin from the highest degree attained.

Example:
Educational Background
 Damong Maliit Elementary School
June 2002 - March 2008
Top 7

 Novaliches High School


June 2008 – March 2012
3rd Honorable Mention

 Our Lady of Fatima University


June 2012 – March 2016
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
Dean’s Lister
Academic Excellence Awardee

5. Voluntary Initiatives / Extra Curricular Activities


Volunteer works and extracurricular activities has factor in some companies and job positions. This should be listed from
the most recent and most relevant to the job applied.

Example:
Voluntary Initiatives
 Teach-a-student Program
October 28, 2017 – Habik Elementary School
HTML Instructor
Taught students on how to create simple webpages using HTML

6. Character References
It is strongly advised and polite to seek permission first from the people intended to be used as character reference.
However, the reference information (name, company name, job position, and contact information) must not be written in the
resume itself. The right way is to simply place “available upon request” and prepare a separate sheet were the list of reference
is written. This is to keep the privacy of the person whom you consider as your reference.

Example:
Character References
Ms. Hermione Everdeen
Project Manager, Leviosa Inc.
09987654321
hermione_everdeen@gmail.com

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
3
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

CURRICULUM VITAE
Curriculum Vitae is a Latin word meaning “course of life”. It is more detailed than a resume, it is the longest of all formats, generally
3 to 6 pages, or even longer as per the requirement. A C.V. lists out every skill, all the jobs and positions held, degrees, professional
affiliations the applicant has acquired, and in chronological order. A C.V. is used to highlight the general talent of the candidate rather
than specific skills for a specific position by demonstrating the achievements and potential of the applicant.

It is used to write in detail about the life events. It is generally used by fresh graduates, someone who is changing their line of career,
students for academic requirements, or people who are applying for academic positions. It is accompanied by a cover letter which covers
the gist of the CV. The contents are generalized in nature and are not made for different companies. It serves to give an overall picture
of the person rather than identifying certain set skill required for the job.

STRUCTURE
1. A cover letter to summarize the contents of the applicant’s Curriculum Vitae
2. Personal Information
3. Technical Proficiency / Skills
4. Research Publication
5. Scientific Papers
6. Professional Experiences
7. Professional Organization Memberships
8. Professional Licenses
9. Positions of Responsibilities
10. Student Grants
11. Fellowships and scholarships
12. Awards
13. Presentations
14. Volunteer Work
15. Extracurricular Activities

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
4
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LESSON 2
Proper Posture and Attire

PROPER POSTURE

Posture refers to the position in which someone holds their


body when standing. Psychologists proved that it takes only 20 to 32
seconds to make a good or poor first impression, despite an
interviewer's mental attempts to remain neutral. is about far more than
looking confident and poised. Sitting or standing in the right position
makes sure our bodies function properly.

( Reference: Greatist Website)

Correct Standing Posture

1. Imagine a string attached to the top of your head, then the string being pulled upwards.
2. Stand with your weight evenly distributed between your heel and the balls of your feet.
3. Your feet should be about shoulder width, and pointing slightly outward.
4. Avoid locking your knees.
5. Tuck your tummy in and don’t let your pelvis roll forward.
6. Relax your arms and let them hang naturally down the sides of your body.
7. Keep your shoulders back, and don’t let them slump forward.
8. Hold your head up straight with your chin tucked in. Don’t tilt your head either forward, backward or sideways.
9. Look straight ahead.
10. If standing for a long period of time, shift weight from one foot to the other, or rock from heels to toes.

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Faculty, College of Computer Studies
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SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Correct Sitting Posture

1. Sit in the chair and straighten your back.


2. Pull your shoulders back slightly and make sure your buttocks touch the back of the chair
3. Make sure your feet touch the floor. If they do not, rest them on a footrest.
4. Do not cross your legs or sit in other positions that do not allow both feet to touch the floor or a footrest.
5. Keep your knees at about the same height as your hips.
6. Allow a small gap between the back of your knees and the front of the seat
7. Avoid tensing your shoulders and rest your arms on the arms of the chair or on your desk so that they are parallel to
the floor.
8. Keep your body straight. Your torso and neck should remain in line vertically, your thighs should remain in a straight
horizontal line and your lower legs should stay vertical

PROPER BUSINESS ATTIRE


A proper business attire is a good sign of professionalism in any type of work. Dressing cleanly and appropriately for
the workplace shows character. In a workplace, revealing too much is unacceptable, as modesty is key. Accessories, which
range from jewelry to perfume to notebook or briefcase, must also fit a business formal environment and should be worn or
carried in good taste.

For Men

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Faculty, College of Computer Studies
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SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

1. A nice suit should be worn during the interview even if the job will require jeans or outdoor clothing.
2. For men who work indoors in an office setting, a suit is preferred. Do wear a black, navy or gray suit that fits well.
3. Wear a long-sleeve shirt in white or a light color, and have the shirt pressed. The cuffs shouldn't be frayed or rolled
up.
4. Never wear a short-sleeve shirt with a suit.
5. The pants and jacket should be the same color and material.
6. Businessmen should wear conservative or neat ties, not comic strip, silly, or iconic ties. Same goes with socks.
7. Do wear black or brown dress shoes rather than tennis shoes.
8. A nice, appropriate, and presentable hairstyle makes the business attire a complete package.

For Women

1. Pantsuits should be tailored and creased, not flowing or too tight. .


2. A dress suit should have a skirt that goes no higher than 2 inches above the knee
3. Miniskirts, even in a suit, are not appropriate for business wear.
4. If suit wear is not required, wear dress pants/slacks and skirts, never jeans.
5. Don't wear skirts that are too long or billowy and Don't wear pants that are too snug on the body.
6. Women's shoes should have closed toes, not open toes.
7. Don't wear sandals or stiletto heels. Heels should be conservative; shoes with no heel are acceptable.
8. Avoid wearing see-through garments or sleeveless shirts.
9. A clean-looking (usually updo) hairstyles makes the business attire a complete package.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
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SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LESSON 3
Job Interview Skills Training

THINGS TO DO BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER A JOB INTERVIEW


Before an Interview
The week before the interview
1. Do your homework
Research the company and its background beforehand. Search for information online. Find out who will be interviewing you,
and review the job description in detail so you understand it inside out. It’s also worth researching news or activities relating to the
specific industry, as this shows interest. These tips will help you with your pre-interview homework. Make sure that you re-read
the job description and can communicate why you would be a good fit for the position
2. Prepare your questions
When asked by the interviewer if you have any questions, have a few ideas up your sleeve. This demonstrates that you’re
prepared, enthusiastic and committed to the role and the company. Try to think of less obvious but interesting questions that will
set you apart from other candidates.
3. Practice your interview technique
Think beforehand about how you can best demonstrate your skills and experiences in an interview. This can make you feel
more confident on the day. If you’ve been asked to give a presentation as part of the interview process, give it a final run-through,
make sure you’ve got prompt cards, and try to make it as compelling as possible.
Prepare for the different types of interviews: behavior, experiential, or combination. Have a story from each place you’ve
already worked at that exemplifies one of your strengths. For every strength or skill, you should have a story about how you
successfully used it. You will make a far better impression if you can back up your dry list of previous employment with interesting
stories that show what you gained from each experience.
4. Plan your journey
Spend time prior to the interview working out how you’ll get there. Look up public transport routes and timetables, or find out
where you can park. Plan how long the journey will take. Do a practice run, if necessary. Aim to arrive about 15 minutes early.
5. Stay focused
Clear your diary before and after the interview, so you can stay fully focused on the event. In order to give the interview your
total attention, you don’t want to be preoccupied with other things that need doing that day.

Day before the Interview


1. Lay out your outfit
Even if this is something you never do on a regular basis, laying out your outfit the day before ensures you’re not scrambling
in the morning to come up with something appropriate. Plus, it’s a great opportunity to make sure your shoes match and that your
clothes are stain and wrinkle-free.
2. Pack your bag
Next, pack your bag (or briefcase) with all the essentials — water, a stain stick, makeup, and of course, a copy of your resume
(and portfolio if needed).
3. Review answers to the most common questions
Every interview has a different feel, but you can still practice. The easiest way to do that is to review some of the most common
interview questions, which will help you feel prepared and confident.
4. Print extra copies of resume
5. Plan to eat breakfast
Sure, you might not be in the habit of eating breakfast, but when you have an interview, you should make an exception.
Hunger can throw you off your game, so make sure to eat a light breakfast or lunch. And more importantly, plan to do so (which
means: give yourself the necessary time).
6. Prepare for the worst
Bad things happen: it starts pouring on your walk, there’s traffic on a street that never has traffic, your shirt rips. While some
things can’t be prevented or predicted, you can still prepare for the worst. For example, if you’re worried about sudden road
closures or traffic jams, give yourself extra time to arrive. Or, if you’re worried about blanking on an interview question, learn how
to stall for time. You can also carry an extra shirt in the event of rips or stains.
7. Create a cheat sheet
Jot down all the nitty-gritty details: who you’re meeting with and what their titles are, a couple past work accomplishments or
stories you want to bring up, and the questions you want to ask at the end. Preparing like this can be a huge lifesaver when you’re
moments away from meeting the hiring manager and blanking on their name.
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MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
8
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

8. Set your alarm (and put it in your calendar)


This may sound silly, but sleeping in the day of a morning interview can throw all your preparation out the window, and get
you all frazzled for the interview. Set your alarm and avoid the snooze button to make sure you have the time you need. You
should also make sure to add the interview to your email and phone calendar as soon as a time is confirmed. The last thing you
want to do is get the time or date wrong.
9. Get a good night’s sleep
A good night sleep is your secret weapon for a job interview, ensuring you’re at your most charming and lively. To make sure
you get some quality shut-eye, turn off your TV, and put down the mobile phone! Social media will still be there after your interview
the next day.
Don’t cram any last minute interview preparation in just before bedtime, as this could disrupt your sleep. Relax before bed to
ensure you get a restful night’s slumber, so you’re firing on all cylinders the next day.

During The Interview


The Day of the Interview
1. Be on time! Arrive at least 10 to 15 minutes early.
2. Bring the supplies you prepared the night before your interview.
3. Avoid any scents or jewelry that may be distracting to the employer.
4. Do not smoke right before your interview.

On arrival at the interview


1. A friendly, professional greeting
When you enter the interview building, greet reception staff in a friendly, professional manner. If possible, find out the name
of the receptionist so you can break the ice with a personal greeting. Introduce yourself and explain that you’re there for an
interview and provide the name of the interviewer/s.
2. Wait professionally
Adopt a professional approach when you’re sat waiting for the interview, using positive, confident body language. Now isn’t
the time to check your social media accounts or WhatsApp your friends. Instead, switch your phone off before you enter the
building and leave it alone until afterwards. If there are any corporate brochures to hand, flick through these while you wait.
3. First impressions count
It’s a fact that first impressions count, so as soon as the interviewer approaches you, ensure you come across as personable,
professional and courteous. Stand up straight, smile, make eye contact and extend your hand. Say hello and introduce yourself,
stating that it’s a pleasure to meet them, and thank them for taking the time to see you today. Attention to detail can go a long way
to securing your dream role. Be considerate and polite to ALL staff members. You never know who will provide input for a hiring
decision.
4. Discard any chewing gum or breath mints before your interview.
5. Carry a tissue or handkerchief in your pocket to dry your hands in case you are nervous before you go in.

During the Interview


1. Listen carefully to the interviewer.
2. Make sure you answer the question your interviewer is asking.
3. Relate your skills, accomplishments, and objectives to the needs of the company.
4. Provide specific examples when possible using the SARA method (Situation, Action, Result, Application).
5. Focus on the positive aspects of your training and experience. You don’t have to apologize for any perceived lack of experience
or background.
6. If you do not have the interviewer’s contact information request a business card so that you can send a thank you note.
7. Your posture can convey confidence or insecurity. Sit up straight to send a message that you are comfortable and confident.
8. Maintain eye contact with your interviewer and others in the room. If you focus all of your attention on one person, you will not
engage other interviewers.
9. Avoid fidgeting. Use your hands to express yourself in moderation.
10. Be clear and direct. Avoid the use of filler words such as um or like between phrases or sentences. Do not ramble. When you
finish making your point, stop! Silence is acceptable

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
9
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

After the Interview


1. Send a Thank You note within 24 hours of the interview.
2. Check out a sample Thank You note for inspiration.
3. If you do not hear from the employer after the hiring timeline they initially indicated follow up professionally, and only once.
4. Call or email the interviewer or human resources representative and inquire about the position and the new hiring timeline.
5. Evaluate your performance.
6. Did any questions stump you? Now is the time to improve your answers for the next interview.
7. After a first round interview you may be called back for additional rounds of interviews depending on the employer’s process.
8. For those participating in On-Campus Interviews, keep in mind that second round interviews are typically not held at CCE, but
at company offices.
9. Check out our resource on what to expect at a second round interview to help you prepare.
10. If a job offer is provided on the spot, which is uncommon, it is appropriate to thank the employer and to tell them that you need
more time to consider the opportunity.
11. At that point, ask about the company’s timeline and deadline for your answer

DO’S AND DON’TS IN A JOB INTERVIEW


What to do during an interview
1. Answer the question that was asked.
2. Shake the interviewer’s hand.
3. Let the interviewer show you your chair – now is the time to be submissive, so as to not offend the interviewer.
4. Say “Yes,” not “Yeah.”
5. Take a second before answering a question to show you are putting some thought into your answer.
6. Take notes.
7. Let your achievements speak for you.
8. Ask questions, including asking for a full description of the type of work that you will be doing.
9. Keep eye contact.
10. Be yourself.
11. Start with conversation topics that you are comfortable with. This will allow you to direct the interview to a certain degree and
present yourself in a positive light.

What not to do during an interview


1. Don’t talk too quickly.
2. Don’t digress from your points. Answer questions directly.
3. Don’t use slang.
4. Don’t use words you don’t know the meaning of.
5. Don’t be arrogant.
6. Don’t talk about your personal life.
7. Don’t give the employer any reason to think you will not perform well.
8. Don’t act nervous. You probably will be, but it is best if you take a few seconds and clear your mind; your answers will be less
jumbled. If you find yourself getting really nervous, excuse yourself and go to the bathroom to get some air. Don’t take too long
but it is better to collect your thoughts than to plow ahead when you can’t focus.
9. Don’t fidget. This might be something you have to practice but it is worth it.
10. Don’t get defensive. The interviewer will be asking technical questions. Everyone has their weak spots and that is okay – work
with it and practice for it.
11. Don’t bring coffee. Sipping a drink is a sign of disrespect.
12. You don’t want to use this time to over-prepare or rehearse responses, which can make your conversation seem scripted and
not authentic. remember your interview is a conversation.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
10
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LESSON 4
Familiarizing the Workplace

PROFESSIONS AND THEIR TASK ASSIGNMENT/S


The following are 10 examples of professions – and their task assignments – in different clusters under the STEM Strand,
Health, Technology, and Engineering. The students and/or the class instructor may discuss other professions not included in the list.

Health Cluster

PROFESSION JOB DESCRIPTION

Biologists study organisms and plant life to learn more about their composition, behaviors,
habitats, and how they interact with other organisms and their environment. They conduct
Biologist
research, collect samples and measurements, perform tests and experiments, and interpret and
report their findings.

This broad degree covers the development and design of products that involve chemical and
biological changes. Chemical engineers can be involved in the production of drugs, food, fuels,
Chemical Engineer household chemicals, and substances used in mechanics. They are often involved in the
development of manufacturing processes but can also work on safety and health issues involving
chemistry.

Dentists diagnose and treat problems with a patient's teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth.
Dentist They provide advice and instruction on taking care of teeth and gums and on diet choices that
affect oral health.

Medical laboratory technicians assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by
performing tests on tissue, blood and other body fluids. The day-to-day duties of a medical
technologist include complex analysis of microscopic, immunologic, biologic, bacteriologic,
Medical Technician/Technologist
hematologic, and chemical tests and their results. Delivering test results to physicians,
researchers or patients. Collecting and studying blood samples to determine morphology. Medical
lab technicians most commonly work in hospitals or doctors' offices.
Nursing jobs require not only treating patients who are sick and injured, but also offering advice
Nurse and emotional support to patients and their families, taking care of paperwork (lots and lots of
paperwork), helping doctors diagnose patients and providing advice and follow-up care.
Prepares medications by reviewing and interpreting physician orders; detecting therapeutic
Pharmacist incompatibilities. Dispenses medications by compounding, packaging, and labeling
pharmaceuticals. Controls medications by monitoring drug therapies; advising interventions.
Physical therapists help people with physical injuries or illnesses of to regain range of movement
Physical Therapist and control their pain. They help determine the root causes of the trauma, counsel patients, and
work with them to create a plan for rehabilitation.
A physician, medical practitioner, medical doctor, or simply doctor is a professional who practices
medicine, which is concerned with promoting, maintaining, or restoring health through the study,
Physician / Medical Doctor / diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and other physical and mental impairments.
Medical Practitioner Physicians examine patients; take medical histories; prescribe medications; and order, perform,
and interpret diagnostic tests. They often counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive
healthcare.

A radiologist is a medical doctor who is trained in executing and interpreting medical images such
as X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds, and MRIs and using them to treat health problems in patients.
Radiologist
Radiologists perform image-guided procedures but do not normally handle the general medical
needs of a patient.

Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose,
Veterinarian
treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
11
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Technology Cluster
PROFESSION JOB DESCRIPTION
Analyze needs and design computer programs to accomplish specific goals. They may create
applications or plan parts or a whole program. Heads and plans the system design needed for a
certain project. Systems analysts analyze how well software, hardware and the wider IT system
System Analyst
fit the business needs of their employer or of a client. They write requirements for new systems
and may also help implement them and monitor their effectiveness. Typical responsibilities of the
job include: examining current systems.
A degree in computer programming can be applied to nearly any industry and nearly any
Computer Programmer geographical area. Computer programmers write and test code, making them essential to the
production of efficient and effective computer technology.
A professional that creates and maintains a website. The role is responsible for designing, coding
Website Developer and modifying websites, from layout to function and according to a client's specifications. Strive
to create visually appealing sites that feature user-friendly design and clear navigation.
Creates games for different platforms (consoles, mobile, PC, etc.). Many components are involved
in the development of a video game. Designers, producers and graphic artists all contribute to the
Game Developer
final product. However, programmers and software developers turn the idea into code, which
provides the game with its operating instructions.
A professional that construct plans in network and internet installation and its maintenance. Fully
supporting, configuring, maintaining and upgrading corporate customer's networks and in house
Network Administrator
servers. Installing and integrating new server hardware and applications. Keeping an eye out for
needed updates.
The organization and implementation of databases is crucial to many organizations, including
businesses, non-profits, and government institutions. Database administrators need to
understand database language, such as SQL, and will learn other important computer science
and information technology skills. A professional that manages database server or web servers
Database administrators (DBAs) use specialized software to store and organize data. The role
Database Administrator
may include capacity planning, installation, configuration, database design, migration,
performance monitoring, security, troubleshooting, as well as backup and data recovery. The
database administrator is responsible for the performance, integrity and security of a database.
Updating and amending existing databases. Setting up and testing new database and data
handling systems. Monitoring database efficiency.
Specializes in typing documents in different area of professions, but, data encoders do much more
than type on a keyboard all day. A data encoder job description typically includes duties such as
Data Encoder
entering data, maintaining databases and client files, managing hard copies, scanning documents
and handling other data-related tasks
Fixes computer problems, assemble computer parts, and supports network in maintenance.
Computer technicians fill this role across a broad range of industries, and though individual
responsibilities vary by employer, a computer repair technician's job responsibilities and duties
often include: Installing software or hardware, maintaining and repairing equipment., configuring
Computer Technician
computer networks. Computer technicians offer remote support from an office or they perform
hands-on work at the work site, so they help get software, hardware and operating systems
installed and configured. They also provide support when problems occur. The roles of a computer
technician also include troubleshooting.
Creates animations (e.g. special effects, cartoons, etc.) using various types of application
Graphics Animator software. Animators produce images that appear to come to life on screen. Their work is found in
feature films, commercials, pop videos, computer games, websites and other media.
Multimedia/new media designers build on their skills and abilities as a graphic designer by
combining graphic design with animation to create computer based movies and presentations.
Multimedia Designer Multimedia designers create engaging presentations of images and information for various media
including the Web, television, movies, and video games. Though they work in a high-technology
field, multimedia designers generally need a strong foundation in art to be successful.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
12
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Engineering Cluster

PROFESSION JOB DESCRIPTION

A degree in civil engineering will educate you on how to create publicly-owned structures, such
as roadways, bridges, and municipal buildings. Civil engineers often analyze long-range plans for
cities and states, and take into account construction costs and regulations while planning projects.
Civil Engineer Civil engineers create, improve and protect the environment in which we live. They plan, design
and oversee construction and maintenance of building structures and infrastructure, such as
roads, railways, airports, bridges, harbours, dams, irrigation projects, power plants, and water and
sewerage systems.
Students who obtain a degree in mechanical engineering are trained to design, redesign, and
analyze mechanical devices. Much of the work done by mechanical engineers is completed with
computer-aided processes. Mechanical engineering degrees not only study the development of
Mechanical Engineer mechanics, but also testing and final analysis. Mechanical engineers design power-producing
machines such as electric generators, internal combustion engines, and steam and gas turbines
as well as power-using machines, such as refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. Mechanical
engineers design other machines inside buildings, such as elevators and escalators.
Students who are proficient in math, physics, and chemistry may be perfectly suited to a degree
in aerospace engineering. Aerospace engineers typically specialize in one of two types of
engineering: aeronautical or astronautical. Aeronautical engineers work with aircraft. They are
involved primarily in designing aircraft and propulsion systems and in studying the aerodynamic
Aerospace Engineer
performance of aircraft and construction materials. Astronautical engineers perform engineering
duties in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft. May conduct basic
and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials and equipment to aircraft design and
manufacture.
An electrical engineering degree involves classroom studies, laboratory work, and field activities
to develop a strong understanding of how electricity functions and how it can be harnessed on a
Electrical Engineer
large and small scale. Electrical engineers may design new uses for electrical power or perform
detailed calculations to be used in the installation or maintenance of electrical systems.
From sailboats to aircraft carriers, marine engineers and naval architects are responsible for the
design and production of water crafts. They need a strong understanding of hydrodynamics,
Marine Engineer
machinery, performance testing, and many other skills to create seaworthy vessels. From military
to shipping to recreation, marine engineering students are the minds behind the boats.
This degree is largely concerned with the efficiency and productivity of industrial processes.
Someone who studies industrial engineering will know how to review production schedules, find
Industrial Engineer
ways to manufacture products, and develop management control systems that create greater
profitability and success in the industrial sector.
Computer engineering is a common education for people who want to work as computer hardware
engineers, which is one of the high-paying STEM careers available today. Hardware engineers
Computer Engineer create a wide variety of computer equipment and often test and analyze the hardware they have
built. They may also be tasked with updating existing computer hardware or managing the
manufacturing of new devices.
Designs equipment for the extraction and use of oil and gas while considering many economic
Petroleum Engineer
and environmental factors.
This degree uses a combination of sciences, such as chemistry, physics, geology, and biology,
as well as engineering basics to understand the earth’s structure and develop systems for
Geological Engineering responsible use of resources. Geological engineers are often employed by the mining industry,
developing open-pit and underground mines while supervising construction and devising safe
transportation methods for extracted materials.
Design the structures where people live, work, and play. Architecture takes into account scientific
Architecture laws, but also includes artistic design, creating buildings and homes that are structurally-sound as
well as visually pleasing.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
13
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LESSON 5
Work Ethics

CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD EMPLOYEE


Working/improving the right traits can help you in the long run. Knowing the best qualities of employees, may help an
employee find a stronger foothold in the company and increase your chances of getting promotions and success.

1. Hard worker
There is no substitute to hard work. Although everyone seems to say that they work hard not many keep on working after
being at the job for a while. So, one has to keep reminding oneself about the importance and significance of working hard
as an employee.

2. Ethical
Work rules are made to be followed. There is decorum of every place that ought to be kept. A good employee follows the
policies of the company and inspires others to do so too.

3. Positive attitude
A positive attitude has many benefits for individual employees and their colleagues. Positivity leads to a more productive
workday, and creates a better environment for fellow employees. Great employees consistently stand out for their upbeat
attitudes and earn positive reputations for themselves. An employee that has a positive attitude has the ability to
acknowledge mistakes and still move forward in a positive way.

4. Self-motivated
When it comes to finding good employees, hiring managers often look for candidates who can take initiative and get work
done with little to no encouragement. Sheer enthusiasm and interest in the work is often enough to drive these employees.
A good employee never hesitates of taking responsibility or a more responsible position.

5. Team-oriented
According to CareerBuilder, 60% of hiring managers look for team-oriented candidates during the application process.
Many companies succeed based on the work of teams and entire departments, not just individuals. Many companies
consist of teams. Any company requires an effective team effort. An employer who can contribute is an ideal worker.
Someone who is like a fish in the water (of the organization), who can perform well in a team will become a factor sooner
or later. This make the person establish friendly relations with the coworkers and keeps the office running smoothly which
in turn is appreciated by the employers.

6. Effective communicator
Employers love to hire employees who have the ability to communicate well and express themselves in a clear manner,
whether in writing or speaking. Ideal employees will understand the importance of good communication, and just how
badly things can go wrong when a message is unclear or missed altogether. Inaccurate/inappropriate communication
between employees can cause many problems to the company.

7. Flexible and Dedicated


A good employee will not resist change blindly, but instead embrace it and adapt to it as it proves necessary for the
business. Employees who know how to adjust themselves to new environment, willing to learn new things (quick learners)
and perform their best in changes are likely to be the best performers in any organization. He/she is also ready to work
beyond the call of duty in order to meet goals or to solve problems, even if the job in discussion is not one of the regular
works she is usually assigned.

8. Honest
A good employee is honest about his/her work and qualifications. Self-criticism and willing to receive feedback (bad as
good) is essential to become a good learner.
Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
14
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

9. Give credit where it is due


One of the most prevalent practices doing the rounds in offices today is stealing the credit of a job well done. A good
employee will not only truthfully let the right co-worker have her credit but also share her own accolades with his team.

10. Polite
Being friendly and approachable will never harm. a good employee greets her coworkers a ‘good morning’, says little
courteous things like ‘thank you’ and ‘you are welcome’. These things may appear insignificant but go a long way in
establishing the person as favorite employee.

11. Disciplined and punctual: Every boss loves a punctual, disciplined and conscientious employee. Time is money. Coming
late to office, taking unnecessary breaks, procrastinating and leaving earlier than the usual hours cost money to the
company. No employer will ever appreciate this.

12. Professional: Employees should always remember that they came to the office to work, to make a career, not to spread
office gossip or rumors. Respect the privacy of the coworkers. Safeguard and protect the confidential nature of office
business and transactions.

WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR
8 Types of Employees
Francie Dalton, an instructor for the U.S. Chamber’s Institute of Organizational Management program and a
recognized expert in leadership development, has described eight classic types of workplace behavior to help managers
better understand their employees.

1. The Commander
Commanders might be perceived as domineering and aggressive. They don't like to waste time worrying about how to
phrase things tactfully and are often perceived as bullies. It helps to see the positive side to these workers. They usually
demonstrate great drive and initiative. They are the ones you can count on to complete a task and meet deadlines.
Because they like to take charge of situations, they do well when given the opportunity to lead a specific project.
2. The Drifter
The drifter is found at the opposite side of the spectrum to the commander. Drifters are disorganized and unfocused. They
have difficulty staying on task but do their best work when variety and creativity are called for. They are often the ones to
come up with unique solutions that no one else could conceive of.
3. The Attacker
Attackers go through life with a superiority complex. They care little about other people's feelings and often offend others.
They do the most damage in situations that require cooperative team building. They work best when given a task they
can do on their own. They can be useful when given difficult tasks that nobody else wants to do, especially when praised
for their ability to get the task done.
4. The Pleaser
Unlike attackers, making other people feel good is of prime importance to pleasers. Although this might be good for the
morale of the staff, it sometimes comes at the expense of getting the work done. Pleasers respond well to praise that
recognizes their people skills. If there is a harsh message that needs to be delivered to pleasers, they are most likely to
hear the criticism if it is embedded in a lot of appreciation and thanks for all the other things that they did well.
5. The Performer
This is a bit of a misnomer because performers give the impression of accomplishing a lot more than they actually do.
They have a great sense of humor and keep the atmosphere lighthearted and upbeat with their jokes. Behind all the
bluster, however, there's often a person who does not hesitate to take credit for someone else's hard work. They often
try to shift blame for their mistakes to someone else. On the positive side, they are very good public speakers and are
skilled at forming new relationships.
6. The Avoider
Avoiders like to keep a low profile. They are quiet and prefer to work alone than be part of a team that requires social
interaction. They require detailed instructions and lots of patience. They don't function well if they have to work with or for
Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
15
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

loud, aggressive types. Although they don't usually show initiative, they are very reliable and will meticulously follow
instructions.
7. The Analytical
Analyticals are very meticulous, and will double-check their work as well as the work of those around them. They aren't
very receptive to change because they can't help seeing all the negative aspects of proposed new ideas. They are more
successful when working alone, as those on their team often feel overwhelmed by the information overload. Analyticals
respond well to praise about their ability to anticipate what lies ahead.
8. The Achiever
These employees display confidence in their beliefs and actions. They are capable individuals who are aware of their own
strong abilities without displaying arrogance. They are well-liked, well-adjusted, competent workers with a sense of humor.
They consult with others and make good decisions that keep the organization's goals in the forefront. Their decisions are
not influenced by personal gain. They are gifted with the ability to get along with all the other behavior types.

The 'Terrible 10' Behaviors


Through an informal online survey with Yahoo! and Survey Monkey, researchers at the Civility Initiative at The Johns
Hopkins University and the Jacob France Institute of the University of Baltimore identified workplace behaviors that irritate
people the most. More than 600 workers and college students in the Baltimore area ranked bad behavior on a scale ranging
from 1 (not offensive) to 5 (most offensive).

1. Employment discrimination.
2. Erratic/aggressive driving that endangers others.
3. Taking credit for someone else's work.
4. Treating service providers as inferiors.
5. Mocking race, gender, age, disabilities, sexual orientation or religion.
6. People who behave aggressively or who bully others.
7. Littering.
8. Misusing handicapped privileges.
9. Smoking in nonsmoking places or smoking in front of nonsmokers without asking.
10. Using cellphones or text-messaging in mid-conversation or during an appointment or meeting.

Some actions, such as discrimination, may be illegal; but even more subtle behaviors, such as making a sexist joke or
not asking before lighting a cigarette, still add to the stress of the daily grind and can actually lower productivity.

WORKPLACE RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES


It’s important to understand your workplace rights and responsibilities in regards to pay and conditions, health and safety
and workplace bullying.

By law, the employer is responsible for making sure:


1. Work environment is safe and providing appropriate protective equipment if necessary
2. Workers are free from discrimination and bullying
3. Employees receive all your entitlements in terms of pay and conditions.

As a worker, you are responsible for:


1. Understanding the conditions of your employment. This includes knowing your rate of pay, working hours and
entitlements to breaks and leave
2. Working in a way that is not harmful to the health and safety of yourself or others
3. Knowing what to do if you think your employer is not meeting their responsibilities.
4. Make sure you:
 understand the conditions of your employment. This includes your rate of pay, working hours and your entitlements
for breaks, leave and public holidays

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
16
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

 know your rights in regards to discrimination and bullying. Know what to do if you experience or witness this in
your workplace
 know the health and safety requirements of your workplace. Know how to maintain a safe environment for yourself
and others
 have access to all of the appropriate safety gear and equipment. Know what to do in the event of an accident
 know where to get help on workplace health and safety issues relevant to your state or territory.

CONFIDENTIALITY IN THE WORKPLACE


Workplace confidentiality can be defined as keeping the employee, customer and client information private. In today’s increasingly
litigious and highly competitive workplace, confidentiality is important for a host of reasons: Failure to properly secure and protect
confidential business information can lead to the loss of business/clients. In the wrong hands, confidential information can be misused to
commit illegal activity (e.g., fraud or discrimination), which can in turn result in costly lawsuits for the employer. Many states have laws
protecting the confidentiality of certain information in the workplace. The disclosure of sensitive employee and management information
can lead to a loss of employee trust, confidence and loyalty. This will almost always result in a loss of productivity.

An employee should know what files or materials he is permitted to access in the office and he should adhere to that. Under no
circumstances should these files be shared or given to unauthorized people. As far as the employer is concerned, any personal or
professional details of employees should be handled with prudence. Data related to the personal details of an employee, applications
forms, references, health data, salary structure should be kept well under wraps. Only staff members of the HR department who require
the data for certain purposes should be given access to the personal files of employees.

The word “confidentiality” has both casual and legal meanings in the workplace and will have different meanings throughout your
professional career. In some instances, confidentiality refers to not discussing internal goings-on with co-workers. In other instances, it
refers to not sharing trade secrets and other company information with competitors, the press or anyone outside of your company.

Casual Definition
You’ll be more likely to climb the corporate ladder during your career if you get along well with co-workers, build strong professional
networks and have a reputation as a trustworthy employee. If you repeat confidential statements made by co-workers, even if the original
source doesn’t hear about your gossip, the people you tell might lose respect for you and no longer trust you. If you gossip with customers,
they might tell your competitors, who will be less likely to hire you in the future.

Examples of breaking casual, confidential communications include repeating a co-worker’s opinion of his boss, revealing the fact
that a peer is interviewing with another company, forwarding a confidential email from one employee to another, sharing information you
overhead others discussing or passing around a document you found that wasn’t intended for others. A general rule of thumb for
discussing others and/or their information is not to repeat something if you wouldn’t say it if the person was standing next to you.

Legal Definition
During your time in the workforce, you’ll have access to information your employer doesn’t want made public or revealed inside the
company. This can include salaries, employee perks, client lists, trade secrets, sales numbers, customer information, news about pending
terminations, reasons for a firing, phone codes or computer passwords. You may not divulge this information while you are working for
an employer or after you leave. In some instances, you will be asked to sign a confidentiality agreement requiring you to keep company
secrets after you leave an employer. Some companies might offer to hire you specifically because they want you to bring inside
information about your former employer they can use. Even if you don’t sign a confidentiality agreement, sensitive information you have
might be protected under state or federal laws.

Information you can’t share outside of a business might include customer lists, production processes, recipes, patents, financial
information, research, website traffic statistics and computer and building security information. Companies that collect data on customers
cannot share this information with other companies unless it informs customers in advance, such as when businesses share email lists.
Personnel information is confidential, and information in an employee’s file, such as social security number, salary, health records,
disciplinary actions and termination reason can’t be discussed with other employees. Most of this information can’t be discussed with
potential employers who call for a reference. Divulging inside information can damage your former employer, allowing them to sue you
to recover those damages. Review any non-compete or confidentiality agreements you’ve signed with your attorney and discuss any
proprietary information you have you might not be able to share with a new employer.

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
17
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

APPENDICES

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
18
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

LIST OF SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS


Work Immersion

CLEARBOOK CONTENTS
(w/ tabbings)

Student Profile

Applicant Profile
- Application Letter
- Bio Data
- Curriculum Vitae
- Resume

Academic Files
- Photocopy of Registration Cards
- Photocopy of Report Cards

Certificates
- Photocopy of Awards
- Photocopy of Trainings/Seminars

IDs
- NBI (Schedule only)
- PhilHealth
- Pag-IBIG
- SSS
- Barangay Clearance (Application Form)

In-campus Work Immersion Report

Off-campus Work Immersion Report

Evaluation Forms
- Mock Interview Evaluation Form
- Seminar Evaluation Forms
- Work Simulation

Practicum Journal
- Weekly Accomplishment Reports

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
19
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

JOB INTERVIEW EVALUATION FORM

Name of Applicant: ______________________________________________ Section: ______________________


Position Applied for: _____________________________________________ Date: ________________________

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: You may or you may not use the following questions as your guide
 Tell me something about yourself
 What are your salary expectations?
 What are some of your strength and weaknesses?
 Give two or three things that are most important to you in your work?
 What do you usually do during your spare time?
 How do you work with others? Are you a leader or a follower?
 What is your ideal position and career path?
 After graduation: How will your degree benefit the organization?
 How did you get along with your former boss and co-workers?
 How have your prior experiences and education prepared you for this job?
 Are you interested in promotional opportunities?

Poor Fair Average Very Good Superior


APPEARANCE (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Attire
Grooming
Body Language
Eye Contact
CHARACTERISTICS
Achievement-orientation
Dedication
Maturity
Professionalism
Ability to Learn
GOALS/PERCEPTION OF SELF
Realistic appraisal of self
Reason for interest in field
Leadership Ability
JOB EXPECTATION/SKILLS
Realistic job expectations
Language Proficiency
Technical Skills

Recommendation:
Based upon the observations made above and the applicant’s interview and qualification, do you think the person should be
further considered for this position?

Yes: _______ No: ________ Comment/Suggestions:

Evaluated by:

____________________________________________________ ___________________________
SIGNATURE OVER PRINTED NAME DATE

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
20
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

SEMINAR EVALUATION FORM

NAME: _________________________________________________ STRAND & SECTION: ____________________

SEMINAR TITLE:
THEME:
DATE, TIME, AND VENUE:
PICTURES DURING THE SEMINAR

SPEAKERS
Name of Speaker Topic Rating

LEARNING OUTCOMES
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
21
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

WORK SIMULATION

NAME: ___________________________________________________ STRAND & SECTION: ____________________

WORK NO: DATE:


WORK TITLE:
JOB POSITION:
PICTURES

TASK ASSIGNMENT
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________
EVALUATED BY: SCORE:

______________________________________________________
Signature of Immediate Supervisor over Printed Name
Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
22
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

WEEKLY ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT

NAME: ________________________________________________ STRAND & SECTION: ____________________

WK
DATE ACTIVITY TASK ASSIGNMENT / ACCOMPLISHMENT REMARKS
NO

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

NOTED BY:
___________________________________________________________ __________________________
Work Immersion Instructor Date
Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
23
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

IN-CAMPUS WORK IMMERSION

NAME: _______________________________________________ STRAND & SECTION: ____________________


BATCH: [ ] AM Session [ ] PM Session DATE: _________________________________

TOPIC:
Picture/s: Time and Room: Instructor: Signature of Instructor:

Learning Outcomes:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

TOPIC:
Picture/s: Time and Room: Instructor: Signature of Instructor:

Learning Outcomes:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

TOPIC:
Picture/s: Time and Room: Instructor: Signature of Instructor:

Learning Outcomes:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

NOTED BY:

________________________________________________________ ________________________________
Work Immersion Instructor Date
Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
24
SHS - Work Immersion Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

OFF-CAMPUS WORK IMMERSION

NAME: _______________________________________________ STRAND & SECTION: ____________________


BATCH: ______________________________________________ DATE: _________________________________

VENUE/S:

PICTURES

NARRATIVE REPORT
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prepared by:
MS. CHRISTINE ONQUIT
Faculty, College of Computer Studies
25