You are on page 1of 10

Thursday, december 2, 2010

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Ohio Senate passes human trafficking
bill, p3

Klaus does his part for Blue Jays,
p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
Index
Partly cloudy
Friday; high
in mid30s.
See page 2.
Jennings sets
kindergarten
registration
Fort Jennings Elementary
will hold kindergarten reg-
istration for the 2011-2012
school year from Dec.
13-22 in the school office.
Hours are from 8 a.m.
until 3:30 p.m. each day.
Children must be 5 years
of age on or before Sept.
30, 2011, to be eligible.
Parents are asked to bring
the child’s birth certificate,
Social Security number
and immunization record
at the time of registration.
Call the elementary
office at 419-286-2762
with any questions.
Relay team
offers 2011
calendars
The Franklin Elementary
School Staff Relay
For Life team is sell-
ing photo calendars.
The calendars display
the year 2011 and are 8 1/2
x 11. They are printed on
photo paper and laminated.
Calendars can be picked
up during school hours in
the Franklin office on the
Monday after the order
is placed. To make other
pick-up arrangements,
call Joyce Wiechart at
419-303-2443 or Shelly
Kroeger at 419-692-2409.
Recommended direc-
tions to Canton Fawcett
Stadium: US 30 East to I-77
North (to Akron) and Exit
106 (13th St. NW). Turn
west (left) there and take
to Broad Avenue NW (2nd
traffic light). Take a right
there and head to 17th St.
NW; turn right there to sta-
dium parking areas. Follow
the blue and white OHSAA
signs to the stadium. When
leaving, use 17th St., Broad
Ave. and 13th St. back to
I-77 South and US 30 West.
Or take Blake Ave. (north)
to Fulton Rd. NW (SR 687)
and right to southbound I-77.
Annual Christmas Bazaar draws large crowd
Marge Morris, above left, makes sure fresh table settings are down for new diners
during the Bazaar Dinner. Fellowship Hall was full from 4-6:30 p.m. Wednesday night.
Gloria Baughn looks through the canned jellies in
the Christmas Bazaar General Store at Trinity United
Methodist Church Wednesday. Church members donated
homemade goodies and crafts for the store.
Nancy Spencer photos
Bazaar Chair Kay Ahten gets ham slices ready for the oven Wednesday
morning. Ahten coordinated the many volunteers for the event.
Workers in the carry-out line were kept busy for the full 2 1/2-hour
serving time.
2010 TUMC
Christmas Bazaar
Mail may hinder
online payments
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — In response
to the ongoing mail service
fiasco, online bill payment may
look more attractive to those
unaccustomed to it. However,
even that method often involves
the post office and payments
may still arrive late.
Many companies receive
payment by electronic trans-
fer from financial institutions
but some do not, according
to First Federal Bank Branch
Manager Cindy Metzger.
“With utility companies,
some accept electronic pay-
ment but it depends on the
company. If you go to online
bill-pay to pay Ivy Hutch, for
example, they’re not doing
electronic transfer, so in that
case, our bill-pay service
cuts them a check and mails
it,” she said. “The mail is
the reason a lot of payments
are late. We say to allow
about 10 days, so if payment
is arranged in accord with
our disclaimer, it should get
there and be posted on time
but with the changes to the
mail service, they sometimes
don’t.
“Unfortunately, that’s out
of the bank’s control but cus-
tomers do get a confirmation
code. So, if the company
says they didn’t receive pay-
ment, we can stop payment
and search for checks that
way.”
Another reason online pay-
ments should be made prior
to the due date is because
electronic checks are not
processed instantly. Melinda
Gibbs of American Electric
Power said her company, like
other larger utility providers,
is contracted with several
banks. Electronic checks take
two or three days but do not
involve the mail. A reliable
indicator of how payment
will be made is whether the
bank recognizes the company
when customers set up an
online bill payment account.
If the company is already in
the bank’s system, it’s usu-
ally because it has a contrac-
tual relationship established
through which electronic
payments can be received.
However, if the bank needs
an address for the company in
question, a paper check will
probably be issued, according
to Gibbs.
With smaller compa-
nies, the issue may depend
on prior arrangements. Fort
Jennings Telephone Company
Representative Randy
Wieging said if payment is
pre-scheduled by automatic
withdrawal, then electronic
transfer is made. However,
if a customer pays through
the telephone company’s web
site, payment is by check.
Holidays now about survival
BY TOM BREEN
The Associated Press
Shawn Slonsky’s children
know by now not to give him
Christmas lists filled with the
latest gizmos. The 44-year-
old union electrician is one of
nearly 2 million Americans
whose extended unemploy-
ment benefits will run out this
month, making the holiday
season less about celebration
than survival.
“We’ll put up decorations,
but we just don’t have the
money for a Christmas tree,”
Slonsky said.
Benefits that had been
extended up to 99 weeks start-
ed running out Wednesday.
Unless Congress approves a
longer extension, the Labor
Department estimates about 2
million people will be cut off
by Christmas.
Support groups for the
so-called 99ers have sprung
up online, offering chances
to vent along with tips on
resumes and job interviews.
Advocacy groups such as the
National Employment Law
Project have turned their
plight into a rallying cry for
Congress to extend jobless
benefits.
Things used to be differ-
ent for Slonsky, who lives in
Massillon, Ohio. Before work
dried up, he earned about
$100,000 a year. He and his
wife lived in a three-bedroom
house where deer meandered
through the backyard.
Then they lost their jobs.
Their house went into fore-
closure and they had to move
in with his 73-year-old father.
Now, Slonsky is dreading the
holidays as his 99 weeks run
out.
“It’s hard to be in a jovial
mood all the time when
you’ve got this storm cloud
hanging over your head,” he
said.
The average weekly
unemployment benefit in the
U.S. is $302.90, though it
varies widely depending on
how states calculate the pay-
ment. Because of supplemen-
tal state programs and other
factors, it’s hard to know for
sure who will lose their ben-
efits at any given time.
Congressional opponents
of extending the benefits
beyond this month say fis-
cal responsibility should
come first. Republicans in
the House and Senate, along
with a handful of conserva-
tive Democrats, say they’re
open to extending benefits,
but not if it means adding
to the $13.8 trillion national
debt.
Republicans maintain they
are willing to instead use
unspent money from Obama
stimulus programs to foot
the bill: a $12.5 billion tab
for three months. Democrats
argue that the extended ben-
efits should be paid for with
deficit spending because it
injects money into the econ-
omy.
The GOP didn’t pay any
political price for stalling
efforts earlier this year to
extend jobless benefits that
provide critical help to the
unemployed — including a
seven-week stretch over the
summer when jobless ben-
efits were a piece of a failed
Democratic tax and jobs bill.
But bad publicity because the
benefits end over the holidays
has long been forecast.
Democrats hope that a
final deal on extending Bush-
era income tax cuts to the
wealthy and middle class
will include an agreement
from Republicans to another
extension of deficit-financed
emergency unemployment
benefits.
U.S. Rep. Mike Pence,
R-Ind., the No. 3 Republican
in the House, said extended
benefits must be paid for now,
rather than later, if they’re
going to win support from
fiscal conservatives.
“The fact that we have
to keep extending unemploy-
ment benefits shows that the
economic policies of this
administration have failed,”
said Pence spokeswoman
Courtney Kolb.
Jobless benefits end
Church offers
Advent Breakfast
The First Presbyterian
Church will hold an Advent
Breakfeast at 9 a.m. Dec. 11.
A drama on Joseph
willbe presented by Pastor
Harry and Judy Tolhurst.
The public is invited.
Call Millie Spitnale
by Dec. 9 for reserva-
tions at 419-692-3631.
2
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Michaela
Hoffman.
Congratulations
Michaela!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Devon
Krendl.
Congratulations
Devon!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Thursday, December 2, 2010
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
TODAY IN HISTORY
POLICE REPORT The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 145
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl,
general manager/Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
Dots printed on fabric and called polka dots dates back to
the mid to late 19th century, when the dance the polka was
popular and businessmen attempted to cash in on the craze
by adding “polka” to the names of all sorts of products,
ranging from socks, hats and curtains to dotted fabrics. The
latter outlived the fad and the rest disappeared.
Miss Piggy’s full name when The Muppet Show was
first aired in 1976 was Miss Piggy Lee in humor and tribute
to singer Peggy Lee. The Lee in Miss Piggy’s name was
used only once on the show. It was dropped to avoid upset-
ting Peggy Lee.
Today’s questions:
What was the original significance of the “O” and “Mac”
in Irish surnames?
Which planet experiences 42 earth years of constant
summer followed by 42 earth years of dark winter?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Icosahedron: a 20-sided solid
Zeitgeist: the general intellectual, moral and cultural
level of an era
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Kicker
2-6-4-8-5-2
Mega Millions
11-16-19-47-53, Mega
Ball: 2
Midday 3
4-8-9
Midday 4
2-7-8-2
Pick 3
7-1-9
Pick 4
1-4-8-6
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $95
million
Rolling Cash 5
09-14-18-21-29
Estimated jackpot:
$188,000
Ten OH
01-08-12-21-24-27-30-31-
36-40-45-46-48-51-55-57-61-
65-68-73
Ten OH Midday
10-16-17-19-32-33-37-43-
46-49-50-51-53-55-60-64-65-
68-77-80
Car hit by unknown driver
Weather lends to 3-vehicle crash
At 5:45 p.m. on Tuesday,
a collision occurred when a
parked vehicle was struck
by a second, unknown vehi-
cle.
Ashley Harter, 27, of
Delphos, parked her vehi-
cle in the parking lot of
Chief’s Supermarket. When
she returned to her car, she
noticed it had been struck
by another vehicle. Damages
done consisted of a cracked
windshield, the front bum-
per knocked off and damages
to both front fenders. Harter
was able to drive her vehicle
home, where the information
was gathered.
There were no known
injuries and severe damage to
Harter’s vehicle.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles Steele in Van
Wert County Common Pleas
Court:
Zacharia J. Young, Van
Wert, was placed on two
years of community control
and ordered to immediately
spend 60 days in the Van Wert
County Jail on a charge of
domestic violence, a misde-
meanor of the first degree.
Young was ordered to
undergo a psychological
assessment and complete any
rehabilitation as recommend-
ed. Young was also ordered
not to be within 500 foot of the
victim Nicole Young.
All costs of prosecution
were assessed to Young. Judge
Steele gave Young a 180-day
jail sentence and a $1,000 fine
but deferred the imposition of
the jail and fine pending the
successful completion of the
community control.
Lukas Mortemore, 24,
Napoleon, was given a six-
month sentence on charges of
identity fraud and forgery to
run concurrently and also con-
current to a prison sentence he
is serving on charges out of
Wood County.
Mortemore and a sister-in-
law both were charged after
they had falsely obtained iden-
tification information and later
cashed a check belonging to a
brother of Lukas Mortemore.
Joshua D. Burnett, 32,
Van Wert, was placed on three
years of community control on
a charge of attempted driving
while under the influence, a
fifth degree felony.
Burnett was arrested on
Sept. 4 by the Van Wert City
Police Department for the
alcohol-related charge.
Judge Steele ordered that
Burnett undergo a substance
abuse assessment and complete
any programs recommended.
Burnett told Judge Steele that
he had already involved him-
self in rehabilitation programs.
Burnett had his drivers
license suspended for a year,
ordered to pay a fine of $750,
court costs, $250 as partial
reimbursement for his court
appointed attorney as well as a
$25 affidavit of indigency fee.
Judge Steele sentenced
Burnett to a nine month prison
sentence but deferred the impo-
sition of the sentence pending
the successful completion of
the community control pro-
gram.
Matthew S. Lause, 21,
Van Wert and formerly of
Delphos, was placed on three
years of community control
and ordered to spend up to
six months at the WORTH
Center in Lima. Lause was
also ordered to spend an addi-
tional 30 days in the Van Wert
County Jail, complete a sub-
stance abuse assessment and
pay all costs associated with
the prosecution of his case.
Lause was arrested as the
result of an undercover opera-
tion that took place in Delphos
in September 2009, at which
time, he allegedly sold heroin
to an undercover agent work-
ing for the West Central Crime
Task Force.
Crystal Armstrong, 24,
Delphos, was placed on three
years of community control
and ordered to spend up to six
months at the WORTH Center
on a charge of theft, a felony of
the fifth degree.
According to a Delphos
Police Department investiga-
tion, Armstrong stole a check
from a relative and cashed it at
a store in Lima in July.
Armstrong was ordered to
make restitution in the amount
of $31.26 to the victim, pay
all costs associated with her
prosecution.
Armstrong was being held
in jail but was released on a
$5,000 bond with the condi-
tions that she be tested regu-
larly until the WORTH Center
has room to admit her into their
program.
A basic prison term of nine
months was deferred pending
the successful completion of
the community control pro-
gram.
Benjamin Hurley, 31, Van
Wert, was placed on communi-
ty control and ordered to spend
up to six months on two differ-
ent charges for which he had
failed to comply with.
Hurley was involved in
two previous incidents where
he was ordered to make res-
titution. Judge Steele ordered
Hurley to $5,500 within 12
months of being released from
the WORTH Center.
Hurley was given two six-
month prison sentences, which
would be served concurrently
but the imposition of the prison
sentence was deferred pending
the successful completion of
the community control.
Hurley was ordered to pay
all costs of prosecution.
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was 31
degrees, low was 24. Snowfall
was recorded at .25 inch. High
a year ago today was 46, low
was 34. Record high for today
is 70, set in 1902. Record low
is 8, set in 1979.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly
cloudy. Lows in the lower
20s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
FRIDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the mid 30s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy in the evening; mostly
cloudy with a chance of snow
after midnight. Lows in the
mid 20s. Chance of snow 30
percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly
cloudy. A chance of snow in
the morning; a chance of snow
and rain in the afternoon.
Highs in the mid 30s. Chance
of precipitation 40 percent.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 40 per-
cent chance of snow. Lows in
the mid 20s.
BY JEFF KAROUB
The Associated Press
MORENCI, Mich. —
Megan Nagy had kept quiet
when she heard people whis-
pering in the pizza shop where
she works that the three miss-
ing brothers from the small
Michigan town are dead.
It was a Facebook post
from a friend — “RIP missing
Morenci boys” — that finally
prompted her to respond to the
rumors that the Skelton broth-
ers, last seen on Thanksgiving,
wouldn’t be found alive.
“Please don’t say RIP,” the
19-year-old and another friend
responded. “We all need to
keep hope.”
It’s a theme being repeated
throughout Morenci, where
the fate of 9-year-old Andrew,
7-year-old Alexander and
5-year-old Tanner has gripped
those living in and around the
community of about 2,000
residents 75 miles southwest
of Detroit. Their father, John
Skelton, faces three kidnapping
charges, and Morenci police
Chief Larry Weeks has said
Skelton hasn’t said much about
where the boys might be.
Weeks has cautioned the
public that police do not expect
“a positive outcome,” but he
also told reporters he simply
refuses to believe at this point
that the children were killed.
“It is my desire to maintain
hope,” he said.
Volunteers have fanned out
each day — and will head out
again for a sixth day today
— searching the countryside
around Morenci and across the
border in Ohio. Hundreds have
offered their time and money,
including an account set up at a
local bank to take donations for
the family and an anonymous
donor whom police say has
offered a $10,000 reward for
the return or recovery of the
brothers.
Skelton appeared at a hear-
ing Wednesday in Toledo,
Ohio, where he fought extradi-
tion to Michigan. The 39-year-
old unemployed long-haul
truck driver, sat throughout
the hearing in a wheelchair
covered by a green blanket,
answering the judge’s yes-or-
no questions in a whisper. The
judge set bond at $3 million
and scheduled another hearing
for Dec. 14.
At the United Methodist
Church in Morenci, the Rev.
Donna Galloway found herself
correcting her speech about
the brothers as she described
them. “They were very vital
and important — they are — a
very vital and important part of
our church,” she said.
She recalled the boys and
their estranged parents help-
ing decorate the church and a
nearby park for the Christmas
season on the Sunday before
Thanksgiving.
“Andrew said to me, ‘With
the park all lit up and church all
lit up, we’re going to light up
the town’,” Galloway, who also
serves as the chaplain for the
Morenci Fire Department, said.
“It was a good day, it was a
family day, for all of us at the
church. That light — and the
season of light — is what we’re
holding on to,” she added.
That was the last time
Galloway saw the family
together.
The following Friday,
Tanya Skelton reported the
boys missing when their father
didn’t return them. Police say
he tried to hang himself and
that he lied to investigators
when he said he first gave the
boys to a female acquaintance
to hand over to their mother.
Tanya Skelton, 44, filed
for divorce in September. A
judge gave her custody of the
boys, but she and John Skelton
reached an agreement on visi-
tation.
Police say Tanya Skelton’s
family has asked for their pri-
vacy.
Hometown of missing Mich.
boys tries to keep hope
Delphos weather
At 6:44 p.m. on
Wednesday, a traffic colli-
sion occurred when the driver
of one vehicle slid through an
intersection, struck a second
vehicle which then struck a
third.
Lawrence Brown, 76, of
Elida, was traveling west
on East Second Street when
he attempted to stop at the
intersection of North Pierce
Street. Brown slid through
the snow-covered intersec-
tion, striking the vehicle
of Elizabeth Youngpeter,
54, of Delphos, who was
driving northbound on
Pierce through the inter-
section. This resulted
in Youngpeter’s vehicle
striking the car of Edward
Weilacher, 59, of Delphos,
who was stopped facing
southbound on North Pierce
Street, preparing to turn left
onto Second Street.
There were no injuries and
minor damage to Brown’s and
Youngpeter’s vehicles, mod-
erate damage to Weilacher’s.
No citations were issued.
Corn: $5.38
Wheat: $6.20
Beans: $12.56
C
O
U
P
O
N
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
$
1
0
0
0
O
F
F
B
u
y

o
n
e

e
n
t
r
e
e

g
e
t

t
h
e

2
n
d

e
n
t
r
e
e

1
/
2

o
f
f

4
1
9
-
2
2
5
-
P
A
C
K
E
l
i
d
a

R
o
a
d
,

L
i
m
a
N
e
x
t

t
o

W
E
N
D
Y

S
N
o
t
v
a
lid
o
n
s
p
e
c
ia
ls
. N
o
t
v
a
lid
f
o
r
p
a
r
t
ie
s
g
e
t
t
in
g
B
ir
t
h
d
a
y
d
is
c
o
u
n
t
.
2
n
d
e
n
t
r
e
e
o
f
e
q
u
a
l o
r
le
s
s
e
r
v
a
lu
e
. E
x
p
. 1
2
-
8
-
2
0
1
0
.
M
u
s
t
p
r
e
s
e
n
t
c
o
u
p
o
n
.
(
u
p
t
o
a
t
o
t
a
l
o
f
$
1
0
.
0
0
o
f
f
.
N
o
o
t
h
e
r
d
i
s
c
o
u
n
t
s
a
p
p
l
y
)
E
x
p
. 1
2
-3
1
-2
0
1
0
.
By The Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Dec. 2,
the 336th day of 2010. There
are 29 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Dec. 2, 1970, the
newly created Environmental
Protection Agency opened its
doors. (Its first director was
William D. Ruckelshaus.)
On this date:
In 1804, Napoleon crowned
himself Emperor of the French.
In 1823, President James
Monroe outlined his doctrine
opposing European expansion
in the Western Hemisphere.
In 1927, Ford Motor Co.
formally unveiled its second
Model A automobile, the suc-
cessor to its Model T.
In 1939, New York
Municipal Airport-LaGuardia
Field (later LaGuardia Airport)
went into operation as an air-
liner from Chicago landed at
one minute past midnight.
In 1942, an artificially creat-
ed, self-sustaining nuclear chain
reaction was demonstrated for
the first time, at the University
of Chicago.
In 1969, the Boeing 747
jumbo jet got its first public pre-
view as 191 people, most of them
reporters and photographers, flew
from Seattle to New York City.
1
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
CURVES
WORKS WITH
SilverSneakers!
coming to Curves soon!
419-692-2388
Delphos Sweepstakes Games
Located 1109 Elida Ave., Delphos
BUY
$
5 IN PHONETIME
GET
$
5.00 FREE
WITH THIS AD
East Town Shopping Center, Delphos
Open Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-midnight; Sunday 1 p.m.-midnight
Extended Christmas Hours
Start Dec. 13: Sun. 10-2
Mon.-Fri. 9-7, Sat. 9-3
Christmas Eve 9-2
Brandehoff
Jeweler
8133 Redd Road, Ft. Jennings, Oh
419-692-0085
6/10 of a mile north of Lincoln Hwy.
HUGE STOREWIDE
FABRIC
SALE
THE QUILTERIE
126 N. Main St. Celina, Ohio 419-586-0910
December 3-11
WEEKEND BOWLING SPECIALS!
939 E. Fifth, Delphos
419-692-BOWL
2695
FRIDAY!!
1 HOUR BOWLING & SHOES
MAX 5 PER LANE • $15
SATURDAY!!
1 HOUR BOWLING & SHOES
$20 PER LANE • MAX 5 PER LANE
SUNDAY FAMILY SPECIAL!!
90 MINUTES BOWLING • 1 LARGE
2 ITEM PIZZA • 1 PITCHER OF POP •
SHOE RENTAL • $35.95
Thursday, December 2, 2010 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
EarthTalk®
From the Editors of E/The
Environmental Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: Where
can I find information on
which electronics and their
manufacturers are greener
than others, with regard to
components, manufacturing
processes and end use effi-
ciency?
— John Franken, New
York, NY
Now that many consumers
are beginning to care about their
own environmental footprints,
manufacturers are responding
with loads of greener offer-
ings. One good place to find
them is the Greenpeace Guide
to Greener Electronics, which
ranks the 18 top manufacturers
of personal computers, mobile
phones, televisions and game
consoles according to their
policies on toxic chemicals,
recycling and climate change.
Greenpeace hopes that by pub-
lishing and regularly updating
the guide they can both educate
consumers about their choices
and influence manufacturers
to eliminate hazardous sub-
stances, take back and recycle
their products responsibly, and
reduce the climate impacts of
their operations and products.
According to Greenpeace,
the top five electronics manu-
facturers from a green perspec-
tive are Nokia, Sony Ericsson,
Philips, HP and Samsung.
These companies get high
marks with Greenpeace for
eliminating or scaling way
back on the use of hazardous
chemicals linked to cancer and
other health and environmental
problems, which in turn makes
recycling their products less
problematic.
Nokia gets top honors from
Greenpeace for the second
year in a row: All of the com-
pany’s new phone models and
accessories for 2010 are free of
brominated compounds, chlo-
rinated flame retardants and
antimony trioxide, three of the
most toxic chemicals used com-
monly in most mobile phones
and other consumer electron-
ics today. Toshiba, Microsoft
and Nintendo are the last place
finishers on Greenpeace’s list
for various reasons, including
backtracking on or failing to
make commitments to phase
out chemicals used in the pro-
duction of vinyl plastic (PVC)
and brominated flame retar-
dants (BFRs).
Aother good place to find
info on green electronics and
related products is the new web
site of TopTen USA, a non-
profit that identifies and publi-
cizes the most energy-efficient
products on the market. The
goal of the group—which is
part of a global alliance of
like-minded non-profits—is to
make it easier for consumers
to find the most energy- and
money-saving models, which
in turn encourages manufactur-
ing innovations that will shift
the whole market in a greener
direction. Besides listing the
greenest individual models
of desktop computers, lap-
tops, monitors and televisions
TopTen USA also lists the
greenest refrigerators, freezers,
dishwashers, clothes washers
and even vehicles.
The non-profit Green
Electronics Council, initially
set up to help government,
institutional and corporate
purchasers evaluate, compare
and select electronic products
based on various environmen-
tal attributes, has now opened
up its EPEAT green certifi-
cation database to consumers.
Some 1,300 computers, thin
clients, workstations and moni-
tors from dozens of manufac-
turers now bear the EPEAT
certification label ensuring
compliance with green manu-
facturing and recycling stan-
dards. All federal purchasers
are required to choose between
EPEAT-certified models when
possible, and the database has
steadily gained traction across
a wide range of industries.
Now consumers can freely
browse the listings to see how
various items from the likes of
Apple, LG, Panasonic, Lenovo
and Sony, among others, stack
up.
Dear EarthTalk: I’ve
heard that New York City
schools are trying out
“Trayless Tuesdays” in their
cafeterias in order to reduce
waste. Why are trays such
a big issue? And how can
cutting them out on one day
a week really make a differ-
ence?
— Mark, Brooklyn, NY
Unlike the old days when
many school cafeterias offered
reusable trays that could go
into big industrial dishwash-
ers after lunchtime, the trend
since the early 1990s in New
York City and elsewhere
across the country has been to
provide students with dispos-
able polystyrene (tradename:
Styrofoam) trays that are
used once—typically for less
than 30 minutes—and then
thrown out. From there, most
of the trays end up clogging
already overburdened land-
fills or posing a litter prob-
lem. Polystyrene, impossible
to compost and difficult to
recycle, is one of the predomi-
nant features of litter-filled
beaches, not to mention trash-
based ocean gyres hundreds of
miles from shore.
According to the grass-
roots group SOSnyc.org,
some 850,000 Styrofoam
trays are trashed in New York
City public schools every day.
“At 80 trays per foot, the
daily stack is two miles high,
8.5 times the height of the
Empire State Building,” the
group reports.
Polystyrene can be recy-
cled by specialty recyclers,
but most municipal recycling
programs do not accept it.
The fact that homeowners
and businesses can’t put it
out on the curb with the rest
of their recyclables for pick-
up—they have to pay a pri-
vate recycler to take it off
their hands—means that more
likely than not it ends up
in the garbage can or dump-
ster and subsequently a land-
fill. Also, polystyrene that is
soiled with food is even more
difficult and expensive to
recycle due to issues of bac-
terial contamination—most
polystyrene recyclers won’t
accept Styrofoam that has had
contact with food.
According to leading envi-
ronmental groups, the poly-
styrene in food trays and other
products is dangerous to both
people and ecosystems “The
basic building block chemi-
cals of polystyrene...have been
linked to cancer and other very
serious health problems [and
are] very hazardous to manu-
facture,” says Michael Schade
of the non-profit Center for
Health, Environment and
Justice. He adds that he con-
siders polystyrene “one of
the most toxic plastics for
our health and environment.”
Despite these problems, the
American Chemistry Council
spends millions of dollars per
year lobbying to keep prod-
ucts made with Styrofoam
on the market, according to
SOSnyc.org.
SOSnyc.org is campaign-
ing for the removal of dis-
posable trays from the New
York City school system
altogether, not just one day
a week, but its campaign is
a start. The group’s advo-
cacy has not fallen on deaf
ears. Since March 2010, all
1,500 New York City pub-
lic schools have been serving
lunch in recyclable paper con-
tainers every Tuesday, cutting
the waste from polystyrene
trays by 20 percent across the
five boroughs. SOSnyc.org is
spearheading an effort to find
permanent alternatives for
polystyrene trays five days
a week. Those schools with
dishwashers could switch to
reusable trays. Recyclable or
compostable cardboard trays
could work for schools without
dishwashers, but manufactur-
ers have not yet come up with
anything as lightweight and
sturdy as polystyrene for such
applications. But with such a
big potential market for non-
polystyrene trays opening up,
greener alternatives are sure
to emerge soon.

Send your environmen-
tal questions to: EarthTalk®,
c/o E – The Environmental
Magazine, P.O. Box 5098,
Westport, CT 06881; earth-
talk@emagazine.com.
Image by Thinkstock
Some 850,000 disposable Styrofoam trays used in New
York City public schools are trashed every day. Groups
like SOSnyc.org are trying to get schools to switch to recy-
clable or compostable cardboard trays or — better yet
— traditional trays like the one pictured here that can be
washed and re-used countless times.
Wright State to host
National Science Olympiad
Wright State University
announced Wednesday it has
been selected as the site for the
National Science Olympiad
Tournament, which pits teams
of bright young students from
around the country in science
and engineering competitions
that often involve everything
from astronomy and fossils to
balsa structures and battery-
powered vehicles.
Wright State will play
host to the National Science
Olympiad Tournament in
2013, as well as two events
leading up to it — invitation-
al tournaments in February
2011 and January 2012.
The three events are
expected to pour an estimated
$1.6 million into the region
in restaurant, motel and other
business.
“The National Science
Olympiad is the pinnacle of
science-related competitions
for our sharpest middle and
high school students,” said
Wright State President David
R. Hopkins. “Our campus
and our region will serve as
a national stage for the coun-
try’s best young scientists.”
Science Olympiad fea-
tures competitions in biol-
ogy, chemistry, earth science,
astronomy, physics and tech-
nology.
The 20-plus events, which
involve top teams from each
state of up to 15 students per
team, include the construction
of aquifers, helicopters and
mousetrap-powered vehicles.
Other events test knowledge
of anatomy, fossils, optics,
protein modeling and food-
borne illnesses.
“The students that are
going to be coming to the
national tournament are the
cream of the crop from all
across the United States,” said
CeAnn Chalker, a national
committee chair for Science
Olympiad.
Science Olympiad compe-
titions, which started more
than 25 years ago, were mod-
eled after successful programs
in Delaware and Michigan.
The school-based teams pre-
pare and practice through-
out the year, then compete
in regional and state tourna-
ments. The top teams advance
to the National Science
Olympiad Tournament.
Chalker said preparing for
Science Olympiad competi-
tions enables students to learn
and gain expertise outside
the classroom in areas about
which they are passionate.
She said her own son’s
Science Olympiad proj-
ect was similar to the Ph.D.
research he later did as a
university student in North
Carolina.
“For some students, it
leads them into their career,”
Chalker said. “For other stu-
dents, it teaches them all the
different possibilities out
there.”
Science Olympiad also
serves as a bonding experi-
ence for the students, who
often come from very differ-
ent backgrounds.
“It’s the most eclectic
group of students you will
find, and these bonds last
forever,” Chalker said.
In hosting the National
Sci ence Ol ympi ad
Tournament, Wright State
will be joining previous hosts
such as the University of
Chicago, George Washington
University, the University of
Colorado, Indiana University
and the University of Illinois.
“We’re going to get our
name out there in a big way,”
said Theresa Mileo, Wright
State’s director of ceremo-
nies and protocol. “Once the
competitors start arriving
next year, we will build the
excitement through 2013.”
Mileo said the competi-
tions will occur at venues
across the campus. She said
the university, home to nearly
20,000 students, will be able
to accommodate the hundreds
of middle and high school
students who will be pouring
in for the national event.
The Science Olympiad
Invitational, which will be
held Feb. 26, will feature 90
teams and up to 2,250 people.
At total of 120 teams with up
to 3,000 people will attend
the Invitational Tournament
to be held Jan. 28, 2012.
And the National Science
Olympiad Tournament, to
be held May 17-18, 2013,
is expected to involve 120
teams with up to 5,000 people
that includes more than 100
National Science Olympiad
Committee members, event
supervisors and state directors.
“When this many people
visit for an event, they spend
money on lodging, dining
and shopping that boosts the
bottom line of local retail-
ers,” said Kathleen Young,
executive director of the
Greene County Convention
& Visitors Bureau. “It also
gives us an opportunity to
show visitors just how friend-
ly we can be.”
President Obama has
underscored the importance
of Science Olympiad, com-
paring it to high-profile sports
competitions.
Federal funds to
upgrade hospital
at Wright-Patt
DAYTON (AP) — Military
officials say up to $115 million
in federal stimulus funds will
be used to renovate the medi-
cal center at Ohio’s Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base.
Center administrator Col.
Mark White says that the
upgrade will bring a state-
of-the-art facility to the
base near Dayton without
building a new hospital. That
would have cost some $800
million.
The Dayton Daily News
reports the military expects to
award the renovation contract
next summer, with three years
of renovation work beginning
in fall 2011.
The hospital on average
serves more than 1,000 active-
duty personnel, military retir-
ees and family members each
day.
CLEVELAND (AP) — A
teensy tenth of an inch of
snow is all it took to break
Cleveland’s second longest
streak of days without mea-
surable white on the ground.
Wednesday afternoon’s
meager snowfall at
Cleveland Hopkins airport
followed 251 straight days
without snow. In records
going back to 1893, the only
longer stretch was 267 snow-
less days in 1946.
National Weather Service
meteorologist Kirk Lombardy
says there was little chance of
breaking that record. He tells
The Plain Dealer the city has
a good chance for snow all
this week.
Cleveland’s long span
without snow came amid one
of the city’s warmest years
ever, including a record hot
April.
Snow-free streak
snapped by furry
ANN SANNER
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Human
trafficking was a step closer
Wednesday to becoming a
felony crime in Ohio, a state
long criticized for not doing
enough to punish modern day
slavery.
The Republican-controlled
Senate voted 32-0 to make
human trafficking a stand-
alone, second-degree felony,
punishable by up to eight
years in prison. The bill now
goes to the Democrat-led
House, where it’s likely to be
approved. Gov. Ted Strickland
also supports the measure.
Sen. Teresa Fedor, a
Toledo Democrat who spon-
sored the bill, said Ohio’s lack
of a tough, clear law has left
the state open to people look-
ing to enslave others.
“Slavery on American soil
has yet to end,” Fedor told her
colleagues before they voted.
“Every day Ohio’s most vul-
nerable — children, women,
the disenfranchised — are
coerced and kidnapped with
the intention of sexual and
labor exploitation.”
About 1,000 American-born
children are forced into the sex
trade in Ohio every year and
about 800 immigrants are sexu-
ally exploited and pushed into
sweatshop-type jobs, according
to a February report on human
trafficking in the state.
The bill won bipartisan
support in the Senate after a
last-minute scramble in which
Republican Sen. Bill Seitz
sought to slip in changes to
Ohio’s criminal sentencing
laws. Seitz failed to get the
necessary support to include
his measure in the bill.
His proposal, which would
save the state about $14 million
in incarceration costs, would
impose the same sentences
for crack and powder cocaine
offenses, expand inmates’
ability to reduce their sen-
tences through good behavior,
increase use of halfway houses
and GPS devices, as well as
numerous other changes.
Senate GOP leaders said
they expect the sentencing
measure to be taken up early
in the next session, which
begins in January.
Ohio is among a handful
of states without a stand-alone
human trafficking law, which
means a person caught for
enslaving others would not be
charged for human trafficking.
Instead, prosecutors can attach a
human trafficking specification
to related crimes to increase an
offender’s penalty. But Fedor’s
office said prosecutors don’t
use the specification because
it’s complicated.
The Polaris Project, based
in Washington, D.C., has
listed Ohio among its “dirty
dozen” states that the advo-
cacy group says have failed
to adequately address human
trafficking. The nonprofit
based its list on several cri-
teria, including whether the
state has a law that criminal-
izes sex trafficking or a law
that addresses when a person
is forced into providing labor
or services. Ohio has neither.
The Senate vote all but
ensured a smooth ride to
the governor’s desk. House
Speaker Armond Budish,
D-Beachwood, has made the
measure a priority and is opti-
mistic it will be approved in
the House, House spokesman
David Isaacs said.
Ohio Senate passes
human trafficking bill
4 — The Herald Thursday, December 2, 2010
POLITICS
“When we cannot find contentment in ourselves it is useless to seek it elsewhere.”
— Francois, Duc de la Rochefoucauld (frahn-SWAH’,
duhk doo lah rawsh-foo-KOH’), French author (1613-1680)
www.delphosherald.com
IT WAS NEWS THEN
One Year Ago
• Jefferson High School National Honor Society members
Korey Boggs, Mallorie Wilson and Bridget Culp helped load
the last remaining food items for donation Monday morning.
The society is donating $938 worth of non-perishable food for
the ALCO food drive that will be matched and given to local
food pantries.
25 Years Ago — 1985
• Delphos Jaycees donated $200 to the Delphos Community
Christmas Project. The donation was made by Roger Beckman,
treasurer of the Jaycees, to Jerome Schmit, treasurer for the
Christmas project. Beckman said the Jaycees have about 200
Christmas trees on sale at the A&W Root Beer stand on East
Fifth Street.
• Jefferson placed six players on the Northwest Conference
Football Coaches Association All-Academic team. Named to
the team from Jefferson were Tim Brock, Robb Poling, Alan
Syphrit, Dan Wilson, Tony Closson and Mark Downey.
• Catholic Daughters of the Americas held their annual ben-
efit card party at the K of C hall. Proceeds from the benefit go
to Delphos Public Library and St. John’s school libraries.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• A combined style show and talk on interior decorating
sponsored by the United Women’s Association of the First
Presbyterian Church Tuesday was attended by well over 100
women. The show was held in the social rooms of the local
church. Mrs. D. Arnold Scott served as commentator, with
the latest styles in clothing, shoes and flowers being provided
by various Delphos merchants. The models included Juanita
Miller, Mickey Chiles, Barbara Metzger, Mrs. Oliver Lundgren,
Debbie Rogers, Randy Liggett, Mrs. John Helton, Donna and
Diane LaRue, Becky Kaskell, Lana Spitnale, Dougie Miller,
Mrs. Aaron Schramm, Beth Wilcox, Ronda Bowersock, Susan
Lundgren, Anita Chiles, Mrs. Don Weideman, Linda Kalinsek
and Barbara Zoll. Mrs. Kenneth Fronk, president of the
Association, greeted guests and awarded the door prizes to Mrs.
Robert Shenk and Louise Miller.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• The members of the Happy-Go-Lucky Club met with
Rosemary Bertling, West Second Street. Election of officers
resulted in the following: Helen Swick, president; Margaret
Stallkamp, secretary-treasurer and Virginia Weger, reporter.
In two weeks the club will meet with Marjorie Best, West
Cleveland Street.
• Troop Three, Delphos Boy Scouts, will hold an out-of-
doors meeting this evening. The members of the troop will meet
at Scout headquarters to hike to the woods. A big campfire will
be a feature. Games and musical features will be enjoyed. A
campfire lunch will also be included in the evening’s program.
• Several International Harvester Company salesmen in this
district went to Lima Tuesday to be in attendance at a meet-
ing held at the Barr Hotel. The meeting was conducted by A.
C. Mertz of Lima and John Stirn of the Delphos firm of Geo.
Wannemacher and Company. Those in attendance from this
district were Paul Wannemacher, Joseph Rekart and Stirn of
Delphos, and Leander Wannemacher of Ottoville.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The U.S. government,
apparently aided by freelance
computer hackers, chased
WikiLeaks from an American
commercial computer network
and temporarily stopped the
leak of embarrassing diplo-
matic documents. But within
hours, the website was back
online, publishing from a forti-
fied bunker in Sweden.
The virtual chase
Wednesday was mirrored by
a real-life pursuit as European
authorities hunted for the
site’s fugitive founder, Julian
Assange, who is wanted in
Sweden on rape charges.
Undeterred, Assange con-
tinued releasing confidential
government documents. Some
showed how the Obama admin-
istration and Congress helped
persuade Spain not to pursue
charges against members of
George W. Bush’s adminis-
tration for allowing torture of
terrorism suspects.
Amazon.com Inc. prevent-
ed WikiLeaks from using the
U.S. company’s computers to
distribute State Department
communications and other
documents, WikiLeaks said
Wednesday. The WikiLeaks
site was inaccessible for sev-
eral hours before it returned to
servers owned by its previous
Swedish host, Bahnhof, which
are housed in a protective Cold-
War era bunker. Tech blogs
have compared it to a lair from
a James Bond movie.
“We have been under attack
and we have had to move to
different servers,” WikiLeaks
spokesperson Kristinn
Hrafnsson said. “But we have
ways and means to bypass any
closure in our services.”
Amazon’s move to evict
WikiLeaks from its serv-
ers came after congressional
staff called the company to
inquire about its relationship
with WikiLeaks, Sen. Joe
Lieberman, the Connecticut
independent, said Wednesday.
“The company’s decision
to cut off WikiLeaks now is
the right decision and should
set the standard for other com-
panies WikiLeaks is using to
distribute its illegally seized
material,” Lieberman said in
a statement. He added that he
would have further questions
for Amazon about its dealings
with WikiLeaks.
The White House said it
was taking new steps to pro-
tect government secrets after
WikiLeaks released thousands
of sensitive U.S. diplomatic
cables. Officials said national
security adviser Tom Donilon
has appointed a senior aide to
identify and develop changes
needed in light of the docu-
ment dump.
Australian Prime Minister
Julia Gillard called WikiLeaks’
publication of classified docu-
ments “an illegal thing to do”
today.
But Gillard did not indicate
Australia was about to take
legal action against Australian-
born Assange. The country’s
attorney general reiterated that
authorities are investigating
whether Assange has broken
any Australian laws, but have
not yet reached a conclusion.
The White House on
Wednesday spurned a call from
Assange for Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton to step
down if she had any role in
directing U.S. diplomats’ spy-
ing on other foreign leaders.
“Mr. Assange’s suggestion is
ridiculous and absurd, and why
anyone would find his opinion
here relevant is baffling,” said
spokesman Tommy Vietor,
adding Clinton was doing an
“extraordinary” job.
RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
health care cuts proposed by
President Barack Obama’s
deficit commission would
reach virtually every corner
of society, making cost curbs
in the new overhaul law look
tame by comparison.
Workers with solid cover-
age on the job, seniors, drug
companies, trial lawyers, hos-
pitals, doctors, state govern-
ments and federal employ-
ees would all feel the effects.
For Medicare recipients, the
biggest change would be an
increase in cost-sharing.
The proposals from com-
mission co-chairmen Erskine
Bowles and Alan Simpson
were strongly criticized
Wednesday by groups rang-
ing from AARP to hospitals
and labor unions. At the same
time, there was recognition
that drastic measures may be
needed to confront spiraling
health care costs.
The plan leaves in place
the president’s signature health
care law expanding coverage
to more than 30 million unin-
sured, but it would repeal a
new long-term care program
included in the legislation, call-
ing it “financially unsound.”
It would gradually phase
out the federal tax break
for job-based health plans,
a change that would force
workers and their families to
seek out cost-conscious insur-
ance. Labor unions, which
have given up wage increases
to secure better coverage, are
adamantly opposed.
For the first time, the gov-
ernment would set — and
enforce — an overall budget
for Medicare, Medicaid and
other federal programs that
cover more than 100 million
people, from Alzheimer’s
patients in nursing homes to
premature babies in hospital
intensive care.
Overall, the nation will
spend about $2.6 trillion this
year on medical care, and
some experts believe a sig-
nificant share of that is for
procedures and tests that are
of little benefit to patients.
Americans are no healthier
than citizens of other coun-
tries that spend much less.
The new health care law
laid the groundwork for
expanding coverage but dab-
bled around the edges when
it came to curbing costs. That
left a major piece of unfin-
ished business that the deficit
commission took on.
Prospects for action in
Congress any time soon are
dim — but the problem isn’t
going away.
“My personal perspective
is that we are going to see all of
these things on the table over
the next couple of years as we
really struggle with the defi-
cit,” said Christine Ferguson,
a former senior Republican
congressional aide and top
state health official.
“Unless the economy turns
around, these are the kinds
of proposals that are going to
be debated,” added Ferguson,
a professor at George
Washington University. She
called some of the specific
ideas “pretty draconian.”
If they also prove political-
ly untouchable, Medicare will
be a big part of the reason.
Newly elected Republicans
campaigned against the
Medicare cuts in the health
care law, and the commission
proposal would slice deeper
while also making significant
changes in how the program
works.
Many seniors already in
the program would face an
increase in cost-sharing for
medical services.
The deficit commission
found that co-payments in
most cases are low, encourag-
ing overtreatment and over-
use. Revamping Medicare’s
cost-sharing would raise
$110 billion through 2020. In
return, seniors would get an
annual cost-sharing limit of
$7,500, stop-loss protection
that isn’t currently offered
under traditional Medicare.
MATTHEW DALY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — BP’s
oil well in the Gulf of Mexico
is dead, but the political fall-
out is very much alive.
The Obama administration
said it won’t open up new
areas of the eastern Gulf and
Atlantic seaboard to drilling,
reversing a decision to hunt
for oil and gas that the presi-
dent himself announced three
weeks before the largest off-
shore oil spill in U.S. history.
“We are adjusting our
strategy,” Interior Secretary
Ken Salazar said Wednesday.
Salazar said the BP spill
taught officials a number of
lessons, “most importantly
that we need to proceed with
caution.”
The politics of the decision
were clear. The ban satisfies
environmental interests and
Democratic lawmakers along
both coasts, particularly in
Florida, a crucial 2012 swing
state where the drilling pro-
posal was unpopular.
But the oil and gas indus-
try and many Republicans
said the Obama administra-
tion was stifling domestic oil
production and contradicting
the will of recession-weary
voters eager for new jobs.
Rep. Doc Hastings,
R-Wash., said Obama’s plan
would lock up vast portions
of America’s offshore energy
resources, costing jobs and
inflicting long-term economic
harm. Hastings, who takes
over next month as chair-
man of the House Natural
Resources panel, said the BP
spill shouldn’t disrupt plans
to develop U.S. oil and gas
resources.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby
Jindal, a Republican who has
criticized the Obama admin-
istration’s response to the
spill and its five-month deep-
water drilling moratorium,
expressed deep disappoint-
ment. “This makes us even
more dependent on foreign
countries for our energy,” he
said.
And Sen. Mark Warner,
D-Va., who supports offshore
drilling, was preparing to
work with GOP Gov. Robert
McDonnell and other offi-
cials to re-examine the deci-
sion, especially as it applies
to Virginia, said Kevin Hall,
a Warner spokesman.
The announcement revers-
es a March plan that would
have authorized officials to
explore the potential for drill-
ing from Delaware to cen-
tral Florida, plus the north-
ern waters of Alaska. The
new approach allows drilling
in Alaska, but officials said
they will move cautiously
before approving any leases.
The focus instead will be on
areas with active leases in the
central and western Gulf of
Mexico and off the coast of
Alaska.
Under the revised plan, the
Interior Department will not
propose any new oil drill-
ing in the Atlantic Ocean and
eastern Gulf for at least the
next seven years. Already
planned lease sales in the Gulf
of Mexico will be delayed
until late 2011 or early 2012,
Salazar said.
The new plan does not
affect the Pacific seaboard,
which will remain off-limits
to drilling in federal waters.
Environmental groups
cheered the decision. They
say oil and gas reserves off the
Atlantic Coast are not worth
the risk to commercial fishing
and tourism destinations such
as Virginia Beach and the
Chesapeake Bay. According
to government estimates,
reserves off Virginia, North
and South Carolina, Georgia
and north Florida amount to
about three months of supply
at current U.S. consumption
rates.
LIZ SIDOTI
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
White House on Wednesday
pledged to work more closely
with the nation’s Democratic
governors after a tumultuous
election year marked by a
strained relationship.
President Barack Obama’s
interim chief of staff, Pete
Rouse, assured current and
incoming Democratic chief
executives in an hour-long
private meeting that the White
House will step up its com-
munication with governors,
and he invited them to call
him anytime.
They welcomed the
change.
That’s according to a
Democratic official who
attended the Democratic
Governors Association meet-
ing and spoke on the condition
of anonymity because the ses-
sion was closed to the public.
Rouse, according to
the official, said several of
Obama’s significant accom-
plishments were made pos-
sible because of the help of
governors, including money
for jointly funded state-fed-
eral social services programs.
But, the official said, Rouse
acknowledged that the White
House didn’t effectively
communicate and interact
with governors, calling those
instances missed opportuni-
ties.
In turn, the official said
several Democratic gover-
nors acknowledged the past
tension and welcomed the
White House’s commitment
to improving the relationship.
They called Obama’s White
House the most responsive they
had ever dealt with and called
the visit by a White House
chief of staff a historic first.
“We’re always looking for
more and better coordination
and collaboration,” Maryland
Gov. Martin O’Malley, the
new DGA chairman, said
before the meeting with
Rouse. Still, he added: “Were
it not for the actions of the
president and the Democratic-
controlled Congress on the
economy, statehouses would
be in shambles right now.”
On Capitol Hill, incoming
House Speaker John Boehner
of Ohio and Senate Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., were meeting with
more than a half dozen newly
elected Republican governors,
in hopes of working together
on proposals for cutting spend-
ing, creating jobs and repealing
Obama’s health care law.
Three of the newly elected
governors told reporters they
would stand up to Washington
on issues such as President
Barack Obama’s health care
overhaul.
“Let our people go,” said
John Kasich of Ohio, a for-
mer member of the House.
“Washington will not let our
people go.”
Mary Fallin of Oklahoma
promised to focus on jobs,
the economy and fiscal
responsibility. Niki Haley of
South Carolina railed against
unfunded mandates.
In both parties, leaders in
Washington were looking to
strengthen ties with their state
counterparts as they seek to
both plot strategy and show
the public that they are listen-
ing after an election that high-
lighted the public’s disgust
with the capital.
Obama was hosting newly
elected Republican and
Democratic governors at the
White House on Thursday.
Throughout the 2010 cam-
paign cycle, there was little col-
laboration between the White
House and Democratic gov-
ernors on fundraising, policy
and political matters. In July,
tensions flared in Boston when
Democratic governors met pri-
vately with White House offi-
cials to express grave concerns
about immigration policy and
the Obama administration’s
lawsuit against Arizona’s tough
new law.
During the year, the
president’s direct campaign
involvement was mostly lim-
ited to three presidential swing
states that will be important
to his re-election chances —
Florida, Ohio and Wisconsin
— as well as states where
key allies were running, like
Massachusetts where Obama-
friend Gov. Deval Patrick was
in a tough re-election fight.
He ultimately won.
Moderately confused
The Delphos Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should
be no more than 400 words. The newspaper reserves the right to
edit content for length, clarity and grammar. Letters concerning
private matters will not be published.
Failure to supply a full name, home address and daytime phone
number will slow the verifcation process and delay publication.
Letters can be mailed to The Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, Ohio 45833, faxed to 419-692-7704 or e-mailed to ns-
pencer@delphosherald.com. Authors should clearly state they
want the message published as a letter to the editor. Anonymous
letters will not be printed.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Deficit panel tackles
health care costs
Obama restores Gulf drilling ban
White House vows to strengthen ties with Dem govs
WikiLeaks
founder sought
Kitchen
Press
1
You can get the Delphos Herald delivered to your
home 6 days a week with all the local news and sports
information for the entire basketball season at a
special rate.

You have the option to pay by cash, check,
credit card or call about our convenient
"EZ PAY" automatic payment plan.
Name  Visa
 MasterCard
 Discover
 American Express
City Zip
Expiration Date
Phone / Amount $
Signature
Email Address
405 N. Main St. - Delphos, OH 45833
Do you want to know all the local scores and statistics?
Please charge my credit card
*Offer valid only for households who have not received home delivery of The Delphos Herald within the past 90 days.
CALL 419-695-0015
For more information
 Please sign me up for 4 months of home or mail
delivery of The Delphos Herald for the 2010-2011
Address
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
The Delphos Herald
OFFER EXPIRES JAN. 3, 2011
Dec. - March
4 mo. Mail Delivery
6 days/week
Basketball 8eason
2010-2011
Do you look forward to Basketball Season?
Carrier Delivery Mail Delivery
ONLY $41
CALL BEFORE NOV. 24th AND YOU'LL ALSO RECEIVE THE WINTER SPORT'S GUIDE!
basketball season.
Ask about our "EZ PAY"
automatic payment plan.
Call 419-695-0015
Dec. - March
4 mo. Home Delivery
6 days/week
ONLY $33
Thursday, December 2, 2010 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy
Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Veterans
Memorial
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.

FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open. The facil-
ity can also be opened by
appointment by calling John
Trentman at 419-692-7185.
9:30-11:30 a.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Parks
and Recreation board meets
at the recreation building at
Stadium Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
DEC. 3
Jamie Moreo
Olivia Martin
Joe Burgei
Barbara Hughes
THRIFT SHOP
WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
DEC. 2-4
THURSDAY: Darla
Rahrig and Alene Klausing.
FRIDAY: Lorene
Jettinghoff, Donna Holdgreve,
Mary Jane Watkins and Carol
Holman.
SATURDAY: Hanna
Kleman, Rita Wrasman, Eilene
Martz and Alice Grothouse.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS:
5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon
Saturday.
Anyone who would like
to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-
695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey
419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact
the Thrift Shop at 419-692-
2942 between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF DEC. 6-10
MONDAY: Meatloaf with tomato topping, parslied red
potatoes, Brussels sprouts, Italian bread, margarine, peaches,
sugar cookie, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Shredded chicken in whole wheat bun, cream
of potato soup with crackers, tossed salad with assorted dress-
ings, fresh apple, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Swiss steak with gravy, whipped potatoes,
cooked cabbage, wheat bread, margarine, apple juice, pudding,
coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Roast pork over dressing with gravy, baked
sweet potato, green beans, dinner roll, margarine, fruit cock-
tail, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Sliced roast beef in au jus, whipped sweet pota-
toes, green beans, dinner roll, margarine, fresh orange, assorted
cookies, coffee and 2% milk.
Kitchen
Press
The Holiday Season is start-
ing. Try some of these easy and
quick recipes to share with your
friends and family.
Easy Microwave
Caramels
1 cup butter
2 1/3 cups (1 pound)
brown sugar, firmly
packed
1 cup light corn syrup
1 can (14 ounces) sweet-
ened condensed milk
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup chopped wal-
nuts, optional
In a 2-qt. microwave-
safe pitcher, combine but-
ter, sugar, syrup, milk and
salt. Microwave on high for
3 to 4 minutes, stirring once
after about 2 minutes. When
butter is melted, stir well.
MW on HIGH for about
14 minutes or until mixture
reaches 245 degrees (firm-
ball stage). No stirring is
needed. Remove from
microwave; stir in vanilla
and walnuts. Allow to stand
for 10 minutes, stirring well
several times. Pour into but-
tered 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in.
pan (smaller 11-in. x 7-in. x
1-1/2-in. pan yields thicker
candy). Refrigerate until
cool. Invert pan. Carefully
tap out whole block of
candy; cut in squares. Wrap
in wax paper and store in
refrigerator. (Can also
freeze.)
Yield: About 2-3/4 lbs.

Southern Style
Pecan Fudge
1 pound Domino
Confectioners powdered
sugar
6 tablespoons butter or
margarine
½ cup unsweetened
cocoa
¼ cup milk
1 tablespoon vanilla
extract
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup chopped pecans
In medium saucepan,
heat sugar, butter, cocoa,
milk, vanilla and salt
over low heat, stirring
until smooth. Stir in nuts.
Spread mixture quickly
in buttered 9x5-inch pan.
Cool; cut into squares.
Makes 2 dozen.
Microwave directions:
In large microwave-safe
bowl, place butter and
milk. Microwave on high
for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes
until butter is melted. Stir
in sugar, cocoa, vanilla
and salt until smooth; then
stir in nuts. Spread mix-
ture quickly in buttered
9x5-inch pan. Cool; cut
into squares.
COLUMN
Announce you or your family member’s
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
Name
Address

Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Telephone (for verification)
Check one:
º
Please add to birthday list
º
Please delete from birthday list
º
Please make change on birthday list
Photo submitted
Meadows residents visit candy factory
Residents from The Meadows of Kalida recently visited the Spangler Candy
Factory in Bryan. They enjoyed riding the trolley through the factory, and visiting
their factory store and museum. Pictured are Bill and Marie S. with the Dum Dum
Drum Man.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 11,255.78 +249.76
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,549.43 +51.20
S&P 500 INDEX 1,206.07 +25.52
AUTOZONE INC. 260.56 +1.15
BUNGE LTD 61.98 +1.16
EATON CORP. 98.89 +2.49
BP PLC ADR 40.62 +0.62
DOMINION RES INC 42.05 +0.52
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 36.40 +0.80
CVS CAREMARK CRP 31.87 +0.87
CITIGROUP INC 4.30 +0.10
FIRST DEFIANCE 11.77 -0.06
FST FIN BNCP 17.40 +0.88
FORD MOTOR CO 16.46 +0.52
GENERAL DYNAMICS 67.62 +1.53
GOODYEAR TIRE 9.88 +0.32
HEALTHCARE REIT 45.60 -0.68
HOME DEPOT INC. 31.61 +1.40
HONDA MOTOR CO 37.27 +1.04
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.03 +0.20
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 62.42 +0.87
JPMORGAN CHASE 38.15 +0.75
KOHLS CORP. 56.02 -0.40
LOWES COMPANIES 23.75 +1.05
MCDONALDS CORP. 79.29 +0.99
MICROSOFT CP 26.04 +0.78
PEPSICO INC. 65.63 +1.48
PROCTER & GAMBLE 62.15 +1.08
RITE AID CORP. 0.93 -0.01
SPRINT NEXTEL 3.77 -0.01
TIME WARNER INC. 30.21 +0.72
US BANCORP 24.21 +0.43
UTD BANKSHARES 9.83 -0.02
VERIZON COMMS 32.35 +0.34
WAL-MART STORES 54.70 +0.61
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business December 1, 2010
6 – The Herald Thursday, December 2, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
The Delphos Herald
St. John’s senior Chris
Pohlman was a repeat winner
of the All-Ohio Division VI
De f e n s i v e
Player of the
Year honor.
He, along
with fellow
first-teamers
Austin Vogt
(senior left
tackle) and
senior defen-
sive end
Derek Klaus
and special-
mention tail-
back Evan
Burgei (senior), lead the Blue Jays
into Friday’s Division VI state
title game versus Shadyside.
The Tigers have two first-
teamers, one
second-team-
er and three
special-men-
tion players.
Jefferson
s e n i o r
e n d / t i g h t
end Kody
Ri char dson
earned spe-
cial-mention
status.
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — The 2010
Associated Press Division V All-Ohio
high school football team, based on
the recommendations of a state media
panel:
DIVISION V
First Team
OFFENSE:
Ends—Reese
K l e n k e ,
Coldwater, 6-4,
195, sr.; Austin
Jones, Cin.
Hills Christian
Acad., 6-2, 175,
jr.; Desmond
S l e i g h ,
A r c h b o l d ,
5-11, 160, sr.
L i n e m e n —
Logan Awwiller,
Frederi cktown,
6-1, 235, sr.;
Zach Conlan, Youngs. Ursuline, 6-0,
305, sr.; Anthony Kimbrough, Lima
Cent. Cath., 6-2, 242, sr.; Jared
Whitcomb, Jeromesville Hillsdale, 6-4,
280, sr. Quarterbacks—D.J. Gray, W.
Jefferson, 6-1, 180, sr.; Tyler Kinchen,
Woodsfield Monroe Cent., 6-0, 210,
jr.; Nick Lawley, Cin. Hills Christian
Acad., 6-6, 200, sr.; Garrett Morton,
Archbold, 6-3, 190, sr. Backs—
Brandon Schankweiler, Wheelersburg,
5-11, 185, sr.; Westen Hale, Oak
Hill, 6-0, 205, sr.; Alec Torgerson,
Cle. Cuya. Hts., 5-9, 186, sr.; Akise
Teague, Youngs. Ursuline, 5-8, 176,
sr. Kicker—Logan Eyer, Cin. Summit
Country Day, 6-0, 165, sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Cody
Bensman, Anna, 6-0, 225, sr.; Xavier
Dye, Hamler Patrick Henry, 5-10,
190, sr.; Justin Carver, Mount Gilead,
6-3, 205, jr.; Brock Jones, Woodsfield
Monroe Cent., 5-10, 185, sr.; Marcus
Moser, Defiance Tinora, 5-10, 240,
sr. Linebackers—Austin Hoeflich,
Fredericktown, 6-0, 190, sr.; Warren
Shields, Richwood N. Union, 6-3, 210,
sr.; Richard Hawthorne, W. Lafayette
Ridgewood, Tyler Gaines, Minford,
5-8, 195, jr.; Christian Hauber, Kirtland,
6-0, 210, jr.; Keil’n Thurston, Youngs.
Ursuline, 6-0, 210, sr. Backs—Ryan
Severo, Columbia Station Columbia,
6-1, 175, sr.; Dylan Schwieterman,
St. Henry, 5-11, 185, sr.; Damian
Winner, Versailles, 6-1, 182, sr.
Punter—Tyler O’Connor, Lima
Central Cath., 6-0, 160, jr.
Offensive player of the year:
Akise Teague, Youngs. Ursuline.
Defensive players of the year:
Keil’n Thurston, Youngs. Ursuline;
Christian Hauber, Kirtland;
Ryan Severo, Columbia Station
Columbia.
Coaches of the year: Brian Baum,
Fredericktown; Dave Tarpley, New
Lebanon Dixie; Mike Stoll, Collins
Western Reserve.
Second Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Cody Morris,
Caldwell, 6-3, 205, sr.; Mitchell
Campbell, Versailles, 6k-4, 205, jr.
Linemen—Dan Satterthwaite, Cols.
Grandview Hts., 6-1, 265, sr.; Donald
Mullett, W. Lafayette Ridgewood, 6-1,
229, sr.; Brock Bahan, W. Liberty-
Salem, 6-2, 250, sr.; Nick Glass,
Columbia Station Columbia, 5-10,
215, sr.; Matt Malone, Columbia
Station Columbia, 5-10, 220, sr.
Quarterbacks—Dylan Sayre, Caldwell,
6-0, 175, sr.; Jesse Slone, Oak Hill,
6-4, 200, sr.; Carter Hill, Columbiana
Crestview, 6-0, 199, sr. Backs—Matt
Smith, Fredericktown, 5-10, 195, soph.;
Devante Hunter, Cin. Summit Country
Day, 6-3, 235, sr.; Blake Buckhannon,
Collins Western Reserve, 5-10, 185,
jr.; Dan Skiba, Mineral Ridge, 6-0,
190, sr. Kicker—Alex Moser, Defiance
Tinora, 5-11, 165, sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Nick Seither,
Hamilton Badin, 6-3, 230, sr.; Dave
Kampman, Louisville Aquinas, 6-3,
232, sr.; Curtis Fairchild, Oak Hill, 6-2,
280, jr. Linebackers—Jordan Markota,
Youngs. Ursuline, 6-2, 215, sr.; Alex
Batt, Defiance Tinora, 6-3, 220, sr.;
Bryan Hefflinger, Liberty Ctr., 6-1, 210,
jr.; Reed Pyers, Casstown Miami E.,
5-9, 170, jr. Backs—Serafin Sanchez,
Newcomerstown, 5-11, 155, sr.; Jeff
Smith, Hamilton Badin, 6-0, 176, sr.;
Landon Drewes, Defiance Tinora,
6-0, 185, sr. Punter—Ray Benedetti,
Louisville Aquinas, 6-0, 170, sr.
Third Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Joey Maynard,
Oak Hill, 6-1, 180, sr.; Bubba
Kreig, Lima Cent. Cath., 6-0, 155,
sr. Linemen—Joey Reinhardt,
Wheelersburg, 6-3, 295, sr.; Alex
Haney, Woodsfield Monroe Cent., 5-10,
245, sr.; James Wilker, Versailles,
6-2, 175, sr.; Pete Wearsch, Youngs.
Ursuline, 6-2, 245, sr. Quarterbacks—
Josh McLaughlin, Hanoverton United,
6-0, 180, sr.; John Banyasz, Columbia
Station Columbia, 6-0, 180, jr.; Tyler
Walter, Sugarcreek Garaway, 5-10,
160, soph. Backs—Nick Bellik, W.
Lafayette Ridgewood, 5-9, 165, sr.;
Dexter Bensman, Anna, 5-9, 165,
sr.; Mark Slone, Minford, 5-11, 210,
sr. Kicker—Ned Reilly, Kirtland, 5-5,
130, jr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Tyler Keeley,
Mineral Ridge, 5-10, 220, sr.; Colin
Ross, Columbia Station, Columbia, 5-9,
245, sr.; Nick Stacey, Fredericktown,
6-3, 260, sr. Linebackers—Pat
Pickenpaugh, Caldwell, 5-10, 200,
sr.; Caleb Maurer, Anna, 6-0, 175,
jr.; Justin Cunningham, Nelsonville-
York, 6-1, 210, sr.; Drew Randleman,
Oberlin, 5-7, 224, jr.; Nick Cooper,
Columbia Station Columbia, 5-10, 190,
sr. Backs—Kaleb Deam, N. Lewisburg
Triad, 5-10, 155, sr.; Devin Jones,
Castalia Margaretta, 6-3, 195, sr.;
Phillip Arsuffi, N. Lima S. Range, 6-0,
160, sr. Punter—Brandon Garlough,
Tipp City Bethel, 5-10, 180, soph.
Special Mention
Tony Lybarger and Tyler Hathaway,
Fredericktown; Logan McGovern,
Centerburg; Gage Barton, Milford Ctr.
Fairbanks; Jacob Boyd, Blake Taylor
and Clay Hastings, Richwood N. Union;
Brian Garen, Chaney Fulton, Greg
Houk, T.J. Langermeier and Charlie
Ramey, W. Jefferson;
Shane Snyder, Baltimore Liberty
Union; Demetrius Clark, Cols. Ready;
Preston Pearson and Austin Peterman,
Cols. Acad.; Nate Webb, Grandview
Hts.; Caleb Martin, Cardington Lincoln;
Darian Arnold, Chandler Shryock
and Marquece “Bubba” Harris,
Newcomerstown; Zach Renner and
Kellan Mutschelknaus, Sugarcreek
Garaway; Adam Rossiter, Brian Sawyer
and Michael Smith, Caldwell; Shane
Crum, Brett
Farnsworth and
Kalob Davis,
Sa r a h s v i l l e
Shenandoah;
P r e s t o n
Dornon, Dustin
Starr and
Kyle Morris,
Bar nes v i l l e;
Evan Jones and
Jarod Conrad,
W. Lafayette
Ri d g e wo o d ;
M a r c u s
Schumacher,
Wo o d s f i e l d
Monroe Cent.; Daniel Kline, Thomas
Taggart and Isaiah Andrews,
Nelsonville-York; Sandy Proehl, Clay
Wescott, Reid Hutchison and Jake
Freeman, Frankfort Adena; Kyle Dunn,
Chillicothe Southeastern; Derek Fulk
and Nathan Brooks, Crooksville;
Drew Cannon,
Dylan Lewis
and Devon
Davis, Oak Hill;
Blake Yates,
L u c a s v i l l e
Valley; Alex
Shears and
Chris Prater,
Wheelersburg;
Jacob Piguet
and Colbie
Griffith, Minford;
Steven Hall,
C h i l l i c o t h e
Southeastern;
Boo Woods,
Bubba Wood
and Jake Murphy, Coal Grove
Dawson-Bryant; Alex Holcomb and
Brice Crabtree, Lucasville Valley;
Cody Mann, Trey West and Austin
McMaster, Chesapeake; Garrett
Tyree, Bainbridge Paint Valley; Jeremy
Simmons and Jacob Gries, Gates
Mills Hawken; Clayton Thurling and
Vinny Polverine, Middlefield Cardinal;
Anthony Eder, Logan Matt and Jordan
D’Orazio, Cle. Cuyahoga Hts.; Dan
Lofgren, Kenny Greco, Jimmy Durst,
Damon Washington, Paul Guhde,
Bobby Matthews, Jake Finkler, Zach
Santo and Ryan Loncar, Kirtland;
Mitchell Lake, Josh Rigg and A.J.
Henson, Orwell Grand Valley; Sam
Stretar and Nick Kraus, Independence;
Drew Guisinger, Anna; Josh Thiel and
Zach James, Cin. Hills Christian Acad.;
Jordan Holtvogt, Tipp City Bethel; Nick
Marenberg, N. Lewisburg Triad; Ben
McBride, Cin. Summit Country Day;
Al Upshaw, Cin. Clark Montessori;
Ryan Moore, Zach Fulk, Sam Young
and Trevor Badertscher, Jeromesville
Hillsdale; Bobby Silagy, Louisville
Aquinas; Ryan Powell, Hanoverton
United; Corey Mullins, Apple Creek
Waynedale; Josh Forbes, West Salem
Northwestern; Jeff Sickle, Columbiana
Crestview; Ethan Whitmer, N. Lima
S. Range; Joey Badini, Rootstown;
Lawrence Wolfe, Taylor Kassa and
Adam Wallace, Creston Norwayne;
Jeff Podolsky, Youngs. Ursuline; Cory
Siefring, St. Henry; Willy Flanary,
Sherwood Fairview; Austin Tittle and
Kipp McCann, Defiance Tinora; Jake
Fannin and Ethan Patrick, Collins
Western Reserve; Josh Almanza,
Hamler Patrick Henry; Ben Miller
and Noah Keefer, Archbold; Clint
Endicott, Mason Minnich and Garrick
Montgomery, Ashland Crestview;
Zach Bermejo, Northwood; Kody
Richardson, Delphos Jefferson;
Sam Huffman, Lima Cent. Cath.; Aaron
Rammel, Coldwater.
DIVISION VI
First Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Taylor Haines,
McComb, 6-1, 175, sr.; Alex Weber,
Ada, 6-2, 200, sr.; Hayden Welch,
Lancaster Fairfield Christian Acad., 6-0,
152, jr.; Nicholas Houston, Day. Ponitz,
5-10, 165, jr. Linemen—Aaron Silverio,
Shadyside, 6-1, 253, sr.; Austin Vogt,
Delphos St. John’s, 6-4, 270, sr.;
Robert Gilliland, Sycamore Mohawk,
6-1, 250, sr.; James Tripp, Lockland,
6-2, 243, sr. Quarterbacks—Andrew
Dee, McComb, 5-11, 195, sr. Backs—
Britt Wilder, Newark Cath., 5-10, 190,
sr.; Garrett Price, Bridgeport, 5-11,
180, sr.; Johnathon Barbee, Bradford,
5-10, 160, jr.; Tyler Dyla, Glouster
Trimble, 5-8, 170, sr.; Evan Herrell,
Willow Wood Symmes Valley, 5-11,
170, sr.; Danny LaRosa, Thompson
Ledgemont, 5-11, 170, jr. Kicker—
Daniel Kohr, Strasburg-Franklin, 5-10,
165, jr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Josh
Boehringer, Covington, 6-2, 205, sr.;
Taylor Brown, Shadyside, 6-1, 177, sr.;
Derek Klaus, Delphos St. John’s, 6-2,
205, sr. Linebackers—Curt Smelley,
Bridgeport, 6-0, 225, sr.; Grant Foster,
Willow Wood Symmes Valley, 6-0,
200, sr.; Chris Pohlman, Delphos
St. John’s, 6-3, 240, sr.; Nick Rota,
McDonald, 6-1, 175, sr. Backs—Zach
Brewer, Danville, 6-2, 178, jr.; Brad
Marsic, Thompson Ledgemont, 6-3,
160, jr.; Devontay Scott, Lockland,
5-10, 175, sr.; Cody Albers, Ft. Loramie,
5-11, 167, sr.; Gavin Hackett, Dalton,
6-0, 170, sr. Punter—Ty Jolliff, Ada,
5-11, 180, sr.
Offensive player of the year:
Andrew Dee, McComb.
Defensive player of the year:
Chris Pohlman, Delphos St. John’s.
Coaches of the year: Curtis Enis,
Bradford; Joe LaRosa, Thompson
Ledgemont.
Second Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Jordan Gaines,
Canal Winchester Harvest Prep, 5-11,
175, jr.; Cody Latimer, Day. Jefferson,
6-3, 210, sr.; Derek Mangas,
Leipsic, 5-9, 165, sr. Linemen—Cody
Eccard, Lancaster Fairfield Christian
Acad., 6-3, 275, sr.; Devin Richard,
Sidney Lehman, 6-0, 205, sr.; Matt
Douglas, Columbiana, 6-3, 255, sr.
Quarterbacks—Brandon Bauman,
Rittman, 6-1, 185, sr.; Brandon Ross,
Canal Winchester Harvest Prep, 6-3,
215, sr.; Konnor Baker, Ada, 6-3,
190, jr. Backs—DeVonte McGhee,
Toronto, 6-3, 220, sr.; Kaleb Goins,
Sidney Lehman, 5-10, 205, sr.;
Shannon Geren, Edon, 5-8, 180, jr.;
Jake McAvinew, Mogadore, 5-10, 200,
sr. Kicker—Brandon Liette, Ansonia,
6-0, 180, sr.
Pohlman repeats
as D-VI Defensive
Player of Year
Pohlman
Vogt
Burgei
Richardson
Klaus
See POHLMAN, page 7
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — You won’t
see number 62 for St. John’s
leave the turf of Hall of Fame
Field at Canton’s Fawcett
Stadium very often during
Friday’s Division VI state
final versus Shadyside.
That would be senior right
guard/right defensive end
Derek “Dozer” Klaus.
From leading the way for
the Blue Jays’ powerful run-
ning game on one side of the
pigskin to putting lots of heat
on the opposing team’s passer
and helping stuff the run on
the other side, he will be in
there.
“I’ve been starting at end
and guard for three years now
and played some on both sides
of the ball as a freshman,” he
began. “I’m used to playing
a lot of minutes, so I worked
hard in the offseason and dur-
ing the summer, doing agili-
ties and lifting. Coach (Todd
Schulte) and the coaching
staff really worked us hard
during two-a-days.”
His work on the offen-
sive side of the ball leaves
him little notoriety outside the
fact that he has 14 pancake
blocks in helping open holes
for 1,000-yard backs Evan
Burgei and Jordan Leininger.
It is his work on the defen-
sive side: 33 quarterback
harassments, 44 solo tack-
les, 21 assists, (3 for loss),
nine sacks and one pick; that
gained him the recognition of
being named a first-team All-
Ohioan Wednesday.
“Playing both ways does
take a lot out of me, especially
when playing teams that pass
a lot where you’re chasing the
quarterback. When I get home
from a game, all I want to do
is go to sleep,” Klaus noted.
“It’s a lot easier to rush the
passer, though; because (nose
tackle) Cody (Brinkman) is
taking so many double-teams,
that leaves Alex (Recker)
on the other side and myself
1-on-1 with the tackle. We’ve
been able to get pressure on
quarterbacks by only rush-
ing three, which makes things
easier in the secondary. We
have our jobs to do, like not
letting quarterbacks out of
the pocket, but I can use my
quickness to get past a tackle.
Against the run, it’s a differ-
ent assignment; I might have
to blow up a guard or a full-
back trying to block me. It’s a
lot more physical work.”
Still, despite having so
many classmates that were
starters on 2008’s state title
team and last fall’s state run-
ners-up, his team needed a
wake-up call before the sea-
son began, in the thought of
Klaus.
“Even though we worked
hard after last season’s sec-
ond-place finish, I think we
did have the attitude that this
was going to be easy and
everything (MAC title and
state championship) was in
the bag,” Klaus explained.
“When we got it handed to us
in our first scrimmage against
Elida (a team that made the
second round of the Division
III playoffs), that woke us up.
After that, we had more of an
edge and intensity during our
practices and we had a faster
tempo. The coaches pushed
us hard and we wanted to
push ourselves hard.”
He did have an older
brother to learn from as a
freshman: Rocky, who was
part of the back-to-back-to-
back title teams in 1997-99
and a key cog in the 57-game
winning streak.
“He helped me a lot when
I first got on varsity; I really
needed his help to learn how
to play the position,” Klaus
said. “The last two years,
though, things have gotten a
lot easier for me. I know what
I am supposed to do; I can
just play.
“Still, we do get into some
silly arguments about what
he did versus what I do now
versus what he did then.”
The Jays also have a bit
of an edge going into Friday
afternoon’s (3 p.m.) game.
“When we lost last year, it
left a bitter taste in our mouths
when we had to accept the
runner-up trophy and Norwalk
St. Paul was celebrating with
the championship. As a team,
no one had to say it but we all
felt we didn’t want to experi-
ence that feeling ever again;
I think it was possibly the
worst feeling I’ve ever had,”
he added. “The seniors didn’t
really have a meeting among
ourselves about it until after
the Elida scrimmage and we
talked about what we really
wanted to accomplish.
“Our mood this week is all
business. We know when to
joke around and when to be
serious and this is serious. We
didn’t finish what we started
last year; we have a job to do
and we want to get it done
this time. Only then we can
joke around.”
St. John’s senior right defensive end and Division VI All-Ohio first-teamer Derek
“Dozer” Klaus, here tackling a New Bremen runner, is one of the leaders of the Blue Jay
defense that will try to give the program its sixth state title Friday versus Shadyside.
Tom Morris photo
Klaus in on lots of action
Lady Racers edge
Cornerstone University
LIMA — Amanda Francis
hit a free throw with five sec-
onds left to give the University
of Northwestern Ohio Lady
Racers a 66-65 college bas-
ketball win over Cornerstone
University at “The Garage”.
Shaye Warman led the win-
ning Racers (6-4, 1-0 Wolverine-
Hoosier Athletic Conference)
with 13 points (2 steals), along
with 12 from Francis (3 steals,
3 assists) and Tara Olberding (2
assists). Ashley Rothney added
nine boards and Molly French
seven.
Cornerstone (9-1, 0-1
WHAC) was led by 19 points
and 13 rebounds from Brooke
Carter, 16 markers from Robyn
Veltkamp and 12 from Melissa
Veltkamp.
VISITORS: Cornerstone
University 9-1 (0-1 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Melissa Veltkamp 6-8 0-2 0-1 12,
Maria Schafer 1-4 1-3 0-0 3, Brooke
Carter 9-17 0-0 1-5 19, Samantha
Flietstra 0-0 0-0 2-2 2, Robyn Veltkamp
8-15 0-0 0-0 16, Ashley Moon 0-2
0-1 0-0 0, Alexa Hensler 1-3 0-1 0-0
2, Kathy De Young 0-1 0-0 0-0 0,
Alicia TerHaar 0-2 0-0 0-0 0, Kayleigh
Hammond 1-2 0-0 0-0 2, Ellisha Crosby
3-6 1-3 2-2 9. Totals 29-60(48.3%)
2-10(20%) 5-10(50%) 65.
HOME TEAM: Northwestern
Ohio 6-4 (1-0 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Kelly Warris 1-7 0-3 2-3 4, Molly
French 4-8 1-3 0-0 9, Ashley Rothney
3-6 0-0 1-1 7, Alexa Kennedy 0-6 0-4
1-2 1, Amanda Francis 4-11 1-5 3-4 12,
Shaye Warman 5-8 3-5 0-0 13, Amanda
Henry 2-3 0-0 0-0 4, Tara Olberding
4-6 4-5 0-0 12, Rebecca Puckett
1-2 0-0 2-2 4. Totals 24-57(42.1%)
9-25(36.0%) 9-12(75%) 66.
Rebounds: CU 34/12 off. (Carter
13), UNOH 35/12 off. (Rothney 7);
Assist: CU 14 (Carter 4), UNOH
15 (Kennedy 4); Steals: CU 6 (R.
Veltkamp 2), UNOH 7 (Francis 3);
Blocks: CU 2 (M. Veltkamp/Carter 1),
UNOH 2 (Warman/Olberding 1); Fouls:
CU 10, UNOH 8; Turnovers: CU 14,
UNOH 15.
Officials: Laura Fraze, Meghan
Joseph, Jay Marcotallio.
Technical fouls: Cornerstone
University-None. Northwestern
Ohio-None.
Attendance: 102
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Cornerstone Univ. 36 29 - 65
Northwestern Ohio. 27 39 - 66
-----
First half carries
Cornerstone Univ.
LIMA — Cornerstone
University, ranked third in the
nation, used a 42-22 edge in the
first 20 minutes to sink the host
University of Northwestern
Ohio 90-64 in a Wolverine-
Hoosier Athletic Conference
tilt at “The Garage”.
Leading Cornerstone
(8-1, 1-0) were the quintet of
Bryan Pasciak (16 markers,
5 boards), Kelvin DeVries
(15 counters, 2 blocks), Justin
Yoder (15 points, 4 assists),
Derek KIngshott (12 points, 7
caroms) and Caleb Simons (10
markers, 2 blocks).
For the Racers (2-4, 0-1),
four were in double digits:
Jake Bolyard with 14, Kyle
Gillette 13, Dustin Guthrie 12
and D.J. Quarles 10. Brandon
Miller added nine rebounds
and five assists.
VISITORS: Cornerstone
University 8-1 (1-0 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Dominic Allen 0-3 0-2 0-0 0,
Ronald Bates 1-6 0-2 0-0 2, Kelvin
DeVries 5-8 5-8 0-0 15, Bryan Pasciak
7-10 0-1 2-2 16, Caleb Simons 4-6
0-0 2-2 10, Anthony Allen 0-1 0-0 0-0
0, Bryce Semple 1-1 0-0 0-0 2, Justin
Yoder 4-10 1-3 6-6 15, Jake Plite 2-4
0-2 1-2 5, Wes Hudson 0-4 0-1 0-0 0,
Ted Albert 2-3 0-0 3-5 7, Dan Possehl
3-5 0-0 0-0 6, Shane Tiemeyer 0-1
0-0 0-0 0, Derek Kingshott 6-8 0-0 0-0
12. Totals 35-70 (50%) 6-19(31.6%)
14-17(82.4%) 90.
HOME TEAM: Northwestern
Ohio 2-4 (0-1 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA TP
Wes Gelhaus 0-3 0-0 1-7 2, Jake
Bolyard 5-13 2-7 2-2 14, Brandon
Miller 0-2 0-0 1-2 1, Darko Bucan
1-6 0-2 0-0 2, Kyle Gillette 6-10 0-0
1-5 13, Isaac Bowers 1-7 1-4 0-0 3,
Bryce Carlton 0-0 0-0 0-0 0, Cyle
Strouble 3-5 0-0 0-1 6, Dustin Guthrie
4-8 2-4 2-4 12, D.J. Quarles 2-4 1-2
5-6 10, Todd Watkins 1-2 0-0 0-0
2. Totals 23-60(38.3%) 6-19(31.6%)
12-27(44.4%) 64.
Rebounds: CU 48/15 off. (Kingshott
7), UNOH 34/13 off. (Miller 9); Assists:
CU 20 (Yoder 4), UNOH 14 (Miller
5); Steals: CU 7 (7 with 1), UNOH 10
(Gelhaus 4); Blocks: CU 5 (DeVries/
Simons 2), UNOH 3 (Gelhaus/Miller/
Quarles 1); Fouls: CU 18, UNOH 14;
Turnovers: CU 14, UNOH 15.
Officials: Cornell Kincaid,
Richard Ames, Brett Gearhart.
Attendance: 171
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Cornerstone Univ. 42 48 - 90
Northwestern Ohio. 22 42 - 64
----
10 Bluffton athletes earn
Academic All-Heartland
Conference honors
BLUFFTON — The
Heartland Collegiate
Athletic Conference recently
announced the fall honorees
of the HCAC All-Academic
awards for the 2010-11 school
year. 10 Bluffton University
athletes were recognized for
their efforts in the classroom.
Women’s soccer and football
led the way for the Beavers
with four and three honorees,
respectively.
Juniors Lyndsay Nelson (St.
Marys), Megan Denoi (Bryan)
and Meron Dibia (Ethiopia) and
sophomore Maddie Moore (Linn
Grove, Ind./South Adams) were
recognized from the women’s
soccer team. It marked the sec-
ond straight year that Nelson
and Denoi were honored by the
conference.
Senior Ben Ilnicki
(Indianapolis, Ind./Brebeuf
Preparatory) and sophomores
Thomas Gingrich (Goshen,
Ind./Goshen) and Ryan Sabin
(Canal Winchester) from the
football team were recognized
as HCAC All-Academic.
Ilnicki has been honored dur-
ing each of the three years
that an athlete is eligible for
consideration.
Representing the volley-
ball team were juniors Jenna
Eshleman (Landisville, Pa./
Hempfield) and Courtney
Zimmerman (Leesburg/
Fairfield). Both Eshleman and
Zimmerman were honored in
2009 as well.
Junior Heather Smith
(Elkhart, Ind./Concord), from
women’s cross country, picked
up her second Academic All-
HCAC honor this season.
To be named All-Academic
HCAC, a student-athlete must
have completed a full year at
the institution, be a varsity
athlete and carry a minimum
cumulative grade point aver-
age of at least 3.50 through the
semester preceding the end of
the season.
-----
MSJ dominates second half
in 66-58 win over Beavers
By Keisha Holtsberry
Sports Information
Assistant
CINCINNATI — The
Bluffton University women’s
basketball team traveled to the
College of Mount St. Joseph
on Wednesday, took a 30-22
lead in the first half, but Mt.
St. Joseph outscored Bluffton
in the second period 44-28
for a 66-58 win. Bluffton fell
to 2-2 overall and 0-1 in the
Heartland Conference, while
MSJ improved to 1-4 overall
and 1-1 in the HCAC.
The Beavers started off the
scoring with a free throw by
Brittany Stegmaier (Garfield/
Trinity). Mount St. Joseph
pulled ahead with a couple of
layups as they led the Beavers
8-7 after four minutes of play.
Bluffton then turned the scor-
ing in their favor with another
free throw from Stegmaier
and a jumper by junior Kim
Miller (Delphos/St. John’s),
making the score 10-8. After
three more minutes of play the
Beavers increased their lead to
four (18-14) following a layup
by Miller.
The game remained close
for the next seven minutes
until junior Alicia Amis
(Woodstock/Mechanicsburg)
put in back-to-back layups.
The half ended with Miller
sinking another jumper for a
30-22 advantage.
The Lions came out ready to
play in the second half, quickly
taking control nd scoring eight
points in the first three min-
utes of the period. Bluffton
answered Mt. St. Joseph with
a jumper, two free throws,
and a three-pointer, all from
Stegmaier for a 39-30 lead.
For the next three minutes MSJ
was in control of the game,
out-scoring Bluffton 6-0. The
Lions kept the game close for
the next four minutes, tying
the game at the 10:17 mark.
Two minutes later, the Beavers
pushed their lead back to five
(51-46) with two jumpers from
junior Emily Shellabarger (St.
Marys/Memorial) and a layup
by Miller.
The Lions took over the
game from that point and out-
scored the Beavers 20-7 to take
the win. Kim Miller led Bluffton
with 16 points while Stegmaier
contributed 14. Lions’ scoring
was led by Shelby Benzinger
with 16 points.
Bluffton struggled from
the field, going 21-of-58. The
Beavers hit only 2-of-12 (16.7
percent) from behind the arc.
MSJ proved more efficient from
the field, hitting 23-of-48 (47.9
percent) and 5-of-13 (38.5 per-
cent) from behind the arc. The
Beavers knocked down 14-of-23
(60.9 percent) at the line. MSJ
was slightly better, hitting 15-of-
22 (68.2 percent). MSJ won a
close battle on the boards (34-
32). The Beavers turned the ball
over 16 times while forcing 22
miscues from MSJ.
The Bluffton University
women’s basketball team will
face Transylvania on Saturday
in Founders Hall. The game,
part of a women’s and men’s
doubleheader with the Pioneers,
will begin at 2 p.m.
----
Bluffton men stay perfect
with 82-76 win over MSJ
By Josh Bruner
Sports Information Assistant
BLUFFTON — The
Bluffton University men’s
basketball team hosted the
College of Mount St. Joseph on
Wednesday for the first game
of the HCAC season. Bluffton
took an early lead on the Lions
and held a 44-30 advantage
going into the half. The Lions
made a comeback in the sec-
ond period as they outscored
the Beavers 46-38. The come-
back was not enough, though,
and the Beavers picked up the
LOCAL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7
1
Thursday, December 2, 2010 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
ASA seeks passage of estate tax
legislation during lame duck session
The American Soybean
Association (ASA) partici-
pated in a press conference
Tuesday at the National
Press Club in Washington,
D.C., calling on Congress to
enact estate tax legislation
before Dec. 31, 2010. Estate
tax legislation enacted in
2001 increased the exclusion
amount from $675,000 to
$3.5 million and reduced the
tax rate on estates exceeding
the exclusion from 55 percent
to 45 percent in 2009. The
bill repealed the tax entirely
for 2010, but it will be rein-
stated in 2011 with an exclu-
sion amount of $1 million
and a top rate of 55 percent.
“If not addressed by
Congress, the high estate tax
rate of 55 percent and low
exclusion level of $1 million
will very negatively affect the
ability to pass farms, ranches,
and small businesses from one
generation to another,” said
ASA Executive Committee
member Joe Steiner, a soy-
bean grower from Mason,
Ohio. “Even small and very
moderate-sized family farm
operations would be nega-
tively affected.”
With farmland in many
regions selling for $5,000 per
acre, it takes only 200 acres
of land to reach the exclusion
value of $1 million. A $1 mil-
lion exclusion is inadequate
to account for the value of
machinery, livestock, and
buildings with tractors now
costing $150,000; combines
costing $250,000-$300,000;
and a single cow valued at
$1,000.
ASA strongly supports
the inclusion in a lame duck
tax bill of legislation intro-
duced by Senators Blanche
Lincoln and John Kyl that
would establish a $5 million
exclusion and a 35 percent
top tax rate. ASA joined a
coalition of farm and com-
modity groups in writing to
Congress on Nov. 9, to ask
for permanent and meaning-
ful estate tax relief, and has
signed on to a letter of the
same message to President
Barack Obama.
“Family farmers and ranch-
ers are not only the caretakers
of our nation’s rural lands
but they are also small busi-
nesses,” Steiner said. “The
2011 change to the estate
tax law does a disservice to
agriculture because we are a
land-based, capital-intensive
industry with few options for
paying estate taxes when they
come due. The state of our
economy, coupled with the
uncertain nature of estate tax
liabilities, makes it difficult
for family-owned farms and
ranches to make sound busi-
ness decisions.”
To press the issue with
Members of Congress, ASA
has issued a nationwide
Action Alert to its members
and supporters asking them
to contact their elected offi-
cials about the importance of
passing estate tax legislation
during the current lame duck
session.
“Passage of permanent
and meaningful estate tax
laws before the end of 2010
will strengthen the business
climate for farm and ranch
families while ensuring agri-
cultural businesses can be
passed to future generations,”
said Steiner. “Allowing estate
taxes to be reinstated with-
out an exemption and rate
that protect family farms puts
many operations at risk and
threatens succession to the
next generation of farmers.”
ASA represents all U.S.
soybean farmers on domes-
tic and international issues
of importance to the soy-
bean industry. ASA’s advo-
cacy efforts are made pos-
sible through the voluntary
membership in ASA by over
22,500 farmers in 31 states
where soybeans are grown.
For more information con-
tact:
Joe Steiner, ASA
Executive Committee mem-
ber, (513) 398-6745, stein-
erja@zoomtown.com
Cassandra Langley,
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s
Coordinator, (314) 576-1770,
clangley@soy.org
BY GLEN ARNOLD
OSU Extension Educator
The Extension office has
gotten a number of phone
calls this fall from folks ask-
ing what farmers have in their
fields that look like turnips.
The answer is oilseed radish.
Oilseed radish is a cover
crop that farmers are planting
in hopes of improving soil
quality and increasing crop
yields. It has the ability to
recycle soil nutrients, sup-
press weeds and pathogens,
break up compaction, reduce
soil erosion, and produce
large amounts of biomass or
organic matter.
Oilseed radish (Rapha nus
sativus [L.] var. oleif erus),
belongs in the Bras sicace-
ae plant family, commonly
called mustards. The Daikon
type of oilseed radish has a
large, fleshy taproot that can
grow 2 to 4 inches in diam-
eter and two feet or more in
length. The radish also has
fine root hairs that spread
from the main taproot. Above
ground growth consists of
wide leaves that are soft,
moist, and fast growing.
Seed is planted to a depth
of one-half inch. Seed size is
similar to radishes planted in
the home garden. Farmers can
drill the seed or broadcast the
seed and follow-up with shal-
low tillage incorporation.
Seeding rates for oilseed
radish are still not set in stone.
When drilling before August
15 in Northern Ohio, a seed-
ing rate of 8 to 10 pounds per
acre has been used in research
plots. Several farmers have
both broadcast and drilled
radishes at 6 to 7 pounds
per acre and had good results
when soil moisture permits
quick germination. Radishes
cost between $2.50 and $3.00
per pound so the lighter the
seeding rate the less costly
the cover crop.
Freezing temperatures of
20 to 25 degrees will kill
oilseed radish which allows
for successful no-till spring
planting of subsequent crops.
As a cover crop, oilseed rad-
ish seems to be best utilized
when planted after small
grain (e.g. wheat) or corn
silage harvest. Excess nutri-
ents in manure amended soil
are rapidly absorbed by this
cover crop, thus preventing
leaching or runoff of nutrients
into surface waters.
The Putnam County
Extension office and SWCD
office harvested four cover
crop plots in 2010 involving
strips of radishes, strips of
cereal rye and strips without
a cover crop. In the three soy-
bean plots, radishes showed
a slight yield increase (3 bu/
ac) in only one plot while
cereal rye showed a slight
yield increase (3 bu/ac) in
two of the plots. In the lone
corn plot, radishes showed a
slight yield increase (6 bu/ac)
while the cereal rye had no
increase.
Radish stands were fair
to poor in these plots due
to dry weather after planting
the cover crops. This fall,
many farmers also had disap-
pointing radish stands as the
weather was very dry across
most of the county. This is
one reason why planting rad-
ishes in fields receiving liq-
uid manure could become a
common practice in Putnam
County.
In early spring, rotting
radishes can produce and
odor similar to propane.
Unfortunately, there have
been instances in Ohio in
recent years of volunteer fire-
fighters being called out to
investigate a “gas leak” that
ended up being a field of rad-
ishes. Thus, it would be good
for everyone to take note of
where radish fields are in the
county before snow covers
the fields and their locations
are forgotten.
WORTHINGTON —
The Ohio Soybean Council
Foundation (OSCF) is pleased
to announce scholarship
opportunities for undergradu-
ate and graduate students who
are pursuing degrees related
to the application of science
and technology to the soy-
bean industry and agriculture
at Ohio colleges and univer-
sities. These scholarships are
designed to promote career
development in the soybean
industry, specifically within
the area of bioproducts.
“The list of industrial
applications for soybeans
continues to grow and it is
important to support the sci-
ence and technology behind
these applications,” said Tom
Fontana, OSCF Director of
Programs and Development.
“These scholarships are a
great opportunity for students,
and they will help strengthen
an important part of the Ohio
soybean industry’s future.”
Four undergradu-
ate scholarships of up to
$3,000 each will be award-
ed. Also available to one
undergraduate student is a
$5,000 Bhima Vijayendran
Scholarship, named to honor
Dr. Vijayendran’s contribu-
tions to the soybean industry
resulting from his scientific
research and commercializa-
tion activities at Battelle.
Scholarship applicants
must be Ohio residents and
enrolled as full-time students
at an Ohio college or univer-
sity. The applicant must have
attained at least sophomore
status by the fall of 2011,
with a grade point average
of 3.0 or higher in his or her
major field. Applicants must
also demonstrate the desire
to pursue a career focused on
the application of science and
technology to the soybean
industry and agriculture.
Eligible majors include
biology, biochemistry, bio-
engineering, biotechnology,
bioenergy, biofuels, food sci-
ence, agricultural communi-
cations, agricultural business
and any of the agriculture
disciplines or related fields.
Two scholarships of up
to $5,000 each are available
to graduate students who are
enrolled as a full-time student
at an Ohio college or univer-
sity and have proof of legal
residency in the United States.
Graduate applicants must
be conducting research in
bioproducts, biobased mate-
rials, bioengineering, biopo-
lymers or a related field, and
focused on the development
and use of biobased products
and materials derived from
soybeans.
All OSCF scholarships
will be competitively award-
ed with funds paid directly
to the educational institution.
Scholarships are not renew-
able, although recipients may
re-apply. The deadline for
applications is Jan. 14.
Oilseed radish used
as a cover crop
OSCF offers scholarship opportunities
The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 9 2 0 .818 334 266
N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 187
Miami 6 5 0 .545 205 225
Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 229 295
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 282 252
Jacksonville 6 5 0 .545 240 294
Houston 5 6 0 .455 264 287
Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 257 218
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 8 3 0 .727 250 188
Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727 254 181
Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 216 229
Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225 288
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 285 231
San Diego 6 5 0 .545 310 225
Oakland 5 6 0 .455 255 256
Denver 3 8 0 .273 250 323
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 277 240
Philadelphia 7 4 0 .636 310 257
Washington 5 6 0 .455 215 262
Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 301
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 9 2 0 .818 276 209
New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 197
Tampa Bay 7 4 0 .636 219 223
Carolina 1 10 0 .091 140 276
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 3 0 .727 222 172
Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 269 166
Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 189 239
Detroit 2 9 0 .182 258 282
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 5 6 0 .455 209 275
St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 213 231
San Francisco 4 7 0 .364 187 225
Arizona 3 8 0 .273 194 319
———
Today’s Game
Houston at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
NFL
(Continued from Page 6)
DEFENSE: Linemen—Zack
Shane, Newark Cath., 6-4, 239,
sr.; Sebastian Monnin, Springfield
Cath. Cent., 6-3, 200, sr.; Tre Lopez,
Leipsic, 5-11, 185, sr. Linebackers—
Nate Long, Fremont St. Joseph, 6-0,
190, sr.; Aaron Weyer, Ada, 6-1,
225, sr.; Wyatt Tiffany, Cin. Country
Day, 6-2, 180, sr. Backs—Ellis
Brown, Shadyside, 6-0, 152, sr.; Cole
Smelley, Bridgeport, 5-11, 180, jr.;
Mason Roth, McComb, 5-11, 150, sr.;
Troy Stevenson, Pandora-Gilboa,
5-9, 161, sr.; Craig Parker, Sycamore
Mohawk, 6-0, 155, sr. Punter—Jake
Aldridge, Springfield Cath. Cent., 6-4,
185, jr.
Third Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Trey Griffith,
Salineville Southern, 6-1, 175, sr.;
Ryley Sheptock, Berlin Center
Western Reserve, 6-1, 175, sr.
Linemen—Robert Guyton, Ada,
6-3, 270, sr.; Jason Reichert, Maria
Stein Marion Local, 6-2, 220, sr.;
T.J. Griffith, McComb, 6-1, 195, sr.;
Trent Rowland, Bucyrus Wynford,
6-1, 210, sr. Quarterbacks—Shawn
Ball, Malvern, 6-1, 205, jr.; Brian
Kelly, Springfield Cath. Cent., 6-2,
185, jr.; Matthias Tayala, McDonald,
6-3, 205, sr.; Shane Ritts, Thompson
Ledgemont, 6-0, 180, sr. Backs—
Taimere Fambro, Canal Winchester
Harvest Prep, 6-2, 185, jr.; Hunter
Schneiter, Strasburg-Franklin, 5-11,
170, jr.; Chris Smelley, Bridgeport,
6-0, 230, sr.; Tyler Bay, Zanesville
Rosecrans, 5-8, 190, sr.; Tyler
Noffsinger, Covington, 5-9, 150, sr.
Kicker—Eric Ziems, Tol. Christian,
5-10, 155, sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Joey
Brown, Edon, 6-3, 203, sr.; Jeremy
Krill, Monroeville, 6-3, 235, sr.; Bryce
Collins, New Washington Buckeye
Central, 6-1, 275, sr. Linebackers—
Aaron Sanders, Ansonia, 5-11, 180,
sr.; Joe Staley, Sidney Lehman, 5-11,
155, sr.; Kody Chance, Mogadore,
6-0, 190, sr. Backs—Lucas Kennedy,
Lakeside Danbury, 5-11, 185, jr.; Sam
Shafer, New Washington Buckeye
Central, 6-3, 185, sr.; Garrett Raff,
Dalton, 6-3, 170, sr.; Kyle Cramer,
Mogadore, 5-6, 160, sr. Punter—
John Rosati, Berlin Center Western
Reserve, 6-2, 178, sr.
Special Mention
Michael Lewis, Connor Shook
and Aaron Price, Newark Cath.;
Jordan Arnt and Brandon Brookes,
Morral Ridgedale; Zach Casparro,
Dylan Blythe and Tony Roark, Grove
City Christian; Dresan Mathis, Terry
Harper and Devon Wade, Canal
Winchester Harvest Prep; Sean
Tobin, Lancaster Fisher Cath.;
Owen Heckman, Allen Ritchie
and Nelson Anu, Cols. Crusaders;
Aaron Putinski, Lancaster Fairfield
Christian Acad.; Casey Sloan and
Quinton Ferenbaugh, Danville;
Corey Fickiesen and Levi Zartman,
New Matamoras Frontier; Brendon
Sedinger, Matt Hammond and
Logan Hudson, Shadyside; Jerrod
Kinney, Beallsville; Travis Tucci,
Malvern; Erik Myers, Malvern; Eric
Hain, Malvern; Carl McGuire, Daniel
Abbas and Robbie Martinelli, New
Philadelphia Tuscarawas Cent. Cath.;
Cameron Baker and Mike Dalto,
Bridgeport; Trevor Cooper, Toronto;
Zach Erb, Strasburg-Franklin; Cody
Lynskey, Steubenville Cath. Cent.;
Tanner Wright, Hannibal River;
Levi McCutcheon and Levi Porter,
Waterford; Kevin Lewis, Ryan Bradford
and Matt Saab, Portsmouth Notre
Dame; Austin North, Eric Putman,
Charles Kish and Johnny Stobart,
Glouster Trimble; Garrett Foster,
Hunter Boggs, Jacob Patterson and
Cody Myers, Willow Wood Symmes
Valley; Danny Ramthun, Racine
Southern; Tyler Hughes and Chad
Lewis, Franklin Furnace Green; Klint
Connery, Tyler Hendrix and Kyle
Connery, Reedsville Eastern; Colten
Gill, Corning Miller; Ian Watterson,
Manchester; Justin Crager, Sciotoville
Community; Josh Cooper, S. Gallia;
Brad Seiler, Sam Grabinski, Josh
Ohler, Derek Cantrell, Kyle LaRosa,
Kevin Pye, Jimmy Marsic and Kyle
Dennis, Thompson Ledgemont;
Levert Cox, Jalen Coleman, Marques
Coleman and Brian Burdine, Cle.
Hts. Luth. East; J.C. Giffin, Zak Hites,
Kyle Burchett, Brian Griffith, Matt
Amiott, Cory Whitt and Russ Harless,
Fairport Harbor Harding; Seth Beedy,
Spring. Cath. Cent.; Darren Clark,
Covington; Aaron Hall and Derek
Bubeck, Ansonia; Will Duncan, Cin.
Country Day; Rodney Huston, Sidney
Lehman; Jordan Gates, Lockland;
Devyn Turbeville and Trevor
Sahagian, Rittman; Skylar Haines,
Ashland Mapleton; Charles Rader
and Alex Roebken, Mogadore; Nick
Puntel, McDonald; Tyler Burns, Greg
Blevins and Derek Miller, Dalton; Tyler
Powell and Ed Crump, Berlin Center
Western Reserve; Devan Miller,
Leetonia; John Dutton, Lowellville;
Josh Melhorn, Salineville Southern;
Wade Prueitt, Vienna Mathews;
Seamus Johnson, Sebring McKinley;
Shaile Chamberlain, Antwerp;
Greg Schwieterman and Brandon
Arling, Maria Stein Marion Local;
Zach Brumbaugh, Tol. Christian;
Evan Burgei, Delphos St. John’s;
Cam Brown, Arlington; Caleb Coil,
Nathan Anese and Jonathon Morter,
Sycamore Mohawk; Mitchell Gross,
Norwalk St. Paul.
Pohlman
By RUSTY MILLER
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — When
Youngstown Ursuline comes
onto the field before the start of
Saturday’s Division V champi-
onship game at Canton’s Paul
Brown Tiger Stadium, odds are
few fans will be able to pick out
the best high school football
player in the state.
At just 5-8 and 176 pounds,
Akise Teague isn’t a physical
specimen. But those numbers
are just the product of a tape
measure and a scale. Without
question, he’ll be the biggest
player on the field.
That’s why the senior run-
ning back is the winner of the
24th annual Associated Press
Ohio Mr. Football award.
“I’m a strong-hearted player
that plays taller than what I
really am,” said the outgoing
Teague, who will lead unbeat-
en and top-ranked Ursuline’s
attempt for a third consecutive
state championship. This will
be his fourth consecutive state
title game.
Other numbers are far more
revealing when it comes to
Teague.
He carried 164 times for
1,756 yards and 26 touchdowns
during the regular season —
now he’s up to a mind-boggling
43 touchdowns. During the first
10 games, he caught 25 passes
for 545 yards (21.8 ypc) and
five TDs, returned 10 kicks for
328 yards and another score
and brought back 13 punts for
283 yards (21.8 ypr). When
he wasn’t piling up 3,132 all-
purpose yards on offense, he
was intercepting five passes on
defense.
Amazingly, he is averaging
almost a point every time he
touches the ball this season.
“He’s the most explosive
player I’ve ever coached,” said
Ursuline’s Dan Reardon. “That’s
pretty notable because I’ve been
around some pretty good play-
ers — Mario Manningham,
Maurice Clarett, Boom Herron
— from when I previously was
on Warren Harding’s staff.”
Manningham, formerly of
Michigan, now stars for the
New York Giants. Clarett won
the Ohio Mr. Football award in
2001 and, despite off-the-field
notoriety, led Ohio State to its
first national championship in
34 years as a freshman. Dan
“Boom” Herron is currently
Ohio State’s tailback and an
All-Big Ten performer.
The thing about Teague is he
doesn’t seem to realize that he’s
not 6-2 and 230. He’s unafraid
running between the tackles and
just as adept at skirting an end
to outrun defenders to the post.
Blessed with great hands — he
was first-team AP All-Ohio a
year ago as a receiver — he can
also snag passes out of the back-
field. And he seldom makes bad
decisions on kick returns.
So what does he think he
excels at?
“I’m best at blocking for
other players,” he replied. “For
sure. Anything for my team. It
doesn’t matter, as long as we get
yardage.”
Teague is a good-natured
kid who loves hanging around
with his friends. He has put off
making a decision on where
he’ll go to college until after the
Fighting Irish meet Coldwater
on Saturday.
“I’ve narrowed it down
some but I don’t know,” he
said. “I’m not ready to make a
decision yet. I’ve narrowed it
down to Cincinnati, Wisconsin
and a couple of MACs and Ohio
State’s going to be at the state
championship game. Hopefully,
they give me a good look. And
Penn State will also be there.”
Reardon will hate to see him
go and not just because of what
he does on a field.
“He’s a great kid. A kid
who’s worked very hard in all
aspects of his life,” he said.
“He’s very, very personable;
he’s great around kids. He’s one
of those guys that the ballboys
and the waterboys, he takes
them under his wing. They all
kind of gravitate to him. He has
one of those personalities that
all he does is have a smile on
his face. He’s just a fun kid to
be around.”
So how would Teague
describe himself?
“Tenacious,” he aswered.
“That would be the word —
tenacious.”
Reardon vividly remembers
when Teague showed up for his
first football practice.
“He had the ‘it’ factor,” he
recalled.
Akise says he doesn’t know
the origin of his name but
thinks that since his 8-year-old
sister is named Auze and his
10-year old sister is Montazia,
his parents were just seeking
out something original. He’s
unaware of anyone else with
the name Akise.
No question he’s unique,
that’s for sure.
Teague becomes just the
second Youngstown-area
player (joining Clarett) to win
the Ohio Mr. Football award,
which is selected by a media
panel from across the state. He
is the third running back in a
row to win the honor. He will
receive a plaque in the shape
of Ohio.
Others considered for the
award include: Springfield line-
backer Trey DePriest, Mentor
Lake Catholic running back
Richie Sanders, Toledo St.
John’s wide receiver Cheatham
Norrils, Columbus Hartley
running back Noah Key,
Steubenville linebacker Shaq
Petteway, Westerville South
running back Jayshon Jackson
and Huber Heights Wayne
quarterback Braxton Miller.
Akise Teague is 2010 AP Ohio Mr. Football
Akise Teague
82-76 win. The win kept the
Beavers undefeated at 5-0 over-
all with a 1-0 HCAC mark and
it left Bluffton needing just a
victory over Transylvania on
Saturday to equal the 1965-66
squad for the best start in men’s
basketball history. The Lions
fell to 1-5 overall and 0-1 in the
HCAC.
The Beavers came out of
the gates on fire, holding the
Lions scoreless while taking a
12-0 lead after the first four
and a half minutes of the game.
Bluffton was led by junior Nick
Lee (Vanlue) with two shots
from behind the arc. The Lion
offense finally put an end to the
Beaver scoring rampage when
they put in their first two points
on Matt Wester’s layup at the
14:42 mark.
The Lions finally pulled
within single digits (16-9) at
the 12-minute mark thanks to a
three-pointer from Alex Cole.
Bluffton pushed the lead back
to double digits with another
Lee three. This was followed by
a Rob Luderman (Ayersville)
layup which gave the Beavers a
12-point lead with just 11 min-
utes left in the half.
Lee followed with two con-
secutive triples to bring his total
to five with nine minutes remain-
ing in the period. These threes
gave the Beavers their largest
lead to that point at 27-12.
The Mount finally trimmed
the deficit to double digits at the
3:22 mark when Ben Haarman
hit a jumper. Lee added two
more shots from behind the arc
in the last two minutes. His 24
points, on 8-of-10 shooting from
distance through the first half,
led the Beavers to a 44-30 edge
going into the break.
The second half did not start
as hot for the Beavers as the
teams continued to trade points
through the early stages of the
period. A Brent Farley (Lima/
Shawnee) layup kept the Beaver
lead at 14 points with 11 min-
utes remaining in the game.
The Beavers started to take
over the game midway through
the second stanza, opening up
a 22-point lead after a Mychal
Hill (London/Jonathan Alder)
three-point shot with just eight
minutes remaining. The Beavers
continued to maintain their large
margin into the final five min-
utes of the game.
Lions gave the Beavers a
scare in the final minutes as
Haarman terrorized Bluffton
with 26 points over the final
3:33. The Beavers struggled to
control the ball and the Lions
pulled within five with 15 sec-
onds left. Hill hit one of two free
throws with 14 seconds left for
the 82-76 win over the Lions.
Lee led the team with 24
points (8-of-10 from distance)
and he added four assists and five
boards. All his points came from
behind the arc as he finished one
shy of the school record nine-
threes in a game held by Dave
Sheldon and Lee’s brother-in-
law, Scott Bergman. Following
Lee was Josh Johnson (Ottawa/
Ottawa-Glandorf) with 11 off
the bench, hitting 3-of-5 from
behind the arc. Hill added 10,
while Farley chipped in with
six counters, 11 boards and a
career-high five assists. Nate
Heckelman (Norwalk) also
added six points and a career-
high six assists.
Lions were led by Haarman
with 37 points. Cole added 10
with eight boards. Aaron Barber
dropped in six, while David
Lane and David Mann each
added five for the Lions.
The Beavers were outstand-
ing from the field, as they went
28-of-48 (58.3 percent), includ-
ing 13-of-25 (52.0 percent) from
behind the arc. The Lions only
hit 24-of-62 (38.7 percent) from
the field, and 12-for-28 (42.9
percent) on three-pointers. The
Lions excelled from the line as
they hit 16-of-19 (84.2 percent),
while the Beavers converted
13-of-19 (68.4 percent).
Roundup
(Continued from page 6)
8 – The Herald Thursday, December 2, 2010 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
950 Miscellaneous
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina M. Fox
419-236-4134
I’ve got GIFTS for *ALL* on your
list including *Stocking Stuffers*
Call Black Friday, spend $100,
get $25 in FREE products!
Life Tastes
Good Again
Eating Gluten Free
New Product Line
Elida Health Foods
101 W. Main Street
Elida, Ohio 45807
419-339-2771
M-F 10:30-5:30 PM, Sat. 10:00-1 PM
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
HERRON
CONSTRUCTION
419-692-2329
Kitchen and Bath- •
room Remodeling
Roofing •
Siding •
Replacement •
Windows
Garages •
Plumbing and •
Electrical Service
for both new and
existing homes
Drywall •
Give Us A Call Year Round For
All Of Your Home Improvement
Needs Both Large And Small
FREE ESTIMATE
Chris Herron
950 Electricians
RETIRED LICENSED
ELECTRICIAN NEEDS
TO STAY BUSY
RESIDENTAL &
COMMERCIAL
WIRING
WELDING
ED PAXTON
419-692-5193
950 Home Improvement
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
PJ’s
Contracting
567-279-3730
Roofing - Siding -
Windows
Doors
General Remodeling
Small add-ons
950 Transmission
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Place a Classified Ad
TODAY!
Call 419-695-0015 to place
your ad!
The Delphos Herald
www.delphosherald.com
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
Service
AT YOUR
CALL
Subscriber Services
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
419-695-0015
http://www.delphosherald.com
The Delphos Herald
For delivery service-related inquiries.
419-695-0015
HOURS:
Weekdays: 8AM - 5PM
Saturdays: 8:30AM - 11AM
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
D E L P HOS
TR A DI NG
P OST
528 N. Washington St.
419-692-0044
NEED EXTRA
OR LOOKING FOR A
GREAT DEAL?
BUY-SELL-TRADE
tools, games, electronics,
DVD’s, jewelry, firearms,
gold and silver, anything
of value in good to
excellent condition.
Tues.-Thurs. 8:30 to 5
Fri. 8:30 to 6, Sat. 9 to 2
020

Notice
RADIO SHACK -Delphos,
902 Elida Ave., Closing
December 31, 2010. Eve-
rything must go!
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS Monday thru Fri-
day from 2-5 pm at
Chick'n House, 239 W.
Fifth St., Delphos.
AUTO / Diesel technician
wanted. Competitive pay.
Medical insurance plan,
paid vacation. Wrecker /
shop experience a plus.
Apply in person at Knip-
pen Chrysler, 800 W. 5th
St. Delphos
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
090

Job Wanted
55 YEAR old Delphos
man looking to take care
of elder man in their
home. Days or nights.
Ha v e r e f e r e n c e s .
(567)204-0542
095

Child Care
GENERAL DAY care in
my home. All ages. Expe-
rienced. Low rates. Call
JoAnn 567-279-4331.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
501

Misc. for Sale
2002 TOMOS Moped
$450. 6’ Billiard table,
comes with extra sticks,
chalk and racks $150.
(419)233-0240
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, 1 1/2 BA, At-
tached garage. Available
soon. 419-692-3951
2 BR House in Delphos.
Excellent location. Ga -
rage/Basement. Like new
inside and out. No smok-
i n g / No p e t s .
419-233-7911.
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM Apt. 321 S. Ca-
nal St. Available Soon.
(419)695-2761
2 BDRM Apt. 317 S. Ca-
nal St. (419)695-2761
PARTIALLY FINISHED 2
BDRM Apt. for rent in Del-
phos. Heating bills paid.
References and deposit
required. No Pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
(419)302-5227
620

Duplex For Rent
619 DEWEY
2BR 1/2 a double. Credit
check required. Refer -
ences $350/mo. Includes
water, sewer, trash & De-
pos i t . No Pet s .
(419)692-6241
800

House For Sale
FULL REMODEL com-
pleted soon. Can custom-
ize to you. 607 W. 7th St.,
Delphos. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
chbsinc.com
800

House For Sale
FULL REMODEL com-
plete soon at 829 Moening
St. Delphos. Can custom-
ize to you. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
www.chbsinc.com
0 DOWN, warranty, free
appliances, Remodeled
home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home
in Lincolnview school dis-
trict. Has new carpet,
paint, landscape, new
cent r al ai r , wat er
heater, new lighting, up-
dated plumbing and elec-
t r i c , s ome new
windows, 19176 Venedo-
cia-Eastern Rd., Venedo-
cia. 419-586-8220.
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
Over 85
years
serving you
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T..-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
MEMBER: 912 345 678
RAABE FORD LINCOLN MERCURY DEALER
(800) 589-7876
Owner Advantage is our
way of rewarding you for
bringing your vehicle in for
service. You’re rewarded
for each visit. Membership
is easy – ask your Service
Advisor for details!
Taking care of
your vehicle
has its rewards.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE WHITE mother cat
and three white kittens.
(419)230-8722
HAMMOND ORGAN
-Free Only needs tuning.
Call (419)692-3222
Place a
House for
Rent Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily
Herald
419 695-0015
Business Opportunity ALL
CASH VENDING ROUTE! Be
Your Own Boss! 25 machines
+ Candy All for $9995. 877-
915-8222 All Major Credit Cards
Accepted!

Business Services REACH
2 MILLION NEWSPAPER
READERS with one ad place-
ment. ONLY $295.00. Ohio's
best community newspapers.
Call Kathy at AdOhio Statewide
Classifed Network, 614-486-
6677, or E-MAIL at: kmccutch-
eon@adohio.net or check out our
website at: www.adohio.net.

Business Services REACH
OVER 1 MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad place-
ment. Only $975.00. Ask your
local newspaper about our 2X2
Display Network or Call Kathy at
614-486-6677/E-mail kmccutch-
eon@adohio.net. or check out
our website: www.adohio.net.

Help Wanted CDL-A Drivers.
Regional Opportunity. 100%
Owner Operator Reefer Company.
$2,000 Sign-on bonus! Great
rates and family atmosphere.
Call1-800-908-8844 or Visit www.
suncocarriers.com.

Help Wanted CDL-A Drivers:
We've Never Looked Better! Our
package of benefts is the best
it's ever been. Pay, Bonuses,
Miles, Equipment. $500 Sign-
On for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6 mo.
OTR. Western Express 1-888-
801-5295.

Help Wanted Class A CDL
Drivers. Excellent Equipment
Consistent home Time. Great
pay/Benefts. Smith Transport,
Inc. Call 877-432-0048 www.
smithdrivers.com.

Help Wanted Don't
Miss A Paycheck! $750 P/
Wk. Guaranteed 1 st. 2 Wks.
Employed! Flatbed. Excellent
Compensation. 1 Yr. OTR &
Class A CDL Reqd. 888-472-
3218 or www.gicc.chiefnd.com.

Help Wanted Driver- Home
Weekly! No Touch Freight! No
forced NE/NYC! 6 months experi-
ence. No felon/DUI last 5 yrs.
Solons & Teams Wanted. New
Pay Package! 877-740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com.

Help Wanted Drivers - 100%
Tuition Paid CDL Training! Start
your New Career. No Credit
Check, No Experience Required!
Call: 888-417-7564 CRST
Expedited. www.joinCRST.com.

Help Wanted Drivers - $1,000
Sign On Bonus!! REGIONAL and
OTR . Freight Increase, Great
Pay and Benefts! Class A CDL
and 1 year experience required.
800-677-5627 www.westside-
transport.com.

Help Wanted Drivers - Flatbed
Owner Operators. Up to $1000
Sign on Bonus. Earn $1.85/mi.
or more! No Age restriction on
Tractor/trailers. CRST Malone
800-743-0435 www.JoinMalone.
com.

Help Wanted Drivers- Owner
Operators. $2,000 Sign-On
Bonus. Paid FSC on loaded &
empty miles. Weekly Hometime.
75% Drop & Hook. Paid OH & IN
Tolls. Call Comtrak at 866-722-
0291, or apply at www.comtrakl-
ogistics.com.

Help Wanted Drivers- Owner
Operators. *Industry Leading
Revenue per Mile + 100%
FSC *No Money Down, Tractor
Purchase Program*No Lease On
Costs*Class-A CDL, Hazmat and
Tanker Required. 888-240-4808.
www.millerdriving.com.

Help Wanted Drivers -
Teams Wanted, OTR, Class A
CDL, 2yrs. OTR exp., 23 yrs or
older. Excellent pay. Owner
Ops Welcome. HIRING NOW!
877-459-0630.
Help Wanted ****HOME
FOR THE HOLIDAYS****OTR
Drivers APU Equipped Pre-pass
EZ-pass. Every 60K mile raises.
Newer equipment. Passenger/
Pet Policy. 100% No Touch
1-800-528-7825.

Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT. Job
Guaranteed after FREE 3 week
CDL-A Training. Live within 100
mile radius of Wauseon, Ohio
1-800-621-4878. Also, Hiring
Drivers!

Homes For Sale TWO
STORY MODULAR MODEL
CLOSEOUT 2160 sf. 3Bed
2-1/2Bath 42” Cherry cabinets,
Ceramic tile foors in kit, Glamour
Bath, Loaded with Extras. Free
8'x36' Front Covered Porch.
ONLY $88,438 SAVE $42,192.
1-800-686-1763 www.williams-
burgsquare.com.

Manufactured Homes
for Sale MODEL BLOWOUT
NEW 16x80 3Bed 2Bath Vinyl
& Shingle. Includes: Delivery,
Set, Skirting, Steps & Tie Downs.
ONLY $29,995. 1-800-686-1763
www.williamsburgsquare.com.

Manufactured Homes for Sale
SAVE HUGE $$ New 28x60
Dutch 3Bed 2Bath Suite Retreat
Bathroom Cherry cabinets,
Appliance Pkg. Loaded. Includes:
Delivery, Set & AC. SLASHED
$59,958 SAVE $11,465 NOW.
1-800-686-1763 www.williams-
burgsquare.com.

Misc. CANADIAN FISHING
CABINS FOR RENT. Walleyes,
jumbo perch, northerns. Call
Hugh or Doris toll free 800-426-
2550 for free brochure. Or look
at our website www.bestfshing.
com.
OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Glazier’s units
6 Soaks up the sun
11 Hate
12 Peddle
13 Elegant
14 Valuable fur
15 Uptight
16 Warm-water shark
17 Grime
19 Cudgel one’s brains
23 PIN prompter
26 Lock companions
28 Mine fnd
29 Prickly plants
31 Less polluted
33 Waned
34 Lingerie item
35 Fair-hiring abbr.
36 Trivial mistake
39 Cozy place to sit
40 Sp. miss
42 Emir or sheik
44 “Hawkeye” Pierce
46 Locales
51 Bay leaf source
54 Lagoon surrounders
55 Chant
56 Omen seeker
57 Tolerate
58 Wading bird
DOWN
1 Pierre’s dad
2 Two fves for — —
3 Monster’s loch
4 Winding curves
5 Messy place
6 Fox’s sound
7 Chain mail
8 Travel on powder
9 Tenn. neighbor
10 Sault — Marie
11 Insect killer
12 Substantial
16 “Simpsons” bartender
18 Gives the go-ahead
20 Large artery
21 Move furtively
22 Deborah of old flms
23 Trellis
24 Where Lhasa is
25 Ginnie —
27 Resort
29 Wax makers
30 Country rtes.
32 Web site
34 Student stat
37 Punch server
38 Novelist Levin
41 Moses’ brother
43 Enjoy the beach
45 Advance, as money
47 Sound from Simba
48 “Blondie” kid
49 Thicke of “Growing Pains”
50 Job application info
51 Fleur-de- —
52 Crumb-toter
53 Actress Hagen
54 Tool handle wood
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12
13 14
15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 32
33 34
35 36 37 38 39
40 41 42 43
44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54
55 56
57 58
P A N E S B A S K S
D E T E S T M A R K E T
D R E S S Y E R M I N E
T E N S E M A K O
S O O T R A C K
A T M K E Y S O R E
B R I A R S P U R E R
E B B E D G A R T E R
E O E S L I P L A P
S R T A A R A B
A L D A A R E A S
L A U R E L A T O L L S
I N T O N E S H A M A N
S T A N D H E R O N
Answer to Puzzle
Putnam County
Donald L. Jerwers and
Joyce A. Jerwers, Lot 96,
Kalida, Lot 1, Kalida, and
Lot 2, Kalida, to Donald
L. Jerwers TR and Joyce
A. Jerwers TR.
Donald L. Jerwers
and Joyce A. Jerwers, S
5 Q SE, parcel, Union
Township, to Donald L.
Jerwers and Joyce A.
Jerwers.
Donald L. Jerwers and
Joyce Ann Jerwers, S 1
Q SE 40.00 acres, Union
Township, Lot 3, Lee
Sub., Kalida, Lot 4, Lee
Sub, Kalida, Lot 5 Lee
Sub., Kalida, Lot 6, Lee
Sub, Kalida, Lot 1, Kalida
and Lot 2, Kalida, to
Joyce A. Jerwers TR, and
Donald L. Jerwers TR.
Donald L. Jerwers and
Joyce A. Jerwers, S 7 Q
NE 13.75 acres, Union
Township and S 8 Q NW
.25 acre, Union Township,
to Donald L. Jerwers TR
and Joyce A. Jerwers TR.
Fifth Third Mortgage
Company, Lot 577,
Leipsic, to Darrin H.
Schroeder and Laura A.
Schroeder.
Charles U. Meyer and
Marilyn A. Meyer aka
Marilynne A. Meyer, S
30 Q SE parcel, Ottawa
Township, S 30 Q NE
parcel, Ottawa Township,
30 Q NE .206 acre,
Ottawa Township, and S
30 Q SE .319 acre, Ottawa
Township, to Charlie M.
Farm LLC.
Mark R. Long and
Katie Long, Lot 22, Indian
Knoll Sub., Ottawa, to
Thomas E. Fry.
Harold B. Schnipke
LE and Sandra K. Verhoff
Schnipke, S 31 Q NE 29.61
acres, Liberty Township,
S 25 Q NE 40.0 acres,
Perry Township, S 24 Q
sW 40.0 acres, Palmer
Township, and S 31 Q
NE 20.388 acres, Liberty
Township to Buckeye
Country Farms LLC.
Beatrice Velasquez, Lot
1426, Ottawa, to Mark
Ellerbrock and Martha
Ellerbrock.
Rihard M. Wenzinger
TR and Irene A.
Wenzinger TR, S 4 Q
NW 78.62 acres, Palmer
Township, S 4 Q SW
1.811 acres, Palmer
Township, S 3 Q SW
parcel, Palmer Township,
and S 3 Q SW 40.0 acres,
Palmer Township, to
Richard M. Wenzinger
and Irene A. Wenzinger.
Richard M. Wenzinger
LE and Irene A.
Wenzinger LE, S 4 Q
NW 78.62 acres, Palmer
Township, S 4 Q SW
1.811 acres, Palmer
Township, S 3 Q SW
parcel, Palmer Township,
and S 3 Q SW 40.0 acres,
Palmer Township, to R &
I W LLC.
DEAR DR. GOTT: I have osteoarthritis
in my neck and spine. Could you tell
me how a 54-year-old lady like me got
such a thing? My job is repetitive work
in manufacturing, but my employer says
it’s not from the work. I feel it is, but I
don’t feel that 54 is old.
DEAR READER: Osteoarthritis is
a chronic condition that results from a
breakdown of joint cartilage. Healthy
cartilage allows our joints to move easily
and without pain. When osteoarthritis is
present, a degeneration of the cartilage
that cushions bone ends occurs. Over
time, some areas of cartilage may
wear away completely, resulting in
damage to the bone and extreme pain
on movement. The ends of the bone
may form spurs, and the ligaments may
thicken. This common disorder affects
about one in three people and, while
most common in older adults, it can
affect people of any age.
All of our joints are susceptible to
osteoarthritis, but those most commonly
affected are ones that bear weight --
knees, hips, spine, feet, neck, lower
back and hands. When the knees or hips
are involved, pain may be experienced
with motion but may disappear when
at rest. When the spine is involved,
stiffness and discomfort can be felt and
can generate to the lower back. There
may be pain generating to the
head or down the arms.
I cannot determine from your
brief note why you have the
condition. It may be related
to a sports injury when you
were younger, or you may
have a family history of OA.
There is also a consideration
of a chemical change that has
occurred in your cartilage,
causing it to break down faster
than it can be produced. You
also may be carrying more
weight than is healthy for your
frame, or you may be relatively
inactive. As you can see, there
are a number of causes for a
woman at the early age of 54 to
develop this condition.
You might be helped by over-
the-counter or prescription NSAIDS
(nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory
medication). There are also glucosamine/
chondroitin combinations available at
your local pharmacy that may help to
build cartilage and improve your joint
mobility. If appropriate, consider weight
reduction. Above all, stay as active as
possible. Keeping your joints as mobile
and flexible as possible can help reduce
your pain and stiffness. Consider yoga,
tai chi or water aerobics. On the home
front, consider rubbing castor oil on
your painful joints. Some of my readers
have found success by using purple
grape juice and liquid pectin commonly
used to make jam. Simply mix 1 to 2
tablespoons of pectin in 8 ounces of
grape juice, and drink it once a day.
When all else fails and the pain
becomes unbearable, speak with your
physician regarding heavy-duty pain
medication or surgery. Your personal
physician knows your complete medical
history and can help you make the
determination as to whether you are
well enough to consider such a step.
Many hospitals also have occupational
therapists, who can evaluate the
situation and offer suggestions.
To provide related information, I am
sending you a copy of my Health Report
“Understanding Osteoarthritis.” Other
readers who would like a copy should
send a self-addressed stamped No.
10 envelope and a $2 check or money
order payable to Newsletter and mailed
to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe,
OH 44092-0167. Be sure to mention the
title or print an order form off my website
at www.AskDrGottMD.com.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
Osteoarthritis not linked to employment
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PEANUTS
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening December 2, 2010
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Santa Claus, Town Grey's Anatomy Private Practice Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Bang Dad Says CSI: Crime Scene The Mentalist Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC Community 30 Rock Office Outsource The Apprentice Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX Bones Fringe Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 Storage Storage The First 48
AMC Scrooged Scrooged Summer Rental
ANIM Life Life Life Life Life
BET Lockdown American Gangster The Mo'Nique Show Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/Atl. Real Housewives Real Housewives Happens Real Housewives Happens
CMT The Dukes of Hazzard Beverly Hillblls Crossroads Smarter Smarter
CNN Parker Spitzer Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Larry King Live
COMEDY Ugly Amer Futurama Futurama Futurama Ugly Amer South Pk Daily Colbert Tosh.0 Tosh.0
DISC Secret Service The Kennedy Detail Secret Service The Kennedy Detail
DISN High School Musical Sonny Sonny Hannah Hannah Hannah Hannah
E! William a Kardas Kardashian Married to Rock Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN College Football SportsCenter NFL Live
ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball SportsNation MMA Live Nation
FAM The Santa Clause The Santa Clause The 700 Club My Wife My Wife
FOOD Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Food Meat Chopped Iron Chef America
FX Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Sunny League Sunny League Terriers
HGTV First First Property Property House Hunters Hunters House Property Property
HIST Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Brad Meltzer's Dec. UFO Files Ancient Aliens
LIFE Reba Reba The Christmas Shoes The Fairy Jobmother Frasier Frasier
MTV Pranked Pranked Pranked Pranked Pranked Bully Megadrive Jackass Jackass Sin City
NICK My Wife My Wife Chris Chris Lopez George The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny
SCI Destination Truth Destination Truth Fact or Faked Hollywood Hollywood Fact or Faked
SPIKE Gangland TNA Wrestling TNA ReACTION MANswers Son Beach
TBS Along Came Polly Office Office Conan Lopez Tonight
TCM Midsummer Ah, Wilderness! Riffraff
TLC Police- Dallas Police- Dallas Cellblock 6 Police- Dallas Cellblock 6
TNT NBA Basketball NBA Basketball
TOON Total Scooby Adventure Regular King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Delocated Amer. Dad
TRAV Bacon Paradise Carnivore Man, Food Man, Food Man, Food Steak Paradise Carnivore Man, Food
TV LAND Sanford Sanford Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
USA Gone in Sixty Burn Notice White Collar Psych
VH1 Saturday Night Live Saturday Night Live Saturday Night Live Saturday Night Live SNL
WGN WWE Superstars How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Scrubs Scrubs WWE Superstars
Premium Channels
HBO Showtime Edge of Darkness Katie Real Sex Tracy Morgan
MAX Land Species Species II Co-ed Confidential 4Play
SHOW The Score Cocaine Cowboys II: Hustlin' Dexter Next Stop Single The Rock
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Thursday, December 2, 2010 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Wife unhappy with
hubby’s debt
Dear Annie: My husband
is overextended on his credit
cards and sometimes skips
several months of payments
or juggles between one card
and another. Creditors and
collection agencies call our
house all the time, and I’m
losing sleep over it.
These accounts are in his
name only. Our only joint
possession is the house,
which is paid off because I
took over the mortgage pay-
ments years ago.
When I tell my husband
that creditors
are calling, he
laughs and tells
me not to answer
the phone. How
much financial
risk am I assum-
ing by continuing
to be married to
him even though
these debts aren’t
mine? I’d sign
over the house
to him and walk
away in a minute,
but I’m not sure it would
alleviate my responsibility
regarding his debts. -- No
Name, Please
Dear No Name: Some
states have statutes that hold
a spouse responsible for
debts incurred for the ben-
efit of the family. In other
words, if your husband’s
credit cards are overdrawn
because he purchased gro-
ceries, medicine, etc., you
could be sued to collect the
debt. Even if you signed
over the house and divorced
him, you would still be lia-
ble for those debts incurred
during your marriage. Talk
to an attorney, and find out
what the law is in your
state.
Dear Annie: As people
enjoy their neighborhoods
before winter begins, I
would like to pass on a
few reminders to be good
neighbors:
1. As you walk or exer-
cise, please respect other
people’s property. Don’t cut
across their yards or gar-
dens, don’t litter, and if your
pet makes a mess, please
keep a plastic bag handy to
clean up after him.
2. Property owners:
Please keep your shrubs and
trees trimmed away from
the sidewalks. It is not safe
to force a pedestrian to walk
in the street because your
vegetation is overgrown.
This includes tree branches
that force people to duck
down to pass by.
3. When driving through
a residential neighborhood,
please slow down. The few
extra seconds you save by
speeding are certainly not
worth the lives you are risk-
ing.
4. As the days shorten,
walkers, runners and cyclists
need to be sure they are
visible at dusk. Reflective
mesh vests and small light-
weight lights are available
online and at most sport-
ing goods stores. You might
be alert, but the driver of
the 4,000-pound car might
be tired, distracted or even
under the influence. You
need to make sure they see
you. -- Good Neighbor in
Bakersfield, Calif.
Dear Neighbor: Thank
you for the excellent sug-
gestions. We hope everyone
can be as conscientious as
you.
Dear Annie: I’d like
to voice my opinion to
“Confused,” whose fian-
ce objects to her using a
hyphenated name when
they marry. While
I agree that he’s
being immature
and controlling to
object so strongly
that he’d call off
the marriage, I’d
just like to tell her
that, over time, a
hyphenated name
becomes a pain in
the butt.
“Suzy Smith-
Jones” is a mouth-
ful, even when the
names are one syllable. It
takes longer to sign your
name. People get confused
about how to address you.
If you are listed on any-
thing, often the order of
the names gets reversed and
results in difficulty locat-
ing your name. As many
ways as your name can be
interpreted is the number
of different credit ratings
you’ll have under each one,
and is the number of credit
cards offers you’ll receive
in the mail from the same
company.
I was attached to my
maiden name, as well, but
after 10 years of marriage, I
just think of myself as “Mrs.
Smith.” -- Don’t Do It
Annie’s Mailbox is writ-
ten by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers
column. Please e-mail your
questions to anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Friday, Dec. 3, 2010
Your social life is likely to take
on new meanings and dimensions in
the coming months, after you develop
several new groups of friends. Each
intimate circle will be unique, with
you having special pals in each.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - If you expect your friends to do
things that you won’t, you’re likely
to be sadly mistaken. You need to be
prepared to set an example if you want
to play the leadership role.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) - Be extremely careful not to
inadvertently disregard the trust of
another and talk out of turn. You would
violate the confidence s/he placed in
you if you run off at the mouth.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) - Don’t be unduly influenced by
materialistic things or think others
will be measuring your worth by what
you have. They will be weighing your
worth by who you are.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
- Think very carefully before you
act, because a lack of self-discipline
could cause you problems and put
your successes in jeopardy. Be neither
impulsive nor erratic.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -
Try to figure things out for yourself,
because even though others may be
well-intentioned, it doesn’t mean they
know what is best for you. In fact,
they might even make things worse.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -
Before you submit yourself to a joint
endeavor, check out the advantages
versus the disadvantages. If negative
features outweigh the positive, you
might want to pass on it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
Your quick mind has a tendency at
times to jump to conclusions before
you’ve studied everything at hand.
Wait until you have all the facts before
making a judgment call.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Even though you may be extremely
industrious, you still might not be
able to accomplish all of the jobs
you intended to complete. The culprit
could simply be poor planning.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - When
you want to be, you are pretty easy
to get along with, yet the very same
people whom you usually accept
might rub you the wrong way. You
may forgive and forget, but they
won’t.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - It
only makes you look bad if you are
too proud to make changes when
someone else’s ideas are better. Place
the importance on the final product
and not on who authored what.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - You
are asking for trouble if you can’t wait
for an experienced person to show
you how to operate some unfamiliar
equipment. The end results could
be bad if you attempt to work in the
dark.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- A pleasant day with friends could
quickly turn into a nasty time if you
allow money to become an issue. Let
each pay his/her own way rather than
allow a misunderstanding arise over
who foots the bill.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
10 – The Herald Thursday, December 2, 2010
www.delphosherald.com