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YOUR GUIDE TO

BALL MACHINES
Q Exclusive Selector Chart
Q Turn your ball machine
into a money machine
Don’t Let Closeouts
Close You Down
How to Run Tennis Camps
That Make a Difference
Getting the Most From
Customer Service Reps
Find the Right Web Host
For Your Business
Share Your Experience
With RSI’s Best Practices
June 2004
Volume 1 Number 5 $5.00
DEPARTMENTS
R S I J U N E 2 0 0 4
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 3
4 Our Serve
18 Ask the Experts
20 Marketing Success
22 Web Wise
24 Retailing Success
26 RSI’s Best Practices
42 Tips and Techniques
44 New USRSA Members and MRTs
46 Industry Resource Guide
52 Calendar
56 Your Serve
INDUSTRY NEWS
7 US Open Series to launch in
July with landmark TV coverage
8 Ashaway offers new
Crossfire MonoGut set
8 Tennis Channel launches
“Tennis Insiders” series
8 TIA releases data on Tennis
Welcome Centers
9 Wilson introduces new
“nCode” Racquets
10 Workshops for Development
Coaches offered
11 Plexipave does deal with
Dominican Republic
11 USPTA sets World Conference
on Tennis
12 Sixth annual Arthur Ashe
Essay Contest for kids
13 USTA Southern donates
nearly $500,000
14 Head launches new
Liquidmetal Rave
15 Pro Maria Sharapova
demonstrates “Speedminton”
Contents
2004 GUIDE TO BALL MACHINES
29 For Your Business, Nothing Beats
A Ball Machine
No matter what kind of a facility you have, a ball
machine is a key piece of equipment.
30 Ball Machine Selector Chart
We’ve assembled all the information you need
to help you find the right machine.
36 Turn Your Ball Machine Into
A Money Machine
With the right programs, your ball machine
should be throwing money back at you.
FEATURES
40 Don’t Let Closeouts Close You Down
Worried about inventory that you can’t get rid of? Here
are some strategies to help you cut your losses.
page 29
page 30
page 36
page 9
t doesn’t matter what profession you’re in—
carpenter, sales executive, tennis teaching pro,
lawyer, retail shop owner—you need to have the
right tools for the job you do. The bottom line,
naturally, is the bottom line: The right tools will help
you grow your business and help you make money.
Of course, speaking tennis, there are tools that help you directly with your
bottom line. For example, a teaching pro is nothing without a tennis racquet.
And then there are tools that will help you build for the future, such as becom-
ing part of the Tennis Welcome Center initiative to grow the sport as a whole.
Growth in the sport will lead to a growth in your business, too.
This issue of RSI has some great examples of both types of tools. Much like
a racquet is to a teaching pro, so is a ball machine to virtually any tennis facil-
ity. It’s an invaluable tool that you need to utilize to best advantage. You can
get a great bang for your court-time buck by providing your members and
players with the right ball machine, and a great ball-machine program.
And as far as tools of the trade, our exclusive Guide to Ball Machines (page
29) is an invaluable guide to all the units available, along with their features
and benefits. The package also includes how to put together a ball-machine
program that is virtually guaranteed to make you money, while at the same
time giving your players an activity that will keep bringing them back.
Another tool for your business is the newly announced US Open Series of
pro hard-court tournaments that lead up to the US Open (see page 7). For six
weeks this summer, 10 men’s and women’s tournaments have agreed to link
up to be marketed together and provide a “road to the Open.”
Key to the deal, which was spearheaded by the USTA’s chief executive of
Professional Tennis, Arlen Kantarian, is a great television package (see page
17) that adds at least 100 hours of tennis on TV in those six weeks, including
men’s and women’s finals every Sunday afternoon.
How is this a tool for your business? Chances are you have a TV area at your
facility. Now, you have more tennis programming for your members to
watch—while they spend more time at your facility. We’re sure you can think
of ways to capitalize on this: Hold tennis parties around the time of the tour-
nament broadcasts, put certain products on sale during these times as “US
Open Series Specials,” or since the new Series will include a points race and
bonus money for pro players, keep a running chart on the wall of how your
members’ favorite pros are doing.
The bottom line, though, is that the sport from which you make your living
is getting a huge shot in the arm in terms of exposure. And that’s a tool of the
trade that will benefit all of us.
4 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Our Serve
I
Use All Your Tools of the Trade
(Incorporating Racquet Tech and Tennis Industry)
Publishers
David Bone Jeff Williams
Editor-in-Chief
Crawford Lindsey
Editorial Director
Peter Francesconi
Associate Editor
Greg Raven
Design/Art Director
Kristine Thom
Design Consultant
Amy Berger
Assistant to the Publisher
Cari Feliciano
Contributing Editors
Cynthia Cantrell
Rod Cross
Joe Dinoffer
Liza Horan
Andrew Lavallee
James Martin
Mark Mason
Chris Nicholson
Mitch Rustad
Drew Sunderlin
Jonathan Whitbourne
RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY
Corporate Offices
330 Main St., Vista, CA 92084
Phone: 760-536-1177 Fax: 760-536-1171
Email: usrsa@racquetTECH.com
Website: www.racquetTECH.com
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri.,8 a.m.-5 p.m. Pacific Time
Advertising Director
John Hanna
770-650-1102, x.125
john@racquettech.com
Apparel Advertising
Cynthia Sherman
203-263-5243
cstennisindustry@earthlink.net
Racquet Sports Industry (application to mail at Period-
icals Postage Rates is pending at Vista, CA, and at addi-
tional offices) is published 10 times per year: monthly
January through August and combined issues in Sep-
tember/October and November/December by USRSA,
330 Main St., Vista, CA 92084. May 2004, Volume 1,
Number 5 © 2004 by USRSA and Tennis Industry. All
rights reserved. Racquet Sports Industry, RSI and logo
are trademarks of USRSA. Printed in the U.S.A. Phone
advertising: 770-650-1102 x.125. Phone circulation and
editorial: 760-536-1177. Yearly subscriptions $55 in the
U.S., $65 elsewhere. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to Racquet Sports Industry, 330 Main St.,
Vista, CA 92084.
Editorial Director
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 7
he USTA made the new US Open Series official in late
April, announcing a historic breakthrough for the
sport that will link 10 summer hard-court tournaments
to the US Open. The new Series will create a cohesive, six-
week summer tennis season for ATP and WTA Tour
professional tournaments in North America.
Significantly, the Series marks the first time in the U.S. that
there will be a consistent television schedule for the tourna-
ments, which begin this July after Wimbledon and lead up to
the US Open.
Key to the creation of the US Open Series is a landmark
television agreement with ESPN that provides a regular, week-
ly schedule of live broadcasts in prime-viewing time slots for
US Open Series events. In addition, CBS Sports and NBC will
televise select weekend coverage. The combined live, nation-
al coverage of 100 hours of US Open Series events and 140
hours of US Open broadcasts on CBS Sports and USA Network
represent a record 240 hours of professional tennis coverage
over eight weeks during the summer.
For the first time ever, players competing in US Open Series
tournaments will be vying for bonus prize money at the US
Open. Effective in 2005, the men’s and women’s winners of
the US Open Series will play for double the prize money at the
US Open. For 2004, the two winners of the US Open Series
will receive one and one-half times the prize money they
would otherwise receive at the US Open. In addition, the
second-place and third-place finishers will receive bonus prize
money based on their US Open performance.
The US Open Series is the brainchild of Arlen Kantarian,
the USTA’s chief executive of Professional Tennis, who worked
doggedly over the last three years to put together all the
pieces of the puzzle. It represents an unprecedented collabo-
ration between the USTA, tournament owners, television
networks, the ATP and WTA Tour, and sponsors. The official
announcement was made April 20 at the Plaza Hotel in New
York City.
Olympus and MassMutual have signed on as charter spon-
sors of the Series. The USTA is currently in discussions with a
group of companies to become the exclusive presenting
sponsor of the overall US Open Series. The USTA and its part-
ners will join for a national and local marketing campaign,
expected to break in June, that will include television, print,
and online media to launch the Series. Also launching is
USOpenSeries.com, a website providing tournament informa-
tion and live links to all 10 event websites.
“This unprecedented partnership within the sport has
resulted in a huge step forward for professional tennis in
North America,” says Kantarian. “The US Open Series creates,
for the first time, a clear and concise big-league summer
season for tennis, leading into and culminating with the US
Open. A unified Series with a consistent television platform
benefits everyone—players, tournaments, broadcast-
ers, sponsors, and, most importantly, fans.”
The 100 hours of US Open Series coverage will include
both a men’s and women’s final every
Sunday afternoon throughout the summer.
The US Open Series will begin on
July 12, with the top men playing in the
Mercedes-Benz Cup in Los Angeles and the top women at the
Bank of the West Classic in Stanford, Calif. The Series contin-
ues over the course of the ensuing six weeks—in Indianapo-
lis, Los Angeles, Toronto, Cincinnati, Montreal, Washington,
D.C., New Haven, and Long Island.
US Open Series to Launch in July, Linking 10
Pro Events and Providing 100 Hours of TV
I NDUSTRY NEWS
I NDUSTRY NEWS
R S I J U N E 2 0 0 4
I N F O R M A T I O N T O H E L P Y O U R U N Y O U R B U S I N E S S
T
“The US Open Series creates a
clear and concise big-league
summer season for tennis.”
The USTA’s Kantarian (right) led off the press announcement, which featured partners
that included (from left) Donald Dell of Clear Channel Entertainment, Mark Shapiro of
ESPN and Sean McManus of CBS.
For the US Open Series
TV schedule, see page 17.
Penn Announces
Promotions for 3
C
oming on the heels of Penn Racquet Sports’ move of the
Mullingar, Ireland, manufacturing plant operations to its
Phoenix headquarters, the company has now announced
three promotions that will impact its international business.
Terry Truett was promoted to the new position of director
of quality development worldwide and Martin Boyle was pro-
moted to plant manager. Both will report to John Hunter,
Penn’s worldwide director of manufacturing. Jeff Ratkovich
was promoted to international operations manager, reporting
to Ron Lovett, vice president of operations.
“With the move of our Mullingar plant to Phoenix, it gave
us a tremendous opportunity to remain competitive and fos-
ter growth for the Penn brand,” says Dave Haggerty, presi-
dent of Penn Racquet Sports and CEO of Head USA.
“Naturally, that growth makes way for new positions and we
are pleased to promote and create jobs for such dedicated
team players.”
Truett was Penn’s former Phoenix operations manager
and will now be responsible for international quality,
playtesting, product development and supplier development
programs. Boyle was the plant manager for the Mullingar
facility and will be responsible for the world’s largest tennis
manufacturing plant in Phoenix. Ratkovich has 17 years’
experience with Penn and will oversee international
customer service, logistics and forecasting.
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Ashaway Offers New
Crossfire MonoGut Set
A
s h a wa y Ra c k -
e t Strings says its
new Crossfire
MonoGut tennis hybrid
string sets offer a
unique combination of
durability, playabi l i t y
and t ensi on holding
that is ideal for both
hard-hitters who want a
softer playing string
and power players who are looking for a more durable
hybrid. The sets include 23-foot MonoGut mains in metallic
silver and 20-foot synthetic gut crosses in white. Ashaway
suggests that players string the MonoGut mains at 10 per-
cent to 20 percent less tension than they are used to, to
achieve best results. For more information, contact 800-
556-7260 or visit www.ashawayusa.com.
8 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Tennis Channel Launches
“Tennis Insiders” Series
T
he Tennis Channel 24-hour cable television network
announces its latest original series, “Tennis Insiders,” a half-
hour panel series featuring tennis players, coaches, execu-
tives, agents and other industry representatives discussing the
sport in front of an audience. The initial episodes are moderated
by renowned tennis journalist and broadcaster Bud Collins.
The first episode, which aired in April, featured a panel that
included ATP Chief Executive Mark Miles, Inside Tennis reporter
Matthew Cronin, tennis legend Rod Laver and Pacific Life Open
Tournament Chairman Charlie Pasarell. Collins gets his guests’
points of view on everything from the length of the season to the
return to a golden age of tennis.
“‘Tennis Insiders’” lets tennis fans see what people in the
industry think about the game today,” says Bruce Rider, execu-
tive vice president of programming and marketing for The
Tennis Channel. “The on-site audience participation we’ve had
during our first tapings has been tremendous, and the questions
are what our television audience would want to ask these indus-
try figures. And Bud Collins brings his unique flair and experience
to the program as well.”
TIA DATA ON TWCS SHOWS
LEAGUES, FREE LESSONS BIG
T
he Tennis Industry Association has released data on the
3,482 facilities participating in the Ten-
nis Welcome Center initiative that
show 80 percent, or 2,770, run
leagues, while 78 percent, or 2,700,
offer Free Lesson Programs. Nearly 1,400 of TWCs
are at public parks, while 982 are at private facilities that
accept non-members. To become a TWC, visit
www.partners.tenniswelcomecenter.com.
Total TWCs 3,482
Types of Facilities
Public Parks 1,396 40%
Resorts 82 2%
Schools/Universities 509 15%
Private/accepts non-members 982 28%
Private/members only 126 4%
Types of Programs:
Adult Programs 2,288 66%
Junior Programs 2,057 59%
Free Lesson Programs 2,700 78%
Leagues 2,770 80%
50-plus 1,461 42%
Team Tennis 2,393 69%
Ladders 2,000 57%
Socials 2,070 59%
Round Robins 2,325 67%
Tournaments 2,023 58%
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 9
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Wilson Introduces New
“nCode” Series of Racquets
I
f you’re looking for the next big thing in ten-
nis, well, you may never actually see it.
That’s what Wilson is saying about its new
“nCode” line of four racquets, which use an
exclusive nano technology process.
Racquet are made of billions of carbon
fibers, but at the nanoscopic level (one-billionth
of a meter), there are voids between the indi-
vidual fibers, which create stress points and
weaken the frame, says Wilson. The nCode
technology reinforces the
molecular structure of the frame
and fills the voids, which Wilson
says enhances the overall prop-
erties of the carbon matrix,
making nCode racquets
stronger, more resilient and able
to “play better longer.” Specifi-
cally, Wilson says that when a
racquet is “nCoded,” nano-sized silicone oxide
crystals fill the voids between the carbon fibers.
Wilson says the “code” is “2
2 22,” which translates to “2
times stronger, 2 times more
stable and 22 percent more
power.” The nCode racquets
feature a new frame design
and white paint, along with a
new string-bed technology that
Wilson calls nZone.
The n1 frame, in white and chrome, is the
most powerful in the line, with a 115-square-
inch head and length of 27.9 inches. It’s built
for players who need to gen-
erate more power from their
shorter swings.
The n2, in red with white
accents, is available in 98
and 110 square inches,
weighing 9.2 and 9.0
ounces, respectively, and
measuring 27.25 inches long. It’s designed
for players looking to add more control to
their game.
The nSix-One 95 and nSix-One Tour
frames are the heaviest and most flexible of
the line, for competitive players. The nSix-
One 95 is 27 inches long and weighs 11.7
ounces; the nSix-One Tour has a 90-square-
inch head, is 27 inches long and weighs 12
ounces.
For more information, contact Wilson at
773-714-6400 or www.wilsonsports.com.
n1
n2
nSix-One 95
nSix-One Tour
10 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
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USTA Offers
Workshops For
Development Coaches
T
he USTA provides hands-on work-
shops for Development Coaches in
local communities throughout the
country. The faculty consists of certified
tennis teaching pros, and the workshops
emphasize the effective handling of large
groups of new or returning players of all
ages, focusing on getting these students to
play tennis quickly and in a fun and social
environment.
The entry-level Development Coach
Workshops provide participants with a
solid foundation for effective team prac-
tices, the “games-based approach” to
coaching, teaching large groups, and the
proper use of teaching aids. The work-
shops are ideal for inexperienced teach-
ers, seasonal coaches or anyone else
working with children or adults at the
development level.
Upcoming Development Coach Work-
shops include: (dates and locations
subject to change)
May 9, Wilton, Conn., 203-488-0453
May 12, Humacao, Puerto Rico, 787-726-8782
May 15, Little Rock, Ark., 501-227-7611
May 21, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 954-828-5379
May 22, Altamonte Springs, Fla., 321-662-6022
May 23, Branford, Conn., 203-488-0453
June 1-3, Houston, Texas, 713-803-1112
June 3, Missoula, Mont., 406-449-6131
June 5, Arvada, Colo., 303-403-2581
June 5, Billings, Mont., 406-656-6692
June 5, Morton, Ill., 309-263-7550
June 5, Omaha, Neb., 402-444-7332
June 5, Brooklyn Center, Minn., 763-422-9867
June 5, Homewood, Ill., 708-799-1323
June 6, Kalamazoo, Mich., 269-327-1342
June 6, Milwaukee, Wis., 262-241-4250
June 6, Anchorage, Alaska, 907-330-0146
June 6, Essex Junction, Vt., 802-879-7734
June 7, Indianapolis, Ind., 317-575-8803
June 10-12, Boston, Mass., 617-495-3704
June 12, Wilmington, Del., 302-478-1313
June 12, Pittsfield, Mass., 413-499-4600
June 12, St. Paul, Minn., 763-422-9867
June 12, Salt Lake City, Utah, 801-268-0505
June 12, Midland, Mich., 989-631-6151
June 17, Cincinnati, Ohio, 513-398-7497
June 19, Pawtucket, R.I., 508-212-8187
June 19, York, Pa., phone not available
June 19, Greer, S.C., 864-230-1286
June 24, Boston, Mass., 617-562-0900
June 25, Princeton, N.J., 215-322-6802
Aug. 27, Costa Mesa, Calif., 714-557-0211
Sept. 25, Mobile, Ala., 251-304-0386
Oct. 23, Royal Palm Beach, Fla., 561-790-5124
MATCH POINT DEBUTS NEW STRATEGY BOARD
M
atch Point introduces its
new Dual Meet and Strat-
egy Board. The board is 2
feet by 2 feet, two-sided, and
silk-screened with permanent
markings. One side is for record-
ing dual-meet tennis match
scores, while the other side con-
tains a court layout for strategy
diagrams, as well as a ladder
board. A marking pen is includ-
ed, and names can be erased
easily with a damp cloth. The
boards can hang from a court
fence by using the four corner
holes, ties, and S-hooks. Cost is
$34. To order, call 800-670-
4964, fax 262-827-0771, or
order online at www.match-
point.biz.
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 11
Plexipave to Supply 100 Multi-Sport
Courts to Dominican Republic
P
lexipave Sport Surfacing Systems, a division of California Products Corp., will
supply 100 Plexiflor multi-sport courts to the Dominican Republic as part of a
$56 million project in that country.
In addition to the 100 multi-sport courts, the project also includes 115 metal recre-
ation buildings, 30 playgrounds, 10 polyurethane running tracks, 15 NCAA and 11
NBA-grade wood floor basketball courts to be installed at various locations through-
out the country. The project is scheduled to be completed by September 2005.
Funding for the major redevelopment comes from the Ex-Import Bank of the Unit-
ed States and requires 85 percent of the materials used for the project to come from
U.S. suppliers. The Ministry of Sports of the Dominican Republic has contracted with
Child Safe Products Inc. of Amityville, N.Y., to complete the project.
The 100 Plexiflor surfaces will be at indoor facilities intended for use as basket-
ball and volleyball courts. Plexiflor is a reinforced, smooth acrylic coating especially
formulated for use over asphalt or concrete. For this project, the surface will be a five-
layer system installed over concrete, with a Pacific Blue finish color.
“We are pleased to be working with California Products for the 100 acrylic courts
as part of this project,” says Guy Digennaro of Child Safe. “We’ve used the Plexiflor
surface before and are extremely happy with the ease of application and the durable,
affordable, long life we can expect from the product.”
“We’re extremely confident in the product selection and are happy to see our
products used in this type of development project,” says Art Tucker, vice president of
California Products Corporation/Plexipave Sport Surfacing.
For more information about Plexiflor or any of the surfacing systems available from
Plexipave, visit the company website at www.plexipave.com or call 800-225-1141.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
BY-PASS-OPEN CREATOR LISTED AS
A “DAILY POINT OF LIGHT”
H
erman Slotoroff of Somers, N.Y., was selected as the Daily Point of Light for
March 12, 2004. The award honors individuals and organizations that have
made a commitment to connect Americans through service to help meet
critical needs in their communities and in the nation.
Following heart bypass surgery, Slotoroff, an avid tennis player, created the By-
Pass-Open tennis tournament in 1993, and through his efforts the event has now
raised more than $200,000 for research for the American Heart Association.
Slotoroff, a 70-year-old retired accountant, incorporated the By-Pass-Open as a
nonprofit organization, convinced a nearby tennis club to donate its facilities on
an off day, then personally undertook all the tasks needed to make it happen.
President George W. Bush and former president George H.W. Bush have
endorsed the Daily Points of Light Award, and each will send a congratulatory let-
ter to Slotoroff. The award is given by The Points of Light Foundation & Volunteer
Center National Network, in partnership with the Knights of Columbus and the
Corporation for National and Community Service.
USPTA Sets 2004 World Conference
T
he USPTA’s World Conference on Tennis will be Sept. 18 to 25 at the La Quinta
Resort and Club in La Quinta, Calif. The conference will feature more than 80
seminars and four-hour specialty courses. Also, the USPTA will host its Interna-
tional Tennis Championships, board and executive committee meetings, a tennis-
only buying show, awards and more. For more information, including registration
details, visit www.uspta.com or call 800-877-8248.
12 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
J U N E 2 0 0 4 I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Young Wins Easter Bowl 18s
D
onald Young of Chicago became the youngest person, at
age 14, to win the Boys’ 18 title at the Easter Bowl USTA
National Junior Spring Championships in April at the
Riviera Resort and Racquet Club in Palm Springs. In the final,
Young rallied to beat No. 1 seed Daniel Yoo of Florida 3-6, 6-4, 6-2.
This year’s Easter bowl featured 768 players form 43 states
competing in six divisions over nine days. Considered a top
showcase for top American juniors in the U.S., the Easter
Bowl, sponsored by Gatorade, is the only USTA National
Championship where almost every age group—boys’ and girl-
s’ 14, 16 and 18—are competing at the same time in the same location. The
results of the championships are:
Q Boys’ 18: No. 2 seed Donald Young of Chicago defeated No. 1 seed Daniel Yoo of Davie,
Fla. 3-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Q Girls’ 18: No. 4 seed Ashley Joelson of Austin, Texas, defeated No. 5 seed Audra Cohen of
Plantantion, Fla., 1-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Q Boys’ 16: No. 5 seed Sam Querrey of Thousand Oaks, Calif., defeated No. 17 Conor Pol
lock of Austin, Texas, 6-4, 6-2.
Q Girls’ 16: No. 1 seed Logan Hansen of Santa Monica, Calif. defeated No. 17 seed Sanard
Marand of Katy, Texas, 7-5, 6-2.
Q Boys’ 14: No. 1 Mateusz Kecki of Sacramento, Calif., defeated No. 17 seed Andy Magee
of Rolling Hills East, Calif., 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Q Girls’ 14: No. 1 seed Denise Dy of San Jose, Calif., defeated No. 2 seed McCall Jones of
Coto De Caza, Calif., 6-1, 7-5.
USTA/NJTL Launches National
Arthur Ashe Essay Contest
T
he USTA/National Junior Tennis League has launched its sixth annual Arthur Ashe
Essay Contest to commemorate the legacy of humanitarian and tennis great
Arthur Ashe. For the second consecutive year, the essay contest, previously open
only to USTA/NJTL participants, welcomes entries from all schoolchildren.
Winners will receive an all-expense-paid trip to New York from Aug. 20 to 22,
2004, and will be guests at Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess on Saturday,
Aug. 21, preceding the 2004 US Open. Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day is a daylong festival of
kids’ tennis activities—including interactive games, musical entertainment and free
clinics.
“Arthur Ashe lived an exemplary life, donating his time to underprivileged youth
and growth of the game,” says Barbara Wynne of Indianapolis, NJTL Committee
Honorary Chair and originator of the Ashe essay contest. “We are thrilled to honor
Arthur’s achievements and contributions to both tennis and disadvantaged youth
through this national essay contest.”
To enter, children 18 or younger must write an essay in 300 words or less on
“Why is Arthur Ashe a sports legend?” All entries must be submitted to the USTA on
8-1⁄2 by 11-inch paper by the end of the business day on July 6, 2004. Winners will
be notified by July 30. Ten national winners will be selected, one boy and one girl
from each of the five age groups, and awarded round-trip coach air transportation to
New York for themselves and a parent/legal guardian and two nights at the Grand
Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan.
The USTA/NJTL, also known as USA Tennis NJTL, was established in 1969 by Ashe,
Charlie Pasarell and Sheridan Snyder to use tennis as a means of developing the
character of young people who may not otherwise have the opportunity to learn and
play the sport. Since 1985, it has been owned and supported by the USTA as one of
its primary outreach programs to multicultural communities. The program has more
than 1,000 chapters and programs and over 200,000 participants.
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June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 13
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
USTA SOUTHERN GIVES
$490,000 TO SUPPORT LOCAL
TENNIS GROWTH IN REGION
T
he USTA Southern Section announced that it has given $489,609 in
Community Development Local Membership (CDLM) funding to 111
Community Tennis Associations throughout the South in an effort to sup-
port the mission of “promoting and developing the growth of tennis in the local
community.”
Additionally, each of the USTA Southern Section’s nine states matched a
percentage of the overall funding, bringing the total community contribution to
$652,812. The total dollars given in 2004 is based on each individual commu-
nity’s success in growing program and player participation in 2003. All funding
received must be used to help support the mission of “promoting and develop-
ing the growth of tennis in the local community.” This includes the development
of new tennis programs and USTA membership promotion.
Total 2004 funding for the nine USTA Southern Section states is:
Q Alabama—$31,736 ($23,802 funded by section/$7,934 by state) given to
five communities.
Q Arkansas—$30,706 ($23,029.50 funded by section/$7,676.50 by state)
given to nine communities.
Q Georgia —$219,624 ($164,718 funded by section / $54,906 by state) given
to 25 communities.
Q Kentucky—$26,270 ($19,702.50 funded by section/$6,567.50 by state)
given to nine communities.
Q Louisiana—$71,796 ($53,847 funded by section/$17,949 by state) given to
eight communities.
Q Mississippi—$48,398 ($36,298.50 funded by section/$12,099.50 by state)
given to 26 communities.
Q North Carolina—$112,160 ($84,120 funded by section/$28,040 by state)
given to 18 communities.
Q South Carolina—$67,066 ($50,299.50 funded by section/$16,766.50 by
state) given to nine communities.
Q Tennessee—$45,056 ($33,792 funded by section/$11,264 by state) given to
10 communities.
SYNERGY SPORTS ADDS KENAS
S
ynergy Sports, an Ocean, N.J., event marketing
and promotions management agency, has hired
Jennifer Kenas as its account operations director.
Kenas, a graduate of Cornell University, previously
worked for Head/Penn Racquet Sports and The Tennis
Channel, and in 2000 was named one of Tennis Indus-
try magazine’s “40 Under 40,” recognizing the most
influential professionals in the tennis business.
Her primary focus at Synergy will be to provide
leadership and supervision on all operational and logistical elements of the
agency’s events and consumer promotions. Kenas also will manage promo-
tional efforts for Synergy’s tennis industry clients, including Nike, Reebok, and
Head/Penn. She will also lead the company’s execution of the Tennis Magazine
Grand Slam event at New York’s Grand Central Terminal, now in its third year.
J U N E 2 0 0 4
I
N
D
U
S
T
R
Y
N
E
W
S
14 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Head Launches
New Liquidmetal
Rave Frame
H
ead has launched
the new Liquidmet-
al Rave racquet,
which the company
says is designed to use
all the energy that a play-
er’s swing generates.
Head says that, because
of its atomic structure, the
Liquidmetal alloy, which is
integrated into the frame’s con-
struction at four areas of the rac-
quet’s head, won’t deform on
ball impact, allowing all the
energy from the impact with the
ball to be used for the return
shot. “What a player puts into his
or her swing is exactly what they get out
of it,” the company says.
The Rave has a 98-square-inch head,
weighs 10 ounces unstrung, and is 27-
1/3 inches long. It has a suggested retail
price of $170. For more information, call
800-289-7366 or visit www.head.com.
WILLIAMS SISTERS PEN BOOK ON
“HOW TO PLAY TENNIS”
T
he book “How to Play Tennis,”
by Venus and Serena Williams,
will be available starting Aug. 1
from publisher DK, in time for this
year’s US Open. According to the
publisher, the book offers instruc-
tion and inspiration, and will
include personal anecdotes and
advice from the sisters, along with
more than 700 specially commis-
sioned action photographs. Among
the topics covered are how the Williams’s warm up for a
match, serving techniques, basic skills, tennis etiquette, match
tactics and more.
“We hope that publishing this book will draw even more
young players to the sport of tennis, especially those who
may not have access to professional coaching or private
courts,” the sisters said in a statement. “Tennis is an exciting
and fun game to play, and by following the techniques in
this book, young players will develop their skills on the court
and maybe learn to be role models off the court, too.”
The 96-page hardcover book, for ages 8 and up, will sell
for $19.99.
POWERBAR NOW OFFERS
SPORTS BEVERAGE SYSTEM
Y
ou’re probably familiar with PowerBar, which has
been around for more than 17 years. Now, though,
PowerBar Inc. has come out with the PowerBar
Beverage System, two new powdered sports drink
mixes that the company says provide only the essential
ingredients for maximum hydration, prolonged energy
and rapid recovery
PowerBar partnered with renowned coach Chris
Carmichael and Carmichael Training Systems to create
the new drinks, which are available in two formula-
tions. The PowerBar Endurance Sport Drink is in a
lemon-lime flavor (single-
serve packet retails
for $1.49; a
900-gram
canister for
$19.99) and
the PowerBar
Performance
Recovery Drink is offered in orange flavor (single-serve
for $1.75; canister for $24.99). For more information,
call 307-733-1514.
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 15
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
>
Völkl is running a consumer contest to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the
V1 Classic, which debuted in the marketplace in 1994, by asking consumers to email
their stories about the V1 Classic to the company. The contest goes through the sum-
mer, with winners selected at the end of each month. Visit www.volkl.com for details.
>
ClubCorp says that all 60 of its tennis properties have enrolled in the Tennis Wel-
come Center program. As of late April, there were nearly 3,500 TWCs.
>
Pro Tommy Haas, playing with a Dunlop 200G, beat top-seed Andy Roddick 6-3,
6-4 to win the U.S. Clay Court Championship in Houston in April. It was Haas’ first
ATP win since 2001.
>
The U.S. Davis Cup team, behind singles player Andy Roddick and doubles team
Mike and Bob Bryan, beat Sweden 4-1 in the quarterfinal round in April to advance
to the semis in September, against Belarus at a U.S. site to be named. Mardy Fish
completed the U.S. squad.
>
Led by Venus Williams in singles and Lisa Raymond and Martina Navratilova in dou-
bles, the U.S. Fed Cup team beat Slovenia 4-1 to advance to the World Group quar-
terfinals, where the team will meet Austria in July.
>
The USTA Missouri Valley Section has announced that John Terpkosh, the commu-
nity development coordinator for Iowa, is assuming a new role in the park and recre-
ation specialty area.
SHORT SETS
Pro Maria Sharapova Demonstrates
“Speedminton” at Miami Tourney
P
ro player Maria Sharapova introduced the extreme sport “Speedminton” at the
recent Nasdaq-100 Open in Miami in March. The event marked the
official launch of the new sport to consumers, as demonstrations and contests
were held at the pro tournament.
Speedminton is an easy to learn racquet sport that distributor Pro Performance
Sports markets as “combining the best of tennis, badminton and racquetball and
infusing it with speed.” The sport can be played indoors, outdoors and even at
night. The racquet enables participants to strike the “speeder” in excess of 180
mph, but don’t let the speed put you off. Different shuttlecocks allow for different
types of play.
Volleys between players are low and fast. In competitive play, opponents posi-
tion themselves in “speedcourts”—boxes that are 18 feet square and positioned
42 feet apart. A tennis court can
easily be modified for competitive
play. The sport can also be played
in a park or on a beach.
A Speedminton “Speedset” con-
tains everything necessary to get
started, including two racquets, an
EasyCourt Set, three Speeders,
four Speedlights to put in the
Speeders for night play and a rule-
book, for $59.95. For more infor-
mation, visit www.speedminton.com
or call 877-225-7275.
16 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
A
ccording to a sports participation
study by SGMA International, tennis
ranks 22nd in the list of the top 30
sports activities and recreational endeav-
ors in the U.S., based on participation in
2003. Twelve of the top 30 categories are
fitness related.
The good news for tennis, though, is
that according to the survey, there were
about a million more tennis players in
2003 vs. 2002. The SGMA Sports Partici-
pation Survey of participants age 6 and
above shows that 17.32 million people
played tennis in 2003, up from16.35 million
in 2002, which is a 5.9 percent increase.
Tennis Ranks 22nd
in Survey, But Adds
1 Million Players
Sports/Activity No. of Participants
(Based on participation Age 6 and above
numbers in 2003) (in millions)
1. Bowling 55.0
2. Treadmill Exercise 45.6
3. Fishing (Freshwater - Other) 43.8
4. Stretching 42.1
5. Tent Camping 41.9
6. Billiards/Pool 40.7
7. Day Hiking 39.1
8. Fitness Walking 37.9
9. Running/Jogging 36.2
10. Basketball 35.4
11. Dumbbells 30.5
12. Weight/Resistance Machines 30.0
13. Hand Weights 29.7
14. Calisthenics 28.0
15. Golf 27.3
16. Barbells 25.6
17. Darts 19.5
18. Inline Skating 19.2
19. RV Camping 19.0
20. Stationary Cycling (Upright Bike) 17.5
21. Abdominal Machine/Device 17.4
22. Tennis 17.3
23. Ice Skating 17.0
24. Soccer (Outdoor) 16.1
25. Horseback Riding 16.0
26. Fitness Swimming 15.9
27. Hunting (Rifle) 15.2
27. Saltwater Fishing 15.2
27. Target Shooting (Rifle) 15.2
30. Softball (Regular)
This information has been abstracted from the
annual Superstudy of Sports Participation
conducted by American Sports Data Inc., which
monitors 103 sports and fitness activities.
SGMA International’s Sports Participation
Topline Report (2004 edition) can be down-
loaded from www.SGMA.com.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 17
US Open Series 2004 TV Schedule
T
he new US Open Series of summer hard-court pro tourna-
ments leading up to the US Open (see page 7) will provide
100 hours of tennis on TV over the six-week season, includ-
ing a men’s and women’s final every Sunday afternoon. At your
shop or facility, make sure you tune the TV to catch the latest
action. (All times Eastern.)
* San Diego not currently confirmed in Series.
DAT E
7/12/04
7/19/04
7/26/04
8/02/04
8/16/04
8/23/04
ME N’ S E VE NT
Mercedes-Benz Cup
Los Angeles
Fri. 5-7 pm (ESPN2)
Sat. 6-8 pm (ESPN2)
Sun. 6-8 pm (ESPN2)
RCA Championships
Indianapolis
Sat. 2:30-4:30 pm (NBC)
Sun. 2:30-4:30 pm (NBC)
Tennis Masters Canada
Toronto
Mon. 8-10 pm (ESPN2)
Tues. 1-3 pm (ESPN)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Wed. 1-5 pm (ESPN2)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Thurs. 1-5 pm (ESPN2)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Fri. 1-3 pm (ESPN2)
7-9 pm (ESPN)
Sat. 1-3 pm (ESPN2)
7-9 pm (ESPN)
Sun. 5-7 pm (ESPN2)
Western & Southern
Financial Group Masters
Cincinnati
Mon. 7-9 pm (ESPN2)
Tues. 1-3 pm (ESPN)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Wed. 1-3 pm (ESPN)
3-5 pm (ESPN2)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Thurs. 1-5 pm (ESPN2)
10 pm-12 am (ESPN2)
Fri. 1-3 pm (ESPN)
7:30-9:30 pm (ESPN2)
Sat. 6-10 pm (ESPN2)
Sun. 4-6 p.m. (ESPN)
Legg Mason Tennis Classic
Washington, D.C.
Sat. 1-3 pm (Fox Sports Net)
7-9 pm (Fox Sports Net)
Sun. 12:30-2:30 pm (CBS)
TD Waterhouse Cup
Long Island, N.Y.
Sat. 1-3 pm (Fox Sports Net)
7-9 pm (Fox Sports Net)
Sun. 2-4 pm (Fox Sports Net)
WOME N’ S E VE NT
Bank of the West Classic
Stanford, Calif.
Sat. 2-4 pm (ESPN)
11 pm-1 am (ESPN2)
Sun. 4-6 p.m. (ESPN2)
JPMorgan Chase Open
Los Angeles
Fri. 11 pm-1 am (ESPN2)
Sat. 10 pm-12 am (ESPN2)
Sun. 4-6 pm (ESPN2)
[San Diego—TBD*]
Rogers Cup
Montreal
Fri. 3-5 pm (ESPN2)
Sun. 1-3 am (ESPN2)
2-4 pm (ESPN2)
Olympics
[Men’s/Women’s Tennis]
Pilot Pen Tennis
New Haven, Conn.
Wed. 5-7 pm (ESPN2)
Thur. 1-3 am (ESPN2)
5-7 pm (ESPN2)
10 pm -12 am (ESPN2)
Fri. 3-5 pm (ESPN2)
8-10 pm (ESPN)
Sat. 1-3 pm (CBS)
WE E K
1
2
3
4
5
6
18 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
THE EXPERTS
ask
?
Your Equipment & Business Hotline
PRINCE AIRLAUNCH
I HAVE A PRINCE AIRLAUNCH
B850 MP, but in my Digest it lists
only the Airlaunch B875 MP. Do
you have the stringing instructions for the
AirLaunch B850 MP?
SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION, Prince
has called this frame both the
AirLaunch B850 MP and the AirLaunch
B875 MP. There is, however, only one
AirLaunch MP frame, so the stringing
instructions are the same no matter which
designation appears on the frame you
have. In the future, we will show both
designations in the Digest.
TENNIS BALL SHELF LIFE
WHAT IS THE SHELF LIFE of a con-
tainer of tennis balls? One of our
school systems has four cases of
ball that are more than four years old.
ACCORDING TO HEAD/PENN, balls
that are kept in their original,
sealed containers have a shelf life of
three years.
FIRST MOMENT
ON PAGE 53 OF Racquet Service
Techniques, it states, “first moment
(or static moment) is the weight of
the racquet multiplied by the distance of
the balance point from your hand.” Aren’t
you supposed to multiply by the distance
from the balance point to the butt end of
the racquet?
THAT WOULD BE THE CASE if you
were to hold the racquet by the
butt cap. Holding the racquet creates a
pivot point around which the mass of the
racquet tries to rotate, due to the pull of
gravity. When held firmly, of course, it
does not rotate because your hand
provides a force to counter the pull of
gravity. When you hold a racquet handle
in the normal fashion, the pivot point is
considered to be roughly under the first
knuckle of your index finger, which for
most players is about four inches up from
the end of the butt cap. Conveniently,
this pivot point is also the one used by
the Babolat Racquet Diagnostic Center
(RDC) when measuring swingweight.
HIGH-ALTITUDE TENNIS
DOES ALTITUDE (I’m at 3,000 feet)
have any effect on string tensions
or does the different high altitude
ball compensate for the difference in
altitude?
ALTITUDE DOESN’T SEEM TO
effect the strings, but it does effect
how the ball travels. The thinner air offers
less resistance to the ball, so it will tend to
“fly” given the same tension and stroke
as at a lower altitude. According to the
Rules of Tennis, section 3.d, high-altitude
tennis balls are to be used over 4,000
feet, and even though you are not quite
that high, you may find they provide the
compensation you seek. For those below
that altitude (as you are) or well above,
you can further mitigate altitude-related
differences by adjusting your tension,
using high tensions for more control, and
lower tensions for more zip.
TRAP DOORS
IS THERE AN EASY WAY TO
DETERMINE if a racquet has a
removable “trap door” in the butt
cap and if the handle is hollow or foam
filled? By easy, I mean without removing
the grip and the butt cap.
A “TRAP DOOR” IS NOTHING
MORE THAN a removable butt cap
insert. Not all racquets have one, but it is
easy to tell if a butt cap has a “trap
door,” as there will be a small opening
into which you can put the tip of a
screwdriver to pry out the insert.
DIGEST LISTINGS
MAYBE IT’S JUST BECAUSE I deal
with a lot of older, eclectic rac-
quets, but it seems to me that a
lot of them aren’t in the Stringer’s Digest.
I’ve been calling tech support and they
often can find the stringing instructions I
seek, but I also just found out that almost
all of these patterns are on-line at Rac-
quetTECH.com. It’s difficult for me to get
to the computer while I’m stringing. Why
don’t you just put all the patterns into the
Stringer’s Digest?
THE STRINGER’S DIGEST IS NOT a
complete listing of all the racquets
for which we have stringing instructions.
In fact, it represents only about half of
the patterns we have in our database. We
take the older and more obscure out of
the Digest to speed up locating the rac-
quets that are being restrung more often.
Q
Q
A
A
Q
A
Q
A
Q
A
Q
A
Two examples of trap doors
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 19
As you note, there is an almost-complete listing on the Digest
On-line, on our website. For some of the odd-balls that are
missing from the Digest On-line (such as the Wilson T-2000
series and the Dunlop DP series frames), we have download-
able files to which you can refer. We do have some printed
stringing instructions in our files that have not made it to the
website, so if you are looking for instructions that are not in
the Digest and not on-line, it may still be worth a call to us,
just in case.
The same holds true for the really new frames. We are
able to keep pretty current on the new releases, but we
don’t reprint the Digest every time we get a new pattern. We
generally have new patterns on the website within a couple
days of receiving them, so if you do have Internet access, you
are likely to find what you are looking for, no matter how
new.
In either case, if you make it a point to look for the
stringing instructions for each racquet when it gets turned in,
instead of waiting until the day it is due to be picked up, you
will probably find that all the steps won’t seem like such an
ordeal because you won’t be under the pressure of a quickly-
approaching deadline.
HARD WEAVE
I AM A NEW MEMBER trying to learn as I go. I have
been asked to string an Ektelon racquet with a “hard
weave” technique for the crosses. I have been unable
to find a definition or description of “hard weave” in my
Stringer’s Digest. For that matter, easy weave. Would you
please enlighten my on what the terms mean.
TECHNICALLY, A “HARD WEAVE” is when you install
a cross string over raised main strings and under
lowered main strings on frames with staggered grommets.
However, some stringers also use “hard weave” to refer to
installing a cross string over a main string that has been
raised by an adjacent cross.
SWINGWEIGHT SENSITIVITY
HOW MUCH DIFFERENCE in swingweight does it take
for a 3.5 to 4.0 player to notice?
ACCORDING TO TESTS DONE by USRSA
Technical Advisor Howard Brody of the University of
Pennsylvania, professional players can detect changes of as
little as 2 percent in swingweight. Non-professionals were in
the “5 percent and above” category. Keep in mind that not
everyone is sensitive to the same things: some might be
ultra-sensitive to weight or balance, but not swingweight,
and vice versa. —Greg Raven w
We welcome your questions. Please send them to Racquet Sports
Industry, 330 Main St., Vista, CA, 92084; fax: 760-536-1171; email:
greg@racquettech.com.
Q
A
Q
A
SUCCESS
marketing
&
20 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
ust like any business, some tennis
camps succeed and some fail. But
there are some ingredients that you
can add to your camp recipe that can
ensure success. These are features of any
program that can get your campers com-
ing back year after year and telling all of
their friends about the experience.
Although some of the points below
may add a few hundred dollars more to
your expense column, they will also add
more to your income statement as well.
Think of it like going for your best shot in
the finals of a tournament. Play tight and
you lose. Relax, do the right things, and
chances are you’ll come out a winner.
T
ip #1: It’s All About Atti-
tude
Camping is a people business and positive
attitudes are contagious. Hire the right
staff and motivation and training is
relatively easy. Hire the wrong staff and
expect sleepless nights. Then, when you
have good staff, work hard to keep them.
Kids coming back to your camp will have
the most fun when their favorite coun-
selor comes back as well.
How can you increase staff retention?
w Bring in name tennis coaches and
clinicians for pre-camp training of your staff.
w Send them birthday gifts.
w Give end of summer and seniority bonus-
es.
w Produce year-round camp newsletter,
including staff photos and non-camp
activities such as how Mary Smith is
coaching her first high school tennis team.
T
ip #2: Recognition
and Awards
There’s a saying that the sweetest thing
for a person to hear is his or her own
name. This says a lot about the impor-
tance of building self-esteem through
encouragement and recognition. Among
the various phases of our lives, pre-teens
and teenagers, in particular, respond to
recognition and success in big ways. Just
remember that each and every camper
needs to feel successful. Therefore,
emphasizing attitude and effort over
results is critical. Set achievable and per-
sonalized goals so that each and every
camper can experience something they
will remember sweetly the entire year
before the next summer rolls around.
Repeat all achievements and give recogni-
tion as often as possible. Campers should
take home something to show for their
efforts and to remember their success at
your camp throughout the year.
T
ip #3: Mentoring and
Peer Power
One fact of life is that children, teens very
much included, are most motivated and
inspired by their older peers. It is critical to
set up your programs so that each age
group is scheduled to spend time helping
their younger peers and is also helped by
their older ones. For the oldest campers,
give them extra time with your coun-
selors. This tactic helps guarantee success
on many levels.
w The younger children will be motivated
more by peers than adults.
w Their performance will automatically
improve when they are more motivated.
w The older children who are helping the
younger ones will build self-esteem in the
process by feeling needed and appreciated.
T
ip #4: Life Skills
Training
The most successful camps integrate life
skills training into their sports programs.
Again, you can be creative with this one
and have the older and perhaps more
outgoing kids be part of discussion groups
with younger children with the same
advantages listed in the previous tip. Have
a mature adult sit in on the discussions to
guide the topics and create more focus as
needed, but let the children run it. Com-
petitive sports and life skills go hand in
hand and help build youngsters into better
adults. Promote this feature of your pro-
gramming. The parents will love you for it.
T
ip #5: Self-Directed Pro-
gramming
You know it but probably don’t do it. Ask
the kids what they want. Put 50 children
in a camp program and you do not have
50 children in a cohesive group. You have
50 individuals, each with individual needs,
desires, and aspirations. Have a basic pro-
gram and then offer electives, like a col-
lege program or progressive high school.
Increase the options and flexibility for the
campers, as they get older, to entice the
children with the reward of greater per-
ceived freedom when they come back
summer after summer. One size does not
fit all, so don’t even try.
You Can Run Tennis Camps That
Make a Difference
BY J OE DI NOF F E R
J
T
ip #6: Camp Website
and Emails
The Internet is a new and powerful tool,
but only if it is used to your advantage. If
you have a website but it is seldom updat-
ed and lacks the punch and excitement to
bring people back to see what’s new, you
have failed. Here are some ingredients for
using the worldwide web to help you
reach your goals.
w Keep it current with photos and stories.
Try a monthly update and encourage
campers to email you their stories of suc-
cess and achievements outside of their
weeks at your camp. If they don’t send them
in, contact them. Each child has a story to
tell, whether it be an achievement in tennis,
school, or some extracurricular activity.
w Send an email newsletter to campers
and staff every month, punctually and
without fail. And, don’t forget to get the
email addresses of your campers and their
parents. These days, this point is critical or
you will not reach both. Put links on the
newsletter to your website and if possible
include photos of campers.
w This may sound like a lot, but it isn’t.
Keep it short, sweet, and informative. It
does not have to be a lot of work. Who
knows, maybe you even have a camper
who would like to take your website on as
a project? w
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 21
Joe Dinoffer is a Master Profes-
sional in both the PTR and USPTA.
He is the author and editor of 16
books and 29 videotapes, and has
15 shows airing on The Tennis
Channel with 11 more due to be
released by 2005. Dinoffer is a frequent speaker
at national and international tennis conferences
and has conducted over 250 workshops in the
last 10 years. For more, visit his website,
ww.oncourtoffcourt.com.
“Each and every
camper needs to feel
successful.
Emphasizing attitude
and effort over results
is critical.”
web wise
22 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
How to Find the Right Web Host
For Your Business
M
ost business owners know very
little about how to choose the inter-
net hosting provider that’s best for
their website and for their business. What
makes a good web-hoster, or a bad one?
How can this important decision help, or
harm, your business? What types of services
are available, and which are best for you?
Whether your business is a tennis shop
or a facility, and whether you’re signed on
to the Tennis Welcome Center program or
not, more and more people will be looking
on the internet for information about your
business and your programs. Here are some
tips to help you make the right decisions
about who to select to host your website.
0UNDERSTAND THE
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE
TYPES OF WEB-HOSTING
It is crucial that you know the distinctions
between shared, collocated, unmanaged
dedicated and managed dedicated hosting
so you can choose the one that is right for
your business. As the hosting industry has
matured, hosting offers have split into
distinct categories, each with its own
strengths and weaknesses.
I Shared hosting (sometimes called
“virtual hosting”) means that you are
sharing one server with a number of other
clients of that company. The host manages
the server almost completely (though you
maintain your site and your account). They
can afford to charge you little since many
clients are paying for the use of the server.
However, that means companies other than
yours are using the resources of that server,
and heavy traffic to one of the other sites
on the server can really hammer the perfor-
mance of your site. Also, you are typically
not able to install special software programs
on these types of machines, because the
host will need to keep a stable environment
for all of the clients using the server.
I Collocated hosting means that you
purchase a server from a hardware vendor,
Counterstrike servers) or hobbyist servers,
but not for serious businesses that need
responsive, expert-level service.
I Managed dedicated hosting
means leasing a server from a host and
having that company provide a robust
level of support and maintenance on the
server, backed by quality guarantees. This
maintenance typically includes services
such as server uptime monitoring, a
hardware warranty, security patch
updates and more. Make sure your
managed dedicated host is specific about
its managed services.
OASK IF YOUR POTENTIAL
HOST’S NETWORK HAS
BLACKHOLED IPS
Many hosts care little about who is
actually hosting on their networks, so long
as the clients pay their bill. That means
many hosters will allow porn sites,
spammers and servers that create security
issues on their network. Placing ethical
issues aside, however, this does have a
negative impact on customers in general,
for example when a network gets
blackholed.
Getting blackholed means that other
networks will refuse e-mail originated
from Internet Providers (IPs) that are black-
listed. Some hosts have a number of
entire class C (up to 256 IPs) networks
blackholed and redistribute these tainted
IPs to new clients. That means if your
business relies on legitimate closed-loop
opt-in e-mail marketing, being on such a
network can severely cut response to your
campaign because your e-mail may never
get to its destination.
Check with any hosts you are consid-
ering to see if their networks are
blackholed. Also, here is a link to a third
party source that tracks blackholed
networks and lists them:
http://www.spamhaus.org/sbl/isp.lasso
The following URL is a good resource
to help you understand what is labeled
like Dell or HP for example, and you
supply this server to the host. The host
will then plug your server into its network
and its redundant power systems. The
host is responsible for making sure its
network is available, and you are responsi-
ble for all support and maintenance of
your server. Good hosters will offer
management contracts to their collocation
clients so that you can outsource much of
the support to them and come to an
arrangement similar to managed dedicat-
ed hosting. Most collocation hosts do not
offer this service, however.
I Unmanaged dedicated hosting is
very similar to collocation, except that you
lease a server from a host and do not
actually own it yourself. Some very limited
support (typically web-based only) is
included, but the level of support varies
widely from one hoster to another. A
typical price for this type of server is
around $99 a month. Support levels are
typically only provided in general terms.
Ask the host to go into specifics about
what support they will provide—will they
apply security patches to your server?—
before signing up. This service is typically
good for gaming servers (like Doom or
BY CHRI S KI VL E HAN
F
“spam” and what isn’t:
http://www.spamhaus.org/mailinglists.html
ODON'T CONFUSE SIZE
WITH STABILITY
Just because a web-hosting company is
big does not mean it is stable and secure.
How do you protect yourself? Ask some
key questions: How long has the host been
in business? Is current ownership the same
as always? Are they profitable and cash
flow positive from operation-generated
revenue?
ODON'T MAKE PRICE YOUR
ONLY PRIORITY
The old saying "you get what you pay for"
applies. When you over-prioritize price, you
run the risk of ending up with a host that
will provide you with a connection to the
internet and little else in terms of support
(and even that connection may be running
at maximum capacity or have uptime issues).
OMAKE SURE YOUR HOST
HAS FULLY REDUNDANT
DATA CENTERS
When dealing with smaller vendors, make
sure that they have their own data centers
and that those data centers are fully redun-
dant in terms of power and connectivity.
Here are a few questions to ask:
I How many lines do they have coming i
into the facility?
I What is the average utilization of their
connections? (No matter how large the
connection, it if is running at maximum
capacity it will be slow.)
I Do they have redundant power to the
servers?
I Do they have a generator on-site? How
often do they test it?
I What sort of security measures do they
have for the network?
I What physical security do they have?
I What type of fire suppression systems
do they have?
ODO THEY HAVE
EXPERIENCED SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATORS ON THEIR
SUPPORT STAFF?
When you call in for technical support,
it can be a frustrating experience to be
stuck talking with a non-technical
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 23
customer-service rep when you really
need to talk to a systems administrator
who can resolve your issues. Find out
the structure of their support depart-
ment, how quickly you can get to an
actual systems administrator when you
need to, and which systems administra-
tors can help you when you need help.
6 MAKE SURE
THE HOST IS FLEXIBLE
It is important that the hoster under-
stands how important quality servers are
to your business. Even most managed
dedicated hosts will not go near
supporting applications that are not part
of their initial server setup. Find a hoster
that has a vast amount of experience to
support a wide variety of applications,
and one that can bring that expertise to
you through their services.
OFIND OUT WHAT THEIR
FORMER AND CURRENT
CLIENTS SAY ABOUT THEM
Can your prospective host provide you
with success stories for clients with
similar configurations to yours? Are they
able to provide references from clients
who can tell you about their experience
using that company?
OMAKE SURE THE
HOST’S SUPPORT DOESN’T
INCLUDE EXTRA CHARGES
Any host you consider should provide
you with a comprehensive list outlining
the support they offer so that you can
have an understanding of what is
supported for free, what is supported at
a fee, and what is not supported at all.
To win your business, make them get
specific. I
Chris Kivlehan is the marketing manager
for INetU Managed Hosting. INetU
(www.inetu.net) is an award-winning
Allentown, Pa.-based hosting provider
that specializes in managed dedicated
hosting for businesses nationwide in the
online retailing, web development,
e-learning, financial services and online
marketing industries, as well as for
governments, nonprofits and civic
institutions.
SUCCESS
retailing
ith 28 years of experience at the
helm of Mason’s Tennis Mart in
New York City’s midtown retail
district, Mark Mason says his long-
standing success has been a team
effort involving tennis manufacturer
salespeople and customer service
representatives as well as his own
staff.
“They’re extensions of my
business,” Mason says. “They maxi-
mize the experience with a manufac-
turer and encourage me to buy more.”
Although some sales reps have
been able to remain hands-on—Mason
cites Bob Berman of Tail and Polo
among them—their role seems to
have changed since the tennis boom.
Rather than being responsible for one
or two product lines, sales representa-
tives typically juggle multiple lines for
up to 250 accounts spread across a
multi-state territory. For that reason,
Mason says, many sales reps prefer
retailers to
meet with
them at trade
shows to
preview and
order new
product lines, and stay in touch
through occasional visits to the
store and follow-up calls.
To handle day-to-day needs,
including special orders, reorders,
and delivery tracking, Mason says
he often relies on customer-ser-
vice reps like Susan
Roemer of Fila. During
last year’s holiday season,
for example, he sold more
than 100 women’s velour
Fila warm-up suits instead
of his projected 40
Fair Representation
Your vendors’ customer service and sales reps should be helping you do business.
G
W
because Roemer alerted him whenev-
er new stock became available due to
cancelled orders from other stores.
“If a company doesn’t take a
personal interest in you, you lose
interest because working with them
becomes too involved, too hard,”
Mason says. “Susan makes me feel
like I’m her only customer. Why
wouldn’t I be motivated to buy from
Fila?”
Paul Kobelt, director of tennis at
the New Albany Country Club in New
Albany, Ohio, says sales reps are his
primary contacts, but he also feels
comfortable calling CSRs to place an
order or check on the status of a
delivery. Regardless of the longevity
of the business relationship, he says
the sales representatives who consis-
tently add value are those who take
the time to visit his 18-court facility,
which is open from April through
October, in order to
better
under-
stand his
business.
If a sales
rep is
unable to
make a
personal
visit,
Kobelt
says he appreciates calls about specials
on ball machines, teaching carts, and
other equipment.
“Sales reps who take the extra time
[to visit] know I need my inventory by
April 1, and that I’m paring back in
September while other accounts are
gearing up for the holidays,” Kobelt
says. “If they miss a call to me in
January, I probably won’t order as
many racquets or with the same
enthusiasm. It’s the little things that
count.”
A business relationship with a sales
rep is a two-way street, says Chris
Gaudreau, owner of The Racquet Koop
in New Haven, Conn. “We need them
just as much as they need us,” he says.
In exchange for his loyalty, Gaudreau
says he expects prompt response to
phone messages, special pricing for
promotional items showcased during
his annual sale each February, and
breaks on hot new products to com-
pensate for old inventory that isn’t
selling.
“I typically get everything I ask for,
within reason, but I use my discretion.
I don’t go back to the well too many
times,” Gaudreau says. “If you’re
honest and up-front, you can get
things done together. If you’re at odds
with your rep, nothing good can
happen.”
Jason Havelka, head tennis profes-
sional at the Sunset Hills Country Club
in Thousand Oaks, Calif., says he
also views his relationship with
sales reps as reciprocal.
“I give them business, but I
would like support for our club’s
tournaments and social events in
return,” says Havelka, who has
volunteered his time doing demo
days for Head. For example, Sunset
Hills is sponsoring its first “Play Day”
in June, and Havelka says Head/Penn
is providing demo racquets and tennis
balls for the event.
BY CYNT HI A CANT RE L L
24 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 25
Get the Most from Your Sales Rep
Mark Mason of Mason’s Tennis Mart in New York City estimates he has
increased his business with Fila by 20 percent as a direct result of the
responsiveness of customer service representative Susan Roemer. In
order to make every client feel valued, Roemer says she encourages
them to call her “for anything.”
“It’s easier for them to have one contact,” she adds. “I do my best to
help them myself, but if I can’t, then I find out who can.”
Here are some ways to get the most from your own CSR.
w Plan ahead. Don’t wait until the last minute to place an order.
Despite a customer service representative’s best efforts, delivery may
suffer.
w Identify “want” versus “need.” Is an important client going to buy
elsewhere if his new racquet isn’t delivered tomorrow? Or can that
same racquet you wanted for yourself wait a week? Be reasonable
when asking for favors.
w Be patient. In Roemer’s case, she works with 946 accounts belonging
to nine sales reps. CSRs can’t fulfill every wish list, but they try.
w Get personal. Sharing a little about yourself and your business can
provide CSRs with valuable insight that can help them serve you better.
Plus, a good rapport makes conducting business more pleasurable for
everyone involved. —C.C.
“With some manufacturers, it’s a daily battle trying to
get products,” says Havelka. “On top of everything else, I
also do all the marketing for the club. I can’t spend time
worrying about whether merchandise is going to get here
okay.”
Joe Hajducky, a district sales manager for Head/Penn
Racquet Sports covering Connecticut, Rhode Island and
Westchester County in New York, understands his clients’
hot buttons because of his experience as a former
teaching pro, racquet stringer, and club pro shop owner.
“I’ve seen it from both sides. When I was a pro and I’d
call a rep, I’d be upset if I didn’t hear back for a few days.
And I still think that’s unacceptable,” says Hajducky, who
counts Gaudreau’s The Racquet Koop among his top 10
accounts. “There are some days I spend traveling to visit
accounts and I don’t get back to the office until after a
store that called me has closed. My goal is to get back to
everyone in 24 hours, 48 hours at the latest.”
Berman, who services Mason’s Tennis Mart as part of
his New York and New Jersey territories, agrees that
communication with retailers is key. “It’s important to do
everything in a timely manner. If someone calls me, I call
them right back,” Berman says. “I micro-manage my
territory, but it’s kept me successful.” w
RSI best practices
26 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
ur thousands of readers represent
a wealth of information and
experience about how to run a
successful tennis business. Now, we’d like
to collect and share this knowledge in
the pages of RSI with our Best Practices
Contest.
We’d like to tap into the knowledge
you’ve accumulated as a tennis director,
facility manager, pro shop retailer,
stringer, teaching pro or other industry
insider. Tell us what has worked success-
fully in your business, or how you
successfully handled a situation.
Our Best Practices Contest, organized
in conjunction with Dr. Robert Heller of
The Winning Edge, is designed to do two
things: identify those who are doing an
excellent job running their businesses
and, even more importantly, help to
disseminate this information as a way
we all can learn from each other and
continue to grow and improve in what
we do.
We realize that determining best
practices opens up a vast area. To keep
it manageable, though, we’d like to
limit the first installment of RSI’s Best
Practices to these four topics: Program-
ming, Retail, Personnel and Personal
Well-Being. In future issues, we will
solicit more of your best practices about
other aspects of the business.
Pick one or more of the areas below
and briefly tell us what you did that
worked in a specific instance and,
where applicable, the results you
obtained.
Share Your Knowledge
The
questions we list
can be used as a guide, to help you
narrow in on a particular topic. You may
well have a best practice that would
address a different topic or question than
what we list here.
Our panel of experts will go through
each submission and will select the three
or four best practices in each of the four
O
You can help this industry by telling us what has
worked successfully for your business.

June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 27
categories. Those selected will be
featured in upcoming issues of RSI and
will receive a certificate from the
magazine.
A few ground rules:
w We must receive your submission
by July 15.
w Please make sure your submission is
typed, not handwritten.
w Each submission must have com-
plete contact information (your name,
your title, facility or shop name and
address, your phone, and your e-mail if
available).
w Each submission must be identified
by the applicable category (Programming,
Retail, Personnel or Personal Well-Being).
w We appreciate brevity; please keep
your submissions to the point. If chosen
by our panel, we will contact you for
more information.
PROGRAMMING
Possible topics could include:
w How do you determine which
programs will work best at your facility?
w How do you evaluate your pro-
grams to determine their effectiveness?
w What specific strategies do you use
to ensure programs run smoothly?
w How do you market and promote
your programs for maximum exposure
and participation?
w After a program ends, how do you
ensure that participants continue in other
programs you have to offer?
w What mistakes have you made in
the past and how have you addressed
them?
RETAIL
Possible topics could include:
w How do you choose the products
to sell in your shop?
w How, and how often, do you
interact with sales reps?
w How do you handle unsold
merchandise?
w How do you use the internet to sell
or order merchandise?
PERSONNEL
Possible topics could include:
w How do you hire and select the
right employee for the right job?
w How do you maintain and keep
good employees?
w How and how often do you evalu-
ate your employees?
w What strategies do you use to
manage conflicts BEFORE they lead to
blowouts or burnouts?
w If an employee isn’t working out,
how do you let them go?
PERSONAL WELL-BEING
Possible topics could include:
w How do you balance your work,
family and health?
w How do you know when you are
out of balance?
w What personal strategies and
philosophies do you use to cope with
stress? w
Mail your submissions to:
RSI, Best Practices, 330 Main St.,
Vista, CA 92084.
Fax them to: 760-536-1171.
E-mail them to:
RSI@racquettech.com (put “Best Practice”
in the subject line).
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 29
o matter what kind of facility you have, a ball machine should be a key component of
your business. While you may be put off by the initial investment, you’ll make that
money back—and much more—when you have a ball machine available for your
members and students. For example, you can let players rent time on the machine by
themselves, freeing up teaching pros to work on other courts, or you can use the machine to
spice up clinics by working alongside the pro. Whether you’re part of the Tennis Welcome
Center initiative or not, as more students come into the game, they’ll be looking for ways to
hone their strokes, and that’s what a ball machine will provide, while keeping them on your
courts. (For more on making money with ball machines, see page 36.)
Our 2004 Guide to Ball Machines has all the information you need to help you find the
right machine for your business. The Ball Machine Selector on page 30 charts all the machines
available today and what features they offer. Keep in mind that with ball machines, there are
a lot of things that you can change about the unit at the time of purchase or later. In our
chart, we’ve listed the specs and prices for the most basic model of each machine. Then, if
options are offered, we’ve listed the additional cost of adding that feature.
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
For Your
Business,
Nothing Beats
a Ball Machine
For Your
Business,
Nothing Beats
a Ball Machine
N
30 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
PROPULSION
Economy Ball Bucket 202 $419 2 12 x 12 x 27 50 20 X 3, 6, 12 55 X X $50
Ball Bucket 201 $499 2 12 x 12 x 31 50 28 X 3, 6, 12 55 X X $50
Classic 101 $569 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 26 X 3, 6, 12 60 X X $50
Hybrid Model 301 $735 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 31 X 3, 6, 12 70 X X $50
Tournament 401 $819 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 32 X 3, 6, 12 70 X X $50
Elite $1049 1 22 x 16 x 26 150 42 X 2 - 10 80 X X X X X 1
Portable $1,495 1 19 x 21 x 25 200 65 X 1 - 10 80 X X X X 3 X 1
BP-F $2,740 3 32 x 27 x 37 225 90 X 1 - 10 90 X X X 3 X X X $
Ace Basic w/Lg Hopper/Dir Prgm $3,869 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 110 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X $
Genie Deuce $4,995 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X X $
Genie R $6,653 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X X $
Genie PC $7,995 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X $
Little Prince Portable Model 1 $699 1 19 x 17.5 x 18 250 29 X 2 - 7 60 X X X $
Little Prince Portable Model 2 $949 1 19 x 17.5 x 18 250 34 X 2 - 7 60 X X X $
Prince Portable Model 1 $1,099 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $
Prince Portable Model 2 $1,299 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $
Prince Portable Model 3 $1,599 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $
Prince Portable Model 4 $1,899 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X X 2 $
Prince Surefire $2,995 3 35 x 25 x 50 250 87 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 3 X $
Prince Hot Shot $3,595 3 35 x 25 x 50 250 87 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 6 X X X $
Prince Prodigy $4,995 3 31 x 26 x 56 250 143 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 9 X X X X X X $
Big SAM $29,999 1 60 x 48 x 108 200 398 X 2 - 20 100 X X X X X 3
Ultra Lite $699 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 35 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X X 7
Sport $849 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 46 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X X 1
Pro $1099 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 48 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X $
Ace Attack $5,499 1 200 150 X 1.5 - 12 110 X X X X 4 X $
Tennis Twist $199 1 10 x 11 x 23 28 11 5 15 X
Tennis Tutor Jr. - Basic $549 1 12 x 19.5 x 18 125 20 X 1.5 - 10 60 X X X X $
Tennis Tutor Jr. $649 1 12 x 19.5 x 18 125 22 X 1.5 - 10 60 X X X X $
Tennis Tutor - Model 1 $919 1 12 x 19.5 x 20 150 39 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X $
Tennis Tutor $959 1 12 x 19.5 x 20 150 42 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X $
Tennis Tutor - Plus $1,119 1 20 x 19.5’ x 20 150 46 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X X $
Tennis Tower $1,145 1 44 x 23 x 22 225 60 X 1.5 - 8 85 X $200
Shot Maker - Standard $2,800 2 38.5 x 31 x 21.5 300 96 X 1 - 6 95 X X X X X 3 X $
Shot Maker - Deluxe $3,600 2 38.5 x 31 x 21.5 300 96 X 1 - 6 95 X X X X X 6 X X X X X X
Super Coach $7,495 1 36 x 27 x 22 200 121 X 1.4 - 5.6 85 X X X X X 3
Portable $995 1 22 x 14 x 20 110 38 X 1.5 - 10 70 X X X X $
Lobster
www.lobsterinc.com
800-526-4041
Playmate
www.playmatetennis
machines.com
800-776-6770
Prince
www.mastersports.com
800-837-1002
Silent Partner
www.sptennis.com
800-662-1809
Sports Tutor
www.sportstutor.com
800-448-8867
Super Coach
www.tennismachine.co
m
Wilson
www.sportstutor.com
800-448-8867
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1 - Spin Adaptor $50
2 - 3 Hour Rapid Recharger $145
3 - Built-in Transformer for International Power Standards $111
Sports Attack
www.sportsattack.com
800-717-4251
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
MISC.
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 31
REMOTE CONTROL POWER OSCILLATION
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8 - Water-Resistant Storage Cover $65
9 - Water-Resistant Storage Cover $115
10 - Ships Via UPS or FedEx
11 - Feeds Balls from 30” above ground
4 - External Extended Life Battery $189, 110/220 Volt AC Converter $199
5 - Additional Removable Battery $40
6 - Ext. Battery Pack $130, Ext. AC Power Supply $125, Smart charger Upgrade
$30
7 - Lob enhancer $30
12 - Feeds Balls from 39” above ground
13 - Elevates to 9 Feet for Service Practice
14 - Can deliver any type of ball, to any place on court, in any sequence
Economy Ball Bucket 202 $419 2 12 x 12 x 27 50 20 X 3, 6, 12 55 X X $50 X X $70 X $49 1
Ball Bucket 201 $499 2 12 x 12 x 31 50 28 X 3, 6, 12 55 X X $50 X X $70 X $49 1
Classic 101 $569 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 26 X 3, 6, 12 60 X X $50 X X $70 X $49 1
Hybrid Model 301 $735 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 31 X 3, 6, 12 70 X X $50 X X $70 X $49 X 1
Tournament 401 $819 2 36 x 13 x 21 150 32 X 3, 6, 12 70 X X $50 X X X X $70 X $49 X 1
Elite $1049 1 22 x 16 x 26 150 42 X 2 - 10 80 X X X X X 18 X $199 X X $49 X
Portable $1,495 1 19 x 21 x 25 200 65 X 1 - 10 80 X X X X 3 X 15 X X X X $85.15 X 2
BP-F $2,740 3 32 x 27 x 37 225 90 X 1 - 10 90 X X X 3 X X X $85.15 X 3
Ace Basic w/Lg Hopper/Dir Prgm $3,869 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 110 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X $3,995 $85.15 X 3
Genie Deuce $4,995 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X X $3,995 $85.15 X 3
Genie R $6,653 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X X $3,995 $85.15 X 3
Genie PC $7,995 3 35 x 21 x 38 300 124 X 1 - 10 90 X X X X X 7 X X X X X X X X $3,995 $85.15 X 3
Little Prince Portable Model 1 $699 1 19 x 17.5 x 18 250 29 X 2 - 7 60 X X X $199 $100 X 7.2 X X 4,8
Little Prince Portable Model 2 $949 1 19 x 17.5 x 18 250 34 X 2 - 7 60 X X X $199 $100 X 14.4 X X X X X 4,8
Prince Portable Model 1 $1,099 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $199 $100 X 14.4 X X X 4,7,8
Prince Portable Model 2 $1,299 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $199 $100 X 14.4 X X X 4,7,8
Prince Portable Model 3 $1,599 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X $199 $100 X 14.4 X X X X X 4,7,8
Prince Portable Model 4 $1,899 1 19.5 x 16 x 21.5 300 48 X 2 - 13 80 X X X X X 2 $199 $100 X 14.4 X X X X X X X 4,7,8
Prince Surefire $2,995 3 35 x 25 x 50 250 87 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 3 X $99 X $115 X 9,10,11
Prince Hot Shot $3,595 3 35 x 25 x 50 250 87 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 6 X X X $115 X 9,10,11
Prince Prodigy $4,995 3 31 x 26 x 56 250 143 X 1.5 - 8 90 X X X X X 9 X X X X X X $115 X 9,12
Big SAM $29,999 1 60 x 48 x 108 200 398 X 2 - 20 100 X X X X X 30 X X X X X X X X X X 13
Ultra Lite $699 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 35 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X X 7.5 X X $499 $40 X 5
Sport $849 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 46 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X X 15 X X $499 $40 X
Pro $1099 1 22 x 18 x 14 200 48 X 1.0 - 15 95 X X X X $299 2 $249 $80 X 15 X X X X X $499 $40 X
Ace Attack $5,499 1 200 150 X 1.5 - 12 110 X X X X 4 X $300 X X $200 X
Tennis Twist $199 1 10 x 11 x 23 28 11 5 15 X X $0 X 6 D Cells
Tennis Tutor Jr. - Basic $549 1 12 x 19.5 x 18 125 20 X 1.5 - 10 60 X X X X $50 9 X $70 X $35
Tennis Tutor Jr. $649 1 12 x 19.5 x 18 125 22 X 1.5 - 10 60 X X X X $50 9 X $70 X $35
Tennis Tutor - Model 1 $919 1 12 x 19.5 x 20 150 39 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X $50 X 12 X $35 X 6
Tennis Tutor $959 1 12 x 19.5 x 20 150 42 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X $200 4 $50 X 18 X $200 X X $35 X 6
Tennis Tutor - Plus $1,119 1 20 x 19.5’ x 20 150 46 X 1.5 - 12 85 X X X X $200 4 $50 X 18 X $200 X X $35 X 6
Tennis Tower $1,145 1 44 x 23 x 22 225 60 X 1.5 - 8 85 X $200 X $300 4 X $200 X X X X
Shot Maker - Standard $2,800 2 38.5 x 31 x 21.5 300 96 X 1 - 6 95 X X X X X 3 X $200 X X X X
Shot Maker - Deluxe $3,600 2 38.5 x 31 x 21.5 300 96 X 1 - 6 95 X X X X X 6 X X X X X X
Super Coach $7,495 1 36 x 27 x 22 200 121 X 1.4 - 5.6 85 X X X X X 30 X X X X X X $25 X 14
Portable $995 1 22 x 14 x 20 110 38 X 1.5 - 10 70 X X X X $200 2 $50 X X $200 X X X 6
Brand & Contact Info The name of
the manufacturer and how to get in touch
with them. You can contact them to get
more information or to order the machine
that looks best to you. There are eight
manufacturers making machines under eight
brand names.
Model The specific model of machine.
However, remember that many of the
machines offer several different options. In
some cases, when you buy different options,
the name of the machine may change slightly.
But, in each case, the available options for each
machine list the price of adding that option.
Price Manufacturer’s suggested retail price.
Prices range from $199 to $29,999.
Warranty How long the manufacturer guarantees the
machine against defects. However, keep in mind that many of
the manufacturers do offer extended warranties. See the specific
manufacturer for more information and costs of extended
warranties.
Dimensions These are the measurements of the machines
for storage or transport. In other words, some machines will be
considerably bigger than these measurements when you are
using them because you add a ball holder. We list the smaller
measurements because the size of a machine really only matters
when you are trying to fit it on a shelf or in the trunk of a car.
Ball Capacity This indicates how many balls you
can put in the machine at a time. However, several of the
manufacturers indicated that their machines
can actually hold more balls
than they have listed if you
stack the balls higher than
the sides of the machine.
There are machines that
hold as few as 28 balls and
as many as 300 balls.
Weight This is an indication of
how much the basic machine
weighs without balls in it. So, if
you add options or balls, the
weight will increase. We list
the weight without balls
because this is probably
how you will transport the
machine to the court.
Disclaimers
32 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Lobster Elite
Features
Specific Features
Keep in mind that whenever you try to develop a chart like
this, it is necessary to create some pretty broad, non-detailed
features. For example, when we mark that a machine offers
random oscillation, it means that the machine can be set to
shoot balls to different locations on the court in a random
pattern. However, this does not indicate how many different
places the machine can shoot the ball. Some machines will
just shoot the balls randomly between as few as 2 locations at
the same depth, while other machines might be able to shoot
the ball virtually anywhere on the court at different heights
and speeds.
Durability
There really is no easy way to measure the durability of a ball
machine. The only true test of durability is to use the machine
for years and see how it holds up. We assume you don’t want
to wait that long to see the rest of this information. So, we
don’t have a category for durability. However, you can learn
more about how long the machines last by talking to the
manufacturers and asking for references from people they
have sold machines to. Just like we recommend when buying
stringing machines, don’t just buy a ball machine based on
price. If you buy an inexpensive machine that isn’t designed
for the type and amount of use you will be asking of it, it can
end up costing you a lot more money down the road than a
machine that cost more at first, but was designed for what
you have in mind. Make sure you have confidence in the
durability of the machine and the customer service of the
company to help you when you have problems. You should
feel comfortable that the company has a system in place to fix
anything that might go wrong with your machine. In some
cases, they may have local service reps to come fix it at your
facility, while in other cases they should offer a way to ship all
or part of the machine back to the manufacturer for repairs.
So, you probably won’t want to buy a machine strictly based
on what you read in this chart. Rather, this chart should help
you to narrow the universe of machines by eliminating the
machines that don’t offer features you really want. Then,
when you have narrowed your choices, you can do more
research by visiting the websites or calling the phone numbers
listed for each company.
Demo Before You Buy
As always, when investing in a piece of equipment as
expensive as a ball machine, we recommend that you look for
an opportunity to try the machine before you buy it. Ask the
manufacturers for ideas about how you can try their machines.
In some cases they may be able to send you a sample to try, in
other cases they may have sold one to someone near you.
So, now that you know what we’re trying to do, let’s talk
about what all the features listed across the top of the chart
mean.
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
Wilson Portable
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 33
Spinning Wheel Propulsion An “X” in this column
indicates that the machine uses two spinning wheels to feed the
ball to you. In almost every case the spinning wheels are stacked
vertically with just enough space between them for a ball to
squeeze through. So, the faster the wheels are spinning, the
faster the balls will be propelled.
Air Pressure Propulsion An “X” in this column
indicates that the machine shoots the ball through a tube like a
cannon. The amount of air pressure determines the speed and
depth of the shot.
Feeding Intervals This column indicates how often the
machine can feed balls. Most machines offer a range of intervals.
Smaller intervals make for a harder workout, while higher intervals
allow more time for preparation and watching your results.
Top Speed Almost every machine
offers the ability to adjust the speed at
which the ball is shot from the machine.
They all are capable of feeding a very slow
ball for shots shorter in the court and for
weaker players. So, we just list the fastest
speed that each manufacturer says the
machine will shoot the ball. However, most of
the time, most players don’t need the ball speed
maxed out because the players they play with
don’t hit that hard.
Elevation Control –
Electronic An “X” in this column indicates
that the machine can change the height of
the shot by pushing a button or turning a knob.
Elevation Control – Manual
An “X” in this column indicates that the
machine can shoot balls at different
heights, but you have to physically aim a
shooting arm or tilt the machine in some
way to do so.
Able to Feed Lobs An “X” in this
column indicates that the manufacturer tells
us the machine is capable of feeding lobs to
allow you to practice your overheads.
Able to Feed Topspin & Underspin An “X” in
this column means that the machine uses spinning wheels to pro-
pel the balls and you can make one wheel spin faster than the
other to put spin on the top or bottom of the ball. If you see a
price in this column, it means that the machine is capable of
putting spin on the ball, but you must purchase an extra option
to do so.
No Oscillation Machines with an “X” in this col-
umn are not cabable of feeding the ball in more than one
direction. So, if you want to practice forehands you have
to point the machine toward your forehand and vice-versa
for backhands. However, you cannot practice forehands
and backhands at the same time.
Oscillation – Random
These machines are capable of
feeding balls randomly to dif-
ferent locations on the court
to simulate real play.
However, as we
explained before, you
need to do a little more
inquiring to find out just how ran-
domly the machine can shoot balls.
Some machines can choose ran-
domly between two positions, while
others can shoot balls virtually any-
where on the court.
Oscillation – Programmable
This is another feature that requires a
closer look. Machines in this column have
a control panel that allows you to shoot balls in a
pattern that you determine. But look to the next few
columns to see how complicated a program you can give it.
# of Shots in Program This column indicates
how many different shots you can program before the
machine repeats its program. So, machines that have a
higher number in this column offer you the opportunity
to create a more complicated drill for yourself or your
students.
Adjustable Depth w/in
Program These machines offer the oppor-
tunity to create even more complicated drills
because they allow you to feed one ball deep in
the court followed by another ball that is shorter
in the court.
Adjustable Spin w/in Program
Again, these machines offer more complicated drills
because they allow you to vary the amount of topspin or
underspin from one shot to the next.
Adjustable Height w/in Program
These machines allow you to vary the height of the balls
during the program. So, you can practice against a ball
that comes high over the net followed by another ball that
is fed low over the net.
Playmate Genie Deuce
propulsion Oscillation
Prince Hot shot
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
Tennis Tutor Pro Lite
remote control
power
Runs on Battery or Power Cord
An “X” in this column means that you can power
the machine with a battery or a power cord plugged
into an electrical outlet.
Runs on Power Cord
Only Machines in this column
require an electrical outlet for power.
Runs on Battery Only
These machines can only be pow-
ered by a rechargeable battery.
Battery Amp/Hour
This is an indication of how
much “juice there is in the batter-
ies.” It is a measure of the number
of amps of electricity the battery
can deliver in 1 hour. One
manufacturer described
amp/hours as being like a
car’s gas tank. More
amp/hours is like a bigger
gas tank, meaning that the
machine can run longer on a
charge. We are publishing this number instead of
the machine’s battery-life. We felt publishing this
number for each machine helps reduce any dis-
crepancies in the battery life that is indicated by
each of the manufacturers.
Battery Life Indicator These machines
have some sort of indicator to let you know how
much battery life is
left. Once again, some
of these indicators are
more informative
than others. Talk with
the manufacturer for a
more detailed descrip-
tion of how it works.
Battery
Swapability
An “X” in this col-
umn means that
the machine allows
you to take out a
battery that is almost
out of juice and replace it with a fresh
battery. However, keep in mind that to
do this you will have to purchase a spare battery.
Remote Control Comes Standard An “X” in this
column indicates that a remote control is included in the price listed
for the machine. Look at the next several columns to find out what
the remote controls and whether it is wireless.
Remote Control Available as Option These
machines do not come with a remote, but you can
buy one. Look at the next several columns to find
out what the remote controls and whether it is wireless.
Remote Control – Cord The remote
controls that are available for these machines are
actually wired to the machine, making them a little
less portable. However, some of them do allow you
to control more of the settings on the machine.
Remote Control – Wireless The remote
controls that are available for these machines are
not actually attached to the machine. So, you can
take them wherever you want as long as the
signal is strong enough to reach the machine.
Remote Control of Oscillation These remotes are
actually able to turn the oscillation feature of the machine off and
on in addition to being able to start or stop the balls from feeding.
Remote Control of Program Settings These
remotes allow you to control the program settings. So, you don’t
have to go back to the machine to change the order of shots.
Silent Partner Pro
34 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Sports Attack - Ace Attack
miscellaneous
Super Coach
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
Serving Tower Optional Accessory – This column indicates
whether a tower is available from the manufacturer to raise the
machine high enough to simulate a serve. The price in this column
indicates how much the serving tower costs.
Cover Comes Standard These machines come with a
cover included in the price listed.
Cover Available as an Option This column indicates
whether the manufacturer makes an optional cover available and
how much it costs.
Includes Wheels for Portability Machines with an X
in this column have wheels attached to them to make the machine
easier to move around.
Other Optional Accessories This column lists any
other optional accessories that are available for each machine and
how much each accessory costs. It also lists any special features
that we did not create columns for.
hen it comes to generating revenue for your busi-
ness, your ball machine should be throwing money
at you like an ATM. If it’s not, then you may need
some help turning your ball machine into a money machine.
Chances are you probably have a ball machine and an
existing hourly rental program. We call this a “pay-to-play”
program, where customers pay to train with the ball
machine on a time-incremental basis. The national average
for pay-to-play programs is $8 a half-hour and $12 an hour,
averaging about $1,000 to $1,200 a year in total income
from rentals.
P L AY T O P L AY- Pay-to-play requires the customer to
spend money each time he or she trains with the ball
36 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
BY S T AN OL E Y
W
2 0 0 4 GUI DE TO BALL MACHI NES
Turn Your Ball
Machine Into a
MONEY MACHINE
Turn Your Ball
Machine Into a
MONEY MACHINE
machine, causing them to budget their usage with the
machine. The result is that customers often don’t utilize the
ball machine as much as they should be, and they fail to
realize the benefits the machine can provide. (However, the
pay-to-play program still works well at resorts where cus-
tomers cannot always find a game. In this situation, the
customer is usually on vacation and does not mind paying a
fee to work out on the unit.)
BAL L - MACHI NE CL UB - When you decide to buy a new
machine—whether it’s because the current one has seen
better days or you just want a machine with a few more
features—you have a great opportunity to create a new
program around it as well. One of the most effective programs
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 37
Create a Ball-Machine Club for Your Players
The ball-machine club program outlined below may appear quite easy to
implement, but proper organization and ongoing marketing is important to
keep the club going. For more on smoothing the way for members to enjoy
the club, see “Ball-Machine Club Makers or Breakers” on page 38. (Pricing
is based on $12 per hour and $8 a half hour in the pay-to-play program.)
Stan Oley is the National Sales Manager
for Playmate Ball Machines. If you have
questions about ball-machine use for your
facility, contact him at 888-759-6283.
to generate revenue is creating a
“ball-machine club,” where customers
purchase a pass to use the machine
on an unlimited basis.
A ball-machine club allows a
customer to utilize your machine
more frequently without having to
pay a per-usage charge. Once
customers purchase a pass, it is up to
them to schedule time with the
machine so that they can get the most
from their investment. When
organized and marketed properly,
this method generates an average of
$3,000 to $4,000 annually. (See box
at right for some examples of ball-
machine club memberships, which
should be able to accommodate your
customers’ various needs.)
DE MO DAYS - Many clubs pur-
chase a new ball machine with
updated features and begin renting it
out immediately, with no change in
programming. You need to market
your new ball machine, and create
hype about it, even before it arrives.
For instance, one of the best
methods for marketing a ball-
machine club is to run a demo day
that showcases the value of the
machine. Get the rep from the ball-
machine company to run the demo
day, since he’s been trained on how
to properly showcase the unit. You
need to market the demo day with a
sign-up sheet, handouts, and telemar-
keting to ensure attendance, then use
the demo day to sell Platinum Ball
Machine Club passes.
One way to quickly see if you’re
doing all you can to promote the use
of your ball machine is to check the
“Ball-Machine Club Makers or
Breakers” story on page 38. How
many “breakers” exist at your club?
Create a ball-machine club at your
facility and properly promote the unit
to players and your ball machine will
become a money machine in no
time. Q
P L ATI NUM CHART E R ME MBE RS HI P CARD
Suggested price: $200 for two-year pass
This is the most prestigious membership and represents a charter or original
ball-machine club member. Limit the spaces for Platinum members to guaran-
tee exclusivity. It’s best to sell Platinum memberships at a demo day introduc-
ing your new ball machine. You can give this person special perks such as
48-hour sign-up instead of 24-hour, and they can renew for $125 annually
instead of $150.
GOL D ONE- YEAR ME MBE RS HI P CARD
Suggested price: $150 per year single membership; $175 for families up to
three people; additional family members are $25 each
Offer the one-year Gold membership once the Platinum charter membership
has been filled.
F REQUENT - US E R P UNCH CARD
Suggested price: 10 punches for $100
This card is for players who do not wish to purchase a club membership. Also,
this card fills the void for customers looking to use the machine a limited num-
ber of times who are also seeking a value. Many times a customer is focusing
on a single aspect of his game or is only in town for a limited period of time
and cannot reap the benefits of an annual membership. Each punch should
represent a normal usage increment.
COMP L I ME NTARY DAI L Y P AS S
Use this pass as a vehicle for selling ball-machine club memberships to cus-
tomers in the lesson program or who have never trained on the machine. After
a lesson or when someone inquires about the ball machine, offer them a com-
plimentary pass to try it, and make sure you explain the benefits of joining the
ball-machine club.
38 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Q The extension cord must be on a reel. Staff members will not promote the ball machine if it takes them a long
time to set up. Members will not use the machine if it takes 15 minutes to untangle the cord.
Q The pro must share in the revenue. Approximately 80 percent of all commercial ball machines are owned by the
club. It is rare to see a successful ball-machine program where the pro does not share in the revenue. It is recommended
that the pro purchase the ball machine because it is the most overlooked source of revenue.
Q Ball-machine prescriptions. Once a lesson has concluded, give the student a ball-machine prescription drill to
perform before their next lesson. The prescription should have the drill diagrammed on the court with ball-machine
settings, target area, as well as the objective. The prescription drill also should be on paper so you can place a copy in the
student’s player profile for review at the next lesson. This will accelerate your student’s progress while producing revenue
from the ball-machine club. Also, like a prescription from a doctor, if they don’t take their medicine—or in this case
perform their drill for the specified amount of time—they will not progress at their desired rate. If the player does not
perform the drill, it places the burden of the student’s success more on the student than the pro.
Q Sign-in and sign-out procedure. It’s important to have a sign-in and sign-out procedure. This will ensure that the
remote control is returned each time the ball machine is used. You can also use this to monitor and calculate total hourly
use of the unit.
Q Use a ball mower to pick-up balls. It’s simple: People get tired of picking up balls long before they get tired of
hitting them.
Q Semi-annual clinic for ball-machine club members. Ongoing marketing is a key to continued success of the club. Give
members new ideas for creating drills and stress the use of target areas during their workouts.
Q Keep fresh balls in the ball machine. If you do not get enough ball turnover through programs (i.e. men’s day,
ladies day, and tournaments), then it becomes price prohibitive to keep fresh balls in the machine. In this case, you may
want to use pressureless balls. — S.O.
Ball-Machine Club Makers or Breakers
RETAI LI NG STRATEGI ES
40 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Don’t Let
Close You Down
Don’t Let
Close You Down
BY MI T CH RUS T AD
loseouts. Is there a dirtier word in tennis retailing? With
the steady stream of new product introductions, heavy
competition and overall economic climate, closeouts
are a regular part of doing business these days. But that
doesn’t mean closeouts have to close you down.
A variety of leading retailers and manufacturers say that
creative solutions do exist when it comes to closeouts, but
the consensus reveals the most logical first step: smart—but
not necessarily conservative—buying.
“I buy very closely to the vest for the year, so I usually
have very little left over,” says Mark Mason, owner of
Mason’s Tennis Mart in New York City. “But it’s very rare for
a retailer to sell more than 80 percent of a collection anyway,
so you’ll usually have things left over in each category.”
And whether it’s a seasonal closeout—which is the most
common to most retailers—or a random time of the year,
the goal for many is just to break even, lick your wounds and
get on with it.
“We just try to get our money back,” says Dale Queen of
Your Serve Tennis in Atlanta. “There are different sales life
cycles for different items, so when we decide to close it out
depends on that.”
But Queen echoes Mason’s bottom line when it comes to
minimizing closeouts throughout the year. “We are buying
smaller quantities up front now,” says Queen, “because in
the past we’ve had so many shoes and racquets left over.
There are so many products coming out now, you just don’t
have room for anything.”
Queen says the apparel and shoes life cycle in his shop
may last about six months, while racquets last up to a year
Worried about inventory that you can’t get rid of?
Here are some strategies to help you cut your losses.
C
CLOSEOUTS CLOSEOUTS
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 41
Cashing In On Closeouts
Q Draw Them In With Closeouts: A
bargain-shopping customer can be a blessing
in disguise for a savvy salesperson. “Close-
outs can sometimes help you sell the new
stuff,” says Dale Queen of Your Serve in
Atlanta, “because a lot of the people that
come in looking for half-price stuff end up
buying things at full price.”
Q Work With Local Reps: Your local
rep should serve effectively as a good
barometer when planning your buys. “The
local rep needs to know their accounts, and
sell them what their clients will buy,” says
Chuck Vietmeier, product manager for
Gamma/Fischer. “Otherwise it generally
comes back to get you anyway.”
Q Separate But Equal: To create a
more equal “playing” field, try to establish a
separate retail space for your closeout
inventory, utilizing an old storage room, for
example. “Visually, I separate my full-price
customers from my sale customers, so they
can’t even see each other,” says Mark
Mason, owner of Mason’s Tennis Mart in
New York City.
Q Hands On: Certain inventory (especially
shoes) should be displayed right on the sales
floor, which lets customers pick and choose
and serve themselves, saving your staff time
in the process. “It’s a really effective means
of moving some of your closeout inventory,”
says Queen.
Q Turn The Tables: Closeouts go both
ways, so make sure you ask your local reps
about dealer closeouts, where you can
potentially earn back some lost profits. “Just
because it’s on closeout doesn’t mean it’s
junk,” says Roger Kenworthy, owner of The
Tennis Racquet in Grand Rapids, Mich. “If I
know that a manufacturer is closing out a
racquet, but it might not work for a regular
customer, I’ll buy a bunch of them if I know a
local school’s physical education department
would go for it.”
If you can’t find the right dealer closeouts, be
sure to ask your reps for incentives or
premiums that may help sell off remaining
inventory. “If you want them to bring in the
new, you have to help them get rid of the
old,” says Vietmeier. “The rep has to resell
that guy over and over again, so he needs to
put in the effort.”
— M.R.
or more. But Queen says that shelf life also depends heavily on the quantity
of new product introductions, when the need to make room for a hot new
product can force retailers into closeouts. “Generally, when companies come
out with new products, we’ve got to make room for them. Our walls are only
so big,” says Queen.
“We’re trying to order more often,” he adds, “choosing to make three
smaller orders rather than one big one. In my situation, that’s the way to go.”
Some retailers may take a more proactive approach to closeouts. For
instance, Roger Kenworthy, owner of The Tennis Racquet in Grand Rapids,
Mich., actually takes his closeout items on the road, mostly to local schools
and coaches in the area, to sell off his inventory.
“The best method for selling closeout products, especially racquets, is to
show it directly to the customer,” says Kenworthy. “For me, that’s the
schools, or gym coaches. That’s the way I started the business anyway.”
Kenworthy does his sales calls in the morning, before he opens the shop.
“It might be unusual, but it works for me,” he says.
But is there any way to avoid closeouts? “It’s gonna happen,” says
Gamma/Fischer’s Chuck Vietmeier. “But the retailers usually won’t get upset
if they’ve had a good run, and only have two left of something, then put it
on closeout. But when they have a wall full of racquets that won’t sell, they
need to work something out with the rep, and find the best way to solve the
situation. It doesn’t do either one of us any good if you’re not moving
product.”
Prince Tennis Senior Director Dave Holland says that, from the manu-
facturer side, avoiding closeouts at the retail end starts with “excellent plan-
ning and forecasting, so that as new technologies are introduced, we don’t
create disruptive inventory planning for our dealers. So, in a sense, we don’t
clog up the arteries.
“We don’t want to create a lot of closeouts,” says Holland. “In fact, the
objective is to have zero closeouts. And we’ve made great strides and have
gotten a lot cleaner in that regard.”
The key, adds Holland, is working with retailers far enough ahead “so we
allow ample time to plan new introductions into our cycles. We’re all work-
ing together, so we don’t want to spring any surprises.”
Do manufacturers ever take back unsold product? Off the record, some
retailers have indicated that at times, and under certain circumstances, this
does happen. But it certainly is not a practice that retailers, whether large or
small, can rely on to help their bottom line.
But some retailers, like Mason, also use their closeouts to lure otherwise
wary customers into the shop.
“There are people who only buy on sale. Why not satisfy that customer
too?” says Mason. “At least give them that option. Some of my customers are
only looking for sales, and I make sure I always have something to bring
them in. It’s a good vehicle to promote traffic—that’s where closeouts are
wonderful. That’s how I think of it.”
But when the new collection comes in, Mason is sure to relegate old inven-
tory to the sidelines, pronto. “I wouldn’t keep the old with the new. It
visually just takes away from the new,” says Mason. “If they’re shop-worn a
bit, don’t look like they belong, you’re better off taking leftover pieces and
putting them on closeout.” Mason has turned a back-room storage space into
his sale annex.
Ultimately, however, limiting the fear factor may be the best medicine of
all when you’re considering closeouts, says Queen.
“We just try to minimize our losses, turn it around as fast as we can and
get on with it,” says Queen. “That’s just part of doing business. I’m not afraid
of it, you’re going to have them, there’s really no way to get around it.” Q
and TECHNIQUES
42 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
tips
PICK A TOOL
I have discovered a great addition to any
stringer’s toolkit. It’s a
curved pick from Snap-
On ($10) that I use to
snag a string when a
hole is blocked. I haven’t
tried other similar tools
sold at normal auto parts
stores, but this Snap-On
pick is really very highly polished and
strong!
Alpha 5-string pack to:
David Giannandrea, MRT, Tehachapi, CA
AVOIDING POLY FOLLY
We are all well aware of the difficulty of
stringing with polyester strings, especially
when we have to weave the crosses. I’ve
found that when you start the crosses,
always pull all of the string through the
grommet before you start the weave. You’ll
find that after you have completed the
weave, the string will slide across the bed
very easily. I have been doing this method
over and over, and as a result, I can string
many more racquets on any given day
without it hurting my fingers.
Ashaway 5-string pack (including 1 set
of Dynamite WB) to:
Alan Price, CS, APO, AE
SHARED HOLES
It is said that a string will go into a shared
hole if you keep trying. This is probably
true, but it has its disadvantages. It takes
up time, and the more difficult the
process, the more friction there is likely to
be when you successfully feed the second
string through.
Having strung many badminton rac-
quets, I suggest an alternative method.
After removing the old strings and before
starting the string job, use your awl to
expand the holes that are the most
difficult to insert the second string. For
the normal Carlton and Yonex racquets,
these holes are 8T, 10T, and 12T and 7H,
9H, and 11H. These are the holes where
the second string has to go under or over
the existing string rather than sit along-
side it, as with other holes. I think you will
find that you’ll have no problems with
shared holes, and there will be no
damage to the racquet and string.
5 packs of Prince No Sweat overgrips
(3 overgrips per pack) to:
Thorburn Frost, Bromley,
Kent, England
CARPET PROTECTOR
Stenciling racquets over a large trash can
works great as long as everything is
handled perfectly, but if you drop a wet
stencil onto the floor or the top pops off
of the tube of stencil ink, your carpeting
will quickly become ruined. For an extra
measure of safety, I spread a tarp beneath
the trash can where I do my stenciling,
just in case there’s a stenciling disaster.
Bow Brand string pack (including 1
set of natural gut) to:
David Mindell, Cathedral City, CA
BABOLAT PAD
MODIFICATION
For years I’ve extended the pads at 6 and
12 o’clock on my Babolat machines,
because there are so many frames where
the normal pads are just ever-so-slightly
too short. Using the smallest “slide-over”
adaptor can create some issues with
needed room in the throat, in addition to
the aggravation of removing the existing
pad, and then mount-
ing the slide-on
adaptor.
The trick is:
1) Get two of the
new yellow pads. You
need at least one that
has a “flat” side that
goes against the
frame. (There is one that is more round-
ed. Both come with the machine, and in
the sets of replacement retainers.)
2) Trim the three pins on one pad flush.
Make certain it’s smooth where you trim
off the pins.
3) Clean the
trimmed side
with alcohol,
as well as the
front side of
the flat “un-
cut” pad.
4) Use any good “super glue” to bond
them together.
This has worked well for me for many
years now, and it makes mounting Völkl’s
new V-Engine frames much easier. I can
imagine there are numerous other frames
that will be easier to mount with a little
The ideas, suggestions and techniques
found in “Tips and Techniques” have
all been submitted by USRSA
members. This department has run
almost every month since its inception
in 1993, recounting stringers tricks
and tales of the trade garnered from
everyday, real-life stringing and
business experiences. All these tips
have been gathered into a single
volume of the Stringer’s Digest—
Racquet Service Techniques—that is
a benefit of USRSA membership.
Submit tips to: Greg Raven, USRSA,
330 Main St., Vista, CA 92804;
or email: greg@racquettech.com.
Readers’ Know-How in Action
ate up valuable time.
To solve this problem, I put a sticker on
the floor 10 feet from the head (or throat)
of the racquet mounted in the machine.
This has to be done only one time.
Now to measure the short side, I start
the long side first “backwards” (so that the
end of the string is coming out the end of
the racquet where the mains start), grab
the end of the string, and walk to the
sticker on the floor. I stand on the sticker
and hold the short side end to my chest.
Now I have 10 feet for the short side,
which works for most racquets.
5 packs of Unique Tourna Grip
(3 overgrips per pack) to:
Ted Geary, MRT, Bloomington, IN
MARKETING TIPS
PERSONAL TOUCH
Over the years, I’ve found that the
personal touch is the key to customer
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 43
added length to these supports.
5 sets of Völkl Power-Fiber 18 to:
Tom Parry, CS, Bradenton, FL
BEGINNER TIPS
SHORT SIDE MARKER
With one-piece stringing, I tried several
ways to mark the short side, including a
black marker, bending the string, etc.
When installing the string, though, I
always struggled to find the mark, which
satisfaction. Providing the personal
touch doesn’t have to be costly. One
of the ways I achieve this is by inking
the customer’s initials on the strings.
It can be accomplished free hand
and it looks great. A happy customer
is a customer who will return.
Klip bonus pack (including 5 sets
of string, hat, wrist bands, and
decal) to:
Frank Spadavecchia, MRT
Lynbrook, NY
Art Director’s note: If you are
not artistically inclined, or if you
want to try different typefaces
for the initials, print out the
initials at full size from your
computer. Then, lay the racquet
over the print-out, and use the
print-out as a guide for your
“free-hand” artwork.
—Greg Raven
w
MASTER RACQUET TECHNICIANS
Congratulations to the following members who
recently became MRTs
Joel Disbro Kalamazoo, MI
Benjamin Feldmann Cincinnati, OH
Gaines Hillix Marietta, GA
David Pavlich Mandeville, LA
Joshua Sandlin Hoover, AL
McCasey Smith Overland Park, KS
CERTIFIED STRINGERS
Congratulations to the following members who
recently became CSs
Bonnie Clark Woodstock, GA
MRT’s: 411 CS’s: 2506
44 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
NEW MEMBER CITY STATE/COUNTRY
Gary Pilling Jasper AL
Joe Hurst Muscle Shoals AL
Ferenc Fazekas Centerton AR
Monique Bois Grass Valley CA
Deb Piper Wilmington DE
Nathan Shanks Jacksonville FL
Ross Fletcher Longwood FL
James Bewley Palm Beach Gardens FL
Frederick Stoller Columbus GA
Joseph Chastain Marrietta GA
Archie Williams Riverdale GA
Barbara Cooper Snellville GA
Richard Romer Kihei HI
Daniel Baker Cordova IL
Jon Bemisderfer Fort Wayne IN
Bissell Tennis Courts Provincetown MA
Arthur Wiese Potomac MD
Mark Williams Troy MI
Anthony Hiatt Meridian MS
Dale Smith Raleigh NC
NEW MEMBER CITY STATE/COUNTRY
Gordon Paul Basking Ridge NJ
Jonathan Julio West Windsor NJ
Anders Johansson NY NY
Ken Tolber Columbus OH
Taylor Sokolosky Owasso OK
Mark Schantzer Reinholds PA
James Shaughnessy Wakefield RI
John Gustafson Spartanburg SC
David Noble Knoxville TN
Janet Murray Jeffersonville VT
Uly Cheng Bainbridge Island WA
Loi Kuok Chi Peng On Ko CHINA
Jens Seibaek Frederiksberg DENMARK
Tse Wing Cheung Tai Po, NT HONG KONG
Adrian Farnsworth Ponsonby NEW ZEALAND
Robert Puncher Portsmouth UK
Duncan Callan Eastleigh UK
Ruben Gomez Swansea UK
Keir Garnham Swindon UK
NEW MEMBERS
USRSA MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
USRSA membership dues: $99 annually. (CA resi-
dents add 7.75% sales tax. $106.67 total.) Canadi-
an Members add $20 (US) for postage costs. US
Total: $119. Mexican Members add $25 (US) for
postage costs. US Total: $124. All other Interna-
tional Members add $36 (US) for airmail postage
costs. US Total: $135. Membership includes: 10
issues of Racquet Sports Industry, the five-volume
Stringer’s Digest, free consultation, free classified
advertising and access to the member's-only web-
site.
April 2004
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 45
U S R S A
330 Main St., Vista CA 92084 Tel: 760

536

1177
President Patrick Curry
Partner/Business Development Steve Schein
Executive Director David Bone, MRT
Managing Editor/Webmaster Crawford Lindsey
Advertising Director John Hanna
Design/Art Director Kristine Thom
Technical Support
Dot Hogen, MRT; Greg Raven, MRT
Membership Services
Nancy Crowley, Barbara Smith
Shipping/Receiving Pat Regan
USRSA TECHNICAL ADVISORS
Warren Bosworth Professional stringer,
racquet designer and industry advisor
Dr. Howard Brody Professor Emeritus of Physics,
Univ. of Pennsylvania; Science Advisor, PTR
Ron Carr R&D Manager, Gamma Sports
Rod Cross Associate Professor of Physics,
Univ. of Sydney, Australia
Bill Severa Director of Technology, Innovation and
Design Group, Wilson Racquet Sports
Steve Davis VP of Next Generation, Prince Sports
Dr. Simon Goodwill Research Assistant,
University of Sheffield, UK
Dr. Carl Love Professor Emeritus, Metallurgy;
President, Love Sports Enterprises
Bill Mitchell Director R&D, Powers Court
Tom Parry Product Development Manager/
Pro Tour Services Manager; Volkl Tennis GmbH
Roger Petersman Business Manager-Accessories,
Head/Penn Racquet Sports
ADVERTISERS INDEX
For more information on products and services in
this issue of Racquet Sports Industry, please contact
the manufacturers directly.
Company Page
Advantage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Ashaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
ATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Bollettieri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Classic Turf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Fischer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Forten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Fromuth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Gamma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 13, 15, 26
Gosen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC
ICA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45
Klip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Lee Tennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Lobster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Novagrass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19
Nova Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IBC
On Court Off Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
PTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 51
Silent Partner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Super Coach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Tecnifibre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
TIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
TWC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Unique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
USRSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
USTC&TBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC
Wise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 47
10-S Tennis Supply
1820 7th Avenue North
Lake Worth, FL 33461
P 800-247-3907
561-547-1772
F 561-547-3371
Email: sales@10-s.com
Web: www.10-s.com/
Advantage Tennis Supply
Div. of Femco Corp
235 Arcadia Street
Richmond, VA 23225
P 800-476-5432
F 804-276-0557
Email: info@advantagetennissupply.com
Web: www.advantagetennissupply.com/
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
7335 SW 104th Street
Miami, FL 33156
P 305-667-1228
F 305-667-6959
Email: agile@bellsouth.net
Web: www.agilecourts.com/
Alpha Sports
7208 McNeil Drive, #207
Austin, TX 78729
P 800-922-9024
512-250-1499
F 512-279-9454
Email: info@alphatennis.com
Web: www.alphatennis.com/
Ashaway Line & Twine Mfg. Co.
P.O. Box 549 / 24 Laurel Street
Ashaway, RI 02804
P 800-556-7260
401-377-2221
F 401-377-9091
Email: sales@ashawayusa.com
Web: www.ashawayusa.com/
ATS Sports
200 Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15317
P 800-866-7071
412-323-9612
F 412-323-1320
Email: tennis@corp.atssports.com
Web: www.atssports.com/ats/default.asp
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Highgate
King’s Lynn Norfolk
PE30 1PT UNITED KINGDOM
P +44 (0) 1553 772943
F +44 (0) 1553 762887
Email: sales@bowbrand.co.uk
Web: www.bowbrand.co.uk/
Classic Turf Co., LLC.
437 Sherman Hill Road
PO Box 55
Woodbury, CT 06798
P 800-246-7951
203-266-4862
F 203-263-0275
Email: sales@classicturf.org
Web: www.classicturf.org/
Courtside Sports
1136 Hillside Avenue
Victoria, BC V8T 2A9 Canada
P 866-386-4265
604-418-4842
F 250-386-4265
Email: info@courtsidesports.com
Web: www.courtsidesports.com/
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
3441 S. 11th Ave.
Eldridge, IA 52748
P 800-553-8907
F 800-443-8907
Email: sales@douglas-sports.com
Web: www.douglas-sports.com/
Dunlop Sports
PO Box 3070
Greenville, SC 29602
P 800-277-8000
864-271-0201
F 864-527-7881
Email: kai.nitsche@dunlopsports.com
Web: www.dunlopsports.com/
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
13950 Senlac #100
Dallas, TX 75234
P 888-566-8966
F 888-455-3551
Email: Pam@colpac.com
Web: www.cpacsports.com/
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
PO Box 2717
Hagerstown, MD 21741
P 800-511-7272
F 301-739-6519
Email: evgtennis@aol.com
FancyPants, div. of TheLBHGroup, Ltd.
4910 B West Rosecrans Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
P 800-421-4474
310-978-2260
F 310-978-2277
Email: kcury@lbhgroup.com
Web: www.lbhgroup.com/
Fast Dry Companies
1400 North West 13th Avenue
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
P 800-432-2994
F 954-979-8479
Email: info@fast-dry.com
Web: www.fast-dry.com
Forten Corporation
7815 Silverton Ave., Ste. 2A
San Diego, CA 92126
P 800-722-5588
858-693-9888
F 858-693-0888
Email: sales@forten.com
Web: www.forten.com/
Fromuth Tennis
1100 Rocky Drive
West Lawn, PA 19609
P 800-523-8414
610-288-5024
F 610-288-5040
Email: fromuthtennis@fromuthtennis.com
Web: www.fromuthtennis.com/
Gamma/Fischer
200 Waterfront Dr.
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
P 800-333-0337
412-323-0335
F 412-323-0317
Email: tsr@gammasports.com
Web: www.gammasports.com/
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
306 S. 45th Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85043
P 800-289-7366
602-269-1492
F 888-329-7366 or 602-447-2381
Email: askus@us.head.com
Web: www.head.com/
Horizon Sports Group
PO Box 515
Coopersburg, PA 18036
P 610-282-4300
F 610-282-4212
Email: hsg1@fast.net
Web: www.horizonsportsgroup.com/
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
1280 North Winchester
Olathe, KS 66061
P 913-780-0770
F 913-780-0775
Email: info@icasbs.com
Web: www.icasbs.com/
Industry Resource
Guide 2004
K-Swiss
31248 Oak Crest Drive
Westlake Village, CA 91361
P 800-938-8000
818-706-5100
F 818-706-5391
Email: ksmktg@k-swiss.com
Web: www.k-swiss.com/
Klip America
13088 Caminito del Rocio
Del Mar, CA 92014
P 866-554-7872
858-755-6174
F 720-559-3253
Email: info@klipstrings.com
Web: www.klipstrings.com/
Laserfibre, Inc.
P.O. Box 1767
Kingston, RI 02881
P 888-895-2350
401-295-2350
F 401-294-6177
Email: info@laserfibre.com
Web: www.laserfibre.com/
LBH, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
4910 B West Rosecrans Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
P 800-421-4474
310-978-2260
F 310-978-2277
Email: kcury@lbhgroup.com
Web: www.lbhgroup.com/
Lee Tennis
2975 Ivy Road
Charlottesville, VA 22903
P 800-4HARTRU
434-295-6167
F 434-971-6995
Email: hartru@leetennis.com
Web: www.leetennis.com/
Lilly’s of Beverly Hills, div. of The
LBH Group, Ltd.
4910 B West Rosecrans Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
P 800-421-4474
310-978-2260
F 310-978-2277
Email: kcury@lbhgroup.com
Web: www.lbhgroup.com/
Lobster Sports, Inc.
PO Box 2807
Toluca Lake, CA 91610
P 800-210-5992
818-764-6000
F 818-764-6061
L I S T I NG BY COMP ANY
ADVERTISEMENT
48 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Email: info@lobsterinc.com
Web: www.lobsterinc.com/
LSI Courtsider Sports Lighting
10000 Alliance Road
Cincinnati, OH 45242
P 800-436-7800
F 800-373-9998
Email: courtsider@lsi-industries.com
Web: www.courtsider.com
Match Point
13300 Oakhurst Drive
Elm Grove, WI 53122
P 800-670-4964
262-827-0206
F 262-827-0771
Email: jhill47733@aol.com
Web: www.match-point.biz/
Nova Sports USA
6 Industrial Road, Building #2
Milford, MA 01757
P 800-872-6682
F 508-473-4077
Email: info@novasports.com
Web: www.novasports.com/
Novagrass International Inc.
2807 Walker Road
Chattanooga, TN 37421
P 800-835-0033
423-499-5546
F 423-499-8882
Email: info@novagrass.com
Web: www.novagrass.com/
On The Line!
4810 Jean-Talon West #307
Montreal, QC H3G 1X9 Canada
P 888-635-4331
514-341-3208
F 514-342-1902
Email: info@ontheline.ca
Web: www.ontheline.ca/select.asp
Oncourt Offcourt
5427 Philip Ave.
Dallas, TX 75223
P 88-TENNIS-11
214-823-3078
F 214-823-3082
Email: info@oncourtoffcourt.com
Web: www.oncourtoffcourt.com/
Pacific USA
PO Box 367
Bondville, VT 05340
P 802-297-2256
Email: admin@naturalgut.com
Web: www.naturalgut.com/
Premier Concepts, Inc.
4051 North Point Road
Baltimore, MD 21222
P 800-458-4675
410-388-1611
F 410-388-2728
Email: info@premiercourt.com
Web: www.premiercourt.com/
Prince Sports, Inc.
One Advantage Court
Bordentown, NJ 08505
P 800-2 TENNIS
609-291-5800
F 609-291-5900
Web: www.princesports.com/
RLS Lighting, Inc.
2160 SW 58th Way
Hollywood, FL 33023
P 800-226-1757
954-983-4340
F 954-983-3691
Email: rlslight@aol.com
Web: www.rlslighting.net
Silent Partner
2221 Kenmore Avenue, Unit 106
Buffalo, NY 14207
P 800-662-1809
416-284-0061
F 416-284-8271
Email: sptennis@on.aibn.com
Web: www.sptennis.com/
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
15791 Rockfield Blvd., Suite B
Irvine, CA 92618
P 800-538-0026
949-380-0677
F 949-380-7898
Email: sales@gosenamerica.com
Web: www.gosenamerica.com/
SuperCoach International, Inc.
422 Ives Terrace
Sunnyvale, CA 94087
P 408-855-9644
F 408-855-8528
Email: sales@tennismachine.com
Web: www.tennismachine.com/
Tail, Inc.
3300 NW 41st St
Miami, FL 33142
P 305-638-2650
F 305-633-7439
Email: amyb@tailinc.com
Web: www.tailinc.com/
Tecnifibre
272 Columbine Drive
Clarendon Hills, IL 60514
P 877-332-0825
F 630-789-0714
Email: sales@tecnifibreusa.com
Web: www.tecnifibre.com/
Unique Sports Products
840 McFarland Road
Alpharetta, GA 30004
P 800-554-3707
770-442-1977
F 770-475-2065
Email: sales@uniquesports.us
Web: www.uniquesports.us/
USPTA (US Professional Tennis
Association)
3535 Briarpark Drive, Suite 1
Houston, TX 77042
P 800-877-8248
713-97-USPTA
F 713-978-7780
Email: uspta@uspta.org
Web: www.uspta.com/
Volkl Sport America
19 Technology Dr.
W. Lebanon, NH 03784
P 800-264-4579
603-298-0314
F 603-298-6134
Email: tennis@volkl.com
Web: www.volkl.com/
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
PO Box 7770
4501 Old US Hwy 41
Sun City, FL 33586
P 800-282-4415
813-641-7787
F 813-641-7795
Email: custsvc@welchtennis.com
Web: www.welchtennis.com/
Wilson Racquet Sports
8700 W Bryn Mawr Avenue, 10th floor
Chicago, IL 60631
P 800-272-6060
773-714-6400
F 800-272-6062
Email: info@wilsonsports.net
Web: www.wilson.com/flash_intro/index.html
Wimbledon, div. of The LBHGroup, Ltd.
4910 B West Rosecrans Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
P 800-421-4474
310-978-2260
F 310-978-2277
Email: kcury@lbhgroup.com
Web: www.lbhgroup.com/
WLS Lighting Systems
4150 International Plaza, Suite 150
Ft. Worth, TX 76109
P 800-633-8711
F 817-735-4824
Web: www.wlslighting.com
Yonex Corporation USA
20140 S Western Ave
Torrance, CA 90501
P 800-44-YONEX
310-793-3800
F 10-793-3899
Web: www.yonex.com/
E QUI P ME NT
Tennis Racquets
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Squash Racquets
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Fromuth Tennis
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tecnifibre
Wilson Racquet Sports
Racquetball Racquets
Courtside Sports
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fromuth Tennis
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Prince Sports, Inc.
Wilson Racquet Sports
Badminton Racquets
Alpha Sports
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fromuth Tennis
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Strings-Gut
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Unique Sports Products
Wilson Racquet Sports
Strings-Synthetic
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
Ashaway Line & Twine Mfg. Co.
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
L I S T I NG BY P RODUCT
Industry Resource Guide 2004
ADVERTISEMENT
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 49
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Strings-Hybrid
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
Ashaway Line & Twine Mfg. Co.
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Tecnifibre
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Accessories
10-S Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Grips
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Vibration Dampeners
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Stringing Machines
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Tecnifibre
Stringing Tools
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Stringing Accessories
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Bow Brand International Ltd.
Courtside Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Klip America
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Tension Testers
10-S Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Gamma/Fischer
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
Sports Bags
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Prince Sports, Inc.
Sportmode, Inc. (Gosen)
Tecnifibre
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Tennis Balls
10-S Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Oncourt Offcourt
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
Wilson Racquet Sports
Arm Bands
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Unique Sports Products
Wilson Racquet Sports
Knee Bands
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Unique Sports Products
Ankle Supports
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Gamma/Fischer
Unique Sports Products
T E NNI S AP P ARE L
Men’s
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
K-Swiss
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Wimbledon, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Yonex Corporation USA
Women’s
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
K-Swiss
LBH, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Lilly’s of Beverly Hills, div. of The LBH
Group, Ltd.
On The Line!
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tail, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Wimbledon, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Yonex Corporation USA
Children’s
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
On The Line!
Pacific USA
Wilson Racquet Sports
T-shirts
Advantage Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Dunlop Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
K-Swiss
Laserfibre, Inc.
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tail, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Socks
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
K-Swiss
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tail, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Hats/Caps/Visors
10-S Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
K-Swiss
Laserfibre, Inc.
On The Line!
Pacific USA
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tail, Inc.
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Wristbands
10-S Tennis Supply
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
K-Swiss
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tail, Inc.
Tecnifibre
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
ADVERTISEMENT
50 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Tennis Panties
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fancy Pants, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Fromuth Tennis
On The Line!
Tail, Inc.
Sports Bras
Courtside Sports
Fancy Pants, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Fromuth Tennis
Tail, Inc.
Custom Cresting
Fromuth Tennis
Tail, Inc.
Embroidery
Fromuth Tennis
Tail, Inc.
Unique Sports Products
Volkl Sport America
Team Business
ATS Sports
Fancy Pants, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Fromuth Tennis
LBH, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Lilly’s of Beverly Hills, div. of The LBH
Group, Ltd.
On The Line!
Tail, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Wimbledon, div. of The LBH Group, Ltd.
Apparel Other
Courtside Sports (Volleyball, Table Tennis)
Dunlop Sports (Tournament T-Shirts)
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports (Custom
Apparel Program)
On The Line! (High-End, High-Tech)
F OOT WE AR
Tennis
10-S Tennis Supply
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
K-Swiss
Prince Sports, Inc.
Wilson Racquet Sports
Yonex Corporation USA
Other
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
K-Swiss
Prince Sports, Inc.
Yonex Corporation USA
Insoles
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
T E NNI S L I GHT I NG
Outdoor
10-S Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
LSI Courtsider Sports Lighting
RLS Lighting, Inc.
WLS Lighting Systems
Indoor
10-S Tennis Supply
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
LSI Courtsider Sports Lighting
Other
LSI Courtsider Sports Lighting
COURT E QUI PME NT
Court Surfaces
10-S Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Classic Turf Co., LLC.
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
Nova Sports USA
Novagrass International Inc.
Premier Concepts, Inc.
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Maintenance Equipment
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Classic Turf Co., LLC.
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Surface Repair Products
10-S Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Classic Turf Co., LLC.
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
Nova Sports USA
Premier Concepts, Inc.
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Air Structures
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Air Domes
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Fencing
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Tennis Nets
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Lee Tennis
Nova Sports USA
Oncourt Offcourt
Prince Sports, Inc.
Tennis Posts
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Lee Tennis
Nova Sports USA
Oncourt Offcourt
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Scorekeepers
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fast Dry Companies
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Lee Tennis
Match Point
Oncourt Offcourt
Unique Sports Products
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Water Cooler Stands
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
Oncourt Offcourt
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Windscreens
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Alpha Sports
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Lee Tennis
Oncourt Offcourt
Volkl Sport America
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Backdrop Curtains
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Oncourt Offcourt
Netting
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Oncourt Offcourt
Ball Retrieval Equipment
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Lobster Sports, Inc.
Oncourt Offcourt
Prince Sports, Inc.
Unique Sports Products
Ball Machines
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Industry Resource Guide 2004
ADVERTISEMENT
June 2004 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY 51
Lobster Sports, Inc.
Oncourt Offcourt
Prince Sports, Inc.
Silent Partner
SuperCoach International, Inc.
Backboards
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Gamma/Fischer
Horizon Sports Group
Oncourt Offcourt
Teaching Aids
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Fast Dry Companies
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Lobster Sports, Inc.
Match Point
Oncourt Offcourt
Unique Sports Products
Water Removal Equipment
10-S Tennis Supply
Advantage Tennis Supply
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Douglas Sports Nets & Equipment
Edwards Div. of Collegiate Pacific
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc.
Fast Dry Companies
Forten Corporation
Fromuth Tennis
Gamma/Fischer
Lobster Sports, Inc.
Oncourt Offcourt
BUILDERS & DESIGNERS
Court Contractors
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.(South Florida,
Caribean)
Classic Turf Co., LLC. (All of U.S.)
Evergreen Tennis Services, Inc. (Eastern US)
Fast Dry Companies (USA, Carribean)
Horizon Sports Group (Eastern USA)
Lee Tennis
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc. (All of USA)
Facility Planners/Designers
Agile Courts Construction Co. Inc.
Classic Turf Co., LLC.
Fast Dry Companies
Horizon Sports Group
I.C.A. (Indoor Courts of America)
Lee Tennis
MI S CE L L ANE OUS
Books
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Oncourt Offcourt
Computer Software
Oncourt Offcourt
Gifts/Trinkets
Advantage Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Unique Sports Products
Nutrition/Food
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Sports Drinks
Courtside Sports
Sports Eyewear
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Prince Sports, Inc.
Unique Sports Products
Sports Watches
Fromuth Tennis
Sun Protection
Courtside Sports
Sunglasses
Advantage Tennis Supply
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports
Unique Sports Products
Tournament Prizes
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Unique Sports Products
Towels
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Volkl Sport America
Videotapes
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fast Dry Companies
Oncourt Offcourt
Water Bottles
ATS Sports
Courtside Sports
Fromuth Tennis
Prince Sports, Inc.
Volkl Sport America
Associations/Certifications
ATS Sports
PTR (Professional Tennis Registry)
USPTA (US Professional Tennis Association)
USRSA (US Racquet Stringers Association)
USTA (US Tennis Association)
USTC & TBA (US Tennis Court & Track
Builders Association)
Educational Workshops
Fast Dry Companies
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR SALE: Ten (10) brand new TST Pre-
cision 500 stringing machines, used for
the Nasdaq-100 Miami Open are avail-
able for sale. Price . . . just $2200 ea.
plus shipping. For inquiries please
email: sales@TopServe.com.au, or call
Mike at 772/285-5845.
FOR SALE: Prince P-200 stringing machine (electric), in excel-
lent condition (completely serviced in June 2003). Includes
manual, cover, 3 sets of clamps, stand-on rollers, and addi-
tional bar & clamp parts. Asking: $650. Contact: John Zed-
nick, Cary, NC 27511 • 919-859-6788 or Email:
jayze@juno.com
FOR SALE: Brand new Tecnifibre Pro Cord stringing machine.
Normal price $3500—now $3000 (freight not included).
Contact: Paul Kid 877/336-1313 or Email:
pkid@tecnifibreusa.com
FOR SALE: Two (2) Head i.Prestige MP, excellent condition.
Asking: $160 for both. Contact: Jim Wahl, Roswell, GA
30076 • 678/762-1466 or Cell 404/312-1051
FOR SALE: Grommet sets for: Prince TT Vendetta, 2 of Prince
Thunderstorm OS, Wilson Hammer 6.2 OS, Wilson Hammer
5.0 110 Stretch, Head Ti. S6, Head Ti 170/180PZ for racquet-
ball. Asking: $2 ea. plus shipping. If you take them all, $10
plus $3 shipping and they are yours! Contact: Ron Brown,
Rocky Hill, CT 06067 • 860/563-0491 or Email:
ron@allstrungup.com
FOR SALE: Two (2) Volkl Tour 10 Mid# racquets, 4-3/8 grip.
Almost new. Asking: $110 ea. or best offer. Contact: John
Foster, Charleston, SC 29407 • 843/766-8773
FOR SALE: Six Wilson 7.1 Zones, 4-3/8, brand new. Grips still
in plastic w/covers. Asking: $35 ea. including shipping. Leave
message with Tom, Atlanta, GA • 770/777-9011
WANTED: RDC or similar racquet customization unit. Con-
tact: Dina @ 718/268-2300 or Email: westsideproten-
nis@yahoo.com
WANTED: Electronic stringing machine. Technifibre, Babolat
or Gamma preferred. Contact: Dina@ 718/268-2300 or
Email: westsideprotennis@yahoo.com
USRSA CLASSI FIEDS
August ( conti nued)
21-22 USPTA Certification Pittsburgh, PA
21-22 USPTA Certification Joplin, MO
21-22 USPTA Certification Eugene, OR
21-22 PTR Certification Overland Park, KS
21-22 PTR Certification Huntingdon Valley, PA
23-24 USPTA Certification Houston, TX
24-25 USPTA Certification Reno, NV
30-31 USPTA Cerfification Torrance, CA
September
Date Event Location
2-3 USPTA Certification Freeport, NY
4-5 USPTA Certification Atlanta, GA
5-6 USPTA Certification Hilton Head, SC
10-11 USPTA Certification Minneapolis, MN
11-12 PTR Certification Wilmington, DE
11-12 USPTA Certification Rome, GA
11-12 USPTA Certification Valencia, CA
11-12 USPTA Certification Aurora, IL
25-26 PTR Certification St. Louis, MO
25-26 PTR Certification Manasquan, NJ
52 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
E V E N T C A L E N D A R
Jul y
Date Event Location
10-11 USPTA Certification Industry Hills, CA
17-18 USPTA Certification Flushing, NY
17-18 USPTA Certification Indianapolis, IN
17-18 USPTA Certification Mandeville, LA
19-20 USPTA Certification Houston, TX
24-25 USPTA Certification Santa Rosa, CA
24-25 USPTA Certification Atlanta, GA
August
Date Event Location
6-7 USPTA Certification Gastonia, NC
7-8 USPTA Certification Lexington, KY
7-8 USPTA Certification Buena Park, CA
7-8 USPTA Certification Cincinnati, OH
7-8 USPTA Certification Hamden, CN
12-13 USPTA Certification Banksville, NY
14-15 USPTA Certification Nashville, TN
20-21 USPTA Certification Rochester, NY
20-22 PTR Certification San Jose, CA
21-22 PTR Certification Philadelphia, PA
USRSA CERTIFICA-
TION LOCATIONS
CALL FOR DATES
Birmingham, AL 205-985-4989
Anchorage, AK 907-244-9810
or 225-767-1379
Scottsdale, AZ 480-483-5560
Mountain View, CA 650-968-8952
Ojai, CA 805-640-2109
San Diego, CA 858-272-9063
Boulder, CO 303-442-1412
Boca Raton, FL 561-997-0881
Clearwater, FL 727-442-7923
Ft. Walton Beach, FL 850-862-2023
Palm Coast, FL 386-446-6360
Winter Park, FL 407-673-9200
Snellville, GA 770-982-8989
Honolulu, HI 808-373-1212
Boise, ID 208-794-6236
or 208-345-4140
Northbrook, IL 847-480-7841
Overland Park, KS 913-491-4116
Baton Rouge, LA 907-244-9810
or 225-767-1379
East Lansing, MI 517-337-0002
St. Louis Park, MN 952-920-1603
Lincoln, NE 402-474-5050
Mountainside, NJ 908-233-6650
or 201-679-7535
Albuquerque, NM 505-299-8052
Commack, NY 631-543-7077
Flushing Meadows, NY 718-760-6227
Rochester, NY 585-427-2747
Cary, NC 919-859-6788
Cincinnati, OH 513-791-4636
Mentor, OH 440-357-6147
Lakeside, OR 907-244-9810
or 225-767-1379
Bryn Mawr, PA 610-525-2504
Pittsburgh, PA 412-323-0335 ext 256
West Lawn, PA 610-288-5030
Hilton Head Island, SC 843-341-8647
Myrtle Beach, SC 978-343-4944
Antioch, TN 615-731-3700
Dallas, TX 214-821-8440
Sugarland, TX 281-980-4286
Arlington, VA 703-522-2700
Farmville, VA 434-392-6081
Seattle, WA 206-812-6002
Victoria, Canada 604-418-4842
Tokyo, Japan 03-5603-1168
Ontario, CAN 519-534-3745
Tasmania, Australia 03 62348627
or 04 19 523226
Victoria, Australia 061-03-9890-3011
For additional dates and locations,
contact the USRSA, 760-536-1177.
For more information or for additional dates and locations, contact the organization directly:
PTR: 800-421-6289 • USPTA: 713-978-7782
54 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
TENNIS PROS Want to change jobs and
let everyone know you are available? Place a
Tennis Position Wanted classified here -
everyone gets RSI magazine. See details at
the bottom of this page.
TENNIS CLUBS Want to add to staff?
Place an ad in RSI; everyone reads it. All
information is at bottom of this page. We
can help.
DO YOU WANT TO BUY OR SELL A
RACQUET BUSINESS?If you don?t want
to keep it a secret, place a classified ad here.
If you want confidentiality, let us advise you.
For details, see bottom of this page.
DO YOU SELL A PRODUCT OR SER -
VICE TO TENNIS CLUBS OR RETAIL -
ERS? Why not contact them with a
classified ad here in RSI? It’s easy, just see
details at bottom of this page.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FOR THE LATEST IN TENNIS NEWS
all day every day go to
www.tennisnews.com. Why spend hours
looking for the latest news when it is all in
one place? See The Tennis Newswire now.
TENNIS CELEBSis a new weekly publica-
tion with stories and pictures of the rich and
famous tennis people. TENNIS CELEBS gets
its news from reporters around the world
sending it the latest news about the stars.
For a free sample, write
bob@tenniscelebs.com.
FREE SAMPLE TENNIS NEWSPAPER.
Get a free one-month subscription to Daily
Tennis, the world’s only daily tennis news-
paper. Get the latest news about the players,
tournaments, companies, college tennis and
even job availability. For free sample write
bob@tennisnews.com.
HOW TO HIRE A TENNIS PROGet
this free booklet that tells how to hire a pro,
step by step and avoid making a mistake.
For free copy, Call Bob Larson at 952 920
8947 or by e-mail at bob@tennisnews.com.
MERCHANDISE TO BUY/SELL
BOOKS FOR SALE We have a small
number of Vic Braden's book "Laugh and
Win at Doubles" at a closeout price of
$9.77US vs. regular price of $19.95. Postage
and handling in US $6.50. If you buy before
March 31, we will waive the postage and
handling. To order, contact
bob@tennisnews.com.
WE BUY TENNIS BOOKS —952 920
8947
WE BUY TENNIS RACKETS—952 920
8947
POSITION WANTED
Highly successful Tennis Director/Head ten-
nis professional, seeks a position in the
Southern California area. This professional
has extensive experience in all aspects
including world class instructional programs,
national junior development, and all duties
concerning operating, maintaining, and
transforming a facility into an elite class
organization. Professional is currently
employed, but will consider any position in
Southern Calif. Inquries to
bob@tennisnews.com or 952 920 8947.
HELP WANTED
CAMP STAFF MAINE
The Laurel Camps represent the finest in
Maine’s co-ed residential summer camping.
Both camps are currently seeking talented
Tennis Instructors and Professionals who
have strong tennis backgrounds and who
have experience as instructors or coaches.
Both camps boast superb tennis facilities, as
well as a strong commitment to our pro-
grams. We offer top instruction, as well as
intercamp and tournament. Each camp
offers state-of-the-art facilities, a profession-
al atmosphere and excellent salary. We also
welcome internships. Please visit our exten-
sive website at www.TheLaurelCamps.com
to submit an online application, or call us
toll-free at 800-327-3509 for a staff informa-
tion packet and application.
TENNIS COACHES CONNECTICUT
Indoor Tennis Clubs in Connecticut is seek-
ing hardworking, enthusiastic and dedicated
instructors. Minimum two-years experience
and commensurate salary. US Visa sponsor-
ship will be considered for qualified appli-
cants, if required. Contact Jeff Gocke at 203
655 2852 X 308, or via fax 203 656 1091.
SALES REP-NEW JERSEY AND
PENNSYLVANIA
Leading tennis manufacturer seeking a sales
representative in New Jersey and Pennsylva-
nia. This is a commission only position, but
some expenses are covered. Candidates
must be 4.0 rated tennis player. To apply for
this position fax resume to 800 801 3904.
SALES REPS OR DISTRIBU -
TORS NATIONAL
We are a successful company in our area and
are going nation-wide, and we want a staff
of go-getters to develop the line. We offer a
line of hats, visors, socks and sweatbands
tailored for golf and tennis. We want distrib-
ution across the US, Canada and Mexico.
Positions are commission only. Please e-mail
resumes or questions to
cushees@earthlink.net or fax 561 994 3009.
TENNIS ADVISORY STAFF SALES
Bancroft Sports, America's Oldest Racquet
Brand, is seeking qualified tennis profession-
als for part-time area sales positions of our
new racquet line. A successful candidate
will receive commissions from all sales in
their area. There are a limited number of ter-
ritories available. Phone 1-800-779-0807 or
e-mail tennis@bancroftsports.com.
SALES REPS Join the fastest growing
string company with a new fresh approach
to the tennis industry. We are seeking estab-
lished and motivated sales reps that are
looking to add a string and accessory line to
their current products. We offer a full range
of strings including synthetics, polyesters,
natural gut an gut hybrids. Sales reps are
needed across the US, Mexico and Canada.
Positions are commission-based only. Please
e-mail all resumes and/or questions to kli-
pamerica@san.rr.com or fax us at 720 559
3253.
TEACHING PROS AND COACHES
Book your dream trip NOW! Enjoy seven
days and six nights at an “all inclusive”
SuperClubs resort—the most exclusive vaca-
tion destination in the Caribbean (13 loca-
tions) for you and a companion (or with your
family). Small fee and limited teaching oblig-
ation required. Visit our websites at
www.superclubs.com and
www.sportsinternationaltennis.com. To
book or for more information, call 978 466
9393 or e-mail to sportsinternation-
al@hotmail.com.
VACATION OPPORTUNITIES
FOR TENNIS PROFESSIONALS
For only $250 plus airfare, your guest and
you could be vacationing at the #1 ultra all-
inclusive Sandals and Beaches Resorts in
Jamaica and St. Lucia. Your food, drinks and
accommodations are included as well as all
the amenities of the resort. These working
vacations run from Sunday to Sunday. For
more information, contact Mike Romisher at
847 207 9475. E-mail Vis10sPro@aol.com.
WANT TO BUY A CLUB
ATTENTION CLUB OWNERS. Experi-
enced Head Pro/Manager seeking to acquire
tennis, tennis and swim or tennis and health
club in the CT, NY, NJ region. For confiden-
tial inquiries, please contact Bob at
bob@tennisnews.com
BUSINESSES FOR SALE
TENNIS TOUR BUSINESS FOR SALE
This is a rare opportunity to own a tennis
tour company. Travel the world escorting
your clients to the most prestigious tennis
events—Wimbledon, Roland Garros, Aus-
tralian Open and the USOpen, Masters
Series events, plus Davis Cup and Fed Cup
events. Business can be re-located to wher-
ever you choose! 12 successful years in busi-
ness—hundreds of repeat clients. Call Daily
Tennis for information 952 920 8947 or e-
mail bob@tennisnews.com.
TENNIS SERVICES
At no cost for clubs, ProMatch Tennis Service
finds qualified tennis teaching professionals.
We interview, check references and criminal
background, and train. Professionals are cer-
tified either with the USPTA or the
PTR. ProMatch Tennis Service can be con-
tacted by calling 770-817-0559. You can
email us for more information at pro-
match@hotmail.com.
COURT CONSTRUCTION
Is it time to resurface or repair your tennis
court? Sport-Master’s nationwide and
worldwide network of professional sport
surfacing contractors are available to pro-
vide free on-site assessment and recommen-
dations. Phone 1 800 395 7325, e-mail
info@sealmaster.net. www.sealmaster.net.
TENNIS EQUIPMENT
FOR SALE
RALLY MASTER BACKBOARDS
Lowest price, 20 year warranty. Puncture
and crack proof. Quiet performance.
www.Rallymasterbackboards.com. 800-
725-5916
TENNIS SHADE GAZEBO’S
Unique seating/ shade gazebos for between
courts or against fences. No painting or
maintenance with Eco - Board, hunter green
plastic extruded cover over structural wood.
Special designs for units around light poles,
fences, etc.
Easy to assemble, free standing gazebo's,
do not require footings or anchors into
courts. Call (800) 928 - 7331 or visit
www.tennisgazebos.com
BUBBLE FOR SALE
Air supported structure “bubble” for a two
tennis court enclosure, translucent, available
immediately. Used only for one season, 118‚
by 108‚ by 40‚ high. Complete with new
heater/inflation system, doors and lighting.
Contact Walter Ptaszek at MSS Inc. 908 876
0146. Cell phone 908 693 6232. E-mail
waldema@goes.com.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
INCREASE YOUR NET INCOME WITH
NO INVESTMENT!
Promote the new tennis publication, TENNIS
CELEBS to your members or customers and
receive $10 for every sale. With little effort
and no investment or risk it is possible to
earn thousands of dollars annually. For infor-
mation, contact Bob Larson at
bob@tenniscelebs.com.
R S I C L A S S I F I E D S
BY BOB L ARSON
TO PLACE AN AD IN RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY
CLASSIFIEDS
Classified ads are $100 for up to 50 words. Additional words are $1 each. To place an ad
or for help in writing the ad, call Bob Larson, 952 920 8947. Deadline for the July issue is
June 1. E-mail bob@tennisnews.com.
56 RACQUET SPORTS INDUSTRY June 2004
Your Serve
You Gotta Have Heart!
The key to growing tennis, says one of the world’s greatest tennis
teachers, is to have a passion for the game.
M
any years ago, I was the tennis pro
at the Berkeley Tennis Club in Cali-
fornia. I had a regular
Saturday group of 24 kids ranging in age from
8 to 10 years old, who would spend three
hours with me on the court. Agreat thrill for
me was that when it was time for their lesson,
these kids would slamopen the club gate and
run as fast as they could to try to be first on
the court.
I had the use of only one court, so I
divided it with rope widthwise from back
fence to back fence into six playing areas,
and then divided the class into compatible
groups of four per court, and we were
off! We used wooden paddles and played
short-court tennis for 10-minute segments
and the winners would move up, the
losers down, switching partners.
I also taught them all kinds of ball
tricks, from the very simple to ones that
were more challenging, requiring skills
that helped develop their hand-eye
coordination. I would use simple scoring
techniques: add a point for gaining a
point, and minus a point for losing a
point.
At the end of the year, we had a
stroking skills competition of all the
basic strokes. Those who succeeded in
passing the skill test could buy a tennis
racquet from the pro shop at below cost.
(I controlled the feeding and we never had
a person who did not succeed!)
I would then hand the players over to
the assistant pros and start a new group.
All of the teaching pros had one
objective—not to lose a single player.
Now, many years later, our biggest
challenge is to get people playing tennis,
and to keep them playing for the rest of
their lives. Surely, with all the new knowl-
edge available today, we can find a way
to get people playing—not only to start
playing, but also to keep playing!
I think one of the greatest teaching
aids is the backboard. At a recent ATP
tennis teachers course in which pros are
transitioning from playing to teaching
tennis, the group of eight pros were
asked if the backboard played a significant
role in their learning to play tennis. All
eight hands shot up in the air immediate-
ly. There is a wonderful backboard on the
market right now that both kids and
adults love—Sportwall. It is like playing an
interactive computer game. More
emphasis needs to be placed on the back-
board and pros need to incorporate it into
their lessons.
If I could have my wish, it would be
that we have more tennis teachers who
can make the game enjoyable for any
level of player. There are many ways to
teach tennis. My choice to teach newcom-
ers is with Instant Tennis, which gets
people to learn the basic strokes in as little
as 10 minutes. It is important to get
people playing and rallying the ball as
soon as possible, and Instant Tennis is a
fantastic tool to achieve this objective. By
using large, non-threatening foam balls
like SpeedBall, new players learn the basic
strokes more quickly and competition can
be introduced much earlier.
Pros today should have a quiver full of
games so their students can avoid bore-
dom. Competition energizes the players,
but you need to win twice and lose once
to make consistent improvement. Kids like
it when they have peers who are close in
age and have compatible skills. Of course,
adults don’t like to be beaten by kids.
Games should be mostly controlled, but
there should also be some power games,
because everyone likes to hit the ball hard
on occasion.
The coaches' credo should be: A ratio
of five compliments to one correction, and
make a smile part of your life.
The only way to grow the game of
tennis is for teachers and coaches to have
heart. You can throw all the money in the
world into growing the game, and you
can develop volumes of innovative tech-
niques and programs, but only when the
pros get passionate about teaching the
game will players enjoy their beginning
experience and stay with it for life. w
“If I could have my
wish, it would be
that we have more
tennis teachers who
can make the game
enjoyable for any
level of player.”
We welcome your opinions. Please email
comments to rsi@racquetTECH.com or
fax them to 760-536-1171.
Dennis Van der Meer has
taught more people to play
and teach tennis than any-
one in the history of the
game. He has coached sev-
eral national champions,
and coached Billie Jean King
and Margaret Court for the Battle of the Sexes
with Bobby Riggs. He was voted Tennis Coach
of the Decade in the 1994 Tennis Buyers' Guide
Readers Poll and in 1997, was named Develop-
mental Coach of the Year by the U.S. Olympic
Committee. In 1972, the U.S. State Department
presented Van der Meer with a citation for
Exceptional Coaching Performance in the Mid-
dle East and in 1989, he was given the Healthy
American Fitness Award. He is the president
and founder of the Professional Tennis Registry
(PTR) and owner of Van der Meer TennisUni-
versity, World Class Academy and several ten-
nis facilities.
BY DE NNI S VAN DE R ME E R

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