NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY

2010 CATALOG

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
INTRODUCTION STUDENT SERVICES INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY PROGRAMS AND WORKSHOPS GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS: MASTER OF FINE ARTS MFA Admissions Policy Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Master of Fine Arts in Acting for Film Master of Fine Arts in Screenwriting Master of Fine Arts in Producing Master of Fine Arts in Digital Photography Master of Fine Arts in Cinematography Master of Fine Arts in Documentary Filmmaking UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS: BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS BFA Admissions Policy Bachelor of Fine Arts in Filmmaking GE Course Descriptions TWO-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMS: ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS Admissions Policy for Associate of Fine Arts Associate of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Associate of Fine Arts in Acting for Film CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AND WORKSHOPS Admissions Policy for Certificate Programs and Workshops One-Year Filmmaking One-Year Acting for Film One-Year Screenwriting One-Year Producing One-Year Documentary Filmmaking One-Year Digital Photography One-Year Cinematography One-Year Game Design Eight-Week Filmmaking Eight-Week Acting For Film Eight-Week Screenwriting Six-Week Filmmaking Four-Week Filmmaking Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Four-Week Digital Editing Four-Week Acting for Film Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Twelve-Week Evening Digital Editing Twelve-Week Evening Acting for Film Twelve-Week Evening Screenwriting One-Week Digital Filmmaking One-Week Acting for Film INSTRUCTORS ADMINISTRATION 4 9 12 23 24 25 29 47 62 76 89 99 112 125 125 132 149 157 158 160 175 236 237 239 246 254 261 268 276 281 290 296 300 303 306 310 313 316 318 321 325 327 330 332 335 338 342 2

INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE
The purpose of the New York Film Academy is to further a global understanding of, and appreciation for, the art and craft of the moving image through the education and training of interested and qualified individuals, and to hone the skills of future professionals so that they may one day serve the motion picture arts as industry leaders.

MISSION
The mission of the New York Film Academy (NYFA) is to educate students interested in the field of motion picture arts. The NYFA courses have been designed to increase students’ creativity and technical expertise through an intense regimen of hands-on and classroom instruction. The Academy’s goal is to enrich its students as filmmakers, visual storytellers, and actors by helping them to realize their personal artistic visions. NYFA’s expectations center on the growth of each student as a creative individual. In NYFA’s Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program and Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) Program, the goal of the Academy is to find, develop and hone the skills of emerging professional filmmakers and actors, educate them in the art and craft of the moving image, and prepare them for a life in the entertainment industry. The NYFA aspires to cultivate an international student body. For non-native speakers, English Language studies have been designed to encourage multi-cultural relations between native and non-native speakers of the English language and nurture an understanding of the English language, as it pertains to filmmaking.

OBJECTIVES
The NYFA has set the following objectives to fulfill its stated mission: • • • • • To provide a learning environment conducive to creative thought and artistic expression, as well as hands-on collaboration. To help students to better appreciate the art and craft of moving pictures so that they may develop as artists and better express their personal artistic visions. To empower students to find and develop a creative “voice.” To teach and develop new capabilities in students’ approach to the art and craft of moving pictures. In the Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Degree Program, to find, develop, and hone the artistic and creative skills and techniques of emerging professional filmmakers.

HISTORY
The New York Film Academy was founded in October of 1992 on the belief that a top-quality education in filmmaking should be accessible to anyone with the drive
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and ambition to make films. The school opened in Robert De Niro’s Tribeca Film Center in New York City, and today the New York Film Academy occupies its own building, formerly known as Tammany Hall. There is now a complete school facility at Universal Studios in Los Angeles, as well as in other locations around the world.

LICENSING AND APPROVALS
The New York Film Academy is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The New York Film Academy has received approval from the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education (“Bureau”) to operate as a degree granting institution. An approval to operate means that the Bureau has determined and certified that the institution meets the minimum standards for integrity, financial stability, and educational quality, including the offering of bona fide instruction by qualified faculty and the appropriate assessment of students’ achievements prior to, during, and at the end of its programs. The New York Film Academy makes no representation whatsoever that credits earned in the Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Degree Program or any non-degree program or workshop operated by the New York Film Academy will be accepted or applied toward the completion of any degree or certificate by any other postsecondary institution. The receiving school always governs the acceptance of transfer credits. This institution is approved by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, a Bureau of the Department of Homeland Security (formerly: United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization) for attendance by nonimmigrant students.

FACILITIES AT UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
The New York Film Academy’s main office, classrooms, and equipment storage are all located on the backlot of Universal Studios in Building 9128, Suite 179. The New York Film Academy also occupies space on the 5th floor of 3800 Barham Blvd, suite 509 (across the street from main campus). For both locations, there is parking in Universal’s Barham Parking Lot, just across the street from Building 9128, for a monthly fee. Students are not required to pay for parking if they do not drive or are able to find parking outside of Universal property. Students must pay a refundable fee for a magnetized Student ID Badge. This ID is required for access to several areas of Universal Studios. If badges are lost or damaged, the deposit will not be returned. Facilities Include: • Classrooms • Research Library • Computer Stations with Internet • Editing Lab • Postproduction Lab • Equipment Room • Screenwriting Lab • Administrative Offices
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• • •

Office of the Registrar International Students Office Property and Wardrobe Department

The New York Film Academy also has access to several rotating backlot locations and standing sets. Furthermore, Universal Studios makes available, upon the request of the New York Film Academy, several of their screening rooms.

HOLIDAYS
The New York Film Academy will be closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day Memorial Day Independence Day (July 4) Labor Day Rosh Hashanah Yom Kippur Thanksgiving Day Christmas Eve (half day) Christmas Day New Year’s Eve (half day)

MAIN OFFICE HOURS AND ADDRESS
9:00 am - 6:00 pm, Monday through Saturday Mailing address: New York Film Academy at Universal Studios 100 Universal City Plaza Building 9128 Suite 179 Universal City, CA 91608 Address of main office: New York Film Academy at Universal Studios 3801 Barham Blvd. #179 Universal City, CA 91608 Main office phone: Main office fax: 818-733-2600 818-733-4074

STUDENT ACCESS TO STAFF AND FACULTY
Students are provided flexible access to one-on-one consultations with each of their instructors. Additionally, all full-time faculty hold a minimum of three office hours during the week, which are determined at the beginning of each workshop or program. Administrators are readily available to provide individualized mentoring and counseling for any issues related to their individual fields of expertise. The New York
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Film Academy is open for students seven days a week, 359 days a year. When the Academy is open, a staff member is always available by phone or in person for consultation, questions, or help. Also, during hours of operation, students have access to the Library and any and all learning resources. Students may use the Editing Room by signing up one day in advance in the Post-Production Office. The Director, Jean Sherlock, is available to students for in-person or phone consultation Monday through Friday, 9am-6pm.

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION
The New York Film Academy offers all of its courses and workshops in English. The Academy does not offer courses in any language other than English, and it does not provide English-as-a-second-language instruction.

SEMESTER CREDIT UNIT DEFINITION
At the New York Film Academy, one semester credit consists of 48 hours of instruction, which consists of a combination of Seminar/Lecture class time, Lab time and Studio/Practicum hours. General Education credits are one hour of lecture to three hours of homework. Attendance is recorded for Seminar/Lecture time, Lab time, and supervised Practicum hours. Successful completion of unsupervised practicum time is determined based on the quality of students’ work product. Instructional class hours are 50 minutes.

CLASS SIZE
Section sizes are limited to 16. As there are generally four primary instructors per workshop or program per term, the instructor to student ratio is approximately 1:4.

STUDENT INTERACTION
Intra and inter-departmental interaction between students is a vital component of the collaborative experience fostered by the New York Film Academy education. Assigned studio and lab work is often collaborative in nature (as are in-class critiques of student work), but additional interaction is encouraged and supported by the Academy outside of the framework of the curriculum. All students from all departments are encouraged to attend the final screenings.

CLASS SCHEDULING
Typically classes are in session from 9 or 10 AM until 5 or 6 PM, five days per week. Classes may be scheduled to run later in the day or on a Saturday. Twelve-Week Evening Workshops meet Monday through Thursday from 7-10 PM. Extensive lab and Studio/ Practicum hours are generally required in evenings and on weekends.

NOTE ABOUT OUR SCHOOL
Consistent with the mission and educational objectives of NYFA, the focus of the Academy's Workshops is to develop each student's artistic and creative potential in the art and craft of the moving image. In each Workshop, One-Year Program, or Degree Program, the student is exposed to a particular aspect of filmmaking. Filmmaking, Cinematography, Acting, Producing, Screenwriting, and Editing are all
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means by which a student may express his or her personal artistic visions. The school makes no representation that any of its workshops will result in employment or in a career or vocation in any particular area of filmmaking. The Academy's main goal is to "enrich its students as filmmakers, visual storytellers, screenwriters, producers, and/or actors” by helping them to realize their personal artistic visions, as stated in the mission statement. The fact that some of our graduates may go on to become successful directors, producers, or actors means that they accomplished this on their own, due to their own talent, hard work, and persistence.

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STUDENT SERVICES
LEARNING RESOURCES DIRECTOR
The Learning Resources Director is available to students for assistance in locating all research resources, including library holding, Internet, and other online services. On the first day of class, the Learning Resources Director will conduct an orientation on all research techniques and strategies to access the learning resources required to successfully complete each student’s educational program.

LIBRARY RESOURCES
Students have access to the Academy’s library during all hours of operation. The library includes the following resources to facilitate the needs of its students: • • • • • • • • High speed internet access Reference books Access to the OCLC online library Periodicals Books on filmmaking and acting theory DVD movie collection Sound effects library Collections of films by former students

The Library is designed to support the instructional and research needs of students by providing a multi-media environment that encourages independent study, furthers a student’s understanding of filmmaking and acting, and ultimately enhances the quality of student work. Reference materials on film festivals and talent agencies, biographies on filmmakers who have created successful careers for themselves, and other job-related information resources are made readily available to every student.

EDITING RESOUCES
The Editing Room is open daily so that students may edit their projects. Regardless of availability, students must always sign up for editing shifts with the PostProduction Office 24 hours prior to each requested editing slot. An instructor will be on hand to assist students whenever the Editing Room is open.

PRODUCTION RESOURCES
On Production Workshop days, equipment is made available to filmmaking students so that they may film exercises under the supervision of their instructors. For weekend film shoots, students check out equipment on Friday evenings. This equipment is due back on Monday mornings. For extended film shoots (as in the 6Week, 8-Week, and 1-Year Filmmaking Programs), equipment is made available to students as strictly outlined in their course schedules.

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ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT
Faculty Advisors are responsible for monitoring student academic progress throughout the One-Year, AFA and BFA Programs and the MFA Degree Program. Students meet with Advisors at the beginning of each term for information about the educational continuity between consecutive courses (within a given department) for their respective program and for guidance or information concerning applicable fields of study.

TEACHING ASSISTANTS
The Academy provides approximately one Teaching Assistant for every four students during hands-on camera testing and production workshops. The Teaching Assistants provide supervision and guidance to students, while they learn and develop the art of filmmaking. The Teaching Assistants help ensure that all practice time is productive and beneficial.

MENTORING
Mentoring is an important part of the educational experience at NYFA. The administration considers mentoring an essential part of each workshop. At any point during the course of a workshop, students have access to instructors and staff for consultation. Instructors and staff provide one-on-one consultation, upon request, in both degree and non-degree programs.

HOUSING ASSISTANCE
Housing in Los Angeles is plentiful. Although the Academy has no formal dormitories, the New York Film Academy is committed to helping students find options for accommodation during their educational program. Students may request assistance from the Director of Admissions in securing housing options. The Director of Admissions oversees all such requests and ensures that an NYFA staff member is assisting those in need. Upon request, potential students will be sent a housing list either by mail or email. The New York Film Academy has prepared a Housing Suggestion List based upon budget and transportation requirements. Prices vary, depending on location and type of facility, from as low as $500 per month for a shared house or apartment to $2500 for a one-bedroom luxury apartment. The Housing Suggestion List includes advice for students with or without cars, apartment-finding services, tenant resources, apartment hunting tips, and useful definitions and abbreviations.

TUITION ASSISTANCE
While the New York Film Academy does not participate in any state or federal financial aid programs, the Academy does offer tuition assistance in the form of private Career Training Loans through Sallie Mae and Bank One. The Bursar will counsel students and refer them, if applicable, to a financial advisor at the New York Film Academy campus in New York, NY.

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PLACEMENT SERVICES
For those who are interested in working professionally in the entertainment industry, the New York Film Academy (NYFA) does provide information about the film industry and the business of filmmaking, and gives career-building advice on a caseby-case basis. The New York Film Academy does not provide industry or internship placement for current or former students. It is not the goal of the New York Film Academy to secure employment for its students, but rather to enrich and educate each student in the art and craft of the moving image. Due to the structure of the film industry, a traditional job placement program is not possible, nor is it the goal of the Academy to provide professional training. The New York Film Academy is exempt from Article 7 of the New Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education Reform Act of 1998 for its non-degree workshops and programs. New York Film Academy makes no representation that instruction leads to employment either in its nondegree or its degree program offerings.

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INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY
The performance of all students in each course of study in all New York Film Academy degree and certificate workshops and programs is evaluated on the A-F letter grade system. Letter grades are then translated into the standard four point collegiate grading scale. Students must maintain a cumulative average of 2.0 or better (on the four point scale) in order to remain in good academic standing at the New York Film Academy. Students who fail to meet this standard are subject to academic probation, suspension, and/or expulsion from the workshop, program, and the Academy as a whole.

GRADING POLICY
Classroom performance in seminars and lectures will be determined by a combination of preparation, class participation, and successful completion of all inclass exercises. The specific percentage of grade affected by this evaluation will be available in the course syllabus. Additionally, students are graded on any projects assigned within a particular course, workshop, or program. This may include tests, papers, films, or other assignments. The specific percentage of grade affected by this evaluation will be available in the course syllabus. In Filmmaking and Digital Filmmaking workshops and programs, students will be graded according to their performance in: Story, Aesthetic, Direction of Performance, Adherence to Budget and Schedule, and Overall Impact. The same applies for Thesis Option A and Thesis Option B of the Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Degree Program. In Thesis Option C of the New York Film Academy Master of fine Arts in Filmmaking degree program, students will be graded on their performance in: Aesthetic Approach, Consistency of Tone, Consistency of Lighting, Consistency of Spatial Continuity, and Overall Impact. Students in Acting workshops and programs will be graded according to their performance in: Character Choices, Strength of Performance, Ability to Take Direction, Emotional Vulnerability, and Technique. Students in Producing workshops and programs will be graded according to their performance in: Adherence to Budget, Adherence to Schedule, Story Development, Production Value, and Overall Impact. Students in Screenwriting workshops and programs will be graded according to their performance in: Story and Character Development, Stylistic and Tonal Consistency, Dialogue, Screenplay Execution, and Overall Impact. Students in Digital Editing workshops and programs will be graded according to their performance in: Approach to Spatial and Temporal Continuity, Editing of Performance, Pacing and Rhythm, Sound and Music Editing, and Overall Impact.
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ATTENDANCE POLICY
In New York Film Academy One-Week Workshops, attendance for all classes is mandatory. Should a student have an unexcused absence in any One-Week Workshop, he/she must make up all classwork immediately in order to continue with that current course. Failure to do so will result in suspension or expulsion from the course. In 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-Week Workshops, One-Year Programs, and the Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Degree Program, students are allowed 15 % absence relative to the program length. Specific absence allotments are detailed on the course syllabus. A student with excessive absences in a degree or non-degree program will be contacted with a date and time for a Disciplinary Review Hearing (this requires approval of the Department Chair). At the hearing, the appropriate course of action will be determined for that student given his/her explanation for absences and the Academy’s records of the student’s overall attendance and participation. A disciplinary hearing can result in suspension from the workshop or program. If a student is suspended from a workshop or program, he/she cannot continue to study with that current class. The student may return for a future program. However, a Disciplinary Review Hearing in a future workshop or program would result in expulsion. Students who are expelled from a workshop or program, or choose to not continue after a suspension, will receive refunds only in accordance with the policy outlined by the State of California Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education. Additionally, missed classes have a negative effect on a student’s grade for each course. The effect that absences will have on a student’s grade are detailed on the course syllabus.

ACADEMIC AND ATTENDANCE DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES
Students are expected to abide by the Attendance Policy and Academic Standards Policy throughout their tenure at the New York Film Academy. Those students who fail to live up to their obligations in these regards will be subject to disciplinary review and/or action. Disciplinary action at the New York Film Academy includes three categories: Probation, Suspension, and Expulsion. Attendance Probation Students who fail to abide by the New York Film Academy’s Attendance Policy will be placed upon Attendance Probation. Default Attendance Probation is for a period of eight weeks. The length of probation can be amended at the student’s Disciplinary Review Hearing. For the duration of the student’s probation period, he/she cannot miss or be late for a single class, class exercise, production workshop, or official school production. Students on Attendance Probation who violate these terms will face suspension or expulsion, pending an additional Disciplinary Review Hearing. Students may only be placed on Attendance Probation once in a single academic year. A student who violates the attendance policy a second time will face suspension or expulsion from the New York Film Academy.
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Academic Probation Students who receive a letter grade of “F” in one course will be placed on Academic Probation. In order to remain in a particular workshop or program, students who have been placed on Academic Probation must earn a grade of “C” or better in all subsequent courses for the duration of one Academic Year. They must also complete additional coursework assigned by the instructor who gave the failing grade, in order to achieve a passing grade and earn credit for the course. The extent of the additional coursework will depend upon the level of deficiency of each student, as determined by the instructor. Students remain on Academic Probation for one full Academic Year. Any student who receives a grade of “F” in two or more courses, prior to being placed on Academic Probation, will be required to attend an immediate Disciplinary Review Hearing. Possible outcomes of this meeting include suspension and expulsion. Students on Academic Probation who receive an additional “F” for subsequent courses during the duration of their probation will face an immediate and mandatory Disciplinary Review Hearing. The outcomes of this hearing may include suspension or expulsion. Students who are expelled or suspended for reasons of academic deficiency may take advantage of the New York Film Academy student tuition refund policy. Simultaneous Probations Students can be placed on each specific probation one time per Academic Year. A student may be placed on Attendance Probation and Academic Probation simultaneously and remain in their program, provided that they have not been placed on probation at a previous time.

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CODE OF CONDUCT POLICY
1. Under no circumstances are drugs or alcohol allowed on the premises of the New York Film Academy or Universal Studios. Anyone found to possess alcohol or any illegal substances will be subject to expulsion from the New York Film Academy. Any student found associating with a student in possession of alcohol or illegal substances is subject to suspension from the Academy, and will meet with the Director to determine if the student will be expelled. 2. Students must remain quiet in the hallways and general areas surrounding the Academy. Students must not approach or, under any circumstances, enter neighboring offices. Students may not, under any circumstances, enter any of the neighboring offices or attempt to solicit them for employment. Students must cross Barham Boulevard at the crosswalk located at the corner of Barham Boulevard and Lakeside Plaza, between Barham Parking Lot and 3801 Barham Boulevard, where the New York Film Academy is located. 3. Students must follow all Editing and Post-Production Department guidelines for proper conduct in the editing facilities and for while using all NYFA editing and post-production equipment. The guidelines range from how to correctly handle the equipment to the times that editing is permitted at the NYFA. Students are to follow similar guidelines with regard to the filmmaking equipment. These guidelines will be outlined to students on the first day of class. Failure to comply with these guidelines will result in disciplinary measures, including temporary loss of editing privileges, suspension of equipment checkout privileges, and removal from final film screenings. 4. Guns, knives, weapons, or explosives of any kind (regardless of license) are never permitted on the property of Universal Studios, or including the New York Film Academy. Any student found in violation of this will be subject to expulsion. 5. Any student or crewmember who participates in the filming of a project featuring the use of a prop gun in an exterior setting (unless licensed by Film, LA Inc. and supervised by an LAPD officer) is subject to expulsion from the Academy. Any student or crewmember who participates in the filming of a weekend project featuring the use or display of a real firearm in any setting is subject to expulsion from the Academy and will be reported to the authorities for further investigation. Any recorded media that is found to be in violation of the preceding rules may be confiscated and destroyed. 6. Due to increased security, entering and leaving Universal Studios Backlot can be a very timely and frustrating process. Students must be courteous and patient with all studio personnel, security guards and staff at all times. If a student feels as if any member of the Universal Studios
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staff has unfairly treated him or her, they can file an incident report with the Department Heads of the New York Film Academy for assistance.
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Students must be dressed in appropriate attire at all times. Shirt and shoes are required in all of the New York Film Academy.

8. Students must adhere to all rules in the Production or Acting Handbook while on campus, at any Academy-sponsored events, and/or on the Universal Studios Backlot: A) Students must be respectful of the Universal Studios tram tours. B) Students must not stray from the set on which they are filming. C) Students may not climb to rooftops of buildings unless supervised by an instructor. D) Students may not scream or make any other disruptive noise for any reason. 9. Students who fail to abide by these rules will be subject to suspension and/or expulsion from the New York Film Academy. 10. Slander, threatening remarks, sexual harassment and, threats of violence and any physical violence to any New York Film Academy instructor, staff member or student will not be tolerated. Any student who fails to comply with this rule will be subject to suspension or expulsion. 11. The New York Film Academy is a creative and artistic environment. While we embrace each student’s right to free speech and expression, any form of discrimination based on age, race, religion, or sexual preference toward any New York Film Academy instructor, staff member or student will not be tolerated. Any student who fails to comply with this rule will be subject to suspension and expulsion. 12. Students are strictly forbidden to tap Ethernet lines of the NYFA or adjoining businesses for their personal computers. Our network holds confidential information and tapping into it poses a security risk to the New York Film Academy. Any student who fails to comply with this rule will be subject to suspension and expulsion. 13. Students are responsible for Props and Wardrobe at all times while in their possession. If Props or Wardrobe are damaged in any way, the student is responsible for the replacement value dictated either by the NYFA or the Universal Studios Property/Wardrobe Department. 14. Students found misusing or vandalizing property owned by the New York Film Academy, Universal Studios, or any of our neighbors are subject to fines and/or immediate suspension. 15. The New York Film Academy expects all faculty, staff and students to conduct themselves in a considerate manner. Students who disrupt classes may face disciplinary actions. Behaving in an aggressive, harassing, or threatening manner to other students, faculty or staff can also result in suspension or expulsion. 16. Students are required to carry a valid photo I.D. (driver’s license, official state identification card, passport, Universal Studios I.D.) with them at all
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times while on the premises of the New York Film Academy, Universal Studios and/or any of its productions, official student functions, and events. Any student not possessing a valid photo I.D. may be denied entry to the New York Film Academy, Universal Studios, or any of its functions and events, or be removed from such premises at the discretion of New York Film Academy staff. 17. Students are responsible for the conduct of all guests that they bring to the premises, facilities, productions, and events of the New York Film Academy. Students may be held liable for any violations of this Student Code of Conduct committed by such guests and can face disciplinary action for all violations that occur. 18. Students are prohibited from recording audio or video class lectures without written permission from the Director of NYFA. 19. Any student who has been expelled for Code of Conduct violations will forfeit their right to the New York Film Academy Refund Policy.

SUSPENSION
Students suspended from a New York Film Academy Workshop cannot continue instruction in their current session. The student may have the option of resuming study at the Academy with a future class, pending approval of the Academic Dean or Admissions Committee. A suspended student returning to a future Academy workshop, who again violates Academy policy and requires a Disciplinary Review Hearing, faces immediate expulsion. Suspended students may take advantage of the New York Film Academy’s Student Tuition Refund Policy. Any suspended student approved to rejoin a future Academy workshop must re-enroll with the workshop by the official start date of the program. Students re-enrolling must pay the full amount of tuition for that semester.

EXPULSION
Students expelled from any New York Film Academy Workshop or Program cannot continue instruction with their current course. These students are unable to enroll in any future Academy Workshops. A student expelled from the New York Film Academy due to academic or attendance deficiency may take advantage of the New York Film Academy’s Student Tuition Refund Policy. Those students expelled for violation of the Student Code of Conduct are not eligible for the student tuition refund policy (see Student Code of Conduct No. 19).

APPEALS PROCESS
Students may appeal their suspension or expulsion before the Grievance and Appeals Committee. All students have the right to due process and may appeal their case before the administration. Students who wish to have their appeal heard must follow the Appeals Process. While the Grievance and Appeals Committee will hear appeals filed by suspended and expelled students, it will uphold or overturn the original decision at its sole discretion.
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ACADEMIC FREEDOM POLICY
The New York Film Academy believes in the free pursuit of intellectual and artistic inquiry and exchange of ideas by and between instructors and students. Controversial subjects may be explored without fear of censure, retribution or reprisal, so long as the work occurs within the scope of the New York Film Academy education and is consistent with its stated Academic Freedom Policy. Institutional Academic Freedom Policy will be made available to any person upon request. Students, staff and faculty are free to express themselves and explore their artistic horizons as they see fit, provided that they remain in compliance with state and federal law, and so long as they can successfully demonstrate that the work discussed/performed/completed was created with an artistic intent. Pornographic depictions created with commercial intent or used for commercial purposes will not be tolerated, and the creators of such work will be subject to expulsion/dismissal from the Academy. Instructors are free to discuss controversial subjects in class and screen controversial works without fear of reprisal, so long as the work serves the overall goal of New York Film Academy curriculum. Work that contains nudity, graphic sexual depictions, extreme violence, and/or excessive profanity may be precluded from a public screening at the discretion of the administration. Films precluded from public presentation will be screened in private for an appropriate, invited audience.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC HONESTY AND CREATIVE INTEGRITY
The New York Film Academy expects all students to be responsible individuals who insist on high standards of honesty, personal conduct and creative integrity. All incidences of plagiarism, cheating, deliberate hindrance in other student’s work and other forms of dishonesty and misconduct are considered serious offenses and will be subject to a Disciplinary Review Hearing at which penalties will be imposed.

FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND POLICIES ON HARASSMENT, DISCRIMINATION AND SEXUAL ASSAULT
The New York Film Academy is an open, artistic environment. While we embrace the artist’s right to free speech and expression, any form of discrimination (whether based on age, race, religion, gender, or sexual preference, etc) will not be tolerated. Any student who fails to respect these terms is subject to suspension or expulsion by the Director and the Director of Education. Threatening remarks from students (verbal slander, sexual harassment, threats of violence, etc) and/or any act of physical violence from a student towards any instructor, staff member, student, or other person in general will not be tolerated. Any student who fails to respect these terms is subject to suspension or expulsion. Threatening remarks from faculty, staff, or administration (verbal slander, sexual harassment, threats of violence, etc) and/or any act of physical violence from a faculty, staff, or administrative employee towards any other instructor, staff member, administrator, student, or other person in general will not be tolerated. Any employee who fails to respect these terms is subject to immediate termination.
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Any act of sexual assault or any other physical violence will immediately be reported to the proper legal authorities. Any student, staff, faculty, or administrators who fall victim to sexual assault will be immediately taken to the nearest hospital for medical treatment and emotional counseling. Information on crisis counseling is available in the Office of the Registrar.

EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY POLICY
The New York Film Academy operates within the guidelines of federal and state law with regard to the maintenance, organization, and protection of student files. The Academy is aware of, and in compliance with, guidelines established by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 concerning protection of confidentiality and privacy of student records. A copy of FERPA guidelines is available for review in the Office of the Registrar. All records for each New York Film Academy student are kept in separate Academic and Financial files in locked fireproof cabinets in the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar’s office is located inside the school, under 24-hour security surveillance, within the perimeter of Universal Studios. The Registrar’s office remains locked at all times. The Registrar must accompany anyone entering the Registrar’s office. All Academic and Financial records for each student, including current, graduate, or withdrawn, will be stored for a minimum of 50 years after the date of their first class at the Academy. Should a complaint arise concerning a particular student, the Academic and Financial files pertaining to that student will be maintained for the life of the corporation.

DROP OUT AND INCOMPLETE POLICY
Students may not withdraw from any specific class without withdrawing from the workshop or program as a whole. “Incomplete” is not a valid grade at the New York Film Academy. Students who withdraw from a workshop or program during a term may not pick up where they left off; rather, they must re-apply to the Admissions Committee and start over at the beginning of the term. Any student wishing to withdraw or drop out of a workshop or program may take advantage of the NYFA Refund Policy.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY
Students may be allowed one leave of absence (no more than one consecutive twelve-month period) for extreme hardship, personal emergency, or family emergency. Barring this, students must complete the program in one continuous progression.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND GRIEVANCE POLICY
All students have the right to due process in any action brought against them by the New York Film Academy that may adversely affect their academic status with the institution. Students have the right to petition for special consideration with regard to the academic and administrative policies and procedures when circumstances beyond their control prevent them from adhering to said policies and procedures. Students have the right to file a complaint with the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education if they believe that the New York Film Academy is in
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violation of the provisions of the New Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education Reform Act of January 1, 1998, concerning institutional integrity and consumer protection. Students have the right to be fully informed of their rights at the New York Film Academy prior to signing their Enrollment Agreement with the institution.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE
The New York Film Academy will address all appropriate student grievances promptly. A grievance is considered appropriate if a student expresses feelings of dissatisfaction concerning any application or interpretation of the New York Film Academy’s administration or management-related policy. Jean Sherlock, Director of the New York Film Academy, is the student complaint designee. 1. Complaints or problems with the New York Film Academy should be directed to Jean Sherlock, the Director. Phone: 818-733-2600. 2. All student complaints will be investigated thoroughly, including interviewing all people and reviewing all documents that relate to or may potentially relate to the complaint. 3. If the complaint is determined to be valid, all necessary steps will be taken to provide the appropriate remedy for the complaint. 4. Following a valid complaint, the New York Film Academy will implement reasonable policies or procedures to avoid similar complaints in the future. 5. If the complaint is submitted in writing, the Grievance and Appeals Committee will provide the student with a written response within 10 days of receiving the complaint. 6. A written summary of all complaints will be kept in Student Records for a minimum of 5 years following the date that the complaint was first received. 7. If you have any complaints, questions, or problems that you cannot work out with the school, write or call the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education: Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education 1625 North Market Blvd. Ste S202 Sacramento, CA 95834 Phone Number: (916) 574-7720

CANCELLATION POLICY
Each student must sign the NYFA Enrollment Agreement Contract before beginning each degree or non-degree program or workshop. Students may cancel their Enrollment Agreement or Contract with the Academy without any penalty or obligation if they do so prior to midnight on the first day of instruction. If a student cancels prior to midnight on the first day of instruction, as evidenced by postmark, any payment the student has made and any negotiable instrument signed by him or her shall be returned to the student within 30 days following the school’s receipt of the cancellation notice, less the non-refundable deposit amount of $100.00.
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The Notice of Cancellation Form is available in the Office of the Registrar or can be mailed to a student’s home, upon request. Any student who intends to cancel an Enrollment Agreement must mail or personally deliver a signed and dated copy of the Notice of Cancellation Form, or any other form of written notice, as long as it abides by all the provisions stated in the Academy’s Notice of Cancellation Form to: Jean Sherlock, Director New York Film Academy 100 Universal City Plaza Building 9128, Suite 179 Universal City, CA 91608

REFUND POLICY
In compliance with California education law and BPPE regulations, the New York Film Academy advises each student of the following policies with regard to refunds of tuition and institutional charges: A notice of cancellation or withdrawal must be made in writing. The written request must include the following information: specific timeframes, such as the date the course started and the date of cancellation or withdrawal. Notice of Withdrawal forms are available in the Office of the Registrar. Any student who intends to cancel or withdraw must submit a signed and dated copy of the Notice of Withdrawal Form, or any other form of written notice that includes the required information to: New York Film Academy 100 Universal City Plaza Building 9128, Suite 179 Universal City, CA 91608 REFUND CALCULATION:

Refund for transfer credits Transfer of credits will be awarded with a deduction in overall tuition of $725.80 per credit unit cost, deducted from tuition costs (excluding equipment fees) in the final year of matriculation. Refund policy for long-term programs (15 weeks or more) The New York Film Academy will refund 100% of the amount paid for institutional charges, less an administrative processing fee of $100.00 if notice of cancellation is made through attendance at the first class session, or the seventh class day after enrollment, whichever is later.

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Refund Policy for short-term programs (14 weeks or less)
A student who cancels within 7 days of signing the enrollment agreement but before instruction begins receives all monies returned with the exception of the nonrefundable registration fee. Thereafter, a student will be liable for: 1. the non-refundable registration fee plus 2. the cost of any text book or supplies 3. tuition liability as of the student’s last date of physical attendance. Total tuition liability is determined by the policy below:

Short-term Refund Policy:
If Termination Occurs: 0-15% of the program 16-30% of the program 31-45% of the program 46-60% of the program After 60% of the program School May Keep: 0% 25% 50% 75% 100%

Refunds are disbursed within 30 days of the official withdrawal from the school. The withdrawal is dated on the day that the student gave written notice to the school.

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NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY PROGRAMS AND WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW
COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Eight-Week Filmmaking Eight-Week Acting for Film Eight-Week Screenwriting Six-Week Filmmaking Four-Week Filmmaking Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Four-Week Acting for Film Four-Week Digital Editing One-Week Acting for Film One-Week Digital Filmmaking Twelve-Week Evening Digital Editing Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Twelve-Week Evening Acting For Film Twelve-Week Evening Screenwriting

ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
One-Year Filmmaking One-Year Acting for Film One-Year Screenwriting One-Year Producing One-Year Documentary Filmmaking One-Year Digital Photography One-Year Cinematography

TWO-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Associate of Fine Arts in Acting for Film

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Filmmaking

GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking Master of Fine Arts in Acting for Film Master of Fine Arts in Screenwriting Master of Fine Arts in Producing Master of Fine Arts in Digital Photography Master of Fine Arts in Cinematography

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GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS MASTER OF FINE ARTS

MFA ADMISSIONS POLICY
An ideal applicant for the New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts programs must demonstrate a sincere passion for motion picture storytelling, the ability and desire to collaborate with other artists in a creative environment, and must submit a creative portfolio (Supporting Materials) that illustrate the applicant's ability to undertake graduate level study, accelerated level of talent and potential for success within the profession. Candidates for admission to the Master of Fine Arts programs must possess a Bachelor's Degree from a post-secondary institution recognized by the United States Department of Education. No particular major or minor is required as a prerequisite for admission, but applicants with a strong background in storytelling, and/or the arts are preferred. While GPA will be taken into consideration, and is an important component of the admission's process, the strength of the candidate's creative portfolio is also a significant determining factor for admission. Special attention will be given to grades assigned in areas of study related to any aspects of storytelling arts such as the visual arts, creative writing, theater arts, fine arts, performing arts, and the humanities. Applicants who wish to pursue a Master of Fine Arts Degree who have received a Bachelor's Degree (or equivalent degree) from a foreign institution must submit a credentials comparison evaluation of all undergraduate work in order to verify their Bachelor's Degree equivalency. All transcripts and portfolio materials documenting prior collegiate experience (including credentials comparison evaluation, if applicable) will be evaluated by the Academy faculty and Admissions Committee.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION
In addition to the current application form, applicants must submit the following: • Narrative Statement • Resume • Proof of English proficiency (such as TOEFL or IELTS score), if native language is other than English. (TOEFL Code: 6857) • Supporting Materials (will not be returned; see below.) • Sealed Official Academic Transcripts from prior institution(s) sent directly from the issuing institution(s) to the NYFA Registrar’s Office. • Two Letters of Recommendation verifying the applicant’s ability to undertake graduate study in the field successfully. • $50 Non-Refundable Application Fee (Check or money order only in US dollars made payable to NYFA.)

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT
Since all classes at the New York Film Academy are conducted in English, students must be able to communicate clearly in written and spoken English. Applicants for whom English is not the first or native language should submit one of the following to verify English proficiency: • An official transcript verifying completion of secondary education in which English is the primary language of communication.
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• •

TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 520 or higher (190 for computer-based test or 68 for internet-based test); IELTS 5.5 or the equivalent. A report from a valid English Language School verifying completion of course level equivalent to a 520 paper-based TOEFL Score.

In the case that the documentation is not available, a New York Film Academy representative will use a phone or in-person interview as an opportunity to determine whether or not the applicant has the necessary English language proficiency.

INTERVIEW
As part of the admissions process, MFA applicants may be required to have an interview by phone or in person with a New York Film Academy representative. The purpose of the interview is to identify the applicant's goals and prior experience. The ideal applicant has a passion for storytelling, creative expression, and artistic collaboration. The interview is also an opportunity to review the curriculum of the program with the applicant and to ensure that s/he fully understands the level of commitment required to successfully complete the degree.

TRANSCRIPTS
Transcripts from prior academic institutions must be sealed official transcripts sent directly from the institution in question to the New York Film Academy's Registrar's Office. Transcripts, which have been opened, photocopied, or augmented in any way, will not be accepted as evidence of prior academic accomplishment. Prospective students who fail to provide the admissions committee with applicable sealed academic transcripts will be declined admission to the Academy.

NARRATIVE STATEMENT
The narrative statement shall be a mature and self-reflective essay (2-3 typed pages) detailing the applicant’s reasons for pursuing a degree in the motion picture arts. The essay should take into account the individual’s history, formative creative experiences, contemporary influences and inspirations, and personal artistic dreams.

CREATIVE PORTFOLIO/ SUPPORTING MATERIALS:
Applicants must submit one or two examples of original work that best demonstrate their talent and ability as creative individuals. All film/video submissions must be submitted on DVD or hyperlink where the submission can be viewed, regardless of image capture format (20 minutes maximum). Applicants may also submit supporting materials such as slides or photographs (10 maximum). Creative samples are accepted in various stages of development, or as completed work. Examples of work can range from drawings, conceptual illustrations, storyboards, designs, photographs, three dimensional models, or digitally generated images. Students may choose to submit a typed screenplay or short story (10 page maximum). While the creative portfolio is normally the primary determining factor for admission, the New York Film Academy understands that many applicants have attained applicable skills from various professional experiences in publishing, entertainment law, theater,
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online business ventures, architecture, etc. Often, with these applicants, it is the narrative statement and resume that reveal the most about an applicant's qualifications, and potential for success in the program, to the Admissions Committee.

CREDIT TRANSFER POLICY
It is the general policy of New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts Degree Programs neither to accept transfer credits from other academic postsecondary institutions, nor to consider prior experiential learning for application toward any degree or non-degree course of study. Students desiring credit for previous academic work or training may submit a written request for such credit to the Registrar, along with any supporting documentation (e.g. transcripts or syllabi.) If credit is awarded, the length and/or requirements of the program will be adjusted appropriately, at the discretion of the Academic Dean in consultation with the Department Chair. Furthermore, the New York Film Academy makes no representation whatsoever that credits earned in the Master of Fine Arts Degree Program or any non-degree program or workshop operated by the New York Film Academy will be accepted or applied toward the completion of any degree or certificate by any other postsecondary institution. The acceptance of transfer credits is always governed by the receiving school.

BASIS FOR DECLINING ADMISSION
A student will be declined admission to the Academy if the Admissions Committee determines that he or she does not meet the requirements of the Admissions Policy, or if no space is available in the Master of Fine Arts Degree Program. Students who do not speak English will also be declined admission, given that all instruction is conducted in English. Students who are unable to meet the financial obligations of the workshop one month prior to the start date will also be declined admission.

FINANCIAL AID AND GRANTS
For information on Financial Aid & Grants, please visit our website at www.nyfa.edu

GRADUATION COMMITTEE & PROCESS
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts. The Graduation Committee is appointed by the Director of Education and consists of the New York Film Academy Registrar, the Thesis Committee Chairperson, and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields of study applicable to the student's concentration. That committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted. The registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all financial obligations to the school and academic requirements for the entire program. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the MFA degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all financial obligations.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
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In order to graduate, students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade and maintain a cumulative GPA of a "C" (2.0) or higher. Students must also adhere to the Academy's Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher for their thesis production requirement. Satisfactory completion of all semester credits is required for graduation from a New York Film Academy Master of Fine Art Degree Program. A paid fifth semester may be required to successfully complete semester credits for certain thesis options described in this book. These units satisfy semester contact hour requirements. As this is a post baccalaureate degree program, no general education units are required.

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 74 - 80

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Filmmaking is an accelerated, four or five semester conservatory-based, full-time graduate study program. Designed to educate talented and committed prospective filmmakers in a hands-on, total immersion, professional environment, the New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking provides a creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Filmmaking students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning and production goals. In a combination of hands-on classroom education and intense film shoots, students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of motion picture arts and aesthetics, and learn to integrate knowledge into professional experience.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education and an environment that empowers them to artfully tell their stories. Through a sequence of workshops, students begin to work through a number of visual, dramatic, and technical challenges. They rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to make a film. All students participate in an intensive series of courses in Directing, Screenwriting, Producing, Cinematography, and Digital Editing to prepare them for more advanced topics and projects in Year Two.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
Students extend and deepen their in-class learning by producing their own short 16mm films. Working in crews of three or four, each student writes, produces, directs and edits four films, the fourth being up to 10 minutes in length. In addition, each student fulfills the essential roles of Director of Photography, Assistant Camera Operator, and Gaffer (Lighting Technician) on the films of the members of his/her crew. After only the first two months of instruction, each student has the extensive hands-on experience of working on sixteen different short films. Beginning with the third month, students receive intensive instruction and hands-on experience in digital video and digital editing. Each student directs three digital projects and crews on approximately nine additional projects. Following this production period, students’ time will be devoted to Screenwriting, Directing Actors, and Critical Studies. The combination of these classes will prepare students for the second semester and production of the Intermediate Films.

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Learning Goals: 1. Art, aesthetics, and technique of visual storytelling including directing, 16mm cinematography, editing, and sound design. 2. Fundamentals of digital video production and digital editing. 3. Survey and examination of film studies from a director’s perspective. 4. Fundamental training in acting and directing actors. 5. Immersion in screenwriting craft. Production Goals: 1. Write, direct and edit four short non-synchronous 16mm Films. 2. Crew as Cinematographer, Gaffer, and/or Assistant Camera on approximately 14 additional films. 3. Write a short film script with dialogue. 4. Shoot and edit two digital directing exercises and one short film on digital video.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their film craft artistically and technically, and to progress beyond their earlier experiments with the medium. Building upon the filmmaking foundations learned in the previous semester, students will conceive and create a polished short film up to 15 minutes in length (Intermediate Film). This film may be shot on 16mm film, 35mm film, or on High Definition video, depending on each student’s personal aspirations, creative decisions, and budget. Each student comes to the second semester with a script (written in Semester One) for his/her Intermediate Film Project. These projects are the primary focus of the second semester, and are used in several classes as a basis for learning. The semester is divided into three distinct phases. The first is devoted to intensive handson instruction, demonstration, group sync-sound directing exercises, individual consultations, and pre-production (including casting, rehearsal, and location scouting). The second phase of the semester is the production period during which each student directs his/her own film, and crews on his/her classmates’ films. The third phase of the semester is devoted to post-production. During this phase, students edit digitally, receive instruction and critique, and screen rough-cuts of the films. They also receive feedback and finish their films for a final screening of all Intermediate Films. Learning Goals 1. Advanced filmmaking craft including directing, producing, sync-sound production, color cinematography, editing, and sound design. 2. Fundamentals of 35mm cinematography. Production Goals 1. Direct and edit a sync-sound film of up to 15 minutes (shot on 16mm film, 35mm film, or High Definition Video, and edited on Final-Cut Pro). 2. Shoot and edit scenes on 35mm film. 3. Participate as a principle crew member in fellow students’ films.

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Year-End Screenings
The Intermediate Film will be presented in a movie theater for an invited audience. Students are responsible for inviting all guests. This public screening is not part of the formal evaluation process, but serves as a celebration of the students’ progress and achievements thus far.

YEAR TWO
Coursework in the second year includes a series of highly specialized classes and workshops designed to further develop students’ knowledge and skills as professional filmmakers. Students are required to pursue one of three thesis options (described below) for the remainder of the degree program. While each thesis option differs in the length of time for completion, they are equivalent in scope and content. The final thesis is intended to reflect the student’s strengths as a filmmaker and should be of professional quality. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions, besides their own. Students who select Thesis Option B will also be required to enroll in a fifth semester to complete their project. Thesis Options: Thesis Option A: Short Form Thesis Film Students must direct and edit a short form Thesis Film of up to 30 minutes in length. Thesis Option B: Feature Length Film Production & Collaboration in a Key Crew Position on a Short Form Thesis Film In Semester Four, student must fill essential crew positions on short form Thesis Films directed by students pursuing Thesis Option A. In addition, students must present a completed draft, shooting schedule and budget for a feature project to be shot in the following semester. Students will then direct and edit their own featurelength film in a paid fifth semester. The thesis option in cinematography consists of an elective in Semester Three, a production component in Semester Four, and finally a course entitled Special Projects. This course provides a grounding in the professional life of the cinematographer and helps prepare students to embrace that role upon graduation. Students must enroll in the Advanced Topics in Cinematography elective and select from the following sets of terms: Thesis Option C-1: Complete an individual cinematography project in Semester Four. Projects may be up to ten minutes in length; however, shorter formatted projects, such as a series of music videos or commercials, may be submitted if approved by the Thesis Committee Chair. Projects will be mentored by students’ thesis advisors in Semester Three and reviewed for production approval in Semester Four. Students will have a one-week production period in which to shoot their projects. Thesis Option C-2: Collaborate as a Director of Photography on two short thesis films (directed by student pursuing Thesis Option A).

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Thesis Option C-3: Work as Director of Photography on at least one feature length film directed by an MFA student in Semester Five. Cinematography students are not required to pay for the fifth semester, but must wait until the completion of production of the feature length film (end of Semester Five) to fulfill the thesis requirement and graduate from the program.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
The focus of the third semester is on professionalism. Classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting the craft, exposing students to emerging media and technology, along with exposing them to the realities of the film industry and the business of filmmaking. This is intended to prepare MFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. During Semester Three, students participate in a thesis committee and determine which Thesis Option they will pursue over the course of Year Two (and Semester 5 for Thesis Option B). Students must meet regularly with thesis committee members in order to ensure compliance with New York Film Academy standards, and to seek assistance in the realization of their respective creative visions. Students will also begin developing feature length film scripts to later be polished and pre-produced (by students who select Thesis Options A and C) or produced, directed, and edited (by students who pursue Thesis Option B).

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
In Semester Four, students devote the majority of their time to their thesis requirements, working not only on their own productions, but also assisting with their classmates’ projects. In an extensive series of advisements, each student meets one-on-one with faculty members who assist and coach the student through the successful completion of his/her thesis. For students selecting Thesis Option B, Semester Four focuses on development and preproduction of the Semester Five feature thesis project. Students will meet one-on-one with faculty advisors as well as crew on Thesis Option A short film productions.

SEMESTER FIVE OBJECTIVES (Thesis Option B Students Only)
Students who opt for Thesis Option B will direct and edit their feature length thesis films in a fifth semester held at the end of Year Two. This semester is reserved entirely for production and post-production of these projects, plus extensive consultations with faculty and the Thesis Committee in order to ensure the timely and creatively sound delivery of each film. Thesis Option B master students will be required to pay tuition for the fifth semester. Prior to entering into thesis production, all candidates, (regardless of thesis option), must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

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Year-End Screenings
A final celebratory screening will be held at the end of Semester Four (for MFA students who chose Thesis Options A and C) and at the end of Semester Five (for students who chose Thesis Option B). The thesis films will be projected in large format in an open screening for friends, family and invited guests. Students are responsible for inviting all guests. This public screening is not part of the formal evaluation process, but serves as a celebration of the students’ progress and achievements in the MFA program.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking. Appointed by the Director of Education, it consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields applicable to filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, that the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Total Required Semester Credits: Thesis Option A or C: Thesis Option B: 74 80

With the exception of the choice of one elective and the thesis option, the MFA in Filmmaking does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The MFA is a full-time program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters for Thesis Option A and C, or less than five semesters for Thesis Option B. Students who elect to direct feature length films are required to register for a paid fifth semester of study in order to complete their thesis requirements. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 74 semester credits (Thesis Options A and C) or 80 semester credits (Thesis Option B.) Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis production requirement. Those pursuing Thesis Option B must enroll in a paid fifth semester to successfully complete all requirements for the MFA degree. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: 5th Semester (Thesis B Only): Total Tuition (4 Semesters):
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$16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $72,000
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Total Tuition (5 Semesters):
*(Additional Equipment Fee)

$90,000

OTHER COSTS: FILM, PROCESSING, & PRODUCTION EXPENSES:
Year One: Year Two: Total: $3,000 - $12,000 $3,000 - $50,000* $6,000 - $62,000*

*$50,000 for Other Costs is a very high estimate, which accounts for potential expenses accrued by students who choose to fulfill their thesis option by directing feature length films. As a norm, even students who choose to direct feature length films will not spend nearly this much money on their projects. This value was included in order to disclose an estimate for an exorbitantly expensive thesis film. While we do not limit the artistic visions of students, the Academy does encourage students to concentrate on solid storytelling rather than exorbitant spending in the design of their films. While the vast majority of thesis films will cost far less than $50,000, the potential for artistic expression in filmmaking is endless, and it is technically possible for students to spend $50,000 or even more of their projects.

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
CURRICULAR BREAKDOWN Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 72 120%* 78 130%* Art/ Design History Units 2 3%* 2 3%* Total Number of Units 74 123%* 80 133%*

Thesis Option A or C Thesis Option B

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Film Aesthetics I A Film Aesthetics I B Cinematography I Digital Editing I Digital Production Workshop Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting Screenwriting I Acting for Directors* Critical Film Studies I TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers FILM500 FILM501 FILM510 FILM520 FILM530 FILM585 FILM540 FILM550 ARDT501

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 3 2 3 2 1 2 1 0 18 Art/Design Elective Total Credit History Units Units Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 2 3 2 1 2 1 1 19

* This course may be offered in Semester One or Two, depending on scheduling and teacher availability.

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SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Film Aesthetics II Line Producing I Cinematography II Synchronous Sound Production Workshop Digital Editing II Screenwriting II Feature Screenplay I Intermediate Film Production Intermediate Film Crew Participation Intermediate Film Post Production TOTAL Course Numbers FILM505 FILM565 FILM515 FILM535 FILM525 FILM545 FILM575 FILM690 FILM691 FILM692

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 2 2 19 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 2 2 19

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Advanced Approaches to Directing Cinematography III Screenwriting: Short Form Thesis Feature Screenplay II Producing II Advanced Post Production Alternative Narratives: Documentary and New Media Critical Film Studies II Master’s Seminars Production Design and Special Visual Effects Advanced Topics in Cinematography Advanced Final Cut Pro TOTAL Course Numbers FILM600 FILM615 FILM640 FILM675 FILM630 FILM620 FILM602 ARTD601 FILM603 FILM611 FILM616 FILM626

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 2 2 2 4 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 18 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 Total Credit Units 3 2 2 2 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 20

MFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following electives:

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SEMESTER FOUR
(Thesis Options A & C ONLY)

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each MFA candidate is required to take. Course Numbers Studio or Related Units 3 7 4 2 7 2 4 16 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 3 7 4 2 7 2 4 16

Course Title

Candidates pursuing Thesis Option A or C must take the following course: Entertainment Industry Seminar Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Production Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Post Production Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Crew Participation Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography- Production Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography- Crew Participation Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography - Special Projects TOTAL FILM699 FILM690 FILM692 FILM691 FILM696 FILM697 FILM698 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 THESIS OPTIONS: Students Take One Option Only

SEMESTER FOUR
(Thesis Option B ONLY)

Course Title

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each MFA candidate is required to take. Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Numbers Related History Units Credit Units Units Units FILM693 FILM699 FILM691 FILM695 3 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 2 2

Candidates pursuing Thesis Option A or C must take the following course: Thesis Development Entertainment Industry Seminar Thesis Film Crew Participation Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Pre-Production TOTAL

10

0

0

10

SEMESTER FIVE
(Thesis Option B ONLY)

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each MFA candidate is required to take. Course Numbers FILM790 Studio or Related Units 7 Art/Design History Units 0 Elective Units 0 Total Credit Units 7 35

Course Title
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Production Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Post-Production Feature Film Marketing TOTAL

FILM792 FILM799

4 1 12

0 0 0

0 0 0

4 1 12

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Film Aesthetics I A
4 Semester Credits

The core of the first semester, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will take part in several in-class workshops and will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films. Prerequisite: None

Film Aesthetics I B

3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Film Aesthetics I A in the first semester. Students expand upon lessons already learned and complete an additional three short film projects. Prerequisite: Film Aesthetics I B

Cinematography I

2 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture and video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles. Prerequisite: None

Digital Editing I

3 Semester Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software, which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer. Prerequisite: None
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Digital Production Workshop

2 Semester Credits

Students stage and shoot complex dramatic exercises under the guidance of the instructor. They design shots to heighten the emotion of a sequence, then shoot the sequence on digital video in a supervised environment. The relationship between text and subtext is explored in depth through classroom sessions, screenings and critiques, and in the field production exercises. Prerequisite: None

Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting

1 Semester Credit

In this interactive course, students learn how proper script supervision can help filmmakers effectively tell their stories. Students break down their scripts and learn an advanced and efficient approach to the organization and management of the shooting day. Students are challenged to maximize the efficiency of shooting schedules and learn practical techniques for creating and preserving spatial and temporal continuity in their films. Prerequisite: None

Screenwriting I

2 Semester Credits

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea, treatment, and outline to a rough draft, and finally a shooting script. Instruction focuses on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue. Prerequisite: None

Acting For Directors

1 Semester Credit

This course adheres to the philosophy that in order to direct actors, one must understand and experience acting as art and methodology. Directing students will become actors. Students learn how to identify a screenplay’s emotional “beats” and “character objectives” in order to improve their actors’ performances. Students are prepared to not only communicate and collaborate with their actors, but to actualize the best emotional outcome of a scene. Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies I

1 Semester Credit

This seminar teaches students to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of filmmaking. Through screenings and discussions, students will grow to understand how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting, and editing have developed. Students are then challenged to place themselves within that development with regard to their on-going film projects. Prerequisite: None
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SEMESTER TWO Film Aesthetics II
2 Semester Credits

Building upon knowledge and skills acquired in Film Aesthetics I, this course is a concentrated examination and analysis of the aesthetic elements of the director’s toolkit as it applies to shot choice, composition, setting, point of view, character, and camera movement. Students learn how to cover complex dialogue scenes with a series of shots and practice different approaches to coverage by breaking down scenes from their own scripts. Students are encouraged to develop their own directorial style, drawing from the elements presented in this class. Prerequisite: None

Line Producing II

1 Semester Credit

This course leads students through the entire process of pre-production, including scouting and securing of locations, permits, and casting. The producing instructor and students design a production schedule for the entire class. The instructor encourages students to form realistic plans for successfully making their films. Using script breakdowns, students learn how to plan and keep to a schedule and budget for their productions. They use their own finished scripts in class as they learn how to take advantage of budgeting and scheduling forms and methods. Prerequisite: Film Aesthetics I

Cinematography II

2 Semester Credits

This class immerses students in the technical and creative demands of cinematography. They will learn to go beyond simply “getting an image” and focus on the nuances of visual storytelling. Topics include: Arriflex 16SR camera and accessories, High Definition Camera, Use of Color and Light, and 35mm cameras. In addition to being trained to operate advanced camera equipment, students study basic color theory and learn to control the color palette of their projects. Special attention is given to the emotional attributes that can be assigned to an image by changing the hue, saturation, and contrast of any given image. Students learn to incorporate these theories into their projects, and gain a greater understanding of aesthetic image control. Prerequisite: Cinematography I

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop

1 Semester Credit

This hands-on course challenges students to interpret and apply all theory and practice of the first semester curriculum in a series of sync-sound production exercises. Students shoot complex dramatic scenes on 16mm film and high definition video from their own scripts with the guidance and critique of the instructor. Students must determine what adjustments to make to their scripts and shooting plans before entering into production. These practice scenes are expected to be fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, rehearsed and pre-lit) and executed at a professional level. Prerequisite: Digital Production Workshop

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Digital Editing II

1 Semester Credit

This course teaches students to edit their sync-sound projects. Students are encouraged to expand upon previously mastered techniques to establish a consistent editing design, dialogue rhythm, and sense of pacing and continuity that compliments the story as a whole. Prerequisite: Digital Editing I

Screenwriting II

1 Semester Credit

In addition to providing an in-depth study and exploration of dialogue in film, Screenwriting II focuses on the writing, rewriting, and polishing of the Intermediate Film scripts. Students will conduct live readings of their screenplays and engage in instructorled discussions of the work. The goal of this seminar is to increase the writer’s mastery of those aspects of screenwriting as outlined in Screenwriting I. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Feature Screenplay I

1 Semester Credit

The goal of this workshop is to fully immerse each student in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing a feature film treatment. Students will learn the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of story, structure, character, conflict, and dialogue. With strict adherence to professional standards and self-discipline, students will complete a treatment of a feature-length script that will be further developed in the second year of the program. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Intermediate Film Production

6 Semester Credits

Semester two culminates in the pre-production and production of the Intermediate Film. This film project is the capstone project of semesters one through two. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 15 minutes in length of any genre style and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Intermediate Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Intermediate Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Intermediate Film Post Production

2 Semester Credits

In this course students will apply the knowledge gained so far through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Intermediate Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two
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SEMESTER THREE Advanced Approaches to Directing
3 Semester Credits

This class is an advanced exploration of the art of directing performance. Students will hone their skills and prepare a number of scenes for in-class presentation. They will be provided with a selection of pre-published texts (including plays, television scripts, and scenes from produced feature length screenplays) and workshop the scenes (both inside and outside of class) with professional actors from the local community. Instruction and in-class criticism will focus on the process of the director in working with actors. Meticulous sculpting of these scenes will continue throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Film Aesthetics II

Cinematography III

2 Semester Credits

Class sessions are designed to help students master many elements of cinematography using professional high def cameras and the Red One camera system. Proper use of advanced lighting and grip equipment such as HMI lights and dollies is taught in this course. In preparation for the upcoming projects, students learn lighting techniques of increasing complexity, building on their arsenal of skills through shooting tests and experimentation. Prerequisite: Cinematography II

Screenwriting: Short Form Thesis

2 Semester Credits

Building upon the narrative short film screenwriting skills developed in semesters one and two, this course focuses on advanced narrative storytelling techniques to be applied in the thesis project scripts. Students will take their projects from log lines to completed scripts in this class. A supportive workshop environment will allow students to work through multiple scenarios as they hone their narrative vision for thesis projects. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I & II

Feature Screenplay II

2 Semester Credits

This class is designed as a creative and academic safe-haven for students to develop, write, and polish a feature film script. In order for a student to successfully pass this class, each project must be completed and revised by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Feature Screenplay I

Producing II

4 Semester Credits

Students will apply the fundamentals of film producing to their own Thesis Project. This class continues to examine the job of producer by matching tasks and challenges with ways of approaching them. As students start to produce their own projects, the challenges will become clear, and some class time will be devoted to specific production “hurdles”. Students will hone group problem-solving skills, a film industry must-have, and learn through sharing real examples. Larger issues such as intellectual property, contracts and options will also be explored in depth. Prerequisite: Line Producing I
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Advanced Post-Production

1 Semester Credit

Students will gain a fluid knowledge of the post-production process and how it differs based upon output goals, formats, and deliverables. Emphasis is on developing a method to identify needs, and delineate costs, delivering benefits of post-production tools and the confidence to complete professional productions. Prerequisite: Digital Editing II

Alternative Narratives: Documentary & New Media

3 Semester Credits

While traditional cinema recently celebrated its one-hundredth birthday, the future of cinema is in transition as it intersects with the digital domain. This class will investigate contemporary media production as well as artistic and technical approaches in documentary filmmaking. A small production component is an integral element of this course. Prerequisite: Film Aesthetics II

Critical Film Studies II

1 Semester Credit

This seminar examines the contemporary landscape of narrative filmmaking. Style, structure, and the narrative form itself are discussed through close analysis of current filmmakers from domestic and international arenas. This course challenges students to identify techniques and a conceptual framework to apply to their own body of work. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

Master’s Seminars

1 Semester Credit

Designed to broaden students’ appreciation of the scope of the industry, these seminars invite industry professionals to address New York Film Academy MFA students, following a screening of their recent work. A broad cross-section of the film community may be represented in this lecture series, including directors, producers, directors of photography, editors, screenwriters, composers, production designers, post production coordinators, and casting directors. Students will be exposed to multiple avenues for potential employment in the film industry. All lectures will be followed by an extensive Q&A session. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

(choose ONE elective) Production Design & Special Visual Effects
1 Semester Credit

Production design and visual effects play an important role in the success of any production, as they provides the audience with the visual clues that establish and enhance the production content. Topics covered in this workshop include set design and construction, makeup design, costume design, color theory, and basic aesthetics. Students can use the knowledge gained in this class to maximize the production values of their films. Prerequisite: None

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Advanced Topics in Cinematography

1 Semester Credit

This hands-on study of the art and craft of motion picture photography provides the student with multiple approaches towards a more intelligent and artistic way of shooting. This class also provides an in depth analysis of cinematographic techniques and how they affect the visual aspects of mise-en-scene, Students who wish to crew as Director of Photography on any Year Two thesis films are strongly encouraged to take this elective. Students who choose to pursue a focus in Cinematography (Thesis Option C) are required to take this elective. Prerequisite: Cinematography III

Advanced Final Cut Pro

1 Semester Credit

Final Cut Pro is the leading editing platform for independent filmmaking and television production, and is currently being used for many low and mid-budget studio features. This standardized measure of software comprehension instills in students a sense of confidence in the editing platform they will require at the onset of their professional lives. The elective quickly moves into advanced topics including color correction, sound design, creation of Edit Decision Lists and other elements of Final Cut Studio. Prerequisite: Synchronous Sound Editing

SEMESTER FOUR: Thesis Options A & C Only Entertainment Industry Seminar
3 Semester Credits

Students will examine filmmaking from a business perspective as well as the breadth and diversity of the industry today. Topics include the history of the studio system, the roles of production companies, post-production companies, professional guilds, financing, film festivals, agents and managers. Exposure to the expansive scope of the industry provides students with knowledge about multiple potential career pathways. Students will meet industry professionals during special guest lectures. Prerequisite: None

Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Production

7 Semester Credits

Semester Four culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of semesters one through four. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 30 minutes in length, of any genre style, and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Post-Production

4 Semester Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three
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Thesis Option A: Thesis Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Thesis Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography—Production
7 Semester Credits

The production component of the Cinematography thesis option can be satisfied in one of three ways: Students may act as the cinematographer in two of their classmates’ short form thesis films, they may act as the cinematographer on one feature thesis directed by a fellow MFA student, or they may photograph their own series of projects during a oneweek production period. If students elect to undertake the last option, these projects need to bear the creative stamp of the student in addition to their contributions as cinematographers. Students may also petition to photograph both the collaborative projects with other MFA students and their own project. Permission is up to the discretion of the Thesis Committee. Prerequisite: Cinematography III

Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography—Crew Participation
2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during two of their classmates’ short Thesis Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-andbolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a cinematographer. Prerequisite: Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Option C: Emphasis in Cinematography—Special Projects
4 Semester Credits

A series of assignments and exercises conducted under the supervision of the Thesis Advisor, designed to complement the production elements. This may include the creation of a DP’s show-reel, completion of feature film lighting and grip budget and equipment plan, post-production workflow assignments, and reports on the current state of the industry and its associated equipment and technologies. Prerequisite: Completion of Semester Three

SEMESTER FOUR: Thesis Option B Only
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Thesis Development

3 Semester Credits

An in-depth examination of the producing, directorial and dramatic content of the thesis project, this class helps the student develop the project to a more realized, and attainable level. Students will need to pass clear milestones at the end of the class in order to proceed with the project in Semester Three.

Entertainment Industry Seminar

3 Semester Credits

Students will examine filmmaking from a business perspective as well as the breadth and diversity of the industry today. Topics include the history of the studio system, the role of production companies, post-production companies, professional guilds, financing, film festivals, agents and managers. Exposure to the expansive scope of the industry provides students with knowledge of multiple potential career pathways. Students will meet industry professionals during special guest lectures. Prerequisite: None

Thesis Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Thesis Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Pre-Production

2 Semester Credits

Students will enter pre-production of a feature film in Semester Four with the guidance of an appointed faculty member. Mandatory consultations with these appointed faculty members are necessary for students to gain guidance and an understanding of the grueling tasks inherent to feature length film production. These consultations will also include a clear template of delivery dates for script deadlines, casting calls, production meetings, budget breakdowns, location lockdowns and a demonstration of financial responsibility to obtain approval to shoot. Students must receive a “green light” before beginning production on their thesis films. Prerequisite: Intermediate Film

SEMESTER FIVE: Thesis Option B Only Feature Thesis Production
7 Semester Credits

Semester Five culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of all previous semesters/sessions. Students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Seven

Feature Thesis Post-Production

4 Semester Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Feature Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with
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sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision.

Feature Film Marketing

1 Semester Credit

A hands-on producing class designed to prepare marketing materials for the completed Feature Thesis Film. Students may assemble press kits, posters and trailers as part of this course. Prior to entering into thesis production, all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the Thesis Committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 66.5

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Acting for Film is a conservatory-based, four-semester, full-time graduate study program. It is intended for students who are passionate, imaginative and versatile in their craft, who also have a strong desire to further develop these attributes as they apply to the discipline of acting for film. Students in the program will be immersed in an environment created for professional development and creative freedom. In a combination of hands-on classroom education and intense acting seminars, master students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of performing as visual artists in the motion picture arts and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, master students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film acting that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education. They rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to act in motion pictures. All students participate in an intensive sequence of classes in Acting Technique, Acting for Film, Scene Study, Text Analysis, Meisner Technique, Voice and Movement, Speech, Shakespeare, Psychology of Acting and Film Craft (master lectures in Directing, Cinematography, Writing, Producing and Editing with an in-class shoot.) Learning Goals: 1. Understand the fundamental principles of acting for film. 2. Grounding in classical scene study and acting techniques. 3. Fundamentals of script and text analysis. 4. Survey and examination of film studies from a film actor’s perspective. 5 Exposure to a variety of vocal techniques. Production Goals: 1. Perform a live monologue or scene presentation. 2. Perform an in-class, filmed Shakespeare presentation. 3. Shoot in-class on camera scenes for weekly critique.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester of Year One enables students to continue developing as actors by challenging their range, and moving beyond their “comfort zone”. The second semester consists of a sequence of classes in Acting for Film II, Scene Study II, Acting Technique II, Voice and Movement II and Improvisation. Acting for Film students will also have the opportunity to collaborate with film students on Sync Sound Production Workshop projects, learn about playwrights and screenwriters, and shoot a short film project on
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location with professional staff. All instruction and film exercises are geared towards helping students complete their individual projects and production goals. Learning Goals: 1. Intermediate training in acting principles. 2. Grounding in intermediate scene study and acting for film. 3. Intermediate training in vocal, movement and improvisational work. 4. Exposure to basic visual media production. Production Goals: 1. Perform in a short film. 2. Perform in an in-class, filmed Meisner presentation. 3. Perform in a year-end, filmed scene presentation.

YEAR TWO
Through exposure to the many facets of the professional world of film acting, the second year prepares students for their thesis projects. All Year Two MFA students must complete a series of highly specialized courses, participate in multiple film productions, and ultimately deliver a thesis project of their own creation.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
At the beginning of Semester Three, students receive MFA Thesis Project Options to choose and prep for intensive fourth semester thesis work. Students will meet with Academic Advisors and mentors periodically throughout the second year. The focus of the semester is on refining performance skills. Semester Three classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting craft and exposing students to the realities of the acting industry and the business of acting. This is intended to prepare MFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. Learning Goals: 1. Comprehensive movement training. 2. Continued practice in front of camera, behind camera, in a recording studio and in post-production. 3. Exposure to and comprehension of stage vs. film performance. 4. Familiarization with vocal techniques, including voice-over and basic dialects. Production Goals: 1. Perform in short films and film exercises. 2. Perform in a live, multi-camera television shoot. 3. Prepare and record original voice-over reel in studio. 4. Learn editing skills to create professional reel.

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SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
At this point, master students devote the majority of their time to their thesis requirements. Acting faculty will coach and assist students individually in an extensive series of advisements to ensure the successful completion of thesis requirements. Learning Goals: 1. Further development of advanced scene study techniques. 2. Ability to analyze and understand contemporary screenplays. 3. Full integration of the mind-body connection for performance in front of the camera. 4. Development of skills necessary for auditioning (both for television and film). 5. Understanding of marketing tools used by film actors. Production Goals: 1. Perform an original, filmed thesis presentation. 2. Perform in a final film project for final screening.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE AND GRADUATION PROCESS
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Acting for film. The Graduation Committee is appointed by the Director of Education and consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields of study applicable to acting and filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of stated electives, the MFA in Acting does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The MFA is a full-time program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 66.5 semester credits. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition: $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $54,000

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN ACTING FOR FILM
Art/ Design History Units 65.5 111%* 1 2 %* Total Number of Units 66.5 113 %*

Ensemble/Laboratory

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
SEMESTER ONE
Course Title Acting Technique I Scene Study I Acting for Film I Meisner I Voice and Movement I Speech I Film Craft Comedy and Improvisation I Psychology of Acting Shakespeare Text Analysis TOTAL Course Numbers ACTI500 ACTI510 ACTI520 ACTI530 ACTI540 ACTI550 ACTI560 ACTI570 ACTI580 ACTI590 ACTI598 All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 15.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 0 15.5

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title Acting Technique II Scene Study II Acting for Film II Meisner II Voice and Movement II NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers ACTI505 ACTI515 ACTI525 ACTI535 ACTI545

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 49

Speech II Comedy and Improvisation II Stage Combat Playwrights/Screenwriters TOTAL

ACTI555 ACTI575 ACTI585 ACTI595

0.5 0.5 0.5 1 17

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0.5 0.5 0.5 1 17

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title Course Numbers ACTI600 ACTI610 ACTI620 ACTI630 ACTI640 ACTI650 ACTI660 ACTI670 ACTI680 ACTI690 See List

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 1.5 4 4.0 1 1.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 0 15 Art/Design History Units Total Credit Units 1.5 4 4 1 1.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 15.5

Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 0.5

Advanced Acting Technique I Advanced Scene Study: Stage to Screen Acting for the Camera: Scripted TV Voice III Movement III Monologues Audition Technique Advanced Improvisation I Building the Reel Writing for Actors Elective TOTAL

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title Advanced Acting Technique II: Designing the Thesis Advanced Thesis Workshop Advanced Acting for Film: Stage to Screen Advanced Voice & Movement: Designing the Thesis Advanced Improvisation II: Designing the Thesis Business of Acting NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers ACTI605 ACTI615 ACTI625 ACTI645 ACTI675 ACTI685

All courses are mandatory
Studio or Related Units Studio Electives

Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Credit Units

1.5 4 4.5 1.5 1.5 1.5

0 0 0 0 0 0

1.5 4 4.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 50

Advanced Writing for Actors: Designing the Thesis Thesis Portfolio Elective TOTAL

ACTI695 ACTI699 See List

1.5 2 0 18

0 0 0.5 0.5

0 0 0 0

1.5 2 0.5 18.5

**Elective courses will be offered based on demand and teacher availability and offerings are subject to change.

SEMESTER THREE & FOUR ELECTIVES
All students must complete TWO of the following electives during Year Two**: Course Title Advanced Acting Projects The Actor and the Lens Performance Analysis New Media for Actors Stunt Workshop Dance Troupe Workshop Singing for Actors Yoga for Actors Sketch Comedy Workshop Course Numbers ACTI626 ACTI627 ACTI628 ACTI629 ACTI646 ACTI647 ACTI648 ACTI649 ACTI676 Studio or Related Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Studio Electives 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – All courses are mandatory
SEMESTER ONE Acting Technique I
0.5 Semester Credit

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances. Exercises will be taped for in-class critique. Prerequisite: None

Scene Study I

2 Semester Credits

Students learn to analyze scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop a solid grounding in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students in good standing will incorporate all of the various disciplines learned in all other courses into a taped live presentation at the end of semester. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week.
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Prerequisite: None

Acting for Film I

3.5 Semester Credits

Acting for Film provides students an environment to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting, including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in a supervised Production Workshop with film students. Prerequisite: None

Meisner I

3 Semester Credits

A study of the approach to acting taught by the late Sanford Meisner. Largely based on listening and observation, the Meisner technique helps actors to act and react truthfully by being grounded in the reality of the moment. Prerequisite: None

Voice and Movement I

1.5 Semester Credits

In the “Voice” segment of this course, students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension. During the “Movement” portion, students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught to help the student find expression and freedom within the physical and vocal instrument. Prerequisite: None

Speech I

0.5 Semester Credit

In this introductory class, students work with basic elements of speech, such as auditory awareness and how sound is being created. Students also work towards creating Neutral American Speech. Prerequisite: None

Film Craft

1 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will participate in an in-class shoot, utilizing skills gained in the course. Prerequisite: None

Comedy and Improvisation I

0.5 Semester Credit

In order to truly be effective actors, students must learn how to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses. Through a variety of exercises designed to help cast off inhibitions, actors experiment with group dynamics and individual expression vital to vibrant and truthful performances. Prerequisite: None
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Psychology of Acting

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will learn about the etiquette, stamina and understanding required to effectively explore the craft of acting in an open-minded and productive manner. This class is designed to allow students to deepen the practice of their craft while maintaining a healthy balance in school and personal life. Interpersonal communication, as well as understanding the demands placed on the individual within the group dynamic will be explored. Prerequisite: None

Shakespeare

1 Semester Credit

Students are exposed to a historical perspective of the writings of William Shakespeare to better understand these classic works of theatre. In order to gain a better appreciation of this master playwright, text analysis will be done using a variety of approaches including scansion, the Freeman method (using the First Folio text), soundings, and poetic and rhetorical devices. Students will perform in a taped semester-end presentation. Prerequisite: None

Text Analysis

1.5 Semester Credits

This course teaches the core skills necessary for creating a fully realized performance, respecting the written text and assessing how to maintain the integrity of the performance while shooting out of sequence. Students will work on a variety of texts and, through class discussion and written analyses, practice this essential skill set necessary for all professional acting jobs. Prerequisite: None

Dialect Workshop (Year-Round)
In this year-round optional workshop, film actors can practice IPA work and delve into the art of dialects. Students will develop their ability to find character voices that are still grounded in solid vocal technique to promote full control and stamina, allowing for dynamic work in television, film and voice-over. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of speech and diction for actors, and to basic dialects that are used most commonly in contemporary dramatic texts. The course emphasizes the embodiment of a spontaneous relationship to the creative imagination that informs spoken communication, and the clear expression of the text supported by the film actor. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Acting Technique II
1.5 Semester Credits

Through further practice of acting techniques developed in Semester One, students continue to refine their toolbox of choices for their work on increasingly complex material in other classes. Exercises will be taped for review in class. Prerequisite: Acting Technique I
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Scene Study II

3.5 Semester Credits

Students continue developing the skills gained in Scene Study I, with an emphasis on classical or stylistically different material. Students learn how to be emotionally honest in a universe that is markedly different from their own. Students in good standing are required to participate in an end-of-year taped live presentation in front of an invited audience. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study I

Acting for Film II

4.5 Semester Credits

Students apply the training learned in Semester One to in-class exercises. On a weekly basis, they will prepare a script and digitally tape the scene. Students learn the basics of editing, applying these skills towards editing their own scenes to better understand how the mechanics of a performance affect the final edit. Scenes will be screened for critique in class. Students are required to attend a series of Special Lectures by Industry Professionals and submit essays. Actors in good standing will participate in a sync sound workshop with filmmaking students, and will also prepare for a year-end shoot shot by an on-staff professional DP and Director. Prerequisite: Acting for Film I

Meisner II

3.5 Semester Credits

A continuation of Meisner I, students learn to apply the “moment-to-moment” work to characters outside of their own experience. Students deepen the practice by advancing from exercises into scene work, to be presented and taped in-class at the end of the course. Prerequisite: Meisner I

Voice and Movement II

1.5 Semester Credits

In this continuation of the two first semester courses, students will focus on using the techniques learned in Voice and Movement I and continue with ever more demanding physical work designed to heighten performances. They will begin exploring the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) in order to prepare for successfully mastering dialects in later speech classes. In addition, elements of period movement and dance are addressed for specific works that require historical accuracy. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement I

Speech II

0.5 Semester Credit

In this course, students train their ear and learn to identify and duplicate proper pronunciation elements. They also deepen the study of Standard American Speech and IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) begun in Voice and Movement II in order to neutralize regional dialects and attain more resonant speech. This allows for the beginning practice of dialects including (but not limited to) Standard British, Cockney, and Brooklyn. Prerequisite: Speech I

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Comedy and Improvisation II

0.5 Semester Credit

Following the Semester 1 course, Comedy and Improvisation II encourages students to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses through a variety of individual and group exercises. Prerequisite: Comedy and Improvisation I

Stage Combat

0.5 Semester Credit

Students learn how to safely portray choreographed fights for the screen. Elements of various martial arts are employed to create interesting fight sequences that keep the actor safe from injury. Prerequisite: None

Playwrights/Screenwriters

1 Semester Credit

Students examine contemporary playwrights and screenwriters, examining style as it relates to current forms and genres. Text analysis and plot structure are treated as fundamental tools for rehearsal and performance. Students learn how to use certain given elements of writing, like mood and sub-text, to enhance performance. Prerequisite: Shakespeare

Special Lectures I

0 Semester Credits

In this series of lectures, industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Students will be exposed to such topics as marketing skills, tools necessary for securing interviews with casting directors and agents, as well as proper etiquette for dealing with industry professionals under a variety of circumstances. Guests include casting associates, agents, and working actors, among others. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class credit is folded into Acting for Film class credit. Mandatory attendance. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER THREE Advanced Acting Technique I
1.5 Semester Credits

Students are coached to explore the most effective techniques that work for them in advance of bringing their Showcase Projects to life. Special attention is paid to period, genre and original material necessities that will invoke the use of particular techniques geared toward the showcase project. Exercises will be filmed for critique. Prerequisite: Acting Technique II

Advanced Scene Study: Stage to Screen

4 Semester Credits

Students break down and analyze a one-act play or themed scenes to be performed at the end of the semester. In the following semester, this same one-act play is adapted into a screenplay and filmed, affording students the opportunity to learn to modify their performance technique between stage and screen. Scheduled rehearsals average five
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hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study II

Acting for the Camera: Scripted TV

4 Semester Credits

Through rehearsing various genres of scripted television, students are exposed to the techniques necessary for a multi-camera shoot for television. Students will learn the technical aspects of working on a set with multi-camera set-ups. The course contains two multi-camera in-class shoots. Students must attend a series of lectures by industry professionals and submit essays. Prerequisite: Acting for Film II

Voice III

1 Semester Credit

A hands-on workshop in the highly specialized skill of voice-over acting. This course includes a final recording session in a Hollywood studio from which students create a demo reel for use in showcasing their voice-over skills. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement II

Movement III

1.5 Semester Credits

Students apply the foundational skills acquired during previous Movement classes, towards learning traditional Eastern movement techniques such as T’ai Chi and Wing Chun as well as creating deeper body awareness with modalities such as yoga, pilates and Alexander technique practice. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement II

Monologues

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will work on assigned and chosen monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills learned thus far. Students will understand the structure and particular elements that make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be auditionready. Prerequisite: None

Audition Technique

0.5 Semester Credit

Students learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop the audition and cold-reading skills necessary for landing roles in the highly competitive field of acting. Students will work in a mock audition format that will be videotaped for instructor and peer critique. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Improvisation I

1 Semester Credit

Continuing where they left off, students will work with more complex set-ups and further advance their abilities to react in the moment and spontaneously, sharpening listening and performance skills. Students participate in an in-class taped presentation. Prerequisite: Comedy and Improvisation II

Building the Reel
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An overview of the basics of digital editing using Final Cut Pro. Students will learn by

experiencing exactly what is needed to match shots, which will help them understand how to tailor their performances accordingly. Prerequisite: Film Craft I

Writing for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

Students craft original monologues by applying sound writing principles. Through multiple exercises designed to spark the creative process, actors refine their work so that it can be used in the audition setting and for performance pieces. Prerequisite: None

Special Lectures II

0.5 Semester Credit

Continuing the lecture series, invited industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Guests include casting associates, agents, and working actors. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class credit is folded into Acting for Film class credit. Mandatory attendance. Prerequisite: Special Lectures I

SEMESTER FOUR Advanced Acting Technique II: Designing the Thesis
1.5 Semester Credits

Students continue exploring major acting techniques such as Meisner, Method, Grotowski, Stanislavsky and Chekhov, focusing on bringing their Thesis performance to life. Class exercises will be filmed for in-class review. Prerequisite: Advanced Acting Technique I

Advanced Thesis Workshop

4 Semester Credits

Beginning in Semester Three, students receive a list of Thesis options which they begin working on in earnest in Semester Four. All Semester Four core classes will be geared toward assisting the student in the creation of the Thesis Project, which will include intensive research, writing and showcase prep. Prerequisite: Adv. Scene Study: Stage to Screen, Graduate Standing

Advanced Acting for Film: Stage to Screen

4.5 Semester Credits

After completing Stage to Screen in Semester Three, students immerse themselves in learning to adapt their live performance to the screen for a filmed production, to be screened at the end of the program. This experience offers students an invaluable opportunity to explore the breadth of skills required from a versatile actor. Prerequisite: Acting for the Camera: Scripted TV

Advanced Voice and Movement: Designing the Thesis

1.5 Semester Credits

Students are guided through advanced exercises in Voice and Movement specific to the period and style of their Thesis Project. Students then refine their choices through the process of rehearsal and Showcase readiness, fine tuning the performance and their skill
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within these disciplines. Prerequisites: Voice III, Movement III

Advanced Improvisation II: Designing the Thesis

1.5 Semester Credits

Through a series of improvisational sessions, actors develop projects to be filmed in their final semester. Students will focus on specific character work to be improvised and interpreted through a series of given events. The improvisation sessions will be taped, and the script and character development will be enriched by this process and lead to solid script elements. The actors will meticulously journal this experience as a major part of their thesis presentation. Prerequisite: Advanced Improvisation I

Business of Acting

1.5 Semester Credits

Second year students will explore the self-marketing aspects of the business, learning what constitutes one’s professional package. Students will practice advanced audition technique, and learn the ropes of navigating agencies and managers, while building a professional portfolio with which to enter the profession. Prerequisite: Special Lectures II

Advanced Writing for Actors: Designing the Thesis

1.5 Semester Credits

Students advance their writing skills as they develop their thesis project, working with professional writing staff to craft the script for performance. Students workshop their pieces with weekly input and critiques from teachers and fellow students — from idea inception to final draft. Prerequisite: Writing for Actors

Thesis Portfolio

2 Semester Credits

In the beginning of Semester Three, students will begin to assemble their Final Portfolio. The materials contained in the Final Portfolio are designed to be the student’s “passport” into the professional world of acting, as well as a record and assessment of his/her academic process throughout the second year. Projects assigned must be completed in order to graduate. In consultation with their Academic Advisor, students must design a Career Blueprint, a personal statement that fully outlines a plan for life after NYFA. All work should represent the best work a student is capable of and be of professional industry quality. Contents of Final Portfolio: • Headshots/Resume. • Film Acting Reel (Academic Version 10-15 min.) • Daily Log Journal of Learning Process. • Career Blueprint/Goals Essay. • Self-Assessment Essay of progress in the craft and of Showcase Performance. • Examples of written work involved in the creation of a role, from inception to performance (i.e. biography, detail of choices, character journal, research, text analysis). This Thesis Portfolio will be assessed by a Thesis Committee comprised of faculty and
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the Faculty Chair. Prerequisite: All studio courses and Graduate Standing

Special Lectures III
Continuing the lecture series, invited industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Guests may include casting associates, agents, and working actors. Credit and assignments for this course are part of Acting for Film IV. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class credit is folded into Acting for Film class credit. Mandatory attendance. Prerequisite: Special Lectures II

SEMESTER THREE & FOUR ELECTIVES
MFA Candidates must complete TWO elective courses during their final year. Each course can only be taken once for elective credit, unless otherwise noted. Electives will be offered based on demand and teacher availability and Elective choices are subject to change.

ELECTIVE: Advanced Acting Projects

0.5 Semester Credit

Acting students will audition to collaborate with NYFA Filmmaking students, who will direct short projects in which the acting students perform. Students who are selected for this elective will compile a DVD of all completed work, which will account for a portion of their Final Portfolio. This course may be repeated for elective credits.

ELECTIVE: The Actor and the Lens

0.5 Semester Credit

A study of the development of film and television as media and how actors fit into that historical landscape. Students learn the history and development of the craft of acting from stage to screen, gaining a unique perspective on the world of film and television.

ELECTIVE: Performance Analysis

0.5 Semester Credit

This course seeks to give the student a reference point for key film performances and a working vocabulary of historically important films. As the student works on honing the craft of acting in performance classes, this course offers a supplement: a series of films, each of which becomes a common reference point and teaching example of significant and quality work.

ELECTIVE: New Media for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will explore new media outlets from the perspective of an actor. Websites that specialize in “user created content” such as YouTube are useful marketing tools in the evolving new media world. In order to successfully complete this class, students must complete a new media project of their own design. Projects may include creating a website featuring their resume and samples of their work, video blogs, or other webisodic content.
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ELECTIVE: Stunt Workshop

0.5 Semester Credit

This course is designed to develop specialty skills and techniques of film acting, focusing on stunt work with specific emphasis on film combat. The student will focus on the awareness and development of the mechanics of the body as a tool for the actor, with emphasis on stage fighting, circus skills, stage stunt work, and complex on-camera combat techniques and choreography. The course also includes an instructional component, where the student will teach and/or direct staged fight scenes. Prerequisite: Movement III, Stage Combat

ELECTIVE: Dance Troupe Workshop

0.5 Semester Credit

This is a performance-based class that will enhance professional skills involved in dance, music, acting for live theater, and working together as a cast for a live showcase. A variety of styles will be used from different eras of staged dance works, as well as original pieces made by the cast and director. The final performance is for a live audience. This course may be repeated for elective credit.

ELECTIVE: Singing for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

This course offers actors the opportunity to experience the techniques and joy of singing in order to feel comfortable and competent in an audition or on set. This is a voice workshop, not a performance workshop. The skills practiced are intended to create expressive freedom in a musical environment.

ELECTIVE: Yoga for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

This course teaches actors essential focusing and centering techniques through the use of the ancient practice of yoga. Students gain self-awareness, focus and flexibility — all essential qualities for the trained actor.

ELECTIVE: Sketch Comedy Workshop

0.5 Semester Credit

This workshop is designed for actors with comedy improvisation experience who are interested in writing and performing sketch comedy. Each class will involve instruction on the variety of ways sketch comedy is created (looking at examples on video), using improvisational comedy to bolster the writing process, and brainstorming to help each student discover their unique comic voice. This course may be repeated for elective credit.

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN SCREENWRITING
Total Credit Units: 64

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The MFA Screenwriting program offers a comprehensive look at the art of screenwriting through writing courses, as well as courses in film studies and screenplay analysis. Students will be assigned several writing projects, which will be critiqued by their peers during in-class workshops.

DEGREE LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Upon graduation from the Screenwriting Master of Fine Arts Program, students will: 1. Demonstrate a mastery of cinematic storytelling techniques by employing these techniques in the writing of professional-caliber original film, television, and new media scripts. 2. Demonstrate a mastery of the business practices of professional screenwriters and their counterparts by creating scholarly essays, professional-caliber script coverage, professional-caliber industry correspondence, professional-caliber oral presentations (pitches), and by successfully securing and completing internships within the entertainment industry. 3. Demonstrate a proven discipline and methodology for completing professionalcaliber screenplays in adherence to project parameters and within deadlines. 4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the history of film, television, and new media, and employ this understanding in the creation of original works by adhering to traditional generic and formal storytelling patterns or by deliberately and conscientiously straying from them. 5. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of current digital motion picture production methods by employing these methods in the creation of several original digital short films.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
During Semester One, students will be introduced to the tools and skills necessary for writing successful screenplays. Students are encouraged to be creative, but are also taught to think of the screenplay as the definitive industry tool for articulating ideas or concepts to a production team, including producers, financiers, directors, and actors. Clarity can be as important as creativity. Standard formatting and industry expectations will be studied and analyzed during writing workshops and lectures. Students will also study the Business of Screenwriting and how to navigate the entertainment industry. Learning Goals: 1. WGA format and copyright law. 2. In-depth study of classic screenplay structure, character arcs, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voiceover, subtext, style, tone, visualization, discipline, and genre.
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3. Critical concepts in film history. 4. Entertainment industry methods, practices, and players. 5. Standard conventions of TV writing and the TV industry. Production Goals: 1. Write a treatment/outline for two feature length films. 2. Write a first draft of a speculative (“spec”) feature length screenplay. 3. Write a “network draft” of a spec one-hour TV drama episode.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their craft artistically and technically, and to progress beyond their earlier experiments with the feature length screenplay. In an advanced workshop, students will write a first draft of a second original spec feature length screenplay and will then choose between revising that screenplay or the screenplay from Semester One. Students are expected to share revised or newly written material in workshops. In addition, students will broaden their understanding of the medium by developing material for a half-hour TV comedy spec script and an original TV series pilot script. Students will also study acting techniques and write, direct, and edit their own short film in order to achieve a better understanding of how the written word translates to the screen. Critical Studies class will also provide students with a theoretical and historical prospective on writing and the writing industry over the past one hundred years. The Business of Screenwriting classes continue as students gain a deeper understanding of the entertainment industry and learn to hone their pitching skills.

Year-End Staged Readings
MFA Writing students will celebrate the completion of their first-year program with a night of staged readings of their written work. The readings will be developed in conjunction with actors, and will be held at a nearby professional stage theater. Learning Goals 1. Fundamentals of film directing. 2. Standard conventions of TV half-hour and original pilot writing 3. Fundamentals of acting. 4. Genre and storytelling conventions and influences. 5. Script revision. 6. In-depth study and practice of the pitch. Production Goals 1. Write a first draft of a second feature length screenplay. 2. Revise a draft of one of the two screenplays generated up to this point. 3. Direct a short film. 4. Write a half-hour television comedy spec script. 5. Write a pilot episode of an original television series.

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YEAR TWO
During Year Two, MFA candidates begin working on their thesis: a feature length screenplay or episodic television series. The thesis should represent the best work a student is capable of and, when complete, be of professional industry quality. In advanced workshops, students will use knowledge gained in the first year to slowly and deliberately construct their theses. Coursework in Year Two will focus on refining writing techniques and clarifying each student’s artistic voice, as well as preparing students for a professional life after the MFA. Thesis Options: Thesis Option A: Feature Film. Students may choose to write a feature length film speculative (“spec”) screenplay. Thesis Option B: Episodic Television. Students may choose to write a pilot episode and bible (supporting materials) of an original comedy or drama television series.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
At the beginning of Semester Three, students must form a Thesis Committee consisting of a primary advisor (a Screenwriting faculty member) and two readers. These committee members are in addition to the Thesis Workshop instructor and the Chair of the Screenwriting Department. The thesis advisor works closely with the MFA candidate throughout the process, while the readers serve more of a consulting role. At certain times throughout the year, each student will present treatments and drafts of his/her thesis script to his/her committee, who will then give notes to the student in a mandatory thesis committee meeting. Three such meetings will take place throughout the academic year. Semester Three classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting craft, and exposing students to the realities of the entertainment industry. Students will also work more in depth with character development in a seminar designed to complement thesis workshop classes. To round out the professional portfolio of the students, each student will create an original web series and will write, shoot, and edit the pilot episode of his or her series. Finally, students will study great screenplays of the past century for a greater understanding of how great storytelling works. Learning Goals: 1. Improve character development skills. 2. Examine theories of film through analysis of great screenplays of the century. 3. Gain mastery of the pitch process. 4. Gain an understanding of the new media landscape and its special artistic considerations. Production Goals: 1. Write an outline and first draft of thesis feature or TV pilot. 2. Write pilot episode and bible for original web series. 3. Develop professional pitch for thesis project.
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SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
In Semester Four, students devote most of their time to their thesis requirements. Faculty meets one-on-one with students in an extensive series of advisements to assist them and coach them through the successful completion of thesis requirements. Students will shoot and edit the original web series pilot episodes written in the previous quarter. They will also learn the art and craft of adaptation. This semester, an emphasis will be put on masterful scene writing, as students learn to make scenes from their thesis projects come alive by working more deeply than ever before on a scene level. Finally, in anticipation of a year-end industry pitch fest, students will perfect their pitches for their thesis projects and turn them into professional-grade selling tools. Learning Goals: 1. Lecture series with a cross-section of industry professionals. 2. The challenges of writing and producing independent cinema. 3. Survey of the studio system history. 4. Learn the art of adaptation. 5. Intense examination of scene writing. 6. Mastering the skills of script revision and polish. 7. Improve skills of production and post-production. 8. Perfect the art of the pitch. Production Goals: 1. Revise, rewrite, and polish thesis project. 2. Produce a pilot episode of an original Web series. 3. Write a treatment for an adaptation of an original source material. 4. Develop and perfect a written and verbal pitch for thesis project.

NYFA Pitch Fest
To celebrate the completion of the MFA Screenwriting Program, New York Film Academy hosts a pitch event for graduating MFA writing students. Representatives from top Hollywood agencies, management companies, studios and production companies attend the event to hear NYFA students pitch their thesis projects. While this event has opened industry doors to students in the past, the primary intent of the Pitch Fest is to provide students with pitching experience and feedback outside the classroom walls.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE AND GRADUATION PROCESS
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Screenwriting. The Graduation Committee is appointed by the Director of Education and consists of the New York Film Academy Registrar, the Thesis Committee Advisor, and several instructors specializing in screenwriting and filmmaking. That committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted. The Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all financial obligations to the school and
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academic requirements for the entire program. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the MFA degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all financial obligations.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Satisfactory completion of 64 Semester Credits is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy Master of Fine Art in Screenwriting Degree Program. These units satisfy semester contact hour requirements. As this is a post-baccalaureate degree program, no general education units are required. The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Screenwriting is an accelerated, four semester conservatory-based, full-time study graduate program. The MFA in Screenwriting does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All classes are mandatory. This is a highly specialized program, and there are no majors or minors. The MFA is a full-time study program only. Classes are Lecture, Seminar, and/or workshop based. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition: $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $54,000

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
Graduate Degree-Granting Program (Master of Fine Arts)
Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) Art/ Design History Units Total Number of Units

59.5 99 %*

4.5 8 %*

64 107 %*

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Elements of Screenwriting Advanced Story Generation The Business of Screenwriting I Writing for Television I (1-hr Drama) Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers SCRE500 SCRE510 SCRE520 SCRE530 SCRE540

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 3 3 4 4 18 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 3 3 4 4 18 65

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II (SW Workshop + Revision Class) The Business of Screenwriting II Writing for Television II (1/2Hr Comedy + Pilot) Script to Screen (Acting for Writers + 1wk Seminar in Digital Filmmaking) Critical Studies (Genre) TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE545 SCRE515 SCRE535 SCRE555 SCRE565

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 4 4 2.5 0 14.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 1.5 1.5 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 4 4 2.5 1.5 16

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Advanced Thesis Workshop I (TV or Film Option) The Great Screenplays The Business of Screenwriting III Advanced Writing Seminar I (Character + Special Topics) New Media I TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE600 SCRE650 SCRE610 SCRE630 SCRE640

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 0 3 3 1 11 Art/Design History Units 0 3 0 0 0 3 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 3 3 3 1 14

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Advanced Thesis Workshop II Advanced Writing Seminar II (Scene Writing + Topics) The Business of Screenwriting IV New Media II Adaptation Workshop TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE605 SCRE635 SCRE615 SCRE645 SCRE655

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 4 4 1 3 16 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 4 4 1 3 16

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Elements of Screenwriting
4 Semester Credits

Utilizing lectures, in-class exercises, outside readings, classroom discussions, and film viewings, this course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting. Screenplay formatting will be a major focus, and students will learn how to write scene description, to describe characters and locations, and to develop action sequences. Topics will also include: Classic Screenplay Structure, the Elements of the Scene, Developing the Character, Character Arcs, Antagonists, Dialogue, Writing the Visual Image, Introduction to Final Draft, Theme, Conflict, Flashbacks, Fantasy Sequences and Dream Sequences, Voiceover, Text and Subtext, Developing Your Writing Style, Tone and Genre, Visualization, Revealing Exposition, Creating a Compelling Second Act, Climaxes and Resolutions, and Scene Beats. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Story Generation

3 Semester Credits

Advanced Story Generation is designed to help writers become what the film industry needs most: prolific sources of movie ideas. Through in-class exercises and out-of-class projects, students will develop skills for generating viable stories for feature films of various genres. They will workshop ideas in class in order to come up with the best possible version of their stories. The idea is to become versatile, adaptable, and creative, providing the best “product” to the industry when called upon to generate new ideas to fill various needs. In the second half of the course, students will commit to one of their story ideas and develop it into a treatment to be used for writing the Quarter 3 screenplay. Prerequisite: Elements of Screenwriting; Writing the Feature Screenplay I

The Business of Screenwriting I

3 Semester Credits

There are many “angles” to understand when approaching "the deal," and they differ from one medium to the next. It is crucially important for a writer to protect his or her work both through Copyright Registration and registration through the Writers Guild of America. Next, the writer must strategize about how to get his or her script into the right hands, in the correct manner, and for the appropriate market. An overview of topics include: Agents, What Is Copyright?, How Do I Enforce My Copyright?, How to Register with the Writer's Guild of America?, Getting Your Script in the Right Hands, What To Do If You Don’t Have an Agent, If the Deal Goes Through What You Need to Know, Options, Pay for Rewrites, Writing on Spec or for Hire, How a Television Deal Differs from a Film Deal. Classes will be supplemented with special lectures by industry professionals. Prerequisite: None

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Writing for Television I: The One-Hour Drama

4 Semester Credits

This television workshop is a fast-paced, intensive workshop program that introduces students to the fundamentals of the TV world and TV writing. The class work consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. By the end of the course, each student will have written a Studio/Network draft (which is a second draft, in the TV world) of a one-hour television spec script for an existing show. Students will be encouraged to write through difficult spots with the belief that getting to “The End” is more important than polishing along the way. Workshop sessions will simulate a TV writers’ room, and will be an environment in which students evaluate their own and their classmates’ work. A constructive, creative and supportive atmosphere will prevail, where students will guide and encourage each other in their writing. Prerequisite: None

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I is a fast-paced, intensive workshop that introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting. The classes consist of in-class writing exercises, individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. Students will apply knowledge gained from Elements of Screenwriting and apply it to the creation of their own feature-length scripts. By the end of the course, students will develop and write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II
4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Screenplay II builds upon knowledge gained in Writing the Feature Screenplay I and Advanced Story Generation, in which students wrote a feature-length film script and a treatment for a second feature-length film script, respectively. This course is divided into two components: in the first, students will take the treatment written in Advanced Story Generation and write a draft of that script. In the second half of the course, students will choose one of their two feature scripts and revise it more thoroughly than they have with any project in the program so far. Each week, students will bring in a sequence of their scripts to be workshopped. Prerequisite: Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

The Business of Screenwriting II

4 Semester Credits

Building on last semester’s work, the second semester of Business of Screenwriting features a more in-depth study of the life of a writer. Guest speakers will be invited to illuminate a variety of areas in the world of the screenwriter, and practical workshops in pitching will give the students the tools they need to walk The Way of the Writer in the World of Hollywood. As part of this course, in the fourth and final quarter of the year, students will take part in an industry internship or may instead choose to write an industry-related research paper.

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Students may intern at a film or television production company, film or television studio, management company, or talent agency. Students are encouraged to choose their internship wisely, based on individual interests and strengths honed during the program. The Business of Screenwriting instructor is responsible for approving internships. Any internship considered as enhancing and/or enriching the student’s understanding of the film or television industry may be an option. Students will be expected to write reports on their internship experiences, and internship supervisors will assess the students' performance at the work site. Students should keep in mind as they choose their internship sites that this position is likely to be their entree into the entertainment industry, so it is imperative that they be responsible and recommended that they foster as many positive relationships as possible. Instead of an internship, students may write a Research Project. Students may opt to write a research paper that will investigate a specific topic related to the entertainment industry. All research papers must be approved by the Business of Screenwriting instructor and must address a topic that directly relates to the field, such as the Studio System, histories of specific entertainment companies or movements, depictions of writers and filmmakers in popular culture, etc. Papers must be at least 15 pages in length and must reference a comprehensive list of research sources. Prerequisite: The Business of Screenwriting I

Writing for Television II: The Half-Hour Spec and the Pilot
4 Semester Credits

In the first half of the course, students will become familiar with the half-hour television industry, styles of half-hour television writing, and the current crop of viable series from which to draw the spec they will write. Each student will then draft a professional-caliber spec for a half-hour show. In the second half of the course, students will create an original episodic television series, including completing the script for the pilot episode. Topics will include: introducing your central character and core cast, creating a series "template," creative solutions to providing back story, and building the show's world and tone. Students will learn from individual writing, group workshops, short lectures, television screenings, and story analysis to create two pieces of writing. The workshop portion of the class will be constructed to simulate a TV writers’ room, with students reading, evaluating, and assisting each other from “breaking story,” building outlines, all the way to a completed draft. The primary goal of the class will be for students to leave with a full draft of a television pilot script for an original show, either one-hour or half-hour. Prerequisite: Writing For Television I

Script to Screen

2.5 Semester Credits

Script to Screen is designed to help writing students see what happens to their words when actors interpret them in front of the camera. The class is divided into two components: Acting for Writers and The One-Week Digital Filmmaking Seminar. Acting for Writers introduces students to the theory and practice of the acting craft, using
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Stanislavski Method, improvisation, and scene and monologue work as starting points. By exploring how actors build characters and performances based upon the information provided in a film script, writers will learn how to write more powerful dialogue, develop more memorable characters, and create more effective dramatic actions. Through inclass acting exercises and writing, as well as filmed exercises, students will learn what truly makes for great dialogue and action writing. The Digital Filmmaking Seminar trains students in the fundamentals of film directing, which in turn facilitates an understanding of the filmmaking process as it relates to screenwriting. It is our belief that a student who actually picks up a camera, blocks a scene and directs actors from a script is far better prepared to then write a screenplay. If a writer has actually translated a shot on the page into a shot in the camera, then the writer has a much sharper perspective on the writing process. Hands-on classes in directing, editing, cinematography, and production cover the creative and technical demands of telling a story with moving images. Then, working in small crews, students will make short films or shoot scenes from one of their screenplays using digital video cameras. Afterward, students will edit their footage on Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: None

Critical Studies

1.5 Semester Credits

Genre and Storytelling is a critical studies course focused on exploring eight different genres of film. Through out-of-class screenings, lectures, and in-class scene breakdowns, students will begin to identify the models (and audience expectations) of these different genres. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER THREE Advanced Thesis Workshop I: Film Option
4 Semester Credits

Advanced Thesis Writing Workshop is a full year course, split over two semesters, designed to build on existing student knowledge about feature film writing and take it to the next level. As a whole, the course will mirror the majority of the writing deals being given in Hollywood today. Each student starts by working up a detailed Treatment for his or her idea. From there students take it to a First Draft, after which they will do a Rewrite of that draft. And finally, they will give it a Polish. After each major threshold is completed (treatment, first draft, rewrite, polish), students will hand in their work to their Thesis Committee. This committee will give the student detailed notes and guidance on how to proceed with the next step. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One of the MFA Writing Program

Advanced Thesis Workshop I: TV Option
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4 Semester Credits

This advanced TV writing workshop is a fast-paced, intensive program that builds upon
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the fundamentals of TV writing learned in the previous year. The class work consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, screenings, and workshop discussions. By the end of the first quarter, each student will have written a full, revised outline for their pilot episode, a working outline for Season One of their proposed series, a working description of the show itself, and two general outlines for subsequent episodes. By the end of the second quarter, each student will have a first draft of their pilot script, a revised version of their Season One outline, a revised version of the show description, and revised versions of the two additional episode outlines. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One of the MFA Writing Program

The Great Screenplays

3 Semester Credits

The Great Screenplays is a critical studies course focused on exploring Academy Awardwinning American and foreign movies from the past ten decades. Through in-class screenings, readings of screenplays, lectures, and discussions, students will gain a deeper understanding of how the art of screenwriting has evolved since the 1920s. Prerequisite: None

The Business of Screenwriting III

3 Semester Credits

The Business of Screenwriting III picks up where the first year left off. The core of the class is mastering the “Art of the Pitch” in preparation for a major industry pitch fest with agents, managers and producers. A heavy emphasis on guest speakers will illuminate every corner of the industry. Prerequisite: The Business of Screenwriting II

Advanced Writing Seminar I: Character Development
3 Semester Credits

Advanced Character Development will focus on equipping students with essential psychological theory and tools to approach this potentially daunting element of screenwriting. By combining the disciplines of clinical psychology and screenwriting, students will learn to create characters that guide the development of their story. Just as the psychotherapist immerses him- or herself in the client's subjective point-of-view to lead the client to more meaningful paths of behavior, students will be encouraged, via small-group workshops and exercises, one-onone interviewing, and analysis of movies and literature, to mine their unique points-of-view to find engaging characters that will grow and change, and inform narrative over the course of writing the screenplay. The class will take place in the first quarter, at the inception of students' Thesis projects.
Prerequisite: None

New Media I

1 Semester Credit

The New Media Production Workshop is an intensive three-month course that introduces students to New Media development. Each student will write, direct and edit a pilot for a scripted Webisode. The pilot scripts that will be shot will not exceed five pages – and will be accompanied by a “bible” that will outline future episodes for a completed series and
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introduce the audience to the world that the show will create on the web. The class is broken down into both writing and directing workshops as the students progress from the scripting phase all the way through production and post-production. In the first portion of the course, students will develop their own original web series and will workshop pilot scripts and series bibles. Hands-on directing, camera, and production workshops will prepare students for the final month of the course in which they will produce their pilot episodes. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER FOUR Advanced Thesis Workshop II: Film Option
4 Semester Credits

This course continues where Semester One left off. It will focus entirely on the rewriting process. This course will teach students to dig deeper into their stories than most of them ever have. Through workshop and discussions, students will gain the insight they need to execute a Rewrite and Polish of the scripts they wrote last semester. Upon completion of this course, students will learn how to spot the things in their scripts that aren’t working, develop a game plan for fixing them, and execute that game plan. We will focus on identifying and fixing structural problems as well as problems on the scene level. This semester is designed to build the skills of self-criticism, arguably the writer’s most important tool. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I: Film Option

Advanced Thesis Workshop II: TV Option

4 Semester Credits

This advanced TV writing workshop is a fast-paced, intensive program that builds upon the fundamentals of TV writing learned in the previous year-and-a-half. The classwork consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, screenings, and workshop discussions. By the end of the first quarter, each student will have written a second draft of their pilot episode, a polished outline for Season One of their proposed series, a polished description of the show itself, and two polished, general outlines for subsequent episodes. By the end of the second quarter, each student will have a final, polished draft of their pilot script and be ready to pitch it at pitchfest. Television industry guests are also brought in, schedules permitting, to help students prepare for the professional world during this semester. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I: TV Option

Advanced Writing Seminar II Advanced Scene Writing

4 Semester Credits

This is the class in which students get to leave behind the big picture for a while and pull out the microscope to study their scenes in great detail. Using short excerpts (3-5 pages) from screenplays they have already written – preferably from their thesis scripts – students will focus on emotional progression, dialogue, action, character logic and
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motivation, scene beats, tone and tonal shifts, writing style, subtext, events, and transitions, in order to revise their material. During the first half of the course, a different type of scene will be covered each week, and sessions will consist of a combination of reading scenes aloud, critique, in-class assignments, lecture, and watching clips. Actors will be brought in for the second half of the course to do cold readings of scenes and to provide their unique perspective on the character development, motivation, and beats. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I

The Business of Screenwriting IV

4 Semester Credits

After three semesters of Business of Screenwriting, screenwriters should be skilled in the creation of log lines and the writing of coverage. While they have been introduced to the five-minute pitch, they have not yet perfected it. This shall be the primary focus of Semester Four, building to the Pitch Fest at the end of the semester. In addition to honing their pitches, students will play a large role in identifying and inviting guests. Guest speakers will continue to be featured, with the focus moving away from “general knowledge” topics, to more specific topics in the field of screenwriting and omnimedia. As part of this course, in the fourth and final quarter of the program, students will take part in an industry internship or may instead choose to write an industry-related research paper. Students may intern at a film or television production company, film or television studio, management company, or talent agency. Students are encouraged to choose their internship wisely, based on individual interests and strengths honed during the program. The Business of Screenwriting instructor is responsible for approving internships. Any internship considered as enhancing and/or enriching the student’s understanding of the film or television industry may be an option. Students will be expected to write reports on their internship experiences, and internship supervisors will assess the students' performance at the work site. Students should keep in mind as they choose their internship sites that this position is likely to be their entree into the entertainment industry, so it is imperative that they be responsible and recommended that they foster as many positive relationships as possible. Instead of an internship, students may write a Research Project. Students may opt to write a research paper that will investigate a specific topic related to the entertainment industry. All research papers must be approved by the Business of Screenwriting instructor, and must address a topic that directly relates to the field, such as the Studio System, histories of specific entertainment companies or movements, depictions of writers and filmmakers in popular culture, etc. Papers must be at least 15 pages in length and must reference a comprehensive list of research sources. Prerequisite: The Business Of Screenwriting III

New Media II

1 Semester Credit

In this final month of the New Media course, students will produce and shoot their pilot episodes. Following production, students will attend editing classes, and will then have two weeks to edit their episodes, which they will present to the class in an in-class screening in the final week of the course.
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Prerequisite: New Media I

Adaptation Workshop

3 Semester Credits

In today’s Hollywood, adaptation is everywhere – it’s extremely common to see a “based on” credit ahead of the screenwriter’s name. Historically, novels, short stories, plays, and magazine articles have served as underlying source material; but in the last decade, comic books, graphic novels, TV shows, board games, theme park rides, even old films, have increasingly become fair game. The end result is this: A tremendous number of potential jobs for new screenwriters involve adaptation. In this course, we will identify the challenges that surround translating a non-cinematic art form into a cinematic story by studying existing adaptations. Students will also select a work to adapt or update and generate a 10-15 page treatment for the material. Prerequisite: None

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN PRODUCING
Total Credit Units: 76 The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Producing is an accelerated, conservatory-based graduate program designed for full-time study over the course of four or five semesters. The New York Film Academy provides a creative setting with which to develop, challenge and inspire the talents of dedicated prospective producers in a total immersion, professional environment. By combining seminars and lectures with intense hands-on productions, students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of motion picture arts and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience. Upon graduation for the New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts in Producing, students will successfully: 1. Demonstrate a professional working knowledge of the full range of producing functions in the film, television and related industries. 2. Demonstrate a mastery of production management and post production skills and methodologies through the execution and completion of visual media projects. 3. Display a thorough understanding of the production crafts and their functions, organization and work flow on professionally-produced film and television series. 4. Exhibit a complete understanding and application of financing, marketing and distribution strategies and practices in both independent and studio models. 5. Demonstrate a working knowledge of treatment and script development, conventions, structures, execution and presentation in accordance with industry standard practices. 6. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of fundamental principles of law and business affairs practices pertaining to the entertainment industry. 7. Display a working knowledge of historical and contemporary cinematic innovators and styles and their influences on current trends in the entertainment industry. 8. Exhibit a thorough understanding of professional work environment skills and practices common to the entertainment industry. 9. Demonstrate a mastery of project pitch and presentation practices and methodologies to financial and creative collaborators.

YEAR ONE
During their first year, students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. The Year One curriculum is extremely comprehensive, teaching students the creative aspects of producing, as well as the more technical side of line producing. Students gain a practical understanding of the entertainment industry and the tools needed to successfully navigate it.

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SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
Producers are confronted with a number of visual, dramatic, financial, legal, logistical, managerial, and technical challenges. From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education on how to work through these challenges. Through an intensive sequence of classes and workshops, and with encouragement from their instructors, students rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to produce film and television. Learning Goals: 1. Introduction to the roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. 2. Gain understanding of the physical and post-production processes. 3. Master storytelling concepts of elements, conventions, structure and style. 4. Understand basic principles of entertainment law. 5. Introduction to filmmaking from the perspective of the screenwriter, director, actor and cinematographer. Production Goals: 1. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a short film on the Universal lot. 2. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a short reality television segment. 3. Each student will write, prep, shoot and edit his or her own short film.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their production abilities artistically and technically. Producing students are instructed in the craft of writing and championing dramatic treatments; in pitching story ideas to a variety of audiences; and presenting industry-standard written proposals in support of the feasibility of their projects. This semester culminates in each student pitching and presenting a film or television project at the Producers Pitch Fest. Learning Goals: 1. Continue to analyze and master key elements of effective producer’s craft. 2. Develop and write original film and television pilot treatments. 3. Introduction and practice of effective pitching skills. 4. Learn critical elements of effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. Production Goals: 1. In collaborative groups, produce a short documentary or news segment. 2. Produce a short film for a NYFA filmmaker. 3. Develop an effective pitch and feature film business plan or TV show bible.

YEAR TWO
MFA candidates must complete a series of highly specialized classes and deliver a completed and well-executed Thesis Project in order to successfully complete the program and graduate with a Master of Fine Arts in Producing. Students are required to
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pursue one of three thesis options for the remainder of the degree program. While the thesis options differ in length of time for completion, they are equivalent in scope and content. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions besides their own. Those who select Thesis Option C will also be required to enroll in a paid fifth semester to complete their project. Prior to entering into thesis production all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
Semester Three focuses on perfecting craft, exposing students to emerging media and technology, and exposing them to the realities of the film industry and the business of filmmaking. Emphasizing professionalism, the third semester is designed to prepare MFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. Throughout this semester, students meet individually with their Thesis Advisor, as well as the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department to discuss the progress of their thesis projects. Learning Goals: 1. Explore story and storytelling through an in-depth study of the elements, conventions, structure, style and traditional forms of the art. 2. Identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators. 3. Explore the post-production process. 4. Case study analysis of successful feature film business plans and television show bibles. Production Goals: 1. Develop and write first draft feature screenplay. 2. Develop and write a TV pilot episode. 3. Each student will write, prep, shoot and edit his or her own new media or documentary project. 4. Introduction to the production demands of web episodes, commercials and music videos. 5. Begin in-depth research and development of the MFA Thesis Project.

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
In Semester Four, students devote much of their time to their MFA Thesis Projects and thesis requirements. Throughout this semester, the Thesis Committee, chaired by the Producing Department Faculty Chair, meets with students and advises them through the successful completion and final presentation of their MFA Thesis Projects. Learning Goals: 1. Further advanced study of cinematic innovators. 2. Advanced hands-on study in camera, lighting and sound. 3. Analyze strategies of successful marketing and distribution campaigns. Production Goals: 1. Successfully develop and present the MFA Thesis Project.
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SEMESTER FIVE OBJECTIVES
Students who choose to complete Thesis Option C will complete their thesis in a paid fifth semester. During Semester Five, each candidate will produce a feature length film or television show pilot and will navigate each phase—development, prep, shoot and post production—of their selected project. Students will be involved in all aspects of each phase of the film or television pilot’s production execution, including development of script, casting and talent negotiations, budgeting, scheduling, locations, hiring of crew, payroll, contracts and deal memos, equipment rentals, applicable Union regulations and contracts, and post-production including delivery requirements.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Producing. Appointed by the Director of Education, it consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in producing and filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, that the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of electives and the thesis option, the MFA in Producing does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The MFA is a full-time program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters for Thesis Option A and B, or less than five semesters for Thesis Option C. Students who elect Thesis Option C are required to register for a paid fifth semester of study in order to complete their thesis requirements. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 76 semester credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis production requirement. Those pursuing Thesis Option C must enroll in a paid fifth semester to successfully complete all requirements for the MFA degree. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: 5th (Thesis Option C ONLY): Total Tuition (4 Semesters): Total Tuition (5 Semesters): $16,000 $16,000 $16,000 $16,000 $16,000 $64,000 $80,000

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DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN PRODUCING
Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 71.5 119 %* Art/ Design History Units 2.5 4 %* Total Number Credit Units

General Credit Units

2 3 %*

76 126 %*

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Producers Craft I Producers Roundtable I Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop Finance, Marketing and Distribution Directing for Producers Cinematography and Lighting for Producers Editing for Producers Entertainment Law Introduction to Screenwriting Producing Reality Television Short Film Production I TOTAL Course Numbers PROD500 PROD510 PROD520 PROD530 PROD540 PROD550 PROD560 PROD570 PROD580 PROD590 PROD595 Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 2 1 3 3 18

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 2 1 3 3 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Producers Craft II Producers Roundtable II Pitching for Producers Producing Documentaries and News Course Numbers PROD556 PROD515 PROD525 PROD535 Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 3 1.5 1.5 1.5

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 3 1.5 1.5 1.5 79

Television Producing and Developing PROD545 the TV Pilot Treatment Developing the Feature Film Treatment Business Affairs NYFA Universal Studios PROD555 PROD566

Short Film Production II Industry Speaker Series Developing the Feature Business Plan and TV Show Bible Developing the Pitch Internship TOTAL

PROD595 PROD576 PROD586 PROD596 PROD585

3 0 2 1 2.5 19.5

0 0.5 0 0 0 0.5

0 0 0 0 0 0

3 0.5 2 1 2.5 20

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Course Numbers Studio or Related Units 3 1.5 2

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 Total Credit Units 3 1.5 2 1.5 1 0 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 2.5 2 2 17

Thesis Development Workshop I PROD650 0 Writing the Feature Screenplay PROD610 0 Writing the Situational Comedy or PROD620 0 Drama for Television Producing Commercials, Webisodes PROD630 1.5 0 and Music Videos Entertainment Accounting PROD640 1 0 Cinema Studies I PROD660 0 0 Post Production for Producers PROD670 1.5 0 Acting for Producers PROD680 0.5 0 The Production Crafts: A Deeper PROD600 1 0 Look Advanced Pitching Workshop I PROD690 0.5 0 Internship II PROD685 2.5 0 MFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following electives: New Media PROD601 0 0 Documentary PROD602 0 0 TOTAL 15 0

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Thesis Development Workshop II Course Numbers PROD655 Studio or Related Units 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 0 0.5 0.5 0.5

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 80

Finance, Marketing and Distribution II PROD635 Branding and Developing a Production Company Website Entertainment Law II Advanced Pitching Workshop II Cinema Studies II Directing for Producers II Advanced Camera and Lighting for Producers Sound Workshop for Producers NYFA Universal Studios PROD605 PROD675 PROD695 PROD665 PROD645 PROD655 PROD625

Internship III Thesis Option A Thesis Option B Thesis Option C** TOTAL

PROD686 PROD606 PROD607 PROD608

2.5 9 9 9 19

0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0

2.5 9 9 9 20

MFA candidates must select ONE of the following Thesis Options:

Grades and semester credits for Thesis Option C will be awarded upon completion of Semester Five.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Producers Craft I
2 Semester Credits

This core introductory course outlines the essential roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include navigating the studios, television networks and emerging media and the relationship between the producer and the unions, guilds and talent agencies. Prerequisites: None

Producers Roundtable I

.5 Semester Credit

In this roundtable setting and from the producer’s perspective, students will discuss and analyze current projects in development or production. Current newsworthy events in the entertainment industry will be presented and analyzed. Prerequisites: None

Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop

1 Semester Credit

This workshop introduces students to the industry-standard software used to schedule and budget productions. In a hands-on lab setting, students are instructed in the use of Entertainment Partners (EP) Scheduling and EP Budgeting software programs, including established scheduling and budgeting techniques. Prerequisites: None

Finance, Marketing and Distribution

1 Semester Credit

Using produced films as case studies, this course focuses on successful strategies employed in the finance, marketing and distribution of studio and independent films. Prerequisites: None

Directing for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

Effective producers create a collaborative and artistic production environment that enhances each director’s skills and provide the support needed to make the best possible film or television show. Producing students learn to use basic production documents and to audition, cast and work with actors. In hands-on sessions students will break down a short script into a shooting plan and direct a scene with actors on digital video. In addition, students will work in collaborative groups to develop & shoot a short film.
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Prerequisites: None

Cinematography and Lighting for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

Producing students receive hands-on instruction in basic cinematography and lighting techniques. Prerequisites: None

Editing for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

Students are instructed in the basic techniques of digital editing. Prerequisites: None

Entertainment Law

2 Semester Credits

This course is an overview of contract law and how it impacts the entertainment industry. Producing students will study legal issues regarding television, films, recordings, live performances and other aspects of the entertainment industry. Topics include copyright law, intellectual property and talent representation. Prerequisites: None

Introduction to Screenwriting

1 Semester Credit

Producing students will gain firsthand knowledge of fundamental screenwriting techniques and will develop strategies in communicating with the producer’s key collaborator in story development, the screenwriter. Prerequisites: None

Producing Reality Television

3 Semester Credits

Working in teams, producing students develop and shoot a reality show teaser episode. They will prep, shoot and edit their reality shows for presentation and critique. Prerequisites: Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop and Editing for Producers

Short Film Production I

3 Semester Credits

Producing students will develop, prep and shoot their own individual short films. Working in teams, students will function as crew members on each other’s productions. Prerequisites: Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop, Editing for Producers, and Introduction to Screenwriting

SEMESTER TWO Producers Craft II
2 Semester Credits

This course continues the study of the essential roles of and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include optioning and developing material, film festivals, networks and ratings, studio and independent marketing and distribution and analyzing film tax incentive and rebate programs. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I
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Producers Roundtable II

0.5 Semester Credit

In roundtable discussions, students analyze and discuss development, production, marketing and distribution obstacles of their Year One Thesis Projects. In workshops, students brainstorm to develop effective solutions. Prerequisite: Producers Roundtable I

Pitching for Producers

1 Semester Credit

Through in-class examples, students are exposed to effective pitching styles and instructed on how to develop basic pitching skill. Prerequisite: None

Producing Documentaries and News

3 Semester Credits

This course offers producing students an introductory exposure to documentary filmmaking and news reporting. Working in small collaborative teams, students will produce a short documentary or news segment. Prerequisite: Short Film Production I

Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment

1.5 Semester Credits

Students will learn how the television industry operates and how television programs are pitched and developed. Each student will develop and write a television pilot treatment and the basic outline of a television show bible. Prerequisite: Introduction to Screenwriting

Developing the Feature Film Treatment

1.5 Semester Credits

Through in-class instruction and critique, students will develop storytelling skills within the industry-standard format of the film treatment. In a workshop setting, each student will develop and write a detailed feature film treatment. Prerequisite: Introduction to Screenwriting

Business Affairs

1.5 Semester Credits

Students analyze and discuss legal topics such as contract negotiations, marketing projects to financiers and distributors, and audience and research testing. Prerequisite: Entertainment Law I

Short Film Production II

3 Semester Credits

In this course, producing students will further develop critical line producing skills. Working with filmmaking students in the NYFA Filmmaking Program, producing students will line produce a filmmaker’s Year One Film. Prerequisite: Short Film Production I

Industry Speaker Series

.5 Semester Credit

These informative sessions feature discussions with producers and other industry professionals. Each session includes a Q&A, providing each student access to firsthand
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impressions of real-world circumstances faced by working industry professionals. Prerequisites: Producers Craft I and Producers Roundtable I

Developing the Feature Business Plan and TV Show Bible

2 Semester Credits

Through lectures and analysis of case studies, students will learn the critical skills to develop effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. The feature business plan or television show bible developed in this course will be presented at the Producers Pitch Fest. Prerequisites: Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment, Developing the Feature Film Treatment

Developing the Pitch

1 Semester Credit

Through rigorous in-class exercises, students will develop a brief and effective pitch of the material they choose to pitch at the Producers Pitch Fest. Each student will practice and gain critical and fundamental pitching skills. Prerequisites: Pitching for Producers, Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment, and Developing the Feature Film Treatment

Internship

2.5 Semester Credits

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post-production, and marketing and distribution. During this practicum, student interns often read scores of scripts, participate in client meetings and are responsible for individualized work assignments. Students who are not able to secure an internship must complete an alternate project in order to meet this course requirement. Topics for this assignment can vary and must be approved by the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department. Prerequisite: Producers Craft II and Producers Roundtable II ATTENTION Students in F-1 visa status: Prior to starting any off-campus internship/employment, you must first obtain authorization for curricular practical training (CPT). Please visit the International Students Office for details.

SEMESTER THREE Thesis Development Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

Students begin to conceptualize and develop a detailed outline of their MFA Thesis Projects. Topics include loglines, story and character development, marketing strategy and analyzing comparable films or television shows and developing effective comparisons. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

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Writing the Feature Screenplay

1.5 Semester Credits

In a workshop setting, each student will develop and write a first draft feature screenplay. Structure, style, character development and arcs are some of the topics that will be discussed and put into practice throughout this course. Prerequisite: Developing the Feature Film Treatment

Writing the Situational Comedy or Drama for Television

2 Semester Credits

In a collaborative workshop setting, each producing student will develop an original situational comedy pilot script. Prerequisites: Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment

Producing Commercials, Webisodes and Music Videos

1.5 Semester Credits

This course focuses on producing alternate media, including commercials, web episodes and music videos. Through in-class discussion and samples, students will be exposed to trends in these arenas. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Entertainment Accounting

1 Semester Credit

This course provides an overview of the financial, cost, and managerial accounting functions specific to the film industry, with application to other areas of media production, including television, commercials, web episodes and music videos. Students analyze techniques and control procedures for accurate preparation and presentation of financial statements. Topics include budgeting, cost reporting and film accounting terminology. Prerequisite: Line Producing Essentials — EP/Movie Magic Workshop

Cinema Studies I

1 Semester Credit

In this critical studies course, students are taught to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of cinema. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing, cinematography, acting and editing have developed. Through screenings and in-class discussions, students will analyze how filmmakers from silent film to the digital age have approached the challenge of telling stories with moving images. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Post Production for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

This course explores the entire post-production workflow for both film and digital formats. In addition to the technical aspects of physical post-production, the artistic and managerial aspects will also be addressed. Post-production for all current exhibition venues, including DVD, theatrical, cable and satellite will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Editing for Producers

Acting for Producers

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students will develop a critical understanding of the acting process and what each actor brings to the collaborative process of filmmaking.
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Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

The Production Crafts: A Deeper Look

1 Semester Credit

This course offers an in-depth look into the production crafts such as production design and art direction, wardrobe design and makeup. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Advanced Pitching Workshop I

.5 Semester Credit

This course exposes students to a variety of successful pitch styles and formats in a workshop setting. Students will acquire techniques to develop and execute effective impromptu pitches. Prerequisite: Pitching for Producers, Developing the Pitch

Internship II

2.5 Semester Credits

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post production and marketing and distribution. During this practicum, student interns often read scores of scripts, participate in client meetings and are responsible for individualized work assignments. Students who are not able to secure an internship must complete an alternate project in order to meet this course requirement. Topics for this assignment can vary and must be approved by the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department. Prerequisite: Internship I ATTENTION Students in F-1 visa status: Prior to starting any off-campus internship/employment, you must first obtain authorization for curricular practical training (CPT). Please visit the International Students Office for details.

ELECTIVE: New Media

2 Semester Credits

It is essential for a producer to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis. iPods, webcasts, even cell phones have become viable modes for distribution. The format war between HD, DVD and BluRay, the dynamic possibilities of multimedia tie-ins and Alternate Reality Games, and the anti-piracy aspirations of digital 3-D projection are sampling of topics presented. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

ELECTIVE: Documentary

2 Semester Credits

This course examines artistic and technical approaches to documentary filmmaking. Documentary styles and structure, theme, interview methodology, point of view and reenactment are some of the topics discussed and critiqued. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

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SEMESTER FOUR Thesis Development Workshop II
0.5 Semester Credits

Students will workshop and critique working drafts of their MFA Thesis Projects. Comparable films and television shows are researched and presented, and marketing and distribution strategies are analyzed. Prerequisite: Thesis Development Workshop I

Financing, Marketing and Distribution II

1 Semester Credit

Focusing on domestic, international, and independent marketing and distribution, and using case studies of actual campaigns, this course focuses on successful strategies for each of these vital aspects of producing. Prerequisite: Finance, Marketing and Distribution

Branding and Developing a Production Company Website

1.5 Semester Credits

As students prepare to launch their careers, this workshop offers branding techniques and step-by-step instructions on how to develop a dynamic and innovative production company website. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Entertainment Law II

2 Semester Credits

This course offers a deeper analysis of contract law and critical issues raised in contract negotiations. Copyright law and the protection of intellectual property are further analyzed. Prerequisite: Entertainment Law, Business Affairs

Advanced Pitching Workshop II

1 Semester Credit

Continuing from Semester Three, this course provides further exposure to pitching techniques. Students will practice perfecting their own pitching styles and methods so that they will be comfortable using these skills in a professional environment. Prerequisite: Advanced Pitching Workshop I

Cinema Studies II

1 Semester Credit

A broad cross-section of the film community will be represented in this screening series. The creative styles and influence of particular directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, production designers and editors are analyzed and discussed. Prerequisite: Cinema Studies I

Directing for Producers II

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students will analyze a variety of directing styles and techniques. Through examples and in-class exercises, students will gain a deeper understanding of the director’s integral creative role. Prerequisite: Directing for Producers
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Advanced Camera and Lighting for Producers

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students take a deeper look at the role of the cinematographer and learn advanced camera techniques and lighting concepts. Prerequisite: Cinematography and Lighting for Producers

Sound Workshop for Producers

0.5 Semester Credits

In a workshop setting, students learn the fundamentals of production sound recording. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Internship III

2.5 Semester Credits

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post production, and marketing and distribution. During this practicum, student interns often read scores of scripts, participate in client meetings and are responsible for individualized work assignments. Students who are not able to secure an internship must complete an alternate project in order to meet this course requirement. Topics for this assignment can vary and must be approved by the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department. Prerequisite: Internship II ATTENTION Students in F-1 visa status: Prior to starting any off-campus internship/employment, you must first obtain authorization for curricular practical training (CPT). Please visit the International Students Office for details.

Thesis Option A: Feature Film or Television Track

9 Semester Credits

Candidates choose the Feature Film or Television Track and, based on the chosen track, produce and deliver a complete production element and a complete written proposal of their projects. Feature Track: Produce and deliver a film trailer of the feature film project in addition to a fully developed business plan. Television Track: Produce and deliver a television spot of the television series in addition to a fully developed television show bible. Students will work under the guidance and advisement of the MFA Producers Thesis Committee. Consultations with these faculty members are necessary for students to gain guidance and an understanding of the many tasks inherent in developing their projects. These consultations will also include a clear template of delivery dates for script deadlines, casting, production scheduling, budgeting, location scouting, and a demonstration of financial responsibility to obtain approval to shoot. Students must receive a “green light” before beginning production on their MFA Thesis Option: A projects. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

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Thesis Option B: Feature Business Plan and Show Bible

9 Semester Credits

Each candidate develops one feature film business plan, one television show bible, and a third project of the candidate’s choosing. Students will work under the guidance and advisement of the MFA Producers Thesis Committee. Mandatory consultations with these faculty members are necessary for students to gain guidance and an understanding of the tasks inherent in developing the MFA Thesis Option: B projects. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Thesis Option C: Feature Film or Show Pilot Production

9 Semester Credits

Students will develop and produce a feature length film or television show pilot. With the guidance of an appointed faculty member, they will enter pre-production of the film or pilot in Semester Four and will produce and deliver their final product in an additional fifth semester. Mandatory consultations with the MFA Producers Thesis Committee will be necessary for students to gain guidance and an understanding of the many tasks inherent in developing the MFA Thesis Option: C Project. The faculty consultations will also include a clear template of delivery dates for script deadlines, casting, production scheduling, budgeting, location scouting and a demonstration of financial responsibility to obtain approval to shoot. Students must receive a “green light” before moving on to Semester Five to resume production of their MFA Thesis projects. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Total Credit Units: 61 The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Digital Photography is a foursemester, conservatory-based, full-time graduate study program. The curriculum is designed to immerse gifted and energetic prospective photographers in all aspects of the discipline. The MFA in Digital Photography provides a practical and creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and nourish the talents of its student body. The strength of the program is in its combination and hands-on application of photographic studies, fine art photography, documentary photography, and photojournalism. Based on intense photography workshops designed to challenge the individual photographer beyond their status quo, the program is further enhanced by concentrating on the composition, narrative thrust and aesthetic impact of each frame.

DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Master of Fine Arts in Digital Photography Degree Program are to teach students the art and craft of professional Digital Photography and to instruct students to excel in the creative art of digital photography through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, students will be guided through a comprehensive look at the art of Digital Photography through courses in the history and theory of photography, fine art photography, documentary photography, and photojournalism. Students will also be assigned several photographic projects. These projects will be subject to critique by instructors and peers during in-class workshops.

SEMESTER ONE AND SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
Students will be introduced to the tools and skills necessary for researching, composing, and capturing Digital Photographic Projects. Students are encouraged to be creative, but are also taught to think of each project as a concise statement of artistic, documentary, and/or journalistic intent. Clarity can be as important as creativity. Learning Goals: 1. The ability to work independently in a high-pressure, creative environment. 2. An in-depth knowledge of digital SLR cameras, lighting, and printing. 3. Research a documentary subject or news story and visualize it through photography. 4. Ability to correctly expose and meter 35mm negative film. 5. Mastery of Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite. 6. Knowledge of the history of photography. 7. Knowledge of aesthetic theory of photography and experience, with practical application of the same.

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Production Goals: 1. Completion of Fine Arts Photography Projects I and II. 2. Completion of Photojournalism Projects I and II. 3. Studio Practice Production Workshops. 4. Written Research Projects I and II (History and Theory of Photography).

YEAR TWO
In Year Two, students will be encouraged to reach beyond simply having technical facility and work to hone their individual voice as a photographic artist. They will be exposed to the in-depth nuances of a variety of photographic fields, from Fashion Photography to Nature Photography and will be required to show skill in multiple areas. Before graduation, students will be expected to have acquired experience in the professional world, have a professional portfolio and website. Learning Goals: 1. Grow as artists by finding new and effective ways of visual expression. 2. Acquire professional training in multiple aspects of the photographic industry (commercial, fashion, advertising, portraiture). 3. Complete second year photo exercises. 4. Create and mount Thesis Project. Production Goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Complete and mount Thesis Project (fine art, documentary/photojournalism). Complete fashion photographic project. Complete advertising photographic project. Complete portrait photographic project. Complete elective photographic project (nature or on-set production stills). Create on-line portfolio. Create bound portfolio.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Digital Photography. Appointed by the Director of Education, it consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in the photographic arts. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, that the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts in Digital Photography is a highly specialized program and all non-elective courses are mandatory. The program does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The degree must be pursued full-time and may not be obtained in less than four semesters.

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In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 61 semester credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis project requirement. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition: * OTHER COSTS:
Masters students are encouraged to purchase their own Digital SLR camera and lens(es), which they can continue to use after they receive their degree. However, the New York Film Academy does provide access to school-owned DSLR cameras and lenses, as well as other related equipment, to all NYFA photography students. If students wish to use other cameras or lenses not supplied in the DSLR package provided by the school, the cost for any additional rental/purchase is not included in tuition.

$16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $72,000

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
Graduate Degree-Granting Program (Master of Fine Arts)
Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 48 80%* Art/Design History Units 12 20%* Total Number of Units 60 100%*

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Studio Practice I History and Theory of Photography I Fine Art Photography I Documentary Photography and Photojournalism I TOTAL Course Numbers DIGI500 DIGI510 DIGI520 DIGI530

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Related History Units Units 6 0 0 3 3 12 3 0 0 3 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 6 3 3 3 15

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SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Studio Practice II History and Theory of Photography II Fine Art Photography II Documentary Photography and Photojournalism II One-Year Portfolio Review TOTAL Course Numbers DIGI505 DIGI515 DIGI525 DIGI535 DIGI540

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Related History Units Units 6 0 0 3 3 0 3 0 1 13 0 3 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 6 3 3 3 1 16

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
History and Theory of Photography III News Photography Portrait Photography Thesis Preparation Nature Photography On-Set Production Photography TOTAL Course Numbers DIGI610 DIGI620 DIGI630 DIGI640 DIGI601 DIGI602 Studio or Related Units 0 3 3 3 0 0 9

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3

MFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following electives: 3 15

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
History and Theory of Photography IV Fashion and Advertising Photography Thesis TOTAL Course Numbers DIGI615 DIGI625 DIGI635

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Related History Units Units 0 3 3 0 9 0 12 3 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 9 15

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Studio Practice I
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An introduction to digital cameras, lights, and digital printing technology. Subjects include
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aperture, shutter speed, focal length, contrast, diffusion, filters, and photo imaging and printing using Adobe Photoshop. Through a series of lectures, seminars, and studio workshops, basic principles of photography are covered, including the use of f-stops, depth-of-field, and three-point lighting. Beginning with a technical and applied exploration of black-and-white image-making, followed by the introduction of aesthetic tools made available through use of color, students will learn to both expand and control the expressive quality of their photographic prints. Prerequisites: None

History and Theory of Photography I

A survey of the development of photography from its 19 Century origins to the mid 20th Century. This history includes technological, artistic, social, and journalistic fields of the medium. Prerequisites: None

th

3 Semester Credits

Fine Art Photography I

3 Semester Credits

An exploration of photography as a creative art form, this course examines the techniques and methodology of master practitioners including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Man Ray, Ansel Adams, Sally Mann, and Robert Mapplethorpe, among others, as touchstones for students' own work. Students create and present work for critique on a weekly basis throughout the semester. The work will be evaluated based on application of concepts covered in class, such as composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisites: None

Documentary Photography & Photojournalism I

3 Semester Credits

The seminal work of photographers such as Walker Evans, Berenice Abbott, Brassai, Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Capa, Margaret Bourke-White, and Roman Vishniac, among others, will inform students’ own work as journalism and social commentary. Subjects include journalism ethics and standards, as well as first amendment rights and legal issues pertaining to both photojournalism and documentary photography. Students will create and present black-and-white and color work for critique on a weekly basis throughout the semester. Prerequisites: None

SEMESTER TWO Studio Practice II
6 Semester Credits

This course covers intermediate and advanced use of digital cameras, lights, digital printing and technology. Subjects include full spectrum photography (including infrared and ultraviolet), composite imaging, and advanced editing and printing using Photoshop. Through a combination of lectures and studio workshops, this course will explore the many creative advantages to digital processing, augmentation, color correction, photographic effects, and photo finishing. Prerequisite: Studio Practice I

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History and Theory of Photography II

3 Semester Credits

Continued study of the development of photography in relation to technology, art, and popular culture. This course will look at the impact of photography since the mid-20th Century as a socio-political form, as well as its use in the field of journalism. Prerequisite: History and Theory of Photography I

Fine Art Photography II

3 Semester Credits

This course continues the exploration of photography as a creative art form. Advanced lighting and digital processing techniques are applied to students' weekly work. Each student creates an art photography portfolio for exhibition at the end of the first year. Students’ work will be evaluated in part on their application of concepts taught in class, including photographic composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: Fine Art Photography I

Documentary Photography & Photojournalism II

3 Semester Credits

Research, investigation, and storytelling methodologies are taught and employed by students as they pursue news stories and documentary subjects. New Media applications of non-fiction photography are examined as students post their work to a class website. Students’ work will be evaluated in part on their application of concepts taught in class including photographic composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: Documentary & Photojournalism I

First Year Portfolio Review

1 Semester Credit

Before graduation, students are required to create and present a bound portfolio and online website of their work. These portfolios must display competency in Photojournalism, Fine Art Photography and use of Adobe Creative Suite.

SEMESTER THREE History and Theory of Photography III
3 Semester Credits

This course is a close academic study of the history of aesthetics (from Plato, through Kant, Romanticism, Modernism, to current postmodern theories) as applied to the visual arts and photography. Special attention will be paid to the evolution of the still visual image through history, and how artists have both paralleled and rebelled against the predominant artistic and aesthetic movements of their respective times. Prerequisite: History and Theory of Photography II

News Photography

3 Semester Credits

This course will explore the theory and practice of news photography, practical experience taking news photographs, as well as the professional standards required of photojournalists. Specific emphasis will be placed on photography for a daily metropolitan
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newspaper. This photography will include: general news, features, sports, opinion/editorial, and photo essays. Prerequisite: Documentary & Photojournalism II

Portrait Photography

3 Semester Credits

A study of the photographic principles applied to portrait lighting, posing, printing, and subject direction, this course explores all genres of portrait photography, including commercial portraits, formal and informal studio portraits, and environmental portraiture. Students’ work will be evaluated in part on their application of concepts taught in class including photographic composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: Fine Art Photography II

Elective: On-Set Production Photography

3 Semester Credits

This elective concentrates on the business and craft of motion picture set photography. Production photography plays an integral role in the marketing of a motion picture. The on-set photographer must capture the essence of a film shoot, while working in cooperation with a film crew and a pre-existing lighting scheme and production design elements. Students will learn to be both creative and adaptable collaborators as they interface with NYFA filmmaking, producing, and acting students on their shoots. Prerequisites: None

Elective: Nature Photography

3 Semester Credits

Students will learn techniques of photographing wildlife, landscapes, and scientific subjects. Subjects include optimization of natural light, use of special lenses, underwater photography, creating a blind to photograph wild animals, and microscopic photography. Prerequisites: None

Thesis Prep

3 Semester Credits

At the beginning of Semester Three, master students must form a thesis committee which must meet regularly (at least once per week) throughout the final year. This course will focus on the thesis goals of each individual student, with an emphasis on perfecting craft and exposing MFA candidates to the realities of the photographic industry and the business of professional photography. It is designed to prepare MFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. Prerequisites: None

SEMESTER FOUR History and Theory of Photography IV
3 Semester Credits

An examination of critical theory as it applies to photography and students' own work. The course explores question of how meaning is constructed by the photographer and interpreted by the viewer. Prominent critics and thinkers including Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, and Jacques Derrida will be central to the discussion, as students see images as texts and artifacts which reveal and describe humankind. The course identifies the
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"filters" of gender, ethnicity, culture, and politics and uses them to analyze the work of major photographers, as students apply these concepts to their thesis projects. Prerequisite: History and Theory of Photography III

Fashion and Advertising Photography

3 Semester Credits

An exploration of fashion photography in terms of trends and techniques, included in studio and location work, with an emphasis on model direction and lighting control. This course also covers the planning, setup, execution and presentation of product photography. Students will develop the skills necessary to photograph a variety of products including glassware, fabrics, reflective objects, and food. Prerequisite: Fine Art Photography II

Thesis

9 Semester Credits

MFA students must write a thesis proposal of ten to twenty pages and receive approval from the Thesis Committee made up of their faculty. The proposal must include a clear statement of the artistic vision, purpose, and technique(s) the candidate hopes to employ. It should include historical and aesthetic references and may include sample sketches or photographs from the student’s previous work. The final work must include a minimum of twenty gallery-quality prints, with accompanying text, and a summary statement of the artist. Students may choose a fine art or documentary approach, and will be evaluated by the standards established for those genres, in coordination with the thesis committee. Prerequisite: None

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MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN CINEMATOGRAPHY
Total Credit Units: 81 The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Cinematography is an accelerated, conservatory-based graduate program intended for full-time study over the course of four semesters. Designed to instruct gifted and hardworking prospective Directors of Photography in a hands-on, professional environment, the MFA in Cinematography degree program provides a unique setting for the development of both the creative vision and technical proficiency necessary for a career as a Cinematographer. Students will follow a rigorous program of classroom study, self-directed projects, instructor-led Production Workshops, and school-facilitated collaboration with NYFA students across different disciplines. Upon graduation, students will be proficient with many of the state-of-the-art camera systems used by professional cinematographers today and be able to confidently supervise the creation of sophisticated lighting schemes. Most importantly, they will be able to effectively harness the visual tools of cinema to tell meaningful stories.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, Cinematography MFA students will be immersed in a concentrated schedule of classroom learning, teacher-supervised workshops and outside projects. This regimen presupposes no prior knowledge of Cinematography, but aims to have students confident in the fundamentals of exposure, composition, set-etiquette and lighting by the end of the year. Throughout the program, a combination of classroom experience, practical hands-on workshops, individual and collaborative projects, and instructor-led productions provide a rigorous forum for students to develop their technical skills and artistic identities. In the spirit of fostering collaboration, there will be a screening hosted each semester to showcase the cinematographer’s work to NYFA Directing and Producing students.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
During the first semester, students learn the fundamentals of the art and craft of Cinematography. Topics covered will include optics, incident and spotlight metering techniques, loading and utilizing 16mm and HD video cameras, basic lighting, fundamentals of composition, color theory and film chemistry, and dolly movement. Cinematography students will be expected to complete four projects during their first semester. Their first project will be a story told with stills photographed on 35mm black & white film. The second project will be a Mise-en-scène photographed on 16mm film with basic on-set lighting. In the third project, the Continuity Film, students will use the 16mm Arriflex SR camera, and will begin using more sophisticated grip and light-shaping techniques. This project will focus on shot design and creating a scene that can “cut together” elegantly. Collaboration with film directing students plays a major role in the fourth project. By filming a music video in HD, students are introduced to the unique
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director-cinematographer relationship in the real world context of in-the-field film production. Before undertaking this project, students will study the theory and practice of digital Cinematography. Cinematography and film students will collaborate again on their fifth project, the Semester One Film. This project will be their first introduction to sync-sound dialoguebased projects as well as longer narrative form (up to ten minutes). Working in conjunction with Directing students, Cinematography Master’s candidates must act as either a Director of Photography on a single Filmmaking Semester One Project or as a Gaffer, Camera Operator, or Camera Assistant on several projects.

Learning Goals:
1. The ability to design and execute images specific to narrative media productions. 2. The ability to choose proper film stock and proper development techniques to achieve the desired quality. 3. A working knowledge of optics and depth of field. 4. Accurate exposure of both film and video using the incident meter, spot meter, histogram and waveform monitor. 5. Experience in preproduction planning – including shotlisting, creation of overhead diagrams, scheduling and storyboarding. 6. Skill in the important roles of Camera Assistant, Gaffer and Key Grip. 7. Familiarity with fresnel and open faced based lighting technology. 8. A working knowledge of the Arriflex S, Arriflex SR, HD, the Panaflex 35mm, the RED Camera System, and High Definition camera systems.

Production Goals:
1. Photograph a 35mm still photo project, two short 16mm films, and an HD music video. 2. Crew on eight colleagues’ films as Gaffer, Camera Assistant, Key Grip or Operator. 3. Photograph or operate camera on a NYFA semester one film.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester in the Cinematography program is designed to help students move beyond simply capturing an image, and instead begin painting with light. As students’ ability increases, so does their tool set. Students learn how to build and operate a professional 35mm camera package, as well as advanced High Definition equipment. The RED Camera System provides the core platform around which the second semester is centered. Students will have multiple opportunities during class time to master the extraordinary tools the RED Camera offers, including speed-ramping, 100 fps slow motion, and the 4k production workflow. Sophisticated High Definition cameras will round out the comprehensive assortment of tools available to Cinematography students for digital image capture. Proper operation of wave form monitors, histograms and IRE/ISO calculations will be covered in-depth in a practical hands-on classroom environment. These three camera systems (35mm film, Red One, and HD) are the platforms available for the three individual projects in this semester. Although projects may be directed by students from the Filmmaking program, the Cinematography student is responsible for initiating and
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photographing each project, as well as determining the form and content of their own projects. Examples of format include commercials, music videos, or short narrative. Ideally, these three projects will contribute to an impressive show reel for the emerging graduate. In addition to the above classes, students are introduced to new subjects, including lighting and cinematography workshops in the sound stage environment and a series of on-location “production workshops”. These classes allow students to work on their preproduction planning skills and their set operating procedures under the supervision of an experienced professional. At the end of the first year, New York Film Academy Cinematography students are required to either photograph an advanced project (minimum Year One Film) of a fellow NYFA student or to create their own self-directed short film of up to 15 minutes in length. This film may be shot on any format that the student studied in the previous academic year.

Learning Goals:
1. The ability to constructively collaborate with a director and a crew in a highpressure creative environment. 2. Further knowledge of image creation, incorporating additional elements of visual style specific to the narrative script. 3. A working knowledge of the Panaflex 35mm, the RED Camera System, and High Definition camera systems. 4. An understanding of lighting techniques for day exterior, day interior and night interior scenes. 5. The creative capacity to pre-visualize a cinematographic style and the technical ability to execute it consistently over the course of several days of production. 6. Knowledge of the post-production workflow for film, HD video and 4k R3D files, including telecine and color correction.

Production Goals:
1. 2. 3. 4. Photograph a showcase film utilizing either 35mm or Super 16mm film. Photograph a RED camera showcase film. Photograph a High Definition showcase film. Photograph a Filmmaker’s Year One final film or a self-initiated project of equivalent complexity.

YEAR TWO
Second Year MFA candidates in Cinematography will continue to strengthen their cinematographic skills, building their professional portfolio reel, as well as working on developing their unique visual voice. Each student must complete a series of classes designed to hone the fundamental skills they developed in Year One, fill gaps in their specialized knowledge, and create a space to cultivate their visual voice and sensibility. There will be an increased emphasis on collaboration with other filmmakers as the MFA candidate prepares to enter the professional world to make films with outside Directors and Producers.
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SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES:
Building upon the skills acquired in semesters one and two, Semester Three takes existing topics to new levels and introduces new areas of study, such as special effects cinematography, documentary and reality TV cinematography, and specialized camera movement systems. At the beginning of Semester Three, MFA candidates must form a Thesis Committee and determine which Thesis Option they will pursue over the course of Year Two (detailed below). Students must meet regularly with Thesis Committee members in order to ensure compliance with New York Film Academy standards, and to seek assistance in the realization of their respective creative visions. A significant portion of the semester is devoted to preparing the third semester individual project. This project may be filmed either on the Red camera or 35mm film. Production can take up to four days. Although this project may be directed by a film student, it must be photographed by a cinematography student. As in semester two, the format is left to the discretion of the Cinematography student and may be a commercial, music video, or a short film. Hands-on workshops in sound stage filming and lighting techniques continue in the third semester. Multiple camera systems and advanced lighting instruments will be employed to replicate a host of situations cinematographers will face in the real world, including day for night, night for day, combinations of color temperatures, and a mixture of practical and movie lights. The Production Workshop component returns, allowing students to practice their skills in the field under the mentorship of an instructor. In addition, students are provided a selection of elective options to further develop their skills as cinematographers: The Intensive Camera Movement Workshop or Cinematography for Digital Effects. Additionally, new areas of the entertainment industry will be explored in-depth such as the burgeoning reality TV/documentary field and webisodic programming. Under the guidance of an instructor, the class will photograph a short project in one of these new genres. In preparation for photographing advanced projects after graduation, students will be instructed on the intricacies of the post-production process and how to best integrate with post-production supervisors on all future work. Finally, students are also introduced to the professional world of cinematography in Los Angeles through a series of guest lectures with working cinematographers and industry professionals, as well as field trips to camera rental houses, production facilities, and laboratories.

Learning Goals:
1. Knowledge of greenscreen, compositing and advanced color correction techniques. 2. The ability to effectively collaborate with Directors of all experience levels. 3. Strong knowledge of location and soundstage lighting techniques. 4. Working knowledge of specialty lenses and filters. 5. Greater knowledge of documentary and reality cinematography practices. 6. A competitive portfolio reel of material. 7. Completion of one of two elective classes.
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Production Goals:
1. Photograph a multi-day short film on 35mm, Super-16 or on the RED camera system. 2. Operate and photograph elaborate shots on a sound stage using a geared head, dolly, or Steadicam. 3. Crew in a key position on at least one classmate’s film.

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES:
Students continue extensive development of their thesis projects. Courses such as Cinematography Form and Function will serve as conduits for thesis preparation and production. Tests, scouts and the creation of the complete “look” for each thesis project will also be explored in-depth throughout the semester. In addition to working on thesis projects, students continue taking classes designed to expand their knowledge of post-production, practice their skills in instructor-led Production Workshops, and prepare to transition to the professional world in Navigating the Industry. After receiving a final “greenlight” from the thesis committee, students will enter into thesis production. Cinematography candidates are required to select from one of two thesis options, described below. At the conclusion of the semester, students will screen and critique their entire cinematography reel with their fellow students and faculty.

Learning Goals:
1. Ability to create and present a detailed “look book” for the upcoming thesis project.

2. Increased ability to effectively collaborate with Directors of all experience levels. 3. Strong knowledge of location and soundstage lighting techniques. 4. In-depth knowledge of post-production workflows for multiple image origination systems including elements required for final delivery. 5. A greater knowledge of the current state of the industry in all of its permutations. 6. A competitive portfolio reel of material.

Production Goals:
1. Complete one of two Thesis Options. 2. Crew in a key position on at least two classmates’ films.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Master of Fine Arts in Cinematography. Appointed by the Director of Education, it consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in Cinematography or other fields related to filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, that the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of specified electives and thesis options, the MFA in Cinematography does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The MFA is a full-time program only, and the degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours, lab and practicum hours are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 81 semester credits. See the MFA Admissions Policy for additional Graduation Requirements.

TUITION:
Semester One: Semester Two: Semester Three: Semester Four: Total Tuition (4 Semesters):
*Additional Equipment Fee

$16,000 + $ 2,000 * $16,000 + $ 2,000 * $16,000 + $ 2,000 * $16,000 + $ 2,000 * $72,000

OTHER COSTS (FILM, PROCESSING, & PRODUCTION EXPENSES):
Year One: Year Two: Total Other Costs: Total Cost of Program: $3,000 $3,000 $6,000 $78,000 - $6,000 - $10,000* - $20,000* - $92,000* `
*$20,000 for Other Costs is a high estimate, which accounts for potential expenses accrued by students who choose to fulfill their thesis option by creating a self-directing film on 35mm. As a norm, even students who choose the self-directed films will not spend nearly this much money on their projects. This value was included in order to disclose an estimate for an exorbitantly expensive thesis film. While we do not limit the artistic visions of students, the Academy does encourage students to concentrate on solid storytelling rather than exorbitant spending in the design of their films. While the vast majority of thesis films will cost far less than $20,000, the potential for artistic expression in filmmaking is endless, and it is technically possible for students to spend $20,000 or even more of their projects.

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
Graduate Degree-Granting Program (Master of Fine Arts)
Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) Art/ Design History Units Total Number of Units

General Elective Units

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70 116%*

9 15%*

2 3%*

81 135%*

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Master of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function I Hands-On Camera & Lighting Fundamentals of Lighting Post Production for Cinematographers History of Cinematography Directing for Cinematographers Cinematography Practicum Semester One Cinematography Projects Course Numbers CINE500 CINE510 CINE520 CINE530 CINE540 CINE550 CINE560 CINE570

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 2 2 1 0 2 2 3 2 17 Art/Design Elective Total Credit History Units Units Units 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 2 20

Semester One Film: CINE580 Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaboration TOTAL

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function II 35mm Cinematography Stage Lighting Workshop Advanced Cinematography Practicum Post-Production for Cinematographers II Advanced Lighting History of Cinematography II Steadicam and Camera Assistant Seminar Hands-On Camera II Semester Two Cinematography Projects Semester Two Film: Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaboration TOTAL Course Numbers CINE505 CINE535 CINE515 CINE555 CINE565 CINE525 CINE545 CINE595 CINE598 CINE575 CINE585

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 Art/Design Elective History Units Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 1 1 2 1 1 3 1

4 4 18

0 0 3

0 0 0

4 4 21

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SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function III Reality Television, Documentary, and Cinematography for the Web History of Cinematography III Advanced Lighting II Master’s Seminar in Cinematography Cinematography Practicum III Advanced Stage Lighting Workshop Semester Three Cinematography Projects ELECTIVE: Cinematography for Digital Effects ELECTIVE: Intensive Camera Movement Workshop TOTAL

All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Numbers Related History Units Units Units Units CINE600 3 0 0 3 CINE630 CINE640 CINE620 CINE690 CINE650 CINE610 CINE670 CINE601 CINE602 2 0 1 1 2 2 4 0 0 15 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 2 4 2 2 20

MFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following electives:

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function IV Post-Production for Cinematographers II Navigating the Industry Advanced Cinematography Projects Thesis Project: Option A Thesis Project: Option B TOTAL

All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Numbers Related History Units Units Units Units CINE605 3 0 0 3 CINE665 CINE675 CINE615 CINE606 CINE607 2 2 3 10 10 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 10 10 20

MFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following options:

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Cinematography: Form and Function I
3 Semester Credits

An exploration of both the technical and artistic elements of film and digital motion picture cinematography. Students will examine paintings and photographs as they relate to form and content, study the work of professional cinematographers, and evaluate their work in a workshop environment. This course also serves as a “home room” environment, providing a forum where students can discuss their experiences on set, plan upcoming shoots, and bring in outside material they find relevant to their studies. This is the place where individual and group projects will also be prepared, screened and critiqued.

Hands on Camera

2 Semester Credits

In this class, students will learn best practices for building and utilizing the cameras used in the NYFA cinematography curriculum, including the Arri-S, Arri-SR and HVX-200 cameras. Classes will also cover methods for pulling focus, processing theory and keeping camera reports.

Fundamentals of Lighting

2 Semester Credits

Looking beyond the technical aspects of the art form, students learn how to light for mood and genre. They will learn how to apply learned technical knowledge towards their aesthetic decisions in lighting. High key and low key light, bright and dark scenes, indoor day and night, outdoor day and night, will all be explored from both a subjective and practical approach. Depth of field, color temperature, focal length, deep and flat space and more will be demonstrated in this class to provide students the tools they need to create the look and feel required to tell the story.

Post-Production for Cinematographers I

1 Semester Credit

The job of a contemporary cinematographer is no longer complete after the words “That’s a Wrap!” are uttered. A familiarity with editing, post-production workflow and color correction is now essential to maintaining integrity of the creative vision from the production to the final release. This class will teach cinematographers the basics of Final Cut Pro editing, color correction, image effects and proper methods for handling digital media.

History of Cinematography I

3 Semester Credits

A look at the development of the art of cinematography, with an eye toward the progression of the cinematographic form from early still photography to modern day digital media. Students will screen classic films and discuss which techniques of storytelling have changed as technology has evolved, and which have stayed the same. By learning the history of the art form, students will be able to supplement the topics learned in other classes, as well as draw inspiration for their own films.

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Cinematography Practicum

3 Semester Credits

This is the class where students will be able to take all of the camera, lighting, and storytelling techniques they have been learning and “field test” them. Under direct faculty supervision, students will be given the opportunity to shoot and edit several commercial, music videos and short narrative projects. These practice scenes are fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, and shot-listed) and treated as actual productions. Classmates will rotate through crew positions each shoot, giving students a chance to work as Gaffer, Camera Assistant and Key Grip in a real-world situation.

The Directing for Cinematographers

2 Semester Credits

Through lectures, discussions, in-class exercises, outside readings, and film viewings, students will learn the basic elements of format, premise, structure and plot found in contemporary screenplays. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting screenplays from a Director of Photography’s perspective, in order to communicate narrative, character, theme, and tone through the tools of lighting, blocking, image choices and camera technique.

Semester One Cinematography Projects

3 Semester Credits

Students develop and photograph four individual projects during Semester One: Still Photo, Mise-en-scène, Continuity, and Music Film. These projects allow students to develop their own visual sensibility and will generate essential material for their portfolio reels. Students will employ the technical tools of Cinematography and develop the organizational skills and creative vocabulary to realize their vision. Additionally, they will be expected to crew on and support their colleague’s projects throughout the semester.

Semester One Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaborations

2 Semester Credits

Collaboration is key to the successful cinematographer. In this larger scale project, cinematography students act as either the Director of Photography or Camera Operator for a filmmaker’s semester one project. Moving beyond the classroom experience and the knowledge gained from completing self-directed projects, students collaborate directly with a directing student in the field. The experience will help prepare them to express themselves in “real world” sets for directors and producers as well as further collaborations in semester two.

SEMESTER TWO Cinematography: Form and Function II
3 Semester Credits

Continuing to function as a ”home room” for the cinematography students, this course remains the forum for students to prepare and screen their individual projects, evaluate the work of professional cinematographers, and examine contemporary issues in the world of professional motion picture photography. Here students will learn the RED One and the HPX-500 camera systems before they have the opportunity to use them in the Advanced Practicum.

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Hands-On Camera II

1 Semester Credit

Here students will learn the 35mm, RED One and the HPX-500 camera systems before they have the opportunity to use them in the Advanced Practicum and their individual projects.

35mm Cinematography

1 Semester Credit

Students are trained in the proper use and operation of 35mm cameras and accessories, applying the skills they have learned in 16mm and digital photography to the standard in professional motion picture film photography. This class will demystify the process of designing, shooting, and editing scenes on 35mm. Students will learn how the wider frame and higher resolution of 35mm affects their shot design, framing, composition, staging, camera movement, lens choice, and lighting.

Stage Lighting Workshop

1 Semester Credit

Focusing on the specific craft of set lighting, students will learn the fundamentals of designing shots and lighting for a sound stage. Under the supervision of an experienced Director of Photography, students will gain first-hand experience with designing daytime, nighttime, interior and exterior lighting schemes inside the controlled environment of a soundstage.

Advanced Cinematography Practicum

2 Semester Credits

Combining together all the elements of the second semester program in a practical hands-on workshop, these production exercises allow students to shoot scenes with a NYFA Instructor serving as Director. The more sophisticated tools available to students during the second semester will allow even greater creative options for the team to explore. Once again, students will rotate through crew positions, allowing them to cultivate their “real world” experience with the 35mm and RED camera packages.

Post-Production for Cinematographers II

1 Semester Credit

Color grading, or correction, is a technology that has been developing over the last decade into its own discipline, combining elements of compositing techniques and traditional optical methods into a new form called Digital Intermediate. As a cinematographer, knowledge of these new color sciences and the manipulations that are possible in post-production are important skills to develop. Students will explore the world of post-production from a cinematographer’s perspective by examining post-production workflows for emerging new formats such as HD and Red One, as well as participating in a professional color correction session.

Advanced Lighting

1 Semester Credit

Building upon the basic skills of exposure, composition, and shot design learned in the first semester, students expand both their skill and toolsets. Working with new equipment such as HMI Lights and Kino Flo fluorescent fixtures, students will learn how to create sophisticated and nuanced lighting setups.

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History of Cinematography II

3 Semester Credits

In this continuation of History of Cinematography One, students focus on the masters of cinematography. Students will screen the work of the great DPs, such as Gregg Toland (Citizen Kane), Gordon Willis (The Godfather), and Roger Deakins (No Country for Old Men), and examine how these pivotal cinematographers have influenced the art form over the years. Assignments and discussions will analyze the elements of visual style employed by these masters in both classic and contemporary films.

Advanced Camera Assistant Seminar

1 Semester Credit

The critical and challenging vocation of professional Camera Assistant is about more than simply loading the camera and getting focus. Led by an experienced Camera Assistant, this seminar exposes students to the details of the trade. Topics discussed will include: proper slating technique, film and video camera checkout, advanced focus pulling, calculating for speed ramps, proper marking etiquette, and best practices for film inventory and paperwork.

Semester Two Cinematography Projects

4 Semester Credits

Students photograph three individual projects during the semester on three formats: HD, Red, and 35mm or Super 16mm film. These projects allow students to develop their own visual sensibility as well as generate essential material for their portfolio reels. Through these projects, students will learn the technical tools of Cinematography and develop the organizational skills and creative vocabulary to realize their vision. In addition, students serve in key functions in the Electric, Grip, and Camera Departments of their colleagues’ films. In the roles of Gaffer, Key Grip, and 1st AC, students will learn marketable trades to take out into the professional world, and have the opportunity to see the craft of Cinematography from a variety of different vantage points. By furthering their understanding of lighting, grip, and camera, students will emerge as more complete Directors of Photography and will have provided invaluable help to their classmates in the process.

Semester Two Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaborations

4 Semester Credits

Increasing both the scope and the complexity of the filmmaker/cinematographer collaboration, students will DP a filmmaker’s thesis or Year One Project. Students are expected to participate in the scouting, shot planning, production and post-production of the film. Students that do not participate in this collaboration may produce a self-initiated project of equivalent complexity. This Self-Produced Project need not be directed by the student; however it must bear their creative fingerprint and be driven by their own initiative. The film may be on any format with which the student has worked throughout the year.

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SEMESTER THREE Cinematography, Form and Function III
3 Semester Credits

Continuing from semesters one and two, this course provides the central venue for preparing and screening individual projects, examining the work of other cinematographers and investigating contemporary issues in the world of professional cinematography.

Reality TV, Doc & Cinematography for the Web

2 Semester Credits

Students apply their skills as cinematographers to the increasingly popular formats of reality television, web-based media and more traditional documentary productions. Students will receive formal instruction in the etiquette and ethics of covering real life events, fast methods for setting up sit-down interviews, filming for the small screen and web-based delivery, and techniques in covering an event with multiple cameras. Students will be able to put this training into practice by filming either a verite film, a web pilot or an instructor-led reality show.

History of Cinematography III

3 Semester Credits

Expanding upon the first year History of Cinematography screenings, this course focuses on modern cinematography style and convention, as well as what the future of visual storytelling may become. Students will look at ways in which their contemporaries are drawing on the past and finding their own voices. There will also be discussions on how new technologies, such as 3D photography and ever-smaller digital cameras, may change the art of filmmaking in years to come, just as the development of sound and color did in the past.

Advanced Lighting II

1 Semester Credit

Students continue to explore the latest camera technology, working on night-exterior shooting techniques, and shooting film stock and video tests. Using their own projects as templates, students are encouraged to experiment and plan out shooting and lighting designs for upcoming projects.

Master’s Seminar in Cinematography

1 Semester Credit

A series of invited guests and industry professionals will bring samples of their work, and share experiences from their careers with the MFA Cinematographers in a forum hosted by the instructor. Guests will include Directors, Cinematographers, Gaffers, Key Grips, Camera Assistants and Assistant Directors, as well as other professionals from the industry such as production designers, editors and directors. In addition to the lecture series, students will attend a variety of supervised field trips to locations germane to their studies. Trip locations may include Kodak and Fuji Film, Panavision, and other camera, lighting, and grip rental houses, as well as local museum exhibits.

Cinematography Practicum III

2 Semester Credits

Students continue photographing projects helmed by a member of the NYFA faculty. Building upon the fundamentals of cinematography acquired in previous semesters,
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these projects will be far more challenging and demanding. Students should expect rigorous schedules and projects that will push them to continue growing as artists.

Advanced Stage Lighting Workshop

2 Semester Credits

Students return to a studio soundstage to participate in a week-long workshop in freestanding façade sets. In addition to further guidance on how to work within these controlled environments, ‘day for night’ and ‘night for day’ techniques will also be explored. Students will have access to 16mm, 35mm and RED cameras during this workshop.

Semester Three Cinematography Projects

4 Semester Credits

Students will have up to four days to photograph an ambitious project on either 35mm or the RED camera. The project can be a narrative, a commercial or a music video and can be directed by the student, a fellow NYFA student, or an outside director (approved by the Faculty Chair of the department). Students are responsible for all preparation and pre-visualization materials and must steer the project through to completion, including sound mix and color correction.
Students must select ONE of the following electives.

Elective: Cinematography for Digital Effects

2 Semester Credits

Designing and integrating production photography with CGI elements is becoming more essential to the modern cinematographer. Students will learn to design lighting and compositions for compositing with multiple layers of CGI, as well as how to photograph greenscreens for a variety of situations including moving shots. Additional topics include lighting for miniatures and special lighting effects, such as fire and lightning.

Elective: Intensive Camera Movement Workshop

2 Semester Credits

Steadicam, geared heads, and advanced dollies will provide the tools for students to expand their knowledge of all aspects of camera movement. Intensive class exercises will prepare students to apply these skills to their future projects.

SEMESTER FOUR Cinematography, Form and Function IV
3 Semester Credits

This course is devoted almost exclusively to the Thesis Projects. Students will research, plan and report on their thesis preparation, film collaborations, and shoot and screen tests for their upcoming thesis projects. The “look book” detailing every visual dimension of the thesis project will also be researched and critiqued in this forum.

Post-Production for Cinematographers II

2 Semester Credits

A more advanced exploration of concepts from the previous semester. Students explore the photographed image through every step of post-production. The knowledge and abilities students gain will help prepare them to work seamlessly with professional postproduction supervisors, editors and directors. Trips to post-production facilities,
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laboratories and effects facilities supplement coursework, providing a real world context for these newly acquired skills.

Navigating the Industry

2 Semester Credits

As students transition to the professional world beyond the academic environment, this course provides practical guidance on the myriad of ways cinematographers function in all corners of the entertainment industry. This course includes guest lectures, as well as guidance in preparing a final reel for emerging cinematographers to use in beginning their careers.

Advanced Cinematography Projects

3 Semester Credits

Students mentor under a faculty member in the field, gaining detailed instruction on working within a crew and as a DP, in a practical outside-the-classroom setting. The class will photograph an instructor-led project in the field at a higher caliber than in previous semesters.
Students must select ONE of the following Thesis Options.

Thesis Option A: Photograph an MFA Thesis Film and a Self-Produced Project 10 Semester Credits Thesis Option B: Self-Direct Two Films and Crew Member on Two MFA Thesis Films

10 Semester Credits

The requirements for Candidates who select Thesis Option B are as follows: 1) Create, organize and photograph two short films, or a larger single project, with a period of principle photography of no less than four days (eight days for a larger project). Though this film does not need to be written or directed by the MFA Cinematography candidate, they must be the ones to conceive it and the project must have their unique creative fingerprint. Merely providing equipment and photographing someone else’s short film will not sufficiently satisfy the graduation requirements. 2) The student must function as a key crewmember for two New York Film Academy MFA thesis productions. A key crewmember is either a Gaffer, 1st Camera Assistant, Key Grip, Camera Operator or Assistant Director. 3) The student must create a detailed and complete “look book” for an additional project that need not be produced. This must include the script, a detailed visual palette, a budget for the camera, lighting and post-production elements, and storyboards.

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MFA DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 74.5

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Documentary Filmmaking program is an accelerated, four semester conservatory-based, full-time study graduate program. This program is designed to educate talented and committed prospective documentary filmmakers in a hands-on, total immersion, professional environment. The New York Film Academy Master of Fine Arts in Documentary Filmmaking provides a creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Documentary Filmmaking students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning and production goals. In a combination of hands-on classroom education and production-intense film shoots, master students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of motion picture arts and aesthetics, and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience - assisted by the business of Documentary Filmmaking. YEAR ONE In Year One, students undergo a thorough regimen of class-work and film production that builds the groundwork for a professional life in the art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Starting the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education and an environment that empowers them to artfully tell their stories. Through a sequence of workshops, students begin to work through a number of visual, dramatic, and technical challenges. They rapidly learn the fundamentals of creative and technical skills they need to make a documentary. All students participate in an intensive series of courses in Research, Film Language, Producing, Cinematography, Sound and Digital Editing to prepare them for more advanced topics and projects in Year Two. Based on an academic year, the curriculum is divided into two semesters. During the first semester, students will learn the art and technique of visual storytelling through class instruction, lectures and hands-on workshops. As the year progresses, students will produce films of increasing complexity and depth. By the end of the second semester, students will have produced six documentaries, including one group project and a final thesis. While the emphasis of the program is on hands-on immersion in the art of documentary filmmaking, students will also receive instruction on writing, film studies, and the industry as a whole. OBJECTIVES The overall educational objective of the MFA Documentary Filmmaking Program is to provide a structured, creative environment for students to develop and evolve as artists. Within that broad description are several specific educational objectives. Students will learn to develop, direct, shoot and edit their own projects and be given the opportunity to further enhance their skills by acting as a crewmember on their peers’ films. Film structure and history will be examined during in-class lectures. Students will be assigned six documentary film projects, which they will be expected to deliver on deadline.
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EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES: While students do not need any documentary filmmaking experience to attend this program, it is strongly recommended that they come to the first day of class with at least one idea for a nonfiction observational project. These ideas will serve as a starting point for subsequent work in the program. If students do not have a story idea, they will be assisted by the instructor to formulate one. Students should be ready, willing, and able to work hard and learn within a fast-paced and focused environment. Skills learned as a result of successful completion of the program include: 1. The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment 2. An in-depth knowledge of Digital Video cameras and sound equipment 3. Documentary craft and production 4. The ability to write and pre-visualize a documentary project 5. In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions 6. Mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software 7. Knowledge of documentary film history and film studies 8. Knowledge of aesthetic film theory and experience with practical application of the same 9. Ability to research an issue from multiple, balanced perspectives. Project 1: Observation Film Each student produces a visual portrait of a person, place, or activity. Students are challenged to observe the subject closely, and find the most effective shots for revealing the subject to an audience. Use of camera angle, shot-size, focal length, and editing patterns are emphasized. Each student directs, shoots, and edits a film of up to 2 minutes. Project 2: New Media Each student creates personal cyber-films for distribution on the Internet. Students are challenged to utilize the intimate dimensions of the player window to their advantage and attract the interest of the web-surfing audience. Each student directs, shoots, and edits three vlogs, each of up to 60 seconds. Project 3: Character Film Each student is challenged to reveal an extraordinary or extremely ordinary person using image and sound to build a portrait. Students are challenged to record life as it happens rather than staging scenes or interviewing the subject. Each student directs, shoots, and edits a film of up to 8 minutes. Project 4: Investigative Film / Social Issue This project should be on a social issue or topic. Students will research their subject matter extensively before beginning. They must use both interviews and narration as building blocks for this project. Students may provide a fresh
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perspective on a political issue or document a local story that has larger implications. Each student writes, shoots, directs, and edits a film of up to 10 minutes. Project 5: Reality Program Working in teams, students will produce a seed or pitch an episode for an original reality program. Using documentary techniques learned throughout the first semester students will be challenged to structure a show that obeys classical story conventions. Team projects may be up to 15 minutes in length. Project 6: Final Documentary Film Project The culmination of the first year of the MFA Documentary Filmmaking Program is a thesis film of the student’s own choosing. Through extensive research, writing, and planning, each student produces a thesis film of up to 20 minutes in length.

Year-End Screenings
The Intermediate Film will be presented in a movie theater for an invited audience. Students are responsible for inviting all guests. This public screening is not part of the formal evaluation process, but serves as a celebration of the students’ progress and achievements thus far.

YEAR TWO
Coursework in the second year includes a series of highly specialized classes and workshops designed to further develop students’ knowledge and skills as professional documentary filmmaker. Students are required to produce one personal documentary and to develop a proposal “ready to go” for the remainder of the degree program. The final thesis is intended to reflect the student’s strengths as a documentary filmmaker and should be of professional quality. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions, besides their own.

OBJECTIVES:
The focus of the third semester is on “professionalism.” Classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting the craft, exposing students to emerging media and technology, along with exposing them to the realities of the growing field of documentary filmmaking. This course-intense semester is intended to prepare MFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. In Semester Four, students devote the majority of their time to their thesis requirements, working not only on their own productions, but also assisting with their classmates’ projects. In an extensive series of advisements, each student meets one-on-one with faculty members who assist and coach the student through the successful completion of his/her thesis and the final proposal.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOME:
Since the first year provides a foundation in Documentary Filmmaking, the second year’s goal is to deepen the skill sets associated. Students will figure out their strength and
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affinity in documentary filmmaking and produce a film that showcases that. Students will be taught that documentary filmmaking involves profound teamwork with many different positions and skills. They will work with actors to meet the requirements for re-enactments and re-creation. Postproduction is integral part of the process and students will be made aware of its possibilities and limits. Students must be fluent in the “language of professional” filmmaking and possess a broad background of documentaries and film history. Students must develop profound research capabilities. Students will master technical skills for the camera, sound, lighting and post – not only for a personal project but also to be able to join a documentary film team. Skills set to achieve: 1.Mastering story telling in non-fiction. 2. Writing compelling proposals. 3. Practicing budgeting and line producing. 4. Knowledge about successful grant writing. 5. Learning about Industry perspectives.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of specified electives and thesis options, the MFA in Documentary Filmmaking does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The MFA is a full-time program only, and the degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters. • • In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 74.5 semester credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis production requirement. After a student has received a final grade from the Thesis committee, the school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the MFA degree will be withheld until the candidate meets all academic and financial obligations.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition:
*(Additional Equipment Fee)

$14,000 + $ 2000 * $14,000 + $ 2000 * $14,000 + $ 2000 * $14,000 + $ 2000 * $64,000

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE: SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Documentary Craft I Film Dynamics The Business of Documentary Filmmaking I / New Media Documentary Production Workshop Cinema Studies I Camera and Lighting I Introduction to Editing Writing for the Documentary I Sound I TOTAL Course Numbers DOCU500 DOCU510 DOCU520 DOCU530 DOCU540 DOCU550 DOCU560 DOCU570 DOCU 580 All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 2 1.5 1 0 2 2.5 2 1 16 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 2 1.5 1 3 2 2.5 2 1 19

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Documentary Craft II New Media The Business of Documentary Filmmaking II Writing for the Documentary II Documentary Producing Cinema Studies II New Media Advanced Editing Camera and Lighting II Sound II Final Documentary Film Project TOTAL Course Numbers DOCU505 DOCU515 DOCU516 DOCU575 DOCU525 DOCU545 DOCU535 DOCU545 DOCU555 DOCU 556 DOCU565

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 1 1.5 1 1 0 2 2 2 1 4 18.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 1 1.5 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 4 21.5

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Proposal Development / Grant Writing NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers DOCU571

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 Art/Design History Units 0 Elective Units 1 Total Credit Units 4 117

Introduction to Directing Advanced Producing Workshop HD, RED & 35 mm Workshop Masters Seminar: Industry Perspectives Advanced Post Production Cinema Studies III New Media: Content in the Digital Age The Business of Documentary Filmmaking III Thesis Workshop Advanced Research & Writing TOTAL

DOCU572 DOCU 527 DOCU579 DOCU590 DOCU537 DOCU585 DOCU519 DOCU518 DOCU571

2 1 1 2 2 0 2 2 2 17

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 20

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Advanced Proposal / Grant Writing Proposal Development Thesis Documentary Production A Thesis Documentary Production B TOTAL Course Numbers DOCU595 DOCU596 DOCU599 DOCU598

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 1 1 0 0 2 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 1 3 6 3 13 Total Credit Units 2 4 6 3 15

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Documentary Craft I
4 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to the craft of documentary filmmaking, establishing a foundation for all future projects. It’s the “Spine of the Documentary Program”. Through lectures and screenings, the instructor will highlight a specific documentary topic for students to analyze and discuss. Topics include observational film, character driven documentary and social issue/investigative film (three assignments). “Cinema Verite”, propaganda, re-enactment. Ethical considerations of working with documentary subjects, investigative techniques, journalistic objectivity, chronology and “real time” as well as the P.O.V of the filmmaker and directorial manipulation of documentary subjects. A vlog (at least three episodes) as an introduction to the New Media is an additional assignment. The course guides step by step through the process of making the short documentaries: Developing story ideas, how and where to research, how to write a logline, synopsis and treatment and how to shoot a documentary. Prerequisite: none

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Film Dynamics

2 Semester Credits

This course is designed to further students’ knowledge of the intricacies of feature-length documentary filmmaking by surveying the language and grammar of film including: the shot, sequences, mise-en-scene, continuity, axis, camera angles, composition and montage. Even in the most observational, objective style documentaries, the filmmaker chooses where to point the camera, and which shots to use in the edited film. The choices the director makes ultimately determine whether or not it is a coherent story. This course will teach students how to make the correct choices through the mastering of visual storytelling techniques and understanding the forces behind successful films. Prerequisite: none

The Business of Documentary Filmmaking

1.5 Semester credits

Documentary, once thought of as dull, textbook style filmmaking, is the most vital and exciting form of filmmaking today. As the popularity of the form has grown, so have the complexities of the business overall. This course is a comprehensive look at the business aspects of documentary filmmaking. The producer of the documentary often has the primary creative voice of the project. In this sense, students are the producers of all of the work they complete in the program. Subjects covered include financing projects, writing proposals, contracts, budgets, film festivals, rights and distribution. Since it is essential for producers and filmmakers to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new media outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis there will be a part of this course be dedicated to introduce New Media. Prerequisite: none

Documentary Production Workshop

1 Semester Credit

Workshop sessions are group experiences focusing a certain topic. Students will go out and mutually shoot. Workshop I is an observational experience. Students will shoot – with a 16mm camera on b/w film- a “behind the scene” on the lot. Workshop II focuses on interviews and the third one will serve the actual needs and desire of the students. Workshops are student-driven classes in which student work is evaluated and critiqued. Workshops give students the opportunity to experiment and explore the medium within a learn-by-doing environment Prerequisite: none

Cinema Studies I

3 Semester Credits

The Cinema Studies course introduces students to the critical concepts in documentary filmmaking through lectures, screenings, group discussions and occasionally guest speakers. It also gives an overview over film history. Each session will give students the chance to consider a documentary film or a documentary filmmaker with historical significance within the genre. Documentaries with groundbreaking style and/or structure will be a priority. Prerequisite: none

Camera and Lighting I
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2 Semester Credits

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Digital camera and lighting class sessions are designed to help students master the many elements of digital video photography including white balance, shutter speed, focus, video latitude, gels, and filters. Through hands-on exercises, students will explore the possibilities of digital video. Other subjects include apertures, frame rates, and scene menus. Lighting classes help students maximize the use of available and natural light, as well as traditional studio lighting for interviews and controlled situations. Prerequisite: none

Introduction to Editing

2.5 Semester Credits

Documentary films, or films with nonfiction content, often find their true form in the editing room. This makes the editing process extremely important because a story may take a different shape after the footage is reviewed. This class, in edition to teaching students the fundamentals of editing with Final Cut Pro, will also teach students how to deal with the particular challenges of documentary editing. Some class hours will be devoted to guiding students through the process of editing their own films. Prerequisite: None

Writing for the Documentary I

2 Semester Credits

This course will cover the role of writing, as a storytelling and planning tool, in a documentary film. Not only narratives, also documentaries tell stories. Students will master the basic story elements of a documentary and be introduced to characters, conflicts, story development, dramatic arc and the three act story telling. The course will introduce to different storytelling: with words (commentary, narration) and without words (characters voice, scenes, situations). And for the planning it will define what are loglines, exposes, treatment and how to write them. And what – in a documentary is a shooting script? Prerequisite: none

Sound I

1 Semester Credit

This course will demonstrate the basic and most common devices for digital recording. And it will provide training in using this equipment and in the importance of acquiring usable location sound for a smooth transition into post-production. The course will also define what is a sound effect, an ambient sound and how to record dialogue / interview versus recording narration. And it will raise the question: What do I have to record while shooting? What do I have to add to have for a successful mix? Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Documentary Craft II
3 Semester Credits

The “Spine of the Documentary Program” continues. Through lectures and screenings, students will understand the use and appearance of different genres and styles of documentaries. From event-centered films, progressive films, travelogues, biographies, film essays to mockumentaries or rockumentaries. Foreign films are included. Highlights of this course are guest-speakers and screenings with the director or producer/director
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followed by Q&A. Prerequisite: Documentary Craft

New Media

1 Semester Credit

It is essential for producers to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new media outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis. The objective of this course is for students to develop an introductory sense of the filmmaking challenges and opportunities presented by new/digital/viral media – including pod casting, marketing films, and producing for the web/handhelds. Through readings, discussions, and hands-on production, students will develop critical and pragmatic insights into critiquing and designing new media experiences. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking

The Business of Documentary Filmmaking II

1.5 Semester Credits

During this course, students will be enabled to meet the challenges of producing and realizing profit from motion pictures and television programs with the legal and businessoriented approach necessary for any successful documentary filmmaker. This course is to help students become more generally skilled responding effectively to issues and problems that are likely to arise in the course of their functioning as filmmakers, with emphasis on legal issues and business practices of immediate concern to documentary filmmakers. Subjects included: copyright, plagiarism, contracts, location agreements, release forms and many more. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking

Writing for the Documentary II

1 Semester Credit

This course goes deeper into the process of writing a documentary film. From research to shooting to editing, the subject matter may continue to reveal itself and evolve over time. However, the director is still responsible for delivering a narrative, finding the arc, and in some cases constructing the story from true events and/or “characters”. This means documentary filmmakers must go into a project as prepared as possible and with a strong sense of the story they want to tell. Writing narration and voice-over is a topic covered extensively as well as the use of titles, story boarding, outlines, re-enactments, reconstruction, and docu-drama. Prerequisite: Writing for the Documentary I

Documentary Producing

1 Semester Credit

This course will name the duties and responsibility of the director and the ones of the producer in the field of documentary filmmaking the writer/director often is the producer as well. The producer makes the project happen by ironing out the specifics: scouting, breakdowns, budgets, permits, schedules, and legal issues. This course examines the job of producer by matching tasks and challenges with ways of approaching them. As students start to produce their own projects, the challenges will become clear, and some class time will be devoted to specific production “hurdles”. Students will hone group problem-solving skills, a film industry must-have, and learn through sharing real
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examples. All students will be required to turn in a detailed project description followed by a full budget. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking and Doc Craft I

Cinema Studies II

3 Semester Credits

In continuation of Cinema Studies from the first semester, students use this class to discuss documentary filmmaking technique and using in-class screenings of classic and groundbreaking documentary film and television. The course also highlights filmmakers with extraordinary achievements. Focus here: Award winning documentaries - and hybrids between documentary and narrative filmmaking, Prerequisite: Cinema Studies I

Non Fiction Television

2 Semester Credits

This course examines various types of documentary television programs, from reality series to historical and educational television documentaries. In the past decade, documentary-style storytelling has been pushed to new heights due to audience demand of the medium. Through screening and discussion, students examine popular forms of documentary TV, including styles, successes, and failures. The primary focus of this course is on non-fiction television. A Reality TV assignment and workshop is also overseen in this course and contributes to the final grade. Prerequisite: Documentary Craft

Advanced Editing

2 Semester Credits

In this course students will learn advanced editing techniques used in documentary films. Through the exploration of Final Cut Pro students will learn its many possibilities as a tool for transforming raw material for a broad audience. The goal is for students to master the program and process so that they have a wealth of tools by which to express themselves creatively on their own evolving documentary projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Editing

Camera and Lighting II

2 Semester Credits

Students will be introduced to HD cameras and hybrid cameras (still & video). Throughout several workshops, they will focus on working with existing light, setting light for interviews, and shooting with green screens. Framing and composition will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: Camera and Lighting I

Sound II

1 Semester Credit

Advanced class for sound recording. Documentary filmmakers are often working in difficult and uncontrollable environment. Students will be introduced to challenges that might run into. They will learn about different microphones, recording techniques and playback. How to record sync sound with external recorders is a focus. The theory of sound and soundtracks will be presented with samples. Prerequisite: Sound I

Final Documentary Film Project
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4 Semester Credits

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The culmination of the first year of the Documentary Program is a thesis film of the student’s own choosing. Through extensive research, writing, and planning, each student produces a thesis film of up to 30 minutes in length. During the 5-part Thesis Development Workshop two instructors will work with the students to broaden their perspective. Each student will create a written logline, synopsis and treatment, followed by a budget and schedule. A committee of at least three from NYFA will oversee their thesis project. During shooting and postproduction instructors are there for consultation. Prerequisite: the 5 previous doc films and production workshops.

SEMESTER THREE Proposal Development / Grant Writing
4 Semester Credits

This class is designed as a creative and academic safe-haven for students to develop, re-write, and polish their proposals / scripts. Students who intend to direct and edit their doc features in Semester Four of the MFA in Documentary Filmmaking program must receive “Project Approval” from the Chair of the Documentary Program before proceeding to Pre-Production and Production of their feature length films in Semester Four. Prerequisite: successful completion of Semester 1, 2 and final documentary project from Year One.

Introduction to Directing

1 Semester Credit

Documentaries nowadays are more than just talking heads, educational tools or observations. Think about re-creation, re-enactment or hybrids. This class will introduce the craft of directing and working with actors. Students will be provided with a selection of pre-published texts, including plays, television scripts, and scenes from produced feature length screenplays. They will workshop the scenes (both inside and outside of class) with actor students from the school or professional local community. Instruction and in-class criticism will focus on how the director is working and communicating with actors. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Producing Workshop

1 Semester Credit

In this class students will analyze budgets and schedules of films and television shows that have already been produced in order to gain an understanding of these two key elements in preparing a project for production. In later sessions students will prepare a budget and a schedule from scratch and learn how these two elements interact and drive the production. A second focus of this class will be an in-depth lecture on, and discussion of, the nuts and bolts of practical hands-on producing. Prerequisite: None

HD, RED & 35mm Workshop

1 Semester Credit

Students will participate in a week long Workshop, camera tech, and production period featuring the use of more advanced high definition cameras, the Red and the 35mm camera. Highlight is a field trip to a camera rental house. Prerequisite: None
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Master’s Seminar: Industry Perspectives

2 Semester Credits

On a regular basis, industry professionals will address New York Film Academy master students following a screening of their recent work. A broad cross-section of the film community will be represented in this lecture series, ranging from directors, producers, and directors of photography to editors, screenwriters, and production designers. Students will be exposed to multiple avenues for potential employment in the film industry. All lectures will be followed by an extensive Q&A session. Documentary filmmakers, producers and distributors will be included. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Post Production

2 Semester Credits

In a series of lectures and hands-on demonstrations and field trips, students will study the constantly evolving world of high end digital Post-Production and finishing to film. Many aspects of Post-Production including telecine, datacine, Efilm, negative cutting, conforming, optical printing, color timing, answer printing, sound editing, sound track mastering, effects compositing, ADR, Foley, looping, and theatrical printing will be explored. Students will gain a fluid knowledge of the post-production process and how it differs based upon output goals, formats, and deliverables. Emphasis is on developing a method to identify needs, and delineate costs. Delivering benefits of postproduction tools and the confidence to complete professional productions. Prerequisite: Digital Editing II

Cinema Studies III

2 Semester Credits

This film studies seminar taught from the filmmaker’s perspective serves as a continuation of Applied Film Studies I & II from Year One. Through screenings and discussions of historic and modern cinema, here focus on documentary and hybrids, students identify techniques they may use in their own films. They learn how documentary filmmakers have approached the challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. Prerequisite: Cinema Studies I and II

New Media: Content in the Digital Age

2 Semester Credits

In the ever-changing world of the motion picture industry, it is essential for a filmmaker to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology. New media trends are nearly impossible to predict. The climate changes so quickly that often times, revolutionary new ideas face obsolescence within months of their inception. This class will immerse students in this maelstrom of technological developments in filmmaking including web based production and distribution of content. Prerequisite: None

The Business of Documentary Filmmaking III

2 Semester Credits

As burgeoning film professionals, master students will learn the importance of balancing their artistic inclinations with a thorough understanding of the business of filmmaking and the industry as a whole. Topics such as marketing, financing the documentary in it’s different appearances: single / independent feature length docs, series, reality TV, educational or industrial documentaries, art films. How to license footage, photos and
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artifacts, using music and scores. Plus all about doc film festivals, representation, distribution and other showcasing. Students will learn to develop themselves as a commodity as well as a creative individual, so that they may better pursue their goals of financially supporting themselves through a life in the arts. Prerequisite: None

Thesis Workshop: Advanced Research & Writing 2 Semester Credits
This class focus’ is on research and finding a compelling story within the chosen subject. It will emphasis documentaries without narration or commentary. Guest lectures or guest speeches of professional researches will highlight this part of the course.The second part of the course addresses documentaries with narration/ commentary or the personal essay or biography and helps to refine the filmmaker’s P.O.V. Students will develop new narrations for existing films. At the end of this class students come up with first thesis ideas and learn how to evaluate them. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER FOUR Advanced Proposal & Grant Writing
2 Semester Credits

Students will be guided to write a final proposal. A three times 2,5 hours guest lecture with a professional grant writer will deepen the understanding for the craft and necessity of grant writing. Towards the end of the semester there will be a pitch meeting with producers and / or broadcast / cable executives. Prerequisite: None

Proposal Development Thesis Documentary Production A Focus: Writer/Producer. Thesis Documentary Production B Focus: Cinematography / Sound
Students will focus on crew participation.

4 Semester Credits 6 Semester Credits

Students will focus on her/his own project as a documentary filmmaker.
3 Semester Credits

At the end of semester four, the MFA Documentary Filmmaking student should have produced and developed: A long documentary up to 60 minutes and a bible plus an outline for future episodes for a non- fictional TV / documentary series. OR A proposal package including narratives, visual style, budget, biographies of the key personal, goal / intent of the filmmaker, outreach, and marketing concept – ready to go for funding.
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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

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BFA ADMISSIONS POLICY
All students pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) Degree from The New York Film Academy must be proficient in English and have earned a high school diploma (at a minimum) or an acceptable equivalent. In addition, each applicant must submit a creative portfolio (Supporting Materials) that illustrates the applicant's ability to take on undergraduate level study, and shows a potential for success within the profession.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION
To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following: • A completed New York Film Academy BFA Application Form (available online at www.nyfa.edu) • $50 non-refundable Application Fee • Proof of English proficiency (such as TOEFL or IELTS score), if native language is other than English. (TOEFL Code: 6857) • Official Academic Transcripts (minimum of high school equivalency), sealed and sent by the issuing institution directly to NYFA’s Admissions Office • SAT or ACT scores (DI code: 6513) • Two Letters of Recommendation (see below) • Narrative Statement (see below) • Creative Portfolio (will not be returned; see below) An ideal applicant for the New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts program must demonstrate a sincere passion for their field of studies, and the commitment necessary to complete a rigorous, total immersion undergraduate program. An interview may be required if the admissions department feels more information is needed to determine whether a student meets the qualifications of acceptance.

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT
Since all classes at the New York Film Academy are conducted in English, students must be able to communicate clearly in written and spoken English. Applicants for whom English is not the first or native language should submit one of the following to verify English proficiency: • An official transcript verifying completion of secondary education in which English is the primary language of communication. • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 520 or higher (190 for computer-based test or 68 for internet-based test); IELTS 5.5 or the equivalent. • A report from a valid English Language School verifying completion of course level equivalent to a 520 Paper-based TOEFL Score. In the case that the documentation is not available, a New York Film Academy representative will use a phone or in-person interview as an opportunity to determine whether or not the applicant has the necessary English language proficiency.

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TRANSCRIPT REQUIREMENTS
All students pursuing a Bachelor's Degree from the New York Film Academy must show proof of high school graduation at a minimum. To fulfill this requirement, applicants are required to submit official transcripts from their prior academic institutions. Transcripts must be sealed, official originals sent directly from the institution in question to the New York Film Academy's Admissions Office. Transcripts that have been opened, photocopied, or augmented in any way will not be accepted as evidence of prior academic accomplishment. Prospective students who fail to provide the admissions committee with applicable sealed academic transcripts will not be eligible to receive a degree or certificate from the Academy. Transcripts should be sent directly to: New York Film Academy Office of Admissions 100 Universal City Plaza Building 9128, Suite 179 Universal City, CA 91608 NOTE: The New York Film Academy generally does not consider prior experiential learning as a substitute for the transcript requirements described above. Applicants who do not have the required credentials may choose to audit a program at NYFA, but will not be eligible to receive a degree or certificate of completion without submitting the necessary transcripts.

ARE THERE MINIMUM REQUIRED SAT, ACT, OR SAT SUBJECT TEST SCORES?
The New York Film Academy does not have clearly defined, required minimum scores. Above all, our Bachelor of Fine Arts program is an intensive, rigorous and specialized degree, where standardized test scores are not always the most useful factor in predicting success. However, when considered a thoughtfully among many other factors, test scores can help give the admissions committee a useful indication of the applicant’s academic strengths and weaknesses.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
Applicants to the New York Film Academy BFA program must submit a minimum of two (2) letters of recommendation verifying the applicant’s ability to successfully take on undergraduate study in the relevant field. Letters must be sealed and stamped, and should be submitted directly to the Admissions Office from the individual writing on the applicant’s behalf.

NARRATIVE STATEMENT
The narrative statement should be a mature and self-reflective essay (2-3 typed pages) detailing the applicant’s reasons for pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in the motion picture arts. The essay should take into account the individual’s history, formative creative experiences, contemporary influences and inspirations, and personal artistic dreams.
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CREATIVE PORTFOLIO
The creative portfolio is a contributing factor for admission to the BFA in Filmmaking program. However, the New York Film Academy does not assume applicants have prior filmmaking experience or examples of film work. The admissions committee understands that many applicants have a wide range of creative interests, and welcomes examples of creative writing or other art forms (please see details below). For many applicants, the narrative statement and letters of recommendation, reveal the most about an applicant's potential for success in the program. Applicants must submit one or two examples of original work that best demonstrate their talent and ability as creative individuals. All film/video submissions must be submitted on DVD or hyperlink where the submission can be viewed, regardless of image capture format (20 minutes maximum). Applicants may also submit supporting materials such as slides or photographs (10 maximum). Creative samples are accepted in various stages of development, or as completed work. Examples of work can range from drawings, conceptual illustrations, storyboards, designs, photographs, three dimensional models, or digitally generated images. Students may choose to submit a typed screenplay or short story (10 page maximum). Applicants must submit one or two examples of original work that best demonstrate their talent and ability as creative individuals. All film/video submissions must be submitted on DVD or hyperlink where the submission can be viewed, regardless of image capture format (20 minutes maximum). Applicants may also submit supporting materials such as slides or photographs (10 maximum). Creative samples are accepted in various stages of development, or as completed work. Examples of work can range from drawings, conceptual illustrations, storyboards, designs, photographs, three-dimensional models, or digitally generated images. Students may choose to submit a typed screenplay or short story (10 page maximum). The creative portfolio is normally the primary determining factor for admission – see details below. However, the New York Film Academy understands that many applicants have attained applicable skills from various professional experiences (in business, publishing, entertainment law, theater, etc.). Often, with these applicants, it is the narrative statement and résumé that reveal the most to the Admissions Committee about the applicant’s qualifications and potential for success in the program. Applicants must submit one or two examples of original work that best demonstrate their talent and ability as creative individuals. All film/ video submissions must be submitted on DVD or hyperlink where the submission can be viewed, regardless of image capture format (20 minutes maximum). Applicants may also submit supporting materials such as slides or photographs (10 maximum). Creative samples are accepted in various stages of development or as completed work. Examples of work can range from drawings, conceptual illustrations, storyboards,
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designs, photographs, three dimensional models, or digitally generated images. Students may choose to submit a typed screenplay or short story (10 page maximum).

TUITION DEPOSIT
Once admitted to the Academy, students must pay a required deposit to secure their place in the BFA program. The deposit for all long-term programs (one year or longer) is $1000, which is applied toward the first term's tuition payment. Most of the deposit is refundable, except a $100 administrative processing fee.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS
The New York Film Academy welcomes the diversity brought to campus by students from all over the world. In addition to the BFA Admissions Application, to be considered for admission, international students must also submit a supplementary Application for the Form I-20 Certificate of Eligibility for the F-1 Student Visa. The I-20 Application and Instructions are sent by the International Students' Office to all foreign students upon receipt of their Admissions Application. The materials required for the I-20 Application are: Completed I-20 Application Questionnaire Bank statement or other proof of sufficient funds for tuition and living expenses Letter of Affidavit from Sponsor (if funds are not from the student) Completed Financial Verification Form (provided in the Application) Copy of passport (biographical pages only) $150 non-refundable International Student Fee After all application materials are received, the school will issue the Form I-20 to the student, along with tips for their visa interview. The student will need the Form I-20 to apply for the F-1 Student Visa application at the U.S. Embassy in their home country. Visa requirements and fees can vary between different locations, so each student is responsible for finding out the application procedure specific to their local U.S. Embassy or Consulate. More information about this is available at www.usembassy.gov.

DEFERRED ADMISSION
In some cases, a student might need to postpone their enrollment to a later program than the one indicated on the letter of admission. To defer their attendance, the student must submit a Date Switch Form (available upon request from the Admissions Office). Any fees already paid will simply be transferred to the later program, unless a refund is requested. In the case of students requiring the F-1 Student Visa, NYFA's International Office will send the student an updated Form I-20 with the deferred dates of attendance after the Date Switch Form is processed. A deferred file will be kept active for one calendar year. After that time, the candidate must submit an entirely new application for readmission.

CREDIT TRANSFER POLICY
The Office of the Registrar receives credit transfer requests. Decisions regarding the award of credit rest with the Academic Dean. If credit is awarded, the length and/or requirements of the program may be adjusted.
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Only official transcripts, official score reports and official evaluations of foreign credits shall be used for this review. Transfer students must meet the same overall academic standards and requirements as students who enter the BFA as freshmen. Because the studio arts curriculum NYFA program is highly specialized and integrated with very few electives it is the general policy of New York Film Academy not to accept transfer credits in studio arts from other academic postsecondary institutions. Students desiring credit for previous academic work or training may submit a written request for such credit to the Registrar, along with any supporting documentation (e.g. transcripts or syllabus). To be accepted in transfer, courses must have been taken at an accredited institution, must have been taken for a letter grade and the grade earned must be a C or higher (where the C grade has the numerical equivalent of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 point scale), must be a college-level course and must be the substantial equivalent of a course offered the New York Film Academy. Grades from transfer courses are not used to calculate the NYFA grade-point average; only the course credits transfer. When a transfer course does not have the same credit value as its closest NYFA equivalent course, the course may still be used to fulfill a specific degree or program requirement. All aggregate credit requirements must be met. NYFA may place further restrictions on the acceptance of transfer credits in order to maintain the integrity of the BFA degree program. For this reason, courses, practice, internships, taken at other institutions may not transfer. Acceptance of credits in transfer does not guarantee that those credits will be applicable to the BFA degree. Credit for Nontraditional Experience: The Dean, or her/his designee may authorize non-traditional course work for transfer upon review of relevant transcripts and other supportive materials. Such credits, if granted, are only to be used for program requirements. No credit is granted for life experience. Transfer of International Credits: Credits from colleges and universities outside the United States must be equated to those at accredited U.S. colleges and universities and NYFA. It shall be the responsibility of the student making application to the New York Film Academy to furnish the College with an original certified copy of an evaluation of his/her international credits performed by World Educational Services, or an equivalent service approved by the Office of the Registrar. The acceptability of credits is governed by the same principles stated above. Transfer Credit after Matriculation: Once a student has matriculated at NYFA, credits from other institutions will only be awarded if special permission is granted prior to registration. Such permission must be approved by Dean. Such permission will not be granted for any student who has lower than a 2.5 cumulative average at NYFA, for any student who proposes to take a course for which he/she has previously received a grade
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of lower than B- at NYFA, for any student who has 76 earned credits, nor for any student who has 48 earned credits and proposes to take courses at a two-year institution. The policies governing acceptability of credits are the same as stated above. Other Course Work: Approved Internships, or NYFA Summer Abroad programs shall be listed on the NYFA transcript as transfer credits.

BASIS FOR DECLINING ADMISSION
All transcripts and portfolio materials documenting prior education (including credentials comparison evaluation) will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions. An applicant will be declined admission to the Academy if the Director of Admissions determines that the applicant does not meet the requirements of the Admissions Policy, or if no space is available in that specific BFA program. Students who are unable to meet the financial obligations of their course prior to the first day of class will also be declined enrollment.

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 124 and 131 for Thesis Option B

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Filmmaking is a 9-term conservatory-based, full-time undergraduate study program. The curriculum is designed to immerse gifted and energetic prospective filmmakers in all aspects of the discipline. The New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts in Filmmaking provides a creative setting with which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning goals. During the 1st term, students will learn the foundations of the art and technique of visual storytelling. Students will learn the requisite skills to write, direct, film and edit seven short films. This accelerated pace of study develops students’ basic narrative and visual literacy that further terms will build upon. In the 2nd term, students will shift their focus towards general education. Courses taught in the area of Foundation Studies focus on communications, analysis and deductive reasoning. Students practice critical thinking, analysis, scholarly research, writing and reading at the college level. These courses build a foundation for more specialized subjects requiring advanced written and oral communication skills. The material covered in these courses is designed to provide a foundation for a well-rounded education, while also informing the artistic coursework completed by Bachelor students throughout the remainder of the degree program. The 3rd term improves students’ production and aesthetic skills. Intensive instruction, demonstration, and group sync-sound directing exercises increase students’ comprehension of cinematography, producing, directorial style, editing and collaborative and leadership skills. These skills prepare students to direct their intermediate film in the next term. The 4th term is split between general education classes from the following areas: foundation studies, natural sciences, and production of the Intermediate Film. These productions can be up to fifteen minutes in length, produced on double system highdefinition video or color negative film. This project represents an implementation of all the knowledge learned in first 3 terms of the program. Bachelor’s candidates are expected to spend an additional 20 to 40 hours a week beyond class-time on the production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered part of lab and lecture hours, and they are still necessary to successfully complete the program. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary on a class-by-class basis. Additionally, students must collaborate with their classmates as well as post-production supervisors to ensure that their projects are completed during the designated times. Teamwork is emphasized at the New York Film Academy and is graded in a separate credit unit.

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The 5th term of the Bachelor’s degree completes post-production of the Intermediate Film and returns to a close study of advanced topics rooted in the Arts and Humanities, Social and Behavioral Studies, and Art and Design History. Students expand upon the base of study completed in the second term. These courses emphasize research and the analysis and synthesis of diverse sources of information. As students complete their post-production of the Intermediate Film, they will receive instruction, as well as detailed story and technical notes. The student is then responsible for acting efficiently on these notes. The overall goal of Term 5 and 6 is to challenge students to grow as artists by exposing them to skills, techniques and approaches to filmmaking that are more specific and complex than those learned in previous terms. Students will be asked to undertake projects of increasing complexity. Completed projects should show maturity in terms of artistic ability and subject matter when compared with the work of the previous terms. Advanced filmmaking equipment will be introduced into the curriculum increasing the capabilities for these projects. On-set mentoring classes in which students bring craft and theory together in production exercises will help prepare students for thesis film production in Term 7. Courses in critical film studies provide a historical context of outstanding films and other design forms for these filmmakers to draw upon as they complete the final draft of thesis scripts. Term 7 is divided between Thesis Film production and two courses in the Arts and Humanities. These Thesis Films are the capstone project of the BFA program, putting into practice the skills acquired throughout the previous terms. The 8th term provides an opportunity for students to complete post-production on their thesis films and expand their knowledge of the entertainment industry. They will also undertake instruction in preparing to produce their own projects outside of school environment. Students may choose to direct a Feature-Length Film, which would require them to stay at the New York Film Academy for an additional term after completing all other required coursework (Thesis Option B). The requirements for the option are stringent, and the student must pass multiple check-points before they may proceed. Check-points are designed for student success. Upon acceptance into Thesis Option B, students undertake a modified course of study in the 8th term, providing more time to prepare for their larger thesis project. These students crew with their classmates on the short form thesis projects, but will not start production of their own feature-length thesis projects until Term 10. Thesis Option B students participate in the classes of Term 9, with the exception of the post-production class, as well as continuing with their own class preparing them for the hurdles ahead. Term 10 consists of production, post-production and a class in the marketing and promotion of their feature film thesis project.

DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
In addition to providing a framework of collegiate-level general education and specified upper-level knowledge, the educational objectives in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in
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Filmmaking Degree Program are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking. Through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops, BFA candidates will learn to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of specified electives and thesis options, the BFA in Filmmaking does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The BFA is a full-time program only, and the degree may not be obtained in less than nine terms. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 124 term credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis production requirement. Those pursuing Thesis Option B must enroll in a paid extra term to successfully complete all requirements for the BFA degree. After a student has received a final grade from the Thesis committee, the school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the BFA degree will be withheld until the candidate meets all academic and financial obligations.

OTHER COSTS:
Film and Video Stock, Processing, Telecine, and other production-related expenses are not included in tuition, and vary from student to student.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:
The general education requirements of this degree program meet the general standards and requirements of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and are designed to provide students with engaging elective courses of study within a prescribed framework. In spirit with the traditions of the BFA degree, the curricular structure of this degree program focuses heavily on professional artistic development, supplemented with a well-rounded general education. Students are required to take Foundation Studies prior to other general education requirements. Courses taught in the area of Foundation Studies focus on communications, analysis and deductive reasoning. Students practice critical thinking, analysis, scholarly research, writing and reading. These courses build a foundation for more specialized subjects requiring advanced written and oral communication skills. The skills mastered will prepare students for the advanced course work of constructing an authentic voice in their production projects. Coursework in Physical and Mental Wellness provides focus on the theory and practice of life-long wellness. Remaining General Elective choices are distributed between Arts & Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social & Behavioral Sciences.

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Through courses in the Arts, students are introduced to aesthetic values and their relationship to a cultural language. This study will develop an expanded artistic vocabulary and appreciation for arts-related skills. Coursework guides students to become conversant with the terminology, techniques, attitudes, ideas, and skills that the arts comprise so as to understand how humankind relates to the arts. The study of the Humanities is intended to develop skills to interpret and understand the human condition and of the values inherent in it. This interpretive understanding should evolve into the development of insights and a critical evaluation of the meaning of life, in its everyday details as well as in its historical and universal dimensions. Together, these fields are intended to provide the tools for students to utilize a visual language in their films and add depth to projects illustrating the human condition. The Natural Sciences reveal the order, diversity, and beauty of nature and in so doing enable students to develop a greater appreciation of the world around them. The chosen Natural Science courses will require the student to acquire scientific factual information, to use scientific methodology and to develop an appreciation of the natural world. Students should gain an understanding of how scientists reason and how they draw conclusions and think critically. Social and Behavioral Sciences courses develop students' understanding of the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal forces that shape people's lives and teach them how to approach these subjects through the concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry.

CREDIT TRANSFER:
The New York Film Academy makes no representation whatsoever that credit earned in the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Programs or any non-degree program or workshop operated by the New York Film Academy will be accepted or applied towards the completion of any degree or certificate by any other post-secondary institution. The acceptance of transfer credits is always governed by the receiving school.

TUITION:
1st Year: 2nd Year: 3rd Year: $ 32,000 + $ 4000 * $ 32,000 + $ 4000 * $ 32,000 + $ 4000 * ( + $ 17,000 (additional Thesis Fee for Option B only) Total Tuition: DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
Undergraduate Degree-Granting Program (Bachelor of Fine Arts)

$ 108,000 - $ 125,000

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Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 76 64%*

Art/ Design History Units 12 10%*

General Studies Elective Units 36 30%*

Total Number of Units 124 104%*

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 120-semester credit requirement for Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees.

TERM ONE
Course Title FILMMAKING Director’s Craft I A Director’s Craft I B Cinematography I Digital Editing I Digital Production Workshop Screenwriting I Acting for Directors TOTAL Course Numbers

FALL 17 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units 4 3 2 3 2 2 1 17 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 General Studies Units Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM100 FILM101 FILM110 FILM120 FILM130 FILM140 FILM150 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 2 3 2 2 1 17

TERM TWO
Course Title FILMMAKING Screenwriting II Drawing FOUNDATION MATH Mathematics of Film College Algebra FOUNDATION STUDIES Public Speaking Critical Thinking Introduction to Computing TOTAL Course Numbers

SPRING 15 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Units Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 3 Completion of ONE MATH course is required: FOUN105 0 0 3 3 FOUN107 0 0 3 Completion of the following THREE FOUNDATION courses is required: FOUN102 0 0 3 3 FOUN103 0 0 3 3 FOUN104 0 0 3 3 4 0 12 16 FILM145 FILM111

TERM THREE
Course Title
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Course Numbers
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

137

FILMMAKING
Director’s Craft II Feature Screenplay I Cinematography II Producing I Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I Digital Editing II ART/DESIGN HISTORY

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM105 FILM175 FILM115 FILM165 FILM185 FILM135 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 1

Critical Film Studies I TOTAL

FILM125 1 0 0 1 Completion of the following ART/DESIGN HISTORY course is required: ARTD101 0 3 0 3 9 3 0 12

TERM FOUR
Course Title FILMMAKING Intermediate Film Production Intermediate Film Crew Participation FOUNDATION STUDIES Physical and Mental Wellness English Composition & Literature NATURAL SCIENCES (Choose from course list.) TOTAL Course Numbers

FALL 17 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units 6 2 Art/Design History Units 0 0 General Studies Units 0 0 Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM290 FILM291 6 2

Completion of the following TWO FOUNDATION courses is required: FOUN106 0 0 3 3 FOUN101 0 0 3 3 Completion of ONE NATURAL SCIENCE course is required: 0 0 3 3 8 0 9 17

TERM FIVE
Course Title
FILMMAKING Intermediate Film Post Production Feature Screenplay II ARTS & HUMANITIES (Choose from course list.) SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (Choose BOTH from course list.) TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers

SPRING 15 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM292 2 0 0 2

FILM275 2 0 0 2 Completion of ONE ARTS & HUMANITIES course is required: 0 0 3 3

Completion of TWO SOCIAL SCIENCES courses is required: 0 4 0 0 3 9 3 13 138

TERM SIX
Course Title FILMMAKING
Director's Craft III A Cinematography III Screenwriting Short Thesis A Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II ART/DESIGN HISTORY Critical Film Studies II TOTAL Course Numbers

SUMMER 10 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM205 FILM215 FILM240 FILM230 3 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 2

Completion of the following ART/DESIGN HISTORY course is required. ARTD201 0 3 0 3 8 3 0 11

TERM SEVEN
Course Title FILMMAKING
Director's Craft III B Screenwriting Short Thesis B Producing II Digital Editing III ART/DESIGN HISTORY Critical Film Studies III (Choose 2nd from course list.) TOTAL Course Numbers

FALL 17 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

Completion of the following FILMMAKING courses is required: FILM300 3 0 0 3 FILM340 1 0 0 1 FILM360 2 0 0 2 FILM320 1 0 0 1 Completion of TWO ART/DESIGN HISTORY courses is required. ARTD301 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 7 3 3 13

TERM EIGHT: Thesis Option A
Course Numbers

SPRING 18 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units

General Total Studies Credit Course Title Elective Units Units 9 WEEKS: BFA students must complete the following courses: Thesis Film Production FILM390 7 0 0 7 Thesis Film Crew Participation FILM391 2 0 0 2 9 WEEKS: BFA students must complete 6 credits of General Education. ARTS & HUMANITIES Completion of ONE ARTS & HUMANITIES course is required. 0 3 0 3 NATURAL SCIENCES Completion of ONE NATURAL SCIENCES course is required: 0 0 3 3 9 0 6 15 TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios 139

TERM EIGHT: Thesis Option B
Course Numbers

SPRING 18 WEEKS
Total Credit Units 3 2

Studio General Art/Design or Studies Course Title History Related Elective Units Units Units 9 WEEKS: BFA students must complete the following courses: Thesis Development I FILM393 3 0 0 Thesis Film Crew Participation FILM391 2 0 0 9 WEEKS: BFA students must complete 6 credits of General Education. ARTS & HUMANITIES (choose from course list.) NATURAL SCIENCES (choose from course list.) TOTAL 0 0 3

Completion of ONE ARTS & HUMANITIES course is required. 3 Completion of ONE NATURAL SCIENCES course is required. 0 5 0 0 3 6 3 11

TERM NINE: Thesis Option A
Course Title
Thesis Option A: Thesis PostProduction Producing III Entertainment Industry Seminar TOTAL Course Numbers FILM392 FILM365 FILM399

SUMMER 10 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

4 3 3 10

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

4 3 3 10

TERM NINE: Thesis Option B
Course Title
Thesis Development II Producing III Entertainment Industry Seminar TOTAL Course Numbers FILM394 FILM365 FILM399

SUMMER 10 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

3 3 3 9

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 9

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TERM TEN: Thesis Option B Only
Course Title
Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Production Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Post-Production Feature Film Marketing Course Numbers FILM490 FILM492 FILM499

FALL 18 WEEKS
Studio or Related Units Art/Design History Units General Studies Elective Units Total Credit Units

7 4 1 12

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

7 4 1 12

TOTAL

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
All General Education courses are listed on page 151.

TERM ONE Director’s Craft I A
4 Term Credits

The core of the first term, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will take part in several in-class workshops and will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films. Prerequisite: None

Director’s Craft I B

3 Term Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft I B in the first term. Students expand upon lessons already learned and complete an additional three short film projects. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I B

Cinematography I

2 Term Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non-sync motion picture and video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles. Prerequisite: None

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Digital Editing I

3 Term Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software, which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer. Prerequisite: None

Digital Production Workshop

2 Term Credits

Students stage and shoot complex dramatic exercises under the guidance of the instructor. They design shots to heighten the emotion of a sequence, then shoot the sequence on digital video in a supervised environment. The relationship between text and subtext is explored in depth through classroom sessions, screenings and critiques, and in the field production exercises. Prerequisite: None

Screenwriting I

2 Term Credits

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea, treatment, and outline to a rough draft and finally a shooting script. Instruction focuses on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue. Prerequisite: None

Acting For Directors

1 Term Credit

This course adheres to the philosophy that, in order to direct actors, one must understand and experience acting as art and methodology. Directing students will become actors. Students learn how to identify a screenplay’s emotional “beats” and “character objectives” in order to improve their actors’ performances. Students are prepared to not only communicate and collaborate with their actors, but to actualize the best emotional outcome of a scene. Prerequisite: None

TERM TWO Screenwriting II
1 Term Credit

In addition to providing an in-depth study and exploration of dialogue in film, Screenwriting II focuses on the writing, rewriting, and polishing of the Intermediate Film scripts. Students will conduct live readings of their screenplays and engage in instructorled discussions of the work. The goal of this seminar is to increase the writer’s mastery of those aspects of screenwriting as outlined in Screenwriting I. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I
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Drawing

3 Term Credits

This course covers the necessary tools, materials and techniques to communicate ideas visually. Lectures and assignments demonstrate the basics of how our brains interpret form via value changes. The rendering examples demonstrate the use of pencil, chalk and marker. Students practice practical applications of technique to render value changes, form, and shadows to communicate lighting strategies. Further study leads to the visual development of a storyboard and how this tool aids the filmmaking process. Prerequisite: None

TERM THREE Director’s Craft II
2 Term Credits

Building upon knowledge and skills acquired in Director’s Craft I, this course is a concentrated examination and analysis of the aesthetic elements of the director’s toolkit as it applies to shot choice, composition, setting, point of view, character, and camera movement. Students learn how to cover complex dialogue scenes with a series of shots and practice different approaches to coverage by breaking down scenes from their own scripts. Students are encouraged to develop their own directorial style, drawing from the elements presented in this class. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Feature Screenplay I

1 Term Credit

The goal of this workshop is to fully immerse each student in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing a feature film treatment. Students will learn the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of story, structure, character, conflict, and dialogue. With strict adherence to professional standards and self-discipline, students will complete a treatment of a feature-length script that will be further developed in the second year of the program. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Cinematography II

2 Term Credits

This class immerses students in the technical and creative demands of cinematography. They will learn to go beyond simply “getting an image” and focus on the nuances of visual storytelling. Topics include: Arriflex 16SR camera and accessories, High Definition Camera, Use of Color and Light, and 35mm cameras. In addition to being trained to operate advanced camera equipment, students study basic color theory and learn to control the color palette of their projects. Special attention is given to the emotional attributes that can be assigned to an image by changing the hue, saturation, and contrast of any given image. Students learn to incorporate these theories into their projects, and gain a greater understanding of aesthetic image control. Prerequisite: Cinematography I

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Producing I

1 Term Credit

This course leads students through the entire process of pre-production, including scouting and securing of locations, permits, and casting. The producing instructor and students design a production schedule for the entire class. The instructor encourages students to form realistic plans for successfully making their films. Using script breakdowns, students learn how to plan and keep to a schedule and budget for their productions. They use their own finished scripts in class as they learn how to take advantage of budgeting and scheduling forms and methods. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting

1 Term Credit

In this interactive course, students learn how proper script supervision can help filmmakers effectively tell their stories. Students break down their scripts and learn an advanced, efficient approach to the organization and management of the shooting day. Students are challenged to maximize the efficiency of shooting schedules and learn practical techniques for creating and preserving spatial and temporal continuity in their films. Prerequisite: None

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I

1 Term Credit

This hands-on course challenges students to interpret and apply all theory and practice of the first term curriculum in a series of sync-sound production exercises. Students shoot complex dramatic scenes on 16mm film and high definition video from their own scripts with the guidance and critique of the instructor. Students must determine what adjustments to make to their scripts and shooting plans before entering into production. These practice scenes are expected to be fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, rehearsed and pre-lit) and executed at a professional level. Prerequisite: Digital Production Workshop

Digital Editing II

1 Term Credit

This course teaches students to edit their sync-sound projects. Students are encouraged to expand upon previously mastered techniques to establish a consistent editing design, dialogue rhythm, and sense of pacing and continuity that compliments the story as a whole. Prerequisite: Digital Editing

TERM FOUR Intermediate Film Production
6 Term Credits

Term two culminates in the pre-production and production of the Intermediate Film. This film project is the capstone project of terms one through four. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 15 minutes in length of any genre style and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term Two
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Intermediate Film Crew Participation

2 Term Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Intermediate Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term Two

TERM FIVE Intermediate Film Post Production
2 Term Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge gained so far through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Intermediate Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term Three

Feature Screenplay II

2 Term Credits

This class is designed as a creative and academic safe-haven for students to develop, write, and polish a feature film script. In order for a student to successfully pass this class, each project must be completed and revised by the end of the term. Prerequisite: Feature Screenplay I

TERM SIX Director’s Craft III A

3 Term Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft II; students study the language and craft of film directing from the perspective of the last thirty years. Students will increase their comprehension of visual expression and directorial style through a series of in class exercises, assignments and lectures. These skills will help prepare students for the Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II which runs concurrently. Preparation of a director’s journal will assist students in defining their style and vision for projects in later terms. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft II

Cinematography III

2 Term Credits

Class sessions are designed to help students master many elements of cinematography using professional high def cameras and the Red One camera system. Proper use of advanced lighting and grip equipment such as HMI lights and dollies is taught in this course. In preparation for the upcoming projects, students learn lighting techniques of increasing complexity, building on their arsenal of skills through shooting tests and experimentation. Prerequisite: Cinematography II

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Screenwriting Short Thesis A

1 Term Credit

Building upon the narrative short film screenwriting skills developed in Terms One and Two, this course focuses on advanced narrative storytelling techniques to be applied in the thesis project scripts. Students will take their projects from log lines to completed scripts in this class. A supportive workshop environment will allow students to work through multiple scenarios as they hone their narrative vision for these thesis projects. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I & II

Critical Film Studies II

3 Term Credits

This seminar examines the contemporary landscape of narrative filmmaking. Style, structure, and the narrative form itself are discussed through close analysis of current filmmakers from the international arena as well as examples from the world of documentary and the burgeoning field of new media. This course challenges students to identify techniques and a conceptual framework to apply to their own body of work. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II

2 Term Credits

A continuation of Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I, students stage and shoot exercises under the supervision of the instructor. Putting into practice the skills learned in Director’s Craft III A and Cinematography III, students film using the advanced equipment package. This experience gives students an arsenal of techniques and practical tools, which they can use to successfully complete their Thesis Project. Prerequisite: Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I

TERM SEVEN Director’s Craft III B
3 Term Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft III A; students build upon skills learned previously. These skills provide students with the foundation required to direct a sophisticated music video or commercial using the advanced equipment package. Each student will direct their own project in addition to collaborating as crew on their classmates’ projects. These music videos/commercials allow students to implement the vision and style refined in the last term in Director’s Craft III A and the production experience gained from Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II. Later stages of the class will focus on advanced scene work, performance, and production of the director’s notebook for the upcoming thesis film projects. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft III A

Screenwriting Short Thesis B

1 Term Credit

A continuation of Screenwriting Short Thesis A, this course takes students through multiple drafts, ultimately leading to the final draft of the thesis project. Workshop and instructor feedback, in addition to class exercises and assignments, will provide crucial insights as these projects become production ready. Prerequisite: Screenwriting Short Thesis A
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Producing II

2 Term Credits

Students will apply the fundamentals of film producing to their own Thesis Project. This class continues to examine the job of producer by matching tasks and challenges with ways of approaching them. As students start to produce their own projects, the challenges will become clear, and some class time will be devoted to specific production “hurdles”. Students will hone group problem-solving skills, a film industry must-have, and learn through sharing real examples. Prerequisite: Producing I

Digital Editing III

1 Term Credit

This course seeks to increase students’ proficiency as editors and to increase their knowledge of complex post-production elements such as color correction, sound mixing, and both electronic and traditional film finishing. Using Final Cut Pro, students are given instruction and asked to complete exercises of increasing complexity. The goal is twofold: for students to grow as editors, and to provide them with more complex tools in order bring their final thesis films to a higher stage of completion than in previous terms. Prerequisite: Digital Editing II

Critical Film Studies III

1 Term Credit

In this seminar, students will explore advanced topics in the contemporary world of critical film studies. These could include a survey of international film movements, Third World cinema, alternative narrative forms and strategies, and the cinema of “the margins”, as well as others. The course gives students an understanding of how cinema has developed to the present moment and where they find themselves in that development. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies II

TERM EIGHT: Thesis Options A & B Thesis Option A: Feature Thesis Production
7 Term Credits

Term Eight culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of all previous terms. Students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films.

Thesis Option B Thesis Development

3 Term Credits

An in-depth examination of the producing, directorial and dramatic content of the thesis project, this class helps the student develop the project to a more realized and attainable level. Students will need to pass clear milestones at the end of the class in order to proceed with the project in Term 7.

Thesis Film Crew Participation

2 Term Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Thesis Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of
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filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term 5

TERM NINE Thesis Option A: Thesis Post-Production
4 Term Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term 6

Thesis Option B: Thesis Development II

3 Term Credits

A continuation of the Thesis Development class from Term Six. Students further prepare the thesis project for production in this class. Students will need to pass clear milestones at the end of the class in order to proceed with the production in Term Eight. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Term 6

Producing III

3 Term Credits

An intensive course focusing on creating industry standard proposals for a future work based either upon the student’s short form thesis or the feature screenplay written in the Feature Screenplay I and II classes. Case studies of feature films, both large and small will be examined to help students better prepare to develop their projects in the real world. Prerequisite: Producing II

Entertainment Industry Seminar

3 Term Credits

Students will examine filmmaking from a business perspective as well as the breadth and diversity of the industry today. Topics include the history of the studio system, the roles of production companies, post-production companies, professional guilds, financing, film festivals, agents and managers. Exposure to the expansive scope of the industry will provide students with knowledge of multiple potential career pathways. Students will meet industry professionals during special guest lectures. Prerequisite: None

TERM TEN: Thesis Option B Only Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Production
7 Term Credits

Semester Seven culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of all previous semesters/sessions. Students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films.
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Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Post-Production

4 Term Credits

In this course students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Feature Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prior to entering into thesis production, all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

Feature Film Marketing

1 Term Credit

A hands-on producing class designed to prepare marketing materials for the completed feature thesis film. Students may assemble press kits, posters and trailers as part of this course.

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GE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FOUNDATION STUDIES
18 Term credits required

OVERVIEW: Courses taught in the area of basic studies focus on communications,
analysis and deductive reasoning. Students practice critical thinking, analysis, scholarly research, writing and reading. These courses build a foundation for more specialized subjects requiring advanced written and oral communication skills. The skills mastered will prepare students for the advanced course work of constructing an authentic voice in their production projects. Coursework in Physical and Mental Wellness provides focus on the theory and practice of life long wellness.

English Composition and Literature

3 Term Credits

This course will introduce students to the careful reading of texts and familiarize them with the idea of literature as part of history and culture. Readings will include a selection of lyric poems, short fiction, and critical essays. Structured writing assignments develop written language skills and while fostering sophisticated analytical thinking abilities. Prerequisite: None

Public Speaking

3 Term Credits

This course covers the theory and practice of public speaking. Building on ancient rhetorical canons while recognizing unique challenges of contemporary public speaking, the course guides students through topic selection, organization, language, and delivery. Working independently and with peer groups, students will be actively involved in every step of the process of public speaking preparation and execution. Assignments include formal speeches (to inform, to persuade, and to pay tribute), brief extemporaneous speeches, speech analyses, story pitch. Prerequisite: None

Critical Thinking

3 Term Credits

This course explores the process of thinking critically and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively. Concrete examples from students' experience and contemporary issues help students develop the abilities to solve problems, analyze issues, and make informed decisions in their academic, career and personal lives. Substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions help students develop language skills while fostering sophisticated analytical thinking abilities. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Computing

3 Term Credits

Lectures and hands-on assignments cover a wide variety of topics such as hardware organization, the Internet, computer programming, limits of computing, the research process and graphics usage. Students are introduced to software used in the business of filmmaking. Prerequisite: None

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Physical and Mental Wellness

3 Term Credits

Course covers a variety of physical and mental wellness topics such as diet, exercise, stress management, mental health, team building, alcohol consumption and drug use, sexual health awareness, and safety education. Student is also introduced to safe practices in physical exercise and stunt work used in the business of film making. Prerequisite: None

Drawing

3 Term Credits

This course covers the necessary tools, materials and techniques to communicate ideas visually. Lectures and assignments demonstrate the basics of how our brains interpret form via value changes. The rendering examples demonstrate the use of pencil, chalk and marker. Students practice practical applications of technique to render value changes, form, and shadows to communicate lighting strategies. Further study leads to the visual development of a storyboard and how this tool aids the filmmaking process. Prerequisite: None

Choose ONE Math: Mathematics of Film
3 Term Credits

For students with a background in Algebra, this course explores the practical application of math as it applies to filmmaking. Lighting, Cinematography, and other specializations within the film business rely on precise calculations and formulas to achieve desired artistic results. Prerequisite: Demonstrated understanding of Algebra

College Algebra

3 Term Credits

Provides a solid foundation in algebra for students who have moderate to no previous experience with algebra, as well as to help students succeed with non- mathematical courses that require an understanding of algebraic fundamentals. The concepts examined in this course will include a review of mathematical principles, equations, problem solving, graphing, real world applications, critical thinking, decision making, and geometrical functions. Prerequisite: None

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ARTS & HUMANITIES

6 term credits required

OVERVIEW: Through courses in the arts, students are introduced to aesthetic values
and their relationship to a cultural language. This study will develop an expanded artistic vocabulary and appreciation for arts-related skills. Coursework guides students to become conversant with the terminology, techniques, attitudes, ideas, and skills that the arts comprise so as to understand how humankind relates to the arts. The study of the Humanities is intended to develop skills to interpret and understand the human condition and of the values inherent in it. This interpretive understanding should evolve into the development of insights and a critical evaluation of the meaning of life, in its everyday details as well as in its historical and universal dimensions. Together, these fields are intended to provide the tools for students to utilize a visual language in their films and add depth to projects illustrating the human condition.

Choose TWO of the following: Philosophy of Logic vs. Rhetoric
3 Term Credits

Comparison of Logic to Rhetoric. Logic allows us to differentiate good from bad arguments. The approach is two-sided: (1) the analysis and classification of fallacies and (2) the analysis as well as the construction of valid arguments. Rhetoric is a theoretical and practical introduction to the art of written persuasion. Emphasis on persuasive techniques and their ethical consequences. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Public Speaking, Critical Thinking, Intro to Computing, Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Comparative Literature

3 Term Credits

An introduction to the elements of fiction, from the short story to novel, from a selection of linguistic, cultural and national groups. Course will also explore the comparative relationship between different types of art to literature. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Introduction to Computing, and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Cultural Mythology and World Religions

3 Term Credits

Exploration of the stories and beliefs that characterize a culture. Emphasis on the interdependency of human thinking patterns and the relationship of man to myth. Explores religious doctrine as models for human behavior. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Ethics

3 Term Credits

An examination of the main theories in ethics—including utilitarianism, Kantianism, virtue ethics and contractualism—as well as some of the central topics—the objectivity and meaning of moral claims, the possibility of relativism in ethical judgments, the nature of
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justice, and the relationship between morality and the good life. Readings are drawn both from the classics and from contemporary writings. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

SOCIAL SCIENCES

6 term credits required

OVERVIEW: Social and Behavioral Sciences courses develop students' understanding
of the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal forces that shape people's lives and teach them how to approach these subjects through the concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry.

Choose two of the following: Contemporary Psychology
3 Term Credits

An exploration of the basic concepts of psychology. General introduction including topics in cognitive, experimental, personality, developmental, social, and clinical psychology. Students will be challenged to apply their understanding to contemporary issues as well as to their own artistic work. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing or equivalent

Economics

3 Term Credits

An interdisciplinary introduction to the positive and normative aspects of economics. Topics include: markets as a means of coordinating human behavior toward the achievement of specific social objectives, how and why markets may fail to achieve these objectives, the evolution of non-market institutions such as rules of law as responses to market failures, and theories of unemployment and inflation in their historical context. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

International Politics

3 Term Credits

An introduction to international politics, applying various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

General Anthropology

3 Term Credits

The course examines contemporary anthropological theory in terms of abstract concepts and ethnographic analyses. It will concentrate on several key theoretical approaches that anthropologists have used to understand society, such as structuralism, interpretation, Marxism, feminism, practice theory, critical ethnography, and postmodern perspectives.
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Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Introductory Sociology

3 Term Credits

An introduction to the systematic study of the social sources and social consequences of human behavior, with emphasis upon culture, social structure, socialization, institutions, group membership, and social conformity versus deviance. English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

NATURAL SCIENCES

6 term credits required

OVERVIEW: The Natural Sciences reveal the order, diversity, and beauty of nature and
in so doing enable students to develop a greater appreciation of the world around them. The chosen Natural Science courses will require the student to acquire scientific factual information, to use scientific methodology and to develop an appreciation of the natural world. Students should gain an understanding of how scientists reason and how they draw conclusions and think critically.

Environmental Biology

3 Term Credits

An interdisciplinary study of human interactions with the environment, examining the technical and social causes of environmental degradation at local and global scales, along with the potential for developing policies and philosophies that are the basis of a sustainable society. This course will include an introduction to ecosystems, climatic and geochemical cycles, and the use of biotic and abiotic resources over time. The relationship of societies and the environment from prehistoric times to the present will also be discussed. Interrelationships, feedback loops, cycles, and linkages within and among social, economic, governmental, cultural, and scientific components of environmental issues will be emphasized. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Introductory Physics

3 Term Credits

Algebra-based physics course which covers the fundamental principles of physics, including Newton’s laws of motion, the mechanics of motion, vectors, velocities, and elastic and inelastic collisions, amongst others. Students will incorporate examples from everyday life, such as car crashes, basketball, air travel, and sports in their work. The emphasis will be on developing a conceptual understanding of the physical processes, as well as problem solving skills. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

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Anatomy

3 Term Credits

Introduction to Concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology. This introductory course provides an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of all body systems. It is designed as to be useful for other health-related technologies and for strengthening or developing a vocabulary in human anatomy and physiology. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Introductory Astronomy

3 Term Credits

The fundamentals of planetary, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy will be covered. Designed for the non-specialist, the course provides a basic understanding of the nature of astronomy and its relation to physics. In addition to focusing on selected topics within our solar system, the course will engage students in more philosophical debates within astronomy including the origin of the universe and the search for extraterrestrial life. Prerequisites: English Composition & Literature, Critical Thinking, Introduction to Computing and Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

ART/DESIGN HISTORY Required courses: Critical Film Studies I

12 term credits required

3 Term Credits

This seminar teaches students to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of filmmaking. Through screenings and discussions, students will grow to understand how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting, and editing have developed. Students are then challenged to place themselves within that development with regard to their on-going film projects. Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies II

3 Term Credits

This seminar examines the contemporary landscape of narrative filmmaking. Style, structure, and the narrative form itself are discussed through close analysis of current filmmakers from the international arena as well as examples from the world of documentary and the burgeoning field of new media. This course challenges students to identify techniques and a conceptual framework to apply to their own body of work. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

Critical Film Studies III

3 Term Credits

In this seminar, students will explore advanced topics in the contemporary world of critical film studies. These could include a survey of international film movements, third world cinema, alternative narrative forms and strategies, and the cinema of from “the margins” as well as others. The course gives students an understanding of how cinema has
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developed to the present moment and where they find themselves in that development. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies II

Choose ONE of the following: Art History
3 Term Credits

Course emphasizes the language of visual culture with a particular focus on the symbols, strategies and messages employed in major works. Incorporating the methods of art analysis, the course introduces students to different forms of visual culture (television, advertising, fashion, gaming, architecture and the media), while comparing and contrasting these within a philosophical and historical setting. Prerequisites: English Literature & Composition, Public Speaking, Critical Thinking, Intro to Computing, Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

History of Photography

3 Term Credits

Covering the history of documentary photography, students examine major photographic movements, styles, critics and theoretical perspectives. The focus is on the rich and varied critical and theoretical discourse circulating between photographs, or images using photography, and the texts, which helped frame the most significant contributions to contemporary photography. Prerequisites: English Literature & Composition, Public Speaking, Critical Thinking, Intro to Computing, Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

History of Graphic Design

3 Term Credits

This course surveys the pivotal events and achievements that led to the current state of graphic communication. Through lectures, videotapes, discussions, presentations and research, students are introduced to the creative thinkers, important innovations and breakthrough technologies that have shaped the evolution of visual communication. Prerequisites: English Literature & Composition, Public Speaking, Critical Thinking, Intro to Computing, Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

Film History

3 Term Credits

This course will explore major developments in film history, theory, and criticism. Students will become familiar with several different film movements in the development of the art form and will be introduced to basic ideas in film theory. Through a variety of film movements and historical periods, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, industrial, and political contexts for some of most significant debates about film. Prerequisites: English Literature & Composition, Public Speaking, Critical Thinking, Intro to Computing, Mathematics of Film or College Algebra or equivalent

History of Animation

3 Term Credits

This course focuses on the history and aesthetics of animation, with references to related arts such as live-action cinema, puppetry and comics. Screenings include a wide range of commercial and experimental works produced throughout the world. Students create small projects and written works pertaining to course topics. Prerequisite: Critical Thinking
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History of Sequential Art

3 Term Credits

Highlighting significant works of sequential art including their historical roots and major influences, students in this survey analyze trends, styles, techniques, subject matter and works of important artists across the sequential art spectrum. Prerequisite: Critical Thinking

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TWO-YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS

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ADMISSIONS POLICY FOR ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS
All students pursuing an Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) Degree from The New York Film Academy must be proficient in English and have earned a high school diploma (at a minimum) or an acceptable equivalent.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION
To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following: • A completed New York Film Academy AFA Application Form (available in this brochure or online at www.nyfa.edu). • A $50 non-refundable Application Fee. • Proof of English proficiency (such as TOEFL or IELTS score), if native language is other than English. • Official Academic Transcripts (minimum of high school equivalency), sealed and sent by the issuing institution directly to NYFA’s Admissions Office, or GED. • One Letter of Recommendation (see below). • Narrative Statement (see below). • Creative Portfolio (optional). An ideal applicant for the New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Arts program must demonstrate a sincere passion for their field of studies, and the commitment necessary to complete a rigorous, total immersion undergraduate program.

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT
Since all classes at the New York Film Academy are conducted in English, students must be able to communicate clearly in written and spoken English. Applicants for whom English is not the first or native language should submit one of the following to verify English proficiency: • An official transcript verifying completion of secondary education in which English is the primary language of communication. • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 520 or higher (190 for computer-based test or 68 for internet-based test); IELTS 5.5 or the equivalent. • A report from a valid English Language School verifying completion of course level equivalent to a 520 Paper-based TOEFL Score. In the case that an applicant does not provide any such documentation, their Admissions Counselor will use a phone interview as an opportunity to determine whether or not the applicant has the necessary English proficiency.

TRANSCRIPT REQUIREMENTS
All students pursuing an Associate’s Degree from the New York Film Academy must show proof of high school graduation at a minimum. To fulfill this requirement, applicants are required to submit official transcripts from their prior academic institutions. Transcripts must be sealed, official originals sent directly from the institution in question to the New York Film Academy’s Admissions Office. Transcripts that have been opened, photocopied, or augmented in any way will not be accepted as evidence of prior
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academic accomplishment. Prospective students who fail to provide the Admissions Committee with applicable sealed academic transcripts will not be eligible to receive a degree or certificate from the Academy. Transcripts should be sent directly to: New York Film Academy Office of Admissions 100 Universal City Plaza Building 9128, Suite 179 Universal City, CA 91608 NOTE: The New York Film Academy generally does not consider prior experiential learning as a substitute for the transcript requirements described above. Applicants who do not have the required credentials may choose to audit a program at NYFA, but will not be eligible to receive a degree or certificate of completion without submitting the necessary transcripts.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
Applicants to the New York Film Academy AFA program must submit a minimum of one letter of recommendation verifying the applicant’s ability to successfully take on undergraduate study in the relevant field. Letters must be sealed and stamped, and should be submitted directly to the Admissions Office from the individual writing on the applicant’s behalf.

NARRATIVE STATEMENT
The narrative statement should be a mature and self-reflective essay (2-3 typed pages) detailing the applicant’s reasons for pursuing an Associate’s Degree in the motion picture arts. The essay should take into account the individual’s history, formative creative experiences, contemporary influences and inspirations, and personal artistic dreams.

CREATIVE PORTFOLIO
The creative portfolio is not mandatory for admission to the Associate of Fine Arts program and is instead used as another tool to evaluate an applicant’s creative potential. Submission of an optional creative portfolio will in no way negatively affect an applicant’s status. The New York Film Academy understands that many applicants have attained applicable skills from varying experiences and thus it is the narrative statement that reveals the most about an applicant’s qualifications and potential for success in the program. Applicants may submit one or two examples of original work that best demonstrate their talent and ability as creative individuals. All film/video submissions must be submitted on DVD or hyperlink where the submission can be viewed, regardless of image capture format (20 minutes maximum). Applicants may also submit supporting materials such as slides or photographs (10 maximum). Creative samples are accepted in various stages of development, or as completed work. Examples of work can range from drawings, conceptual illustrations, storyboards, designs, photographs, three dimensional models, or digitally generated images. Students may choose to submit a typed screenplay or short story (10 page maximum).
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ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS IN FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: Thesis Option A: Thesis Option B: 73 79

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW Constructed as a 2-year, 4-semester program, the Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) in Filmmaking strives to teach the art and craft of filmmaking through a combination of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops. The semesters are strategically broken down into phases, each phase acting as a foundation to the next. AFA candidates will first complete a series of short but intensive projects that will expose them to a variety of skills and techniques. After completing several short films in the first year, students will enter the second year ready to focus on their final film projects. This sequential arrangement allows students to progressively gain experience as visual storytellers, and to continuously build on their knowledge and understanding of filmmaking as an art form. The New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) in Filmmaking is an accelerated, four or five semester conservatory-based, full-time study undergraduate program. Designed to educate talented and committed prospective filmmakers in a hands-on, total immersion, professional environment, the New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Arts in Filmmaking provides a creative setting with which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Filmmaking students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning and production goals. In a combination of hands-on classroom education and intense film shoots, students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of motion picture arts and aesthetics, and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. From the first day of class, students experience a hands-on education in an environment that empowers them to artfully tell their stories. Through a sequence of workshops, students begin to work through a number of visual, dramatic, and technical challenges. They rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to make a film. All students participate in an intensive series of courses in Directing, Screenwriting, Producing, Cinematography, and Digital Editing to prepare them for more advanced topics and projects in Year Two.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
Students are immersed in the art of visual storytelling, immediately beginning development and production of their own short 16mm films. Working in crews of three or four, each student writes, produces, directs and edits four films, the fourth being up to 10
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minutes in length. In addition, each student fulfills the essential roles of Director of Photography, Assistant Camera Operator, and Gaffer (Lighting Technician) on the films of the members of his/her crew. As a result, after only the first two months of instruction, each student has the extensive hands-on experience of working on sixteen different short films. Beginning with the third month, students receive intensive instruction and hands-on experience in digital video and digital editing. Each student directs three digital projects, and crews on approximately nine additional projects. Following this production period, students’ time will be devoted to Screenwriting, Directing Actors and Critical Studies. The combination of these classes will prepare students for the second semester and production of the Intermediate Films. Learning Goals: 1. Art, aesthetics, and technique of visual storytelling including directing, 16mm cinematography, editing, and sound design. 2. Fundamentals of digital video production and digital editing. 3. Survey and examination of film studies from a director’s perspective. 4. Fundamental training in acting and directing actors. 5. Immersion in screenwriting craft. Production Goals: 1. Write, direct and edit four short non-synchronous 16mm Films. 2. Crew as Cinematographer, Gaffer, and/or Assistant Camera on approximately 12 additional films. 3. Write a short film script with dialogue. 4. Shoot and edit two digital directing exercises and one short film on digital video. 5. Crew in key positions on an additional 9 digital projects.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their film craft artistically and technically, progressing beyond their earlier experiments with the medium. Building upon the filmmaking foundations learned in the previous semester, students are expected to conceive and create a polished short film up to 15 minutes in length (Intermediate Film). This film may be shot on 16mm film, 35mm film, or on High Definition video, depending on each student’s personal aspirations, creative decisions, and budget. Each student must enter the second semester with a script (written in Semester One) for his/her Intermediate Film Project. These projects are the primary focus of the second semester, and are used in several classes as a basis for learning. The semester is divided into three distinct phases. The first is devoted to intensive handson instruction, demonstration, group sync-sound directing exercises, individual consultations, and pre-production (including casting, rehearsal, and location scouting). The second phase of the semester is the production period, during which each student directs his/her own film and crews on his/her classmates’ films. The third phase of the semester is devoted to post-production. During this phase, students edit digitally, receive instruction and critique, and screen rough-cuts of the films. They also receive feedback and finish their films for a final screening of all Intermediate Films.
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Learning Goals 1. Advanced filmmaking craft including directing, producing, sync-sound production, color cinematography, editing, and sound design. 2. Fundamentals of 35mm cinematography. Production Goals 1. Direct and edit a sync-sound film of up to 15 minutes (shot on 16mm film, 35mm film, or High Definition Video, and edited on Final-Cut Pro). 2. Shoot and edit scenes on 35mm film. 3. Participate as a principal crew member on fellow students’ films.

Year-End Screenings
The Intermediate Film will be presented in a movie theater for an invited audience. Students are responsible for inviting all guests. This public screening is not part of the formal evaluation process, but serves as a celebration of the students’ progress and achievements thus far.

YEAR TWO
Coursework in the second year includes a series of highly specialized classes and workshops designed to further develop students’ knowledge and skills as professional filmmakers. Students are required to pursue one of two thesis options (described in the course descriptions below) for the remainder of the degree program. While each thesis option differs in the length of time for completion, they are equivalent in scope and content. The final thesis is intended to reflect the student’s strengths as a filmmaker, and should be of professional quality. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions, besides their own. Students who select Thesis Option B (Feature Film Production) will also be required to enroll in a fifth semester to complete their project. Prior to entering into thesis production all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES:
The focus of the third semester is on “professionalism.” Classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting the craft, exposing students to emerging media and technology, as well as to the realities of the film industry and the business of filmmaking. Classes and coursework are intended to prepare AFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. During Semester Three, students form a Thesis Committee and determine which Thesis Option they will pursue over the course of Year Two (and Semester 5 for Thesis Option B). Students must meet regularly with Thesis Committee members in order to ensure compliance with New York Film Academy standards, and to seek assistance in the realization of their respective creative visions. Students will also begin developing feature-length film scripts to be polished and completed in the following semester. Thesis Option B students must choose to further develop their own feature scripts for production in Semester Five or submit an additional script to the Thesis Committee for approval.
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SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES:
In Semester Four, students devote the majority of their time to their thesis requirements, working not only on their own productions, but also assisting with their classmates’ projects. In an extensive series of advisements, each student meets one-on-one with faculty members who assist and coach the student through the successful completion of his/her thesis. For students selecting Thesis Option B, Semester Four focuses on development and pre-production of the Semester Five feature thesis project. Students will meet one-on-one with faculty advisors as well as crew on Thesis Option A short film productions.

SEMESTER FIVE OBJECTIVES (Thesis Option B Students Only):
Students who opt for Thesis Option B will direct and edit their feature-length thesis films in a fifth semester held at the end of Year Two. This semester is reserved entirely for Production and Post Production of these projects, and extensive consultations with faculty and the Thesis Committee in order to ensure the timely and creatively sound delivery of each film. Thesis Option B students will be required to pay tuition for the fifth semester.

Year-End Screenings
A final celebratory screening will be held at the end of Semester Four (for students who chose Thesis Option A) and at the end of Semester Five (for students who chose Thesis Option B). The thesis films will be projected in large format in an open screening for friends, family and invited guests. Students are responsible for inviting all guests. This public screening is not part of the formal evaluation process, but serves as a celebration of the students’ progress and achievements in the AFA program.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Associate of Fine Arts in Filmmaking. Appointed by the Director of Education, it consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields applicable to filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, that the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The AFA in Filmmaking does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The AFA is a fulltime program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters for Thesis Option, or less than five semesters for Thesis Option B. Students who elect to direct feature length films are required to register for a paid fifth semester of study in order to complete their thesis requirements. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 73 semester credits (Thesis Option A) or 79 credits (Thesis Option B.) Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the thesis production requirement. Those
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pursuing Thesis Option B must enroll in a paid fifth semester to successfully complete all requirements for the AFA degree. After a student has received a final grade from the Thesis Committee, the school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the AFA degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all academic and financial obligations.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: 5th Semester (Thesis B Only): Total Tuition (4 Semesters): Total Tuition (5 Semesters):
*Additional Equipment Costs

$16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $72,000 $90,000

Additional Costs (Film, Processing, and Production Expenses): Year One: $3,000 - $12,000 Year Two (Thesis Option A) $3,000 - $12,000 Year Two (Thesis Option B): $3,000 - $50,000* Total: $6,000 - $62,000* Total Expected Costs: $78,000 - $152,000*

*$50,000 for Additional Costs is a very high estimate, which accounts for potential expenses accrued by students who choose to fulfill their thesis option by directing feature length films. As a norm, even students who choose to direct feature length films will not spend nearly this much money on their projects. This value was included in order to disclose an estimate for an exorbitantly expensive thesis film. While we do not limit the artistic visions of students, the Academy does encourage students to concentrate on solid storytelling rather than exorbitant spending in the design of their films. While the vast majority of thesis films will cost far less than $50,000, the potential for artistic expression in filmmaking is endless, and it is technically possible for students to spend $50,000 or even more on their projects.

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DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
CURRICULAR BREAKDOWN Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 71.5 119%* 77 132 %* Art/ Design History Units 2 3%* 2 3 %* Total Number of Units 73 122%* 79 134 %*

Thesis Option A Thesis Option B

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60-semester credit requirement for Associate of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Director’s Craft I A Director’s Craft I B Cinematography I Digital Editing I Digital Production Workshop Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting Screenwriting I Acting for Directors Critical Film Studies I TOTAL Course Numbers FILM100 FILM101 FILM110 FILM120 FILM130 FILM185 FILM140 FILM150 ARTD101

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Elective Related History Units Units Units 4 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 18 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

Total Credit Units 4 3 2 3 2 1 2 1 1 19

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Director’s Craft II Producing I Cinematography II Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I Digital Editing II Screenwriting II Feature Screenplay I Intermediate Film Production Intermediate Film Crew Participation Intermediate Film Post Production NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers FILM105 FILM165 FILM115 FILM135 FILM125 FILM145 FILM175 FILM290 FILM291 FILM292

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Elective Related History Units Units Units 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 6 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Credit Units 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 2 2 166

TOTAL

19

0

0

19

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Director’s Craft III A Director’s Craft III B Feature Screenplay II Screenwriting Short Thesis A Screenwriting Short Thesis B Producing II Digital Editing III Critical Film Studies II Cinematography III Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II TOTAL Course Numbers FILM205 FILM300 FILM275 FILM240 FILM340 FILM360 FILM320 ARTD201 FILM215 FILM230

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 3 2 1 1 2 1 0 2 3 18 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 19

SEMESTER FOUR THESIS OPTION A
Course Title
Thesis Film Production Thesis Film Crew Participation Thesis Film Post Production Entertainment Industry Seminar TOTAL

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each AFA candidate is required to take. Course Numbers FILM390 FILM391 FILM392 FILM399 Studio or Related Units 7 2 4 3 16 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 7 2 4 3 16

SEMESTER FOUR THESIS OPTION B
Course Title
Thesis Film Crew Participation Thesis Development Entertainment Industry Seminar Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Pre-Production TOTAL

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each AFA candidate is required to take. Course Numbers FILM391 FILM393 FILM399 FILM395 Studio or Related Units 2 3 3 2 10 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 3 3 2 10

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SEMESTER FIVE THESIS OPTION B
Course Title
Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Film Production Thesis Option B: Feature Thesis Post-Production Feature Film Marketing TOTAL

Choice of Thesis Option will determine which courses each AFA candidate is required to take. Course Numbers FILM490 FILM492 FILM499 Studio or Related Units 7 4 1 12 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 Elective Units 0 Total Credit Units 7 4 1 12

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Director’s Craft I A
4 Semester Credits

The core of the first semester, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will take part in several in-class workshops and will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films. Prerequisite: None

Director’s Craft I B

3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft I B in the first semester. Students expand upon lessons already learned and complete an additional three short film projects. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I B

Cinematography I

2 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture and video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles. Prerequisite: None

Digital Editing I

3 Semester Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial
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continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer. Prerequisite: None

Digital Production Workshop

2 Semester Credits

Students stage and shoot complex dramatic exercises under the guidance of the instructor. They design shots to heighten the emotion of a sequence, then shoot the sequence on digital video in a supervised environment. The relationship between text and subtext is explored in depth through classroom sessions, screen and critiques and in the field production exercises. Prerequisite: None

Script Supervision: Efficient Shooting

1 Semester Credit

In this interactive course, students learn how proper script supervision can help filmmakers effectively tell their stories. Students break down their scripts and learn an advanced and efficient approach to the organization and management of the shooting day. Students are challenged to maximize the efficiency of shooting schedules and learn practical techniques for creating and preserving spatial and temporal continuity in their films. Prerequisite: None

Screenwriting I

2 Semester Credits

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea, treatment, and outline to a rough draft and finally a shooting script. Instruction focuses on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue. Prerequisite: None

Acting For Directors

1 Semester Credit

This course adheres to the philosophy that, in order to direct, actors one must understand and experience acting as art and methodology. Directing students will become actors. Students learn how to identify a screenplay’s emotional “beats” and “character objectives” in order to improve their actors’ performances. Students are prepared to not only communicate and collaborate with their actors, but to actualize the best emotional outcome of a scene. Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies I

1 Semester Credit

This seminar teaches students to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of filmmaking. Through screenings and discussions, students will
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grow to understand how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting, and editing have developed. Students are then challenged to place themselves within that development with regard to their on-going film projects. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Director’s Craft II
2 Semester Credits

Building upon knowledge and skills acquired in Director’s Craft I, this course is a concentrated examination and analysis of the aesthetic elements of the director’s toolkit as it applies to shot choice, composition, setting, point of view, character, and camera movement. Students learn how to cover complex dialogue scenes with a series of shots and practice different approaches to coverage by breaking down scenes from their own scripts. Students are encouraged to develop their own directorial style drawing from the elements presented in this class. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Producing I

1 Semester Credit

Line Producing I leads students through the entire process of pre-production, including scouting and securing of locations, permits, and casting. The producing instructor and students design a production schedule for the entire class. The instructor encourages students to form realistic plans for successfully making their films. Using script breakdowns, students learn how to plan and keep to a schedule and budget for their productions. They use their own finished scripts in class, as they learn how to take advantage of budgeting and scheduling forms and methods. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Cinematography II

2 Semester Credits

This class immerses students in the technical and creative demands of cinematography. They will learn to go beyond simply ”getting an image” and focus on the nuances of visual storytelling. Topics include: Arriflex 16SR camera and accessories, High Definition Camera, Use of Color and Light, and 35mm cameras. In addition to being trained to operate advanced camera equipment, students study basic color theory and learn to control the color palette of their projects. Special attention is given to the emotional attributes that can be assigned to an image by changing the hue, saturation, and contrast of any given image. Students learn to incorporate these theories into their projects, and gain a greater understanding of aesthetic image control. Prerequisite: Cinematography I

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I

1 Semester Credit

This hands-on course challenges students to interpret and apply all theory and practice of the first semester curriculum in a series of sync-sound production exercises. Students shoot complex dramatic scenes on 16mm film and high definition video from their own scripts with the guidance and critique of the instructor. Students must determine what adjustments to make to their scripts and shooting plans before entering into production.
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These practice scenes are expected to be fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, rehearsed and pre-lit) and executed at a professional level. Prerequisite: Digital Production Workshop

Digital Editing II

1 Semester Credit

This course teaches students to edit their sync-sound projects. Students are encouraged to expand upon previously mastered techniques to establish a consistent editing design, dialogue rhythm, and sense of pacing and continuity that compliments the story as a whole. Prerequisite: Digital Editing

Screenwriting II

1 Semester Credit

In addition to providing an in-depth study and exploration of dialogue in film, Screenwriting I focuses on the writing, rewriting, and polishing of the Intermediate Film scripts. Students will conduct live readings of their screenplays and engage in instructorled discussions of the work. The goal of this seminar is to increase the writer’s mastery of those aspects of screenwriting as outlined in Screenwriting I. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Feature Screenplay I

1 Semester Credit

The goal of this workshop is to fully immerse each student in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing a feature film treatment. Students will learn the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of story, structure, character, conflict, and dialogue. With strict adherence to professional standards and self-discipline, students will complete a treatment of a feature-length script that will be further developed in the second year of the program. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Intermediate Film Production

6 Semester Credits

Semester Two culminates in the pre-production and production of the Intermediate Film. This film project is the capstone project of semesters one through four. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 15 minutes in length of any genre style and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Intermediate Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Intermediate Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Intermediate Film Post Production

2 Semester Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Intermediate Film. They will be assessed on their ability
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to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

SEMESTER THREE Director’s Craft III A
3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft II; students study the language and craft of film directing from the perspective of the last thirty years. Students will increase their comprehension of visual expression and directorial style through a series of in class exercises, assignments and lectures. These skills will help prepare students for the Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II which runs concurrently. Preparation of a director’s journal will assist students in defining their style and vision for projects in later semesters. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft II

Director’s Craft III B

3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft III A; students build upon skills learned in semester three. These skills provide students with the foundation required to direct a sophisticated music video using the advanced equipment package. Each student will direct their own music or commercial video in addition to collaborating as crew on their classmates’ projects. These music or commercial videos allow students to implement the vision and style refined in Director’s Craft III A and the production experience gained from Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II. Later stages of the class will focus on advanced scene work, performance, and production of the director’s notebook for the upcoming thesis film projects. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft III A

Feature Screenplay II

2 Semester Credits

This class is designed as a creative and academic safe-haven for students to develop, write, and polish a feature film script. In order for a student to successfully pass this class, each project must be completed and revised by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Feature Screenplay I

Screenwriting Short Thesis A

1 Semester Credit

Building upon the narrative short film screenwriting skills developed in Semesters One and Two, this course focuses on advanced narrative storytelling techniques to be applied in the thesis project scripts. Students will take their projects from log lines to completed scripts in this class. A supportive workshop environment will allow students to work through multiple scenarios as they hone their narrative vision for these thesis projects. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I & II

Screenwriting Short Thesis B

1 Semester Credit

A continuation of Screenwriting Short Thesis A, this course takes students through multiple drafts, ultimately leading to the final draft of the thesis project. Workshop and
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instructor feedback, in addition to class exercises and assignments, will provide crucial insight as these projects become production ready. Prerequisite: Screenwriting Short Thesis A

Producing II

2 Semester Credits

Students will apply the fundamentals of film producing to their own Thesis Project. This class continues to examine the job of producer by matching tasks and challenges with ways of approaching them. As students start to produce their own projects, the challenges will become clear, and some class time will be devoted to specific production “hurdles”. Students will hone group problem-solving skills, a film industry must-have, and learn through sharing real examples. Prerequisite: Line Producing I

Digital Editing III

1 Semester Credit

This course seeks to increase students’ proficiency as editors and to increase their knowledge of complex post-production elements such as color correction, sound mixing, and both electronic and traditional film finishing. Using Final Cut Pro, students are given instruction and asked to complete exercises of increasing complexity. The goal is twofold: for students to grow as editors, and to provide them with more complex tools in order bring their final thesis films to a higher stage of completion than in previous semesters. Prerequisite: Digital Editing II

Critical Film Studies II

1 Semester Credit

This seminar examines the contemporary landscape of narrative filmmaking. Style, structure, and the narrative form itself are discussed through close analysis of current filmmakers from the international arena as well as examples from the world of documentary and the burgeoning field of new media. This course challenges students to identify techniques and a conceptual framework to apply to their own body of work. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

Cinematography III

2 Semester Credits

Class sessions are designed to help students master many elements of cinematography using professional high def cameras and the Red One camera system. Proper use of advanced lighting and grip equipment such as HMI lights and dollies is taught in this course. In preparation for the upcoming projects, students learn lighting techniques of increasing complexity, building on their arsenal of skills through shooting tests and experimentation. Prerequisite: Cinematography II

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop II

3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I, students stage and shoot exercises under the supervision of the instructor. Putting into practice the skills learned in Director’s Craft III A and Cinematography III, students film short projects using the advanced equipment package. This experience gives students an arsenal of techniques and practical tools, which they can use to successfully complete their Thesis Project. Prerequisite: Synchronous Sound Production Workshop I
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SEMESTER FOUR Thesis Film Production
7 Semester Credits

Semester Four culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of semesters one through seven. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 30 minutes in length of any genre style and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ Thesis Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects of filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Thesis Film Post-Production

4 Semester Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Three

Entertainment Industry Seminar

3 Semester Credits

Students will examine filmmaking from a business perspective as well as the breadth and diversity of the industry today. Topics include the history of the studio system, the roles of production companies, post-production companies, professional guilds, financing, film festivals, agents and managers. Exposure to the expansive scope of the industry will provide students with knowledge about multiple potential career pathways. Students will meet industry professionals during special guest lectures. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER FOUR Thesis Option B Only Thesis Development Seminar
3 Semester Credits

A comprehensive workshop review of the thesis projects. Students present their completed production books, detailing their vision to the instructor and fellow classmates for critique. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft III A & B

Feature Thesis Pre-Production

2 Semester Credits

Students will enter pre-production of a feature film in Semester Four with the guidance of an appointed faculty member. Mandatory consultations with these appointed faculty
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members are necessary for students to gain guidance and an understanding of the grueling tasks inherent to feature length film production. These consultations will also include a clear template of delivery dates for script deadlines, casting calls, production meetings, budget breakdowns, location lockdowns and a demonstration of financial responsibility to obtain approval to shoot. Students must receive a “green light” before beginning production on their thesis films. Students who will direct feature-length thesis films must also collaborate in prominent crew positions for students directing short form thesis films. Prerequisite: Intermediate Film

SEMESTER FIVE Thesis Option B Only Feature Thesis Film Production
7 Semester Credits

Semester Five culminates in the production of the Thesis Film. This film project is the capstone project of all previous semesters/sessions. Students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films.

Feature Thesis Post-Production

4 Semester Credits

In this course, students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their Feature Thesis Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision.

Feature Film Marketing

1 Semester Credit

A hands-on producing class designed to prepare marketing materials for the completed feature thesis film. Students may assemble press kits, posters and trailers as part of this course. Prior to entering into thesis production, all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

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ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS IN ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 64

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) in Acting for Film is a conservatory-based, four-semester, full-time study graduate program. It is intended for students who are passionate, imaginative and versatile in their craft, who also have a strong desire to further develop these attributes as they apply to the discipline of acting for film. Students in the program will be immersed in an environment created for professional development and creative freedom. In a combination of hands-on classroom education and intense acting seminars, master students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of performing as visual artists in the motion picture arts and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, Associate Degree students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film acting that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education. They rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to act in motion pictures. All students participate in an intensive sequence of classes in Acting Technique, Scene Study, Acting for Film, Text Analysis, Meisner Technique, Voice and Movement, Speech, Shakespeare, Psychology of Acting and Film Craft (master lectures in Directing, Cinematography, Writing, Producing and Editing with an in-class shoot). Learning Goals: 1. Understand the fundamental principles of acting for film. 2. Grounding in classical scene study and acting techniques. 3. Fundamentals of script and text analysis. 4. Survey and examination of film studies from a film actor’s perspective. 5 Exposure to a variety of vocal techniques. Production Goals: 1. Perform a live monologue or scene presentation. 2. Perform in taped, in-class Shakespeare presentation. 3. Shoot in class on camera scenes for weekly critique. 4. Participate in Film Craft shoot.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester of Year One enables students to continue developing as actors by challenging their range, and moving beyond their “comfort zone”. The second semester consists of a sequence of classes in Scene Study II, Acting Technique II, Voice and Movement II and Improvisation. Acting for Film students will also have the opportunity to collaborate with film students on Sync Sound Production Workshop projects, learn about
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playwrights and screenwriters and shoot a short film project on location with professional staff. All instruction and film exercises are geared towards helping students complete their individual projects and production goals. Learning Goals: 1. Intermediate training in acting principles. 2. Grounding in intermediate scene study and acting for film. 3. Intermediate training in vocal, movement and improvisational work. 4. Exposure to basic visual media production. Production Goals: 1. Perform in a short film. 2. Perform in a taped, in-class Meisner presentation 3. Perform in a filmed, year-end scene presentation.

YEAR TWO
Through exposure to the many facets of the professional world of film acting, the second year prepares students for their final projects, which include Showcase and Final Film Project. All Year Two associate degree students must complete a series of highly specialized courses, participate in multiple film productions, and ultimately deliver a Thesis Portfolio reflecting the depth of their course of study.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
At the beginning of Semester Three, students begin gathering Thesis Portfolio materials. Students will meet with Academic Advisors periodically throughout the second year. The focus of the semester is on refining performance skills. Semester Three classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting craft and exposing students to the realities of the acting industry and the business of acting. This is intended to prepare AFA students for their final projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. Learning Goals: 1. Comprehensive movement training. 2. Continued practice in front of camera, behind camera, in a recording studio and in post-production. 3. Exposure to and comprehension of stage vs. film performance. 4. Familiarization with vocal techniques, including voice-over and basic dialects. Production Goals: 1. Perform in short films and film exercises. 2. Perform in a live, multi-camera television shoot. 3. Prepare and record original voice-over reel in studio. 4. Learn editing skills to create professional reel.

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
At this point, AFA students devote the majority of their time to their final projects and to gathering Thesis Portfolio materials. Acting faculty, coach and assist students individually
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in an extensive series of advisements to ensure the successful completion of degree requirements. Learning Goals: 1. Further development of advanced scene study techniques. 2. Ability to analyze and understand contemporary screenplays. 3. Full integration of the mind-body connection for performance in front of the camera. 4. Development of skills necessary for auditioning (both for television and film). 5. Understanding of marketing tools used by film actors. Production Goals: 1. Prepare and record original voice-over reel in studio. 2. Perform in a Final Showcase presentation. 3. Perform in a Final Film project for final screening.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE AND GRADUATION PROCESS
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Associate of Fine Arts in Acting for film. The Graduation Committee is appointed by the Director of Education and consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields of study applicable to acting and filmmaking. The committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of stated electives, the AFA in Acting does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The AFA is a full-time program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 64 semester credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the Thesis Portfolio. After a student has received a final grade from the Thesis committee, the school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the AFA degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all academic and financial obligations.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition:
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$13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $54,000
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DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS IN ACTING FOR FILM
Art/ Studio or Related Units Design History Units 0 Total Number of Units 64 107 %*

64 107 % *

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60-semester credit requirement for Associate of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title Acting Technique I Scene Study I Acting for Film I Meisner I Voice and Movement I Speech I Film Craft Comedy and Improvisation I Psychology of Acting Shakespeare Text Analysis TOTAL Course Numbers ACTI100 ACTI110 ACTI120 ACTI130 ACTI140 ACTI150 ACTI160 ACTI170 ACTI180 ACTI190 ACTI198

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 15.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 15.5

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title Acting Technique II Scene Study II Acting for Film II Meisner II Voice and Movement II Speech II Comedy and Improvisation II Stage Combat NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers ACTI105 ACTI115 ACTI125 ACTI135 ACTI145 ACTI155 ACTI175 ACTI185

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 179

Playwrights/ Screenwriters TOTAL

ACTI195

1 17

0 0

0 0

1 17

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title Acting Technique III Scene Study III Acting for the Camera: Scripted TV Voice III Movement III Monologues Audition Technique Comedy and Improvisation III Building the Reel Writing for Actors Elective TOTAL Course Numbers ACTI200 ACTI210 ACTI220 ACTI230 ACTI240 ACTI250 ACTI260 ACT270 ACTI280 ACTI290 See List

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 1.5 4 4 1.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 0 15.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 0.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 1.5 4 4 1.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 16

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title Acting Technique IV Scene Study IV Acting for Film III Voice IV Movement IV Business of Acting Thesis Portfolio Elective TOTAL Course Numbers ACTI205 ACTI215 ACTI225 ACTI235 ACTI245 ACTI285 ACTI299 See List

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Studio Related History Electives Units Units 1.5 0 0 3.5 4 1 1.5 1.5 2 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Credit Units 1.5 3.5 4 1 1.5 1.5 2 0.5 15.5

SEMESTER THREE & FOUR ELECTIVES
All students must complete TWO of the following electives during Year Two**: Art/Design Studio or Course Studio Course Title Related History Numbers Electives Units Units Advanced Acting Projects The Actor and the Lens Performance Analysis NYFA Universal Studios ACTI226 ACTI227 ACTI228 0 0 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 0.5 0.5 180

New Media for Actors Stunt Workshop Dance Troupe Workshop Singing for Actors Yoga for Actors Sketch Comedy Workshop

ACTI229 ACTI246 ACTI247 ACTI248 ACTI249 ACTI276

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

**Elective courses will be offered based on demand and teacher availability and offerings are subject to change.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – All courses mandatory
SEMESTER ONE Acting Technique I
0.5 Semester Credit

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances. Exercises will be taped for in-class critique.

Scene Study I

2 Semester Credits

Students learn to analyze scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop a solid grounding in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students in good standing will incorporate all of the various disciplines learned in all other courses into a taped live presentation at the end of semester. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week.

Acting for Film I

3.5 Semester Credits

Acting for Film provides students an environment to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in a supervised Production Workshop with film students.

Meisner I

3 Semester Credits

A study of the approach to acting taught by the late Sanford Meisner. Largely based on listening and observation, the Meisner technique helps actors to act and react truthfully by being grounded in the reality of the moment.

Voice and Movement I

1.5 Semester Credits

In the “Voice” segment of this course, students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension. During the “Movement” portion, students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught To help the student
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find expression and freedom within the physical and vocal instrument.

Speech I

0.5 Semester Credit

In this introductory class, students work with basic elements of speech, such as auditory awareness and how sound is being created. Students also work toward creating Neutral American Speech.

Film Craft

1 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will participate in an in-class shoot, utilizing skills gained in the course.

Comedy and Improvisation I

0.5 Semester Credit

In order to truly be effective actors, students must learn how to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses. Through a variety of exercises designed to help cast off inhibitions, actors experiment with group dynamics and individual expression vital to vibrant and truthful performances.

Psychology of Acting

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will learn about the etiquette, stamina and understanding required to effectively explore the craft of acting in an open-minded and productive manner. This class is designed to allow students to deepen the practice of their craft while maintaining a healthy balance in school and personal life. Interpersonal communication as well as understanding the demands placed on the individual within the group dynamic will be explored.

Shakespeare

1 Semester Credit

Students are exposed to a historical perspective of the writings of William Shakespeare to better understand these classic works of theatre. In order to gain a better appreciation of this master playwright, text analysis will be done using a variety of approaches including scansion, the Freeman method (using the First Folio text), soundings, and poetic and rhetorical devices. Students in good standing will perform in a taped semester end in-class presentation.

Text Analysis

1.5 Semester Credits

This course teaches the core skills necessary for creating a fully realized performance, respecting the written text and assessing how to maintain the integrity of the performance while shooting out of sequence. Students will work on a variety of texts and, through class discussion and written analyses, practice this essential skill set necessary for all professional acting jobs.

Dialect Workshop (Year-Round)
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0 Semester Credits

In this year-round optional workshop, film actors can practice IPA work and delve into the art of dialects. Students will develop their ability to find character voices that are still
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grounded in solid vocal technique to promote full control and stamina, allowing for dynamic work in television, film and voice-over. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of speech and diction for actors, and to basic dialects that are used most commonly in contemporary dramatic texts. The course emphasizes the embodiment of a spontaneous relationship to the creative imagination that informs spoken communication, and the clear expression of the text supported by the film actor.

SEMESTER TWO Acting Technique II
1.5 Semester Credits

Through further practice of acting techniques developed in Semester One, students continue to refine their toolbox of choices for their work on increasingly complex material in other classes. Exercises will be taped for review in class. Prerequisite: Acting Technique I

Scene Study II

3.5 Semester Credits

Students continue developing the skills gained in Scene Study I, with an emphasis on classical or stylistically different material. Students learn how to be emotionally honest in a universe that is markedly different from their own. Students, having met academic and attendance requirements, will participate in an end-of-year taped live presentation in front of an invited audience. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study I

Acting for Film II

4.5 Semester Credits

Students apply the training learned in Semester One to in-class exercises. On a weekly basis, they will prepare a script and digitally tape the scene. Students learn the basics of editing, applying these skills towards editing their own scenes to better understand how the mechanics of a performance effect the final edit. Scenes will be screened for critique in class. Students are required to attend a series of Special Lectures by Industry Professionals and submit essays. Actors in good standing will participate in a sync sound workshop with filmmaking students, and will also prepare for a year-end shoot shot by an on-staff professional DP and Director. Prerequisite: Acting for Film I

Meisner II

3.5 Semester Credits

A continuation of Meisner I, students learn to apply the “moment-to-moment” work to characters outside of their own experience. Students deepen the practice by advancing from exercises into scene work, to be presented and taped in-class at the end of the course. Prerequisite: Meisner I

Voice and Movement II

1.5 Semester Credits

In this continuation of the two first semester courses, students will focus on using the techniques learned in Voice and Movement I and continue with ever more demanding physical work designed to heighten performances. They will begin exploring the IPA
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(International Phonetic Alphabet) in order to prepare for successfully mastering dialects in later speech classes. In addition, elements of period movement and dance are addressed for specific works that require historical accuracy. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement I

Speech II

0.5 Semester Credit

In this course, students train their ear and learn to identify and duplicate proper pronunciation elements. They also deepen the study of Standard American Speech and IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) begun in Voice and Movement II in order to neutralize regional dialects and attain more resonant speech. This allows for the beginning practice of dialects including (but not limited to) Standard British, Cockney, and Brooklyn. Prerequisite: Speech I

Comedy and Improvisation II

0.5 Semester Credit

Following the Semester One course, Comedy and Improvisation 2 encourages students to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses through a variety of individual and group exercises. Prerequisite: Comedy and Improvisation I

Stage Combat

0.5 Semester Credit

Students learn how to safely portray choreographed fights for the screen. Elements of various martial arts are employed to create interesting fight sequences that keep the actor safe from injury. Prerequisite: None

Playwrights/Screenwriters

1 Semester Credit

Students examine contemporary playwrights and screenwriters, examining style as it relates to current forms and genres. Text analysis and plot structure are treated as fundamental tools for rehearsal and performance. Students learn how to use certain given elements of writing, like mood and sub-text, to enhance performance. Written work is an integral part of this class. Prerequisite: Shakespeare

Special Lectures I
In this series of lectures, industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Students will be exposed to such topics as marketing skills, tools necessary for securing interviews with casting directors and agents, as well as proper etiquette for dealing with industry professionals under a variety of circumstances. Guests include casting associates, agents, and working actors, among others. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class work is applied toward the Acting for Film grade. Attendance is mandatory.

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SEMESTER THREE Acting Technique III
1.5 Semester Credits

AFA students are coached to explore the most effective techniques that work for them in advance of bringing their Showcase Projects to life. Special attention is paid to period, genre and original material necessities that will invoke the use of particular techniques geared toward the Showcase project. Prerequisite: Acting Technique II

Scene Study III

4 Semester Credits

Students work on more advanced material in the second year, researching roles that highlight their range gained from studies in previous semesters. Students continue to explore scripts and roles in preparation for final showcase. Students in good standing perform in a taped end of semester presentation. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study II

Acting for the Camera: Scripted TV

4 Semester Credits

Through rehearsing various genres of scripted television, students are exposed to the techniques necessary for a multi-camera shoot for television. Students will learn the technical aspects of working on a set with multi-camera set-ups. The course contains 2 multi-camera in-class shoots. Students must attend a series of lectures by industry professionals and submit essays. Prerequisite: Acting for Film II

Voice III

1 Semester Credit

A hands-on workshop in the highly specialized skill of voice-over acting. This course includes a final recording session in a Hollywood studio from which students create a demo reel for use in showcasing their voice-over skills. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement II

Movement III

1.5 Semester Credits

Students apply the foundational skills acquired during previous Movement classes, towards learning traditional Eastern movement techniques such as T’ai Chi and Wing Chun as well as creating deeper body awareness with modalities such as yoga, pilates and Alexander technique practice. Prerequisite: Voice and Movement II

Monologues

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will work on assigned and chosen monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills learned thus far. Students will understand the structure and particular elements that make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be audition ready. Prerequisite: None

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Audition Technique

0.5 Semester Credit

Students learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop the audition and cold-reading skills necessary for landing roles in the highly competitive field of acting. Students will work in a mock audition format that will be videotaped for instructor and peer critique. Prerequisite: None

Comedy and Improvisation III

1 Semester Credit

Continuing where they left off, students will work with more complex set-ups and further advance their abilities to react in the moment and spontaneously, sharpening listening and performance skills. Students participate in an in-class taped presentation. Prerequisite: Comedy and Improvisation II

Building the Reel

0.5 Semester Credit

An overview of the basics of digital editing using Final Cut Pro. Students will learn by experience exactly what is needed to match shots, which will help them understand how to tailor their performances accordingly. Prerequisite: Film Craft

Writing for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

Students craft original monologues through applying sound writing principles. Through multiple exercises designed to spark the creative process, actors refine their work so that it can be used in the audition setting and for performance pieces. Prerequisite: None

Special Lectures II
Continuing the lecture series, invited industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Guests include casting associates, agents, and working actors. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class credit is folded into Acting for Film class credit. Attendance is mandatory. Prerequisite: Special Lectures I

SEMESTER FOUR Acting Technique IV
1.5 Semester Credits

Students continue exploring major acting techniques such as Meisner, Method, Grotowski, Stanislavsky and Chekhov, focusing on bringing their Showcase performance to life. Students discover tools and techniques which work for them and which they use as a basis for forming their own technique. Prerequisite: Acting Technique III

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Scene Study IV

3.5 Semester Credits

Students mobilize all the skills learned in previous semesters in all classes to prepare a performance that will showcase their skills, talents and originality. Scenes and monologues are explored and rehearsed culminating in a Showcase performance for an audience for students in good standing. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study III, Graduate Standing

Acting for Film III

4 Semester Credits

Students will work on a Final Film Project to be screened at graduation. This will be a short, on-location shoot, directed and shot by professional staff in order to give students an accurate experience of what an on-location shoot entails. Prerequisite: Acting for Film II

Voice IV

1.5 Semester Credit

This semester’s voice work will focus on dialect practice and proficiency. The goal is for students to have an in-depth understanding of 3 major dialects and have working skills to take with them into the industry. Prerequisite: Voice III

Movement IV

1.5 Semester Credits

This semester’s Movement work will focus on freedom of expression within different styles of dance. Students will learn how to release tension through imagery, increase awareness of one’s physical life and apply body work to text. This course will cover aspects of movement analysis and applying movement exercises to developing the physical life of a character. Prerequisite: Movement III

Business of Acting

1.5 Semester Credit

Second year students will explore the self-marketing aspects of the business, learning what constitutes one’s professional package. Students will practice advanced audition technique, and learn the ropes of navigating agencies and managers while building a professional portfolio with which to enter the profession. Prerequisite: Special Lectures II

Thesis Portfolio

2 Semester Credits

In the beginning of Semester Four, students will be begin to assemble their Final Portfolio. The materials contained in the Final Portfolio are designed to be the student’s “passport” into the professional world of acting, as well as a record and assessment of his/her academic process throughout the second year. Projects assigned must be completed in order to graduate. In consultation with their Academic Advisor, students must design a Career Blueprint, a personal statement that fully outlines a plan for life after NYFA. All work should represent the best work a student is capable of and be of professional industry quality.
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Contents of Final Portfolio: • Headshots/Resume. • Film Acting Reel (Academic Version 10-15 min.) • Daily Log Journal of Learning Process. • Career Blueprint/Goals Essay. • Self-Assessment Essay of progress in the Craft and of Showcase performance. • Examples of written work involved in the creation of a role from inception to performance (i.e. biography, detail of choices, character journal, research, text analysis). The Thesis Portfolio will be assessed by a Thesis Committee comprised of faculty, the Faculty Chair and Dean of the Academy. Prerequisite: All studio courses; Graduate Standing

Special Lectures III
Continuing the lecture series, invited industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Guests may include casting associates, agents, and working actors. Credit and assignments for this course are part of Acting for Film 4. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class credit is folded into Acting for Film class credit. Attendance is mandatory. Prerequisite: Special Lectures II

SEMESTER THREE & FOUR ELECTIVES
AFA Candidates must complete two elective courses during their final year. Each course can only be taken once for elective credit, unless otherwise noted. Electives will be offered based on demand and teacher availability and are subject to change.

ELECTIVE: Advanced Acting Projects

0.5 Semester Credit

Acting students will audition to collaborate with NYFA Filmmaking students who will direct short projects in which the acting students would perform. Students who are selected for this elective will compile a DVD of all completed work, which will account for a portion of their Final Portfolio. This course may be repeated for elective credits. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: The Actor and the Lens

0.5 Semester Credit

A study of the development of film and television as media and how actors fit into that historical landscape. Students learn the history and development of the craft of acting from stage to screen, gaining a unique perspective on the world of film and television. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: Performance Analysis
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0.5 Semester Credit

This course seeks to give the student a reference point for key film performances and a
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working vocabulary of historically important films. As the student works on honing the craft of acting in performance classes, this course offers a supplement: a series of films, each of which becomes a common reference point and teaching example of significant and quality work. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: New Media for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will explore new media outlets from the perspective of an actor. Websites that specialize in “user created content” such as YouTube are useful marketing tools in the evolving new media world. In order to successfully complete this class, students must complete a new media project of their own design. Projects may include creating a website featuring their resume and samples of their work, video blogs, or other webisodic content. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: Stunt Workshop

0.5 Semester Credits

This course is designed to develop specialty skills and techniques of film acting, focusing on stunt work with specific emphasis on film combat. The student will focus on the awareness and development of the mechanics of the body as a tool for the actor; with emphasis on stage fighting, circus skills, stage stunt work, and on complex on camera combat techniques and choreography. The course also includes an instructional component, where the student will teach and/or direct staged fight scenes. Students must inform the instructor of their physical condition and ability to undertake this course. Prerequisite: Movement III

ELECTIVE: Dance Troupe Workshop

0.5 Semester Credit

This is a performance-based class that will enhance professional skills involved in dance, music, acting for live theater, and working together as a cast for a live showcase. A variety of styles will be used from different eras of staged dance works, as well as original pieces made by the cast and director. The final performance is for a live audience. This course may be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: Singing for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

This course offers actors the opportunity to experience the techniques and joy of singing in order to feel comfortable and competent in an audition or on set. This is a voice workshop, not a performance workshop. The skills practiced are intended to create expressive freedom in a musical environment. Prerequisite: None

ELECTIVE: Yoga for Actors

0.5 Semester Credit

This course teaches actors essential focusing and centering techniques through the use of the ancient practice of yoga. Students gain self-awareness, focus and flexibility, all essential qualities for the trained actor. Prerequisite: None

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ELECTIVE: Sketch Comedy Workshop

0.5 Semester Credit

This course is designed for actors with comedy improvisation experience who are interested in writing and performing sketch comedy. Each class will involve instruction on the variety of ways sketch comedy is created (looking at examples on video), using improvisational comedy to bolster the writing process, and brainstorming to help each student discover their unique comic voice. This course may be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: None

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AFA SCREENWRITING
Total Required Semester Credits: 66

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The AFA Screenwriting program offers a comprehensive look at the art of screenwriting through writing courses as well as courses in film studies and screenplay analysis. Students will be assigned several writing projects, which will be critiqued by their peers during in-class workshops.

YEAR ONE
Year One introduces students to the medium of the moving image and to cinematic storytelling. Students will learn and practice their craft, and begin to find their own voices in their writing. Good habits for creative work will be honed, and discipline and dedication to the art and craft of screenwriting will become second-nature to the students. In addition, students will learn the aesthetic and commercial differences between film and television, as well as gain an understanding of entertainment business practices and the role writers play in the industry.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
During Semester One, students will be introduced to the tools and skills necessary for writing successful screenplays. Students are encouraged to be creative, but are also taught to think of the screenplay as the definitive industry tool for articulating ideas or concepts to a production team, including producers, financiers, directors, and actors. Clarity can be as important as creativity. Standard formatting and industry expectations will be studied and analyzed during writing workshops and lectures. Students will also study the Business of Screenwriting and how to navigate the entertainment industry. Learning Goals: • WGA format and copyright law. • In-depth study of classic screenplay structure, character arcs, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voiceover, subtext, style, tone, visualization, discipline, and genre. • Critical concepts in film history. • Entertainment industry methods, practices, and players. • Standard conventions of TV writing and the TV industry. Production Goals: • Write a treatment/outline for two feature length films. • Write a first draft of a speculative (“spec”) feature length screenplay. • Write a “network draft” of a spec one-hour TV drama episode.

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SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their craft artistically and technically, and to progress beyond their earlier experiments with the feature length screenplay. In an advanced workshop, students will write a first draft of a second original spec feature length screenplay and will then choose between revising that screenplay or the screenplay from Semester One. Students are expected to share revised or newly written material in workshops. In addition, students will broaden their understanding of the medium by developing material for a half-hour TV comedy spec script and an original TV series pilot script. Students will also study acting techniques and write, direct, and edit their own short film in order to achieve a better understanding of how the written word translates to the screen. Critical Studies class will also provide students with a theoretical and historical prospective on writing and the writing industry over the past one hundred years. The Business of Screenwriting classes continue as students gain a deeper understanding of the entertainment industry and learn to hone their pitching skills. Learning Goals • Fundamentals of film directing. • Standard conventions of TV half-hour and original pilot writing • Fundamentals of acting. • Genre and storytelling conventions and influences. • Script revision. • In-depth study and practice of the pitch. Production Goals • Write a first draft of a second feature length screenplay. • Revise a draft of one of the two screenplays generated up to this point. • Direct a short film. • Write a half-hour television comedy spec script. • Write a pilot episode of an original television series.

Year-End Staged Readings
AFA Writing students will celebrate the completion of their first year with a night of staged readings of their written work. The readings will be developed in conjunction with actors, and will be held at a nearby professional stage theater.

YEAR TWO
During Year Two, AFA candidates begin working on their thesis, a feature length screenplay or episodic television series. The thesis should represent the best work a student is capable of and, when complete, be of professional industry quality. In advanced workshops, students will use knowledge gained in the first year to slowly and deliberately construct their theses. Coursework in Year Two will focus on refining writing techniques and clarifying each student’s artistic voice, as well as preparing students for a professional life after the AFA.

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Thesis Options: Thesis Option A: Feature Film. Students may choose to write a feature length film speculative (“spec”) screenplay. Thesis Option B: Episodic Television. Students may choose to write a pilot episode and bible (supporting materials) of an original comedy or drama television series.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
At the beginning of Semester Three, students must form a thesis committee consisting of a primary advisor (a Screenwriting Faculty member) and two readers. These committee members are in addition to the Thesis Workshop instructor and the Chair of the Screenwriting Department. The thesis advisor works closely with the AFA candidate throughout the process, while the readers serve more of a consulting role. At certain times throughout the year, each student will present treatments and drafts of his/her thesis script to his/her committee, who will then give notes to the student in a mandatory thesis committee meeting. Three such meetings will take place throughout the academic year. Semester Three classes are infused with an emphasis on perfecting craft, and exposing students to the realities of the entertainment industry. Students will also work more in depth with character development in a seminar designed to complement thesis workshop classes. To round out the professional portfolio of the students, each student will create an original web series and will write, shoot, and edit the pilot episode of his or her series. Finally, students will study great screenplays of the past century for a greater understanding of how great storytelling works. Learning Goals: 1. Improve character development skills. 2. Examine theories of film through analysis of great screenplays of the century. 3. Gain mastery of the pitch process. 4. Gain an understanding of the new media landscape and its special artistic considerations. Production Goals: 1. Write an outline and first draft of thesis feature or TV pilot. 2. Write pilot episode and bible for original web series. 3. Develop professional pitch for thesis project.

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
In Semester Four, students devote most of their time to their thesis requirements. Faculty meets one-on-one with students in an extensive series of advisements to assist them and coach them through the successful completion of thesis requirements. Students will shoot and edit the original web series pilot episodes written in the previous quarter. They will also learn the art and craft of adaptation. This semester, an emphasis
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will be put on masterful scene writing, as students learn to make scenes from their thesis projects come alive by working more deeply than ever before on a scene level. Finally, in anticipation of a year-end industry pitch fest, students will perfect their pitches for their thesis projects and turn them into professional-grade selling tools. Learning Goals: 1. Lecture series with a cross-section of industry professionals. 2. The challenges of writing and producing independent cinema. 3. Survey of the studio system history. 4. Learn the art of adaptation 5. Intense examination of scene writing. 6. Mastering the skills of script revision and polish. 7. Improve skills of production and post-production. 8. Perfect the art of the pitch. Production Goals: 1. Revise, rewrite, and polish thesis project. 2. Produce a pilot episode of an original Web series. 3. Write a treatment for an adaptation of an original source material. 4. Develop and perfect a written and verbal pitch for thesis project.

NYFA Pitch Fest
To celebrate the completion of the AFA Screenwriting Program, New York Film Academy hosts a pitch event for graduating AFA writing students. Representatives from top Hollywood agencies, management companies, studios and production companies attend the event to hear NYFA students pitch their thesis projects. While this event has opened industry doors to students in the past, the primary intent of the Pitch Fest is to provide students with pitching experience and feedback outside the classroom walls.

GRADUATION COMMITTEE
The Graduation Committee is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the full body of work of each candidate prior to the awarding of the Associate of Fine Arts in Screenwriting. The Graduation Committee is appointed by the Director of Education and consists of the Thesis Committee Chairperson and several instructors specializing in a diverse range of fields of study applicable to Filmmaking. That committee ensures that each candidate has been adequately prepared for graduation, the standards of the Academy have been upheld, and that the awarding of a degree is warranted. In addition, the Office of the Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program and that all financial obligations to the school have been met. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the Associate of Fine degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all financial obligations.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to graduate, students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade. Students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a B- grade or higher for the thesis production requirement. Satisfactory completion of 66 semester credits is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Art in Screenwriting Degree Program. All semester credits must be undertaken at the New York Film Academy as scheduled. These units satisfy semester contact hour requirements. The AFA is a full-time study program only and may not be obtained in less than four semesters. Classes are Lecture, Seminar, and/or Studio based. As is customary in visual arts studies, Lab and Practicum instructional hours are treated as studio hours.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Cost: $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $13,500 $54,000

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE:

Undergraduate Degree-Granting Program (Associate of Fine Arts)
Program Title: Number of Years to Complete the program: Program Supervisors: Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) Art/ Design History Units Associate of Fine Arts in Screenwriting 2 years (4 semesters) M. Young, S. Calderon General Elective Units Total Number of Units

41.5 62.8%

13.5 20%

9 13.6%

66 110%

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Associate of Fine Arts degrees.

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SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Elements of Screenwriting (Q1) Advanced Story Generation (Q2) The Business of Screenwriting I (Q1+2) Writing for Television I (Q1+2) (1hr Drama) Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I (Q1+2) Art Design History I TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE100 SCRE110 SCRE120 SCRE130 SCRE140 ARTD150

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 3 3 3 3 0 15 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II (Q3+4) (SW Workshop + Revision Class) The Business of Screenwriting II (Q3+4) Writing for Television II (Q3+4) (1/2Hr Comedy + Pilot) Script to Screen (Q3) (Acting for Writers + 1wk Seminar in Digital Filmmaking) Genre Studies (Q 3) Art Design History II TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE200 SCRE210 SCRE220 SCRE230 SCRE240 ARTD250

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 0 3 2.5 0 0 8.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 1.5 3 4.5 General Elective Units 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 2.5 1.5 3 16

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Advanced Thesis Workshop I (Q5+6) (TV or Film Option) The Great Screenplays (Q5+6) The Business of Screenwriting III (Q5+6) Advanced Writing Seminar I (Q5) (Character + Special Topics) New Media I (Q6) Critical Film Studies I TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers SCRE300 SCRE310 SCRE320 SCRE330 SCRE340 ARTD101

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 0 0 3 1 0 8 Art/Design History Units 0 3 0 0 0 3 3 Elective Units 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3 1 3 16 196

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Advanced Thesis Workshop II (Q7+8) Advanced Writing Seminar II (Q7+8) (Scene Writing + Topics) The Business of Screenwriting IV (Q7+8) New Media II (Q7) Adaptation Workshop (Q8) Critical Film Studies II TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE400 SCRE410 SCRE420 SCRE430 SCRE440 ARTD202

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 3 0 1 3 0 10 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Elective Units 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 1 3 3 16

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Elements of Screenwriting
4 Semester Credits

Utilizing lectures, in-class exercises, outside readings, classroom discussions, and film viewings, this course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting. Screenplay formatting will be a major focus, and students will learn how to write scene description, to describe characters and locations, and to develop action sequences. Topics will also include: Classic screenplay structure, the Elements of the Scene, Developing the Character, Character Arcs, Antagonists, Dialogue, Writing the Visual Image, Introduction to Final Draft, Theme, Conflict, Flashbacks, Fantasy Sequences and Dream Sequences, Voiceover, Text and Subtext, Developing Your Writing Style, Tone and Genre, Visualization, Revealing Exposition, Creating a Compelling Second Act, Climaxes and Resolutions, and Scene Beats. Prerequisite: None

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I is a fast-paced, intensive workshop that introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting. The classes consist of in-class writing exercises, individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. Students will apply knowledge gained from Elements of Screenwriting and apply it to the creation of their own feature-length scripts. By the end of the course, students will develop and write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Prerequisite: None

The Business of Screenwriting I

3 Semester Credits

There are many “angles” to understand when approaching "the deal," and they differ from one medium to the next. It is crucially important for a writer to protect his or her work both through Copyright Registration and registration through the Writers Guild of America. Next, the writer must strategize about how to get his or her script into the right hands, in
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the correct manner, and for the appropriate market. An overview of topics include: Agents, What Is Copyright?, How Do I Enforce My Copyright?, How to Register with the Writer's Guild of America?, Getting Your Script in the Right Hands, What To Do If You Don’t Have an Agent, If the Deal Goes Through What You Need to Know, Options, Pay for Rewrites, Writing on Spec or for Hire, How a Television Deal Differs from a Film Deal. Classes will be supplemented with special lectures by industry professionals. Prerequisite: None

Writing for Television I: The One-Hour Drama

4 Semester Credits

This television workshop is a fast-paced, intensive workshop program that introduces students to the fundamentals of the TV world and TV writing. The class work consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. By the end of the course, each student will have written a Studio/Network draft (which is a second draft, in the TV world) of a one-hour television spec script for an existing show. Students will be encouraged to write through difficult spots with the belief that getting to “The End” is more important than polishing along the way. Workshop sessions will simulate a TV writers’ room, and will be an environment in which students evaluate their own and their classmates’ work. A constructive, creative and supportive atmosphere will prevail, where students will guide and encourage each other in their writing. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Story Generation

3 Semester Credits

Advanced Story Generation is designed to help writers become what the film industry needs most: prolific sources of movie ideas. Through in-class exercises and out-of-class projects, students will develop skills for generating viable stories for feature films of various genres. They will workshop ideas in class in order to come up with the best possible version of their stories. The idea is to become versatile, adaptable, and creative, providing the best “product” to the industry when called upon to generate new ideas to fill various needs. In the second half of the course, students will commit to one of their story ideas and develop it into a treatment to be used for writing the Quarter 3 screenplay. Prerequisite: Elements of Screenwriting; Writing the Feature Screenplay I

Art History I

3 Semester Credits

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from antiquity through the medieval period. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, sacred spaces, images of the gods, imperial portraiture, and domestic decoration. Prerequisite: None

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SEMESTER TWO Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II
4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Screenplay II builds upon knowledge gained in Writing the Feature Screenplay I and Advanced Story Generation, in which students wrote a feature-length film script and a treatment for a second feature-length film script, respectively. This course is divided into two components: in the first, students will take the treatment written in Advanced Story Generation and write a draft of that script. In the second half of the course, students will choose one of their two feature scripts and revise it more thoroughly than they have with any project in the program so far. Each week, students will bring in a sequence of their scripts to be workshopped. Prerequisite: Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

The Business of Screenwriting II

4 Semester Credits

Building on last semester’s work, the second semester of Business of Screenwriting features a more in depth study of the life of a writer. Guest speakers will be invited to illuminate a variety of areas in the world of the screenwriter, and practical workshops in pitching will give the students the tools they need to walk The Way of the Writer in the World of Hollywood. As part of this course, in the fourth and final quarter of the year, students will take part in an industry internship or may instead choose to write an industry-related research paper. Students may intern at a film or television production company, film or television studio, management company, or talent agency. Students are encouraged to choose their internship wisely based on their interests and strengths honed during the program. The Business of Screenwriting instructor is responsible for approving internships. Any internship considered as enhancing and/or enriching the student¹s understanding of the film or television industry may be an option. Students will be expected to write reports on their internship experiences, and internship supervisors will assess the students' performance at the work site. Students should keep in mind as they choose their internship sites that this position is likely to be their entree into the entertainment industry, so it is imperative that they be responsible and recommended that they foster as many positive relationships as possible. Instead of an internship, students may write a Research Project. Students may opt to write a research paper that will investigate a specific topic related to the entertainment industry. All research papers must be approved by the Business of Screenwriting instructor, and must address a topic that directly relates to the field, such as the Studio System, histories of specific entertainment companies or movements, depictions of writers and filmmakers in popular culture, etc. Papers must be at least 15 pages in length and must reference a comprehensive list of research sources. Prerequisite: The Business of Screenwriting I

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Writing for Television II: The Half-Hour Spec and the Pilot
4 Semester Credits

In the first half of the course, students will become familiar with the half-hour television industry, styles of half-hour television writing, and the current crop of viable series from which to draw the spec they will write. Each student will then draft a professional-caliber spec for a half-hour show. In the second half of the course, students will create an original episodic television series, including completing the script for the pilot episode. Topics will include: introducing your central character and core cast, creating a series "template," creative solutions to providing back story, and building the show's world and tone. Students will learn from individual writing, group workshops, short lectures, television screenings, and story analysis to create two pieces of writing. The workshop portion of the class will be constructed to simulate a TV writers’ room, with students reading, evaluating, and assisting each other from “breaking story,” building outlines, all the way to a completed draft. The primary goal of the class will be for students to leave with a full draft of a television pilot script for an original show, either one-hour or half-hour. Prerequisite: Writing For Television I

Script to Screen

2.5 Semester Credits

Script to Screen is designed to help writing students see what happens to their words when actors interpret them in front of the camera. The class is divided into two components: Acting for Writers and The One-Week Digital Filmmaking Seminar. Acting for Writers introduces students to the theory and practice of the acting craft, using Stanislavski Method, improvisation, and scene and monologue work as starting points. By exploring how actors build characters and performances based upon the information provided in a film script, writers will learn how to write more powerful dialogue, develop more memorable characters, and create more effective dramatic actions. Through inclass acting exercises and writing, as well as filmed exercises, students will learn what truly makes for great dialogue and action writing. The Digital Filmmaking Seminar trains students in the fundamentals of film directing, which in turn facilitates an understanding of the filmmaking process as it relates to screenwriting. It is our belief that a student who actually picks up a camera, blocks a scene and directs actors from a script is far better prepared to then write a screenplay. If a writer has actually translated a shot on the page into a shot in the camera, then the writer has a much sharper perspective on the writing process. Hands-on classes in .directing, editing, cinematography, and production cover the creative and technical demands of telling a story with moving images. Then, working in small crews, students will make short films or shoot scenes from one of their screenplays using digital video cameras. Afterward, students will edit their footage on Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: None

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Critical Studies

1.5 Semester Credits

Genre and Storytelling is a critical studies course focused on exploring eight different genres of film. Through out-of-class screenings, lectures, and in-class scene breakdowns, students will begin to identify the models… and audience expectations… of these different genres. Prerequisite: None

Art History II

3 Semester Credits

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes. Prerequisite: Art History I

SEMESTER THREE Advanced Thesis Workshop I: Film Option
4 Semester Credits

Advanced Thesis Writing Workshop is a full year course, split over two semesters, designed to build on existing student knowledge about feature film writing and take it to the next level. As a whole, the course will mirror the majority of the writing deals being given in Hollywood today. Each student starts by working up a detailed TREATMENT for his or her idea. From there students take it to a FIRST DRAFT, after which they will do a REWRITE of that draft. And finally, they will give it a POLISH. After each major threshold is completed (treatment, first draft, rewrite, polish), students will hand in their work to their THESIS COMMITTEE. This committee will give the student detailed notes and guidance on how to proceed with the next step. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One of the AFA Writing Program

Advanced Thesis Workshop I: TV Option

4 Semester Credits

This advanced TV writing workshop is a fast-paced, intensive program that builds upon the fundamentals of TV writing learned in the previous year. The classwork consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, screenings, and workshop discussions. By the end of the first quarter, each student will have written a full, revised outline for their pilot episode, a working outline for Season One of their proposed series, a working description of the show itself, and two general outlines for subsequent episodes.
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By the end of the second quarter, each student will have a first draft of their pilot script, a revised version of their Season One outline, a revised version of the show description, and revised versions of the two additional episode outlines. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One of the AFA Writing Program

The Great Screenplays

3 Semester Credits

The Great Screenplays is a critical studies course focused on exploring Academy Awardwinning American and foreign movies from the past ten decades. Through in-class screenings, readings of screenplays, lectures, and discussions, students will gain a deeper understanding of how the art of screenwriting has evolved since the 1920s. Prerequisite: None

The Business of Screenwriting III

3 Semester Credits

The Business of Screenwriting III picks up where the first year left off. The core of the class is mastering the “Art of the Pitch” in preparation for a major industry pitch fest with agents, managers and producers. A heavy emphasis on guest speakers will illuminate every corner of the industry. Prerequisite: The Business of Screenwriting II

Advanced Writing Seminar I Character Development

3 Semester Credits

Advanced Character Development will focus on equipping students with essential psychological theory and tools to approach this potentially daunting element of screenwriting. By combining the disciplines of clinical psychology and screenwriting, students will learn to create characters that guide the development of their story. Just as the psychotherapist immerses him- or herself in the client's subjective point-of-view to lead the client to more meaningful paths of behavior, students will be encouraged, via small-group workshops and exercises, one-on-one interviewing, and analysis of movies and literature, to mine their unique points-of-view to find engaging characters that will grow and change, and inform narrative over the course of writing the screenplay. The class will take place in the first quarter, at the inception of students' Thesis projects. Prerequisite: None

New Media I

1 Semester Credit

The New Media Production Workshop is an intensive three-month course that introduces students to New Media development. Each student will write, direct and edit a pilot for a scripted Webisode. The pilot scripts that will be shot will not exceed five pages – and will be accompanied by a “bible” that will outline future episodes for a completed series and introduce the audience to the world that the show will create on the web. The class is broken down into both writing and directing workshops as the students progress from the scripting phase all the way through production and post-production. In the first portion of the course, students will develop their own original web series and will workshop pilot scripts and series bibles. Hands-on directing, camera, and production workshops will prepare students for the final month of the course in which they will produce their pilot episodes.
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Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies

3 Semester credits

In this seminar students are taught to identify techniques that they may use in their own films through screenings and discussions. They learn how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting, and editing have developed. Instructors select films for screening and discussion from among the great cinematic innovators. The course gives students an understanding of how cinema has developed to the present moment and where they find themselves in that development.

Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER FOUR Advanced Thesis Workshop II: Film Option
4 Semester Credits

This course continues where Semester One left off. It will focus entirely on the rewriting process. This course will teach students to dig deeper into their stories than most of them ever have. Through workshop and discussions, students will gain the insight they need to execute a REWRITE and POLISH of the scripts they wrote last semester. Upon completion of this course, students will learn how to spot the things in their scripts that aren’t working, develop a game plan for fixing them, and execute that game plan. We will focus on identifying and fixing structural problems as well as problems on the scene level. This semester is designed to build the skills of self-criticism, arguably the writer’s most important tool. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I: Film Option

Advanced Thesis Workshop II: TV Option

4 Semester Credits

This advanced TV writing workshop is a fast-paced, intensive program that builds upon the fundamentals of TV writing learned in the previous year and a half. The classwork consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, screenings, and workshop discussions. By the end of the first quarter, each student will have written a second draft of their pilot episode, a polished outline for Season One of their proposed series, a polished description of the show itself, and two polished, general outlines for subsequent episodes. By the end of the second quarter, each student will have a final, polished draft of their pilot script, and be ready to pitch it at pitchfest. Television industry guests are also brought in, schedules permitting, to help students prepare for the professional world during this semester. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I: TV Option

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Advanced Writing Seminar II

4 Semester Credits

Advanced Scene Writing This is the class in which students get to leave behind the big picture for a while and pull out the microscope to study their scenes in great detail. Using short excerpts (3-5 pages) from screenplays they have already written – preferably from their thesis scripts – students will focus on emotional progression, dialogue, action, character logic and motivation, scene beats, tone and tonal shifts, writing style, subtext, events, and transitions, in order to revise their material. During the first half of the course, a different type of scene will be covered each week, and sessions will consist of a combination of reading scenes aloud, critique, in-class assignments, lecture, and watching clips. Actors will be brought in for the second half of the course to do cold readings of scenes and to provide their unique perspective on the character development, motivation, and beats. Prerequisite: Advanced Thesis Workshop I

The Business of Screenwriting IV

4 Semester Credits

After three semesters of Business of Screenwriting, screenwriters should be skilled in the creation of log lines, and the writing of coverage. While they have been introduced to the five-minute pitch, they have not yet perfected it. This shall be the primary focus of Semester Four, building to the Pitch Fest at the end of the semester. In addition to honing their pitches, students will play a large role in identifying and inviting guests. Guest speakers will continue to be featured, with the focus moving away from “general knowledge” topics, to more specific topics in the field of screenwriting and omnimedia writing. As part of this course, in the fourth and final quarter of the program, students will take part in an industry internship or may instead choose to write an industry-related research paper. Students may intern at a film or television production company, film or television studio, management company, or talent agency. Students are encouraged to choose their internship wisely based on their interests and strengths honed during the program. The Business of Screenwriting instructor is responsible for approving internships. Any internship considered as enhancing and/or enriching the student¹s understanding of the film or television industry may be an option. Students will be expected to write reports on their internship experiences, and internship supervisors will assess the students' performance at the work site. Students should keep in mind as they choose their internship sites that this position is likely to be their entree into the entertainment industry, so it is imperative that they be responsible and recommended that they foster as many positive relationships as possible. Instead of an internship, students may write a Research Project. Students may opt to write a research paper that will investigate a specific topic related to the entertainment industry. All research papers must be approved by the Business of Screenwriting instructor, and must address a topic that directly relates to the field, such as the Studio System, histories of specific entertainment companies or movements, depictions of
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writers and filmmakers in popular culture, etc. Papers must be at least 15 pages in length and must reference a comprehensive list of research sources. Prerequisite: The Business Of Screenwriting III

New Media II

1 Semester Credit

In this final month of the New Media course, students will produce and shoot their pilot episodes. Following production, students will attend editing classes, and will then have two weeks to edit their episodes, which they will present to the class in an in-class screening in the final week of the course. Prerequisite: New Media I

Adaptation Workshop

3 Semester Credits

In today’s Hollywood, adaptation is everywhere – it’s extremely common to see a “based on” credit ahead of the screenwriter’s name. Historically, novels, short stories, plays, and magazine articles have served as underlying source material, but in the last decade, comic books, graphic novels, TV shows, board games, theme park rides, even old films, have increasingly become fair game. The end result is this: a tremendous number of potential jobs for new screenwriters involve adaptation. In this course, we will identify the challenges that surround translating a non-cinematic art form into a cinematic story by studying existing adaptations. Students will also select a work to adapt or update and generate a 10-15 page treatment for the material. Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies II

3 Semester Credits

This seminar examines the contemporary landscape of narrative filmmaking. Style, structure, and the narrative form itself are discussed through close analysis of current filmmakers from the international arena as well as examples from the world of documentary and the burgeoning field of new media. This course challenges students to identify techniques and a conceptual framework to apply to their own body of work. Prerequisite: Critical Film Studies I

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ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS IN GAME DESIGN
Total Required Semester Credits: 72

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy (NYFA) Associates of Fine Arts (AFA) in Game Design is a 4-semester (16-weeks per semester) conservatory-based, full-time study graduate program. The curriculum is designed to immerse gifted and energetic prospective Game Writers and Designers in all aspects of the discipline. The New York Film Academy Associates of Fine Arts in Game Design provides a creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning goals. The strength of the NYFA AFA in Game Design Degree Program is in its combination of storytelling studies, game design theory, game arts education, game programming education, and the hands-on direct application of each. Based on a high concentration of intense game narrative and game design workshops designed to challenge the individual student beyond his or her status quo and into a new realm, the program is further enhanced by concentrating on the commercial realities of the medium, and collaboration on a game designed and deployed by a team of students who work hand-in-hand with our senior faculty recruited from the top companies in the game industry. DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The educational objectives in the Associates of Fine Arts in Game Design Degree Program are to teach students the art and craft of professional game writing and design, and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of game writing & design.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, students receive a comprehensive look at the art of Game Design through courses in the history and theory of game design, game writing, game art and game programming. Students are assigned multiple projects in the concentrations of game writing, game art, game programming, and game design. These projects will be subject to critique by senior instructors and by peers during in-class workshops. YEAR-ONE EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES: Associates of Fine Arts in Game Design students at NYFA will be introduced to every facet of game design, from writing to art to development to programming. They are expected to create their own 20-30 page game design document (complete with art and game mechanics), a portfolio of their game art, and demonstrate their knowledge of programming for the Apple iPad by passing a final exam on the subject. Students are encouraged to be creative but are also taught to think of each game design milestone as one part of a larger game. Students knowing their place in a collaborative game design environment is just as important as completing their individual projects.
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Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this program include: 1. The ability to work collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. 2. An in-depth knowledge of the theories of narrative storytelling in video games. 3. An introductory knowledge of the techniques and practices of game art and animation. 4. An introductory knowledge of the language and processes of game programming 5. A firm foundation in the theories, methods and execution of game development, through participation in the creation of a working video game. 6. Intermediate understanding of the Maya 3-D Art Software. 7. Intermediate understanding of the iPhone SDK. 8. Knowledge of the history of video games. YEAR-ONE REQUIREMENTS: The Associates of Fine Arts in Game Design Program requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirement: Year 1 Game Design Document 3-D Art Portfolio 3-D Animation Portfolio Passing Grade, iPad Programming Final Exam Participation in the development of the Year 1 Game Project Satisfactory Participation in Narrative Design Workshop Satisfactory Participation in Game Development Workshop

YEAR TWO
YEAR-TWO EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES: Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this program include: • Continued growth as prospective game industry entrants by way of fully immersive advanced workshops. • Identification of individual area of focus in the industry through a four-track educational curriculum: writer, artist, programmer or producer. • Complete educational track specific thesis projects designed to challenge students to produce the best work they are capable of, while also serving as high quality work samples for prospective employers. • Develop, design and complete a working iPad game in a four-person team environment that serves as their Collaborative Thesis Project. YEAR TWO REQUIREMENTS: The Associates of Fine Arts in Game Design Program requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirement: Game Writing Students: two fully developed, 20-30 page game design documents, plus an additional 30 pages of sample game scripts. Art and Animation Students: a reel of no less than 2 minutes of fully rendered, professional-quality game animation, plus a portfolio of professional-quality game art.
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Programming Students: a fully functional game developed by the student for the Apple iPad, independent of the Collaborative Thesis Project, plus a passing grade on the iPad SDK final exam. Producing Students: four postmortems (20-30 pages each) on separate, top-tier video games, a Game Design Document for a game they plan to produce postgraduation, plus serving as a producer for a least one game other than the Collaborative Thesis Project. All Students: Satisfactory participation in the Collaborative Thesis Project, which is a fully-functional, interactive iPad game created, developed, and produced by a team of four students.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Satisfactory completion of 72 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Associate of Fine Arts in Game Design Program. The New York Film Academy Associate of Fine Arts in Game Design Program is an accelerated full-time study program that provides a single curriculum of study in the first year, and four unique tracks of study in the second year. These unique tracks of study are not considered majors or minors, but instead as “specializations” within the singular major of Game Design. The program may not be completed in less than four semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, workshop, or laboratory format.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Cost: $17,000 $17,000 $17,000 $17,000 $68,000

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
Associates Degree Granting Program (AFA)
Program Title: Number of Years to Complete the program: Program Supervisors: Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) Associate of Fine Arts in Game Design 2 years (4 semesters) M. Young, P. Wells, A. Moore Art/ Design History Units Total Number of Units

72 120%

0 0%

72 120%

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Associate of Fine Arts degrees.

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SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Narrative Design Workshop I Game Design Workshop I Video Game Analysis I Introduction to 3-D Art Game Producing Class Supervised Game Design Lab TOTAL Course Numbers GDSN100 GDSN110 GDSN120 GDSN130 GDSN140 GDSN150

16 WEEKS
Studio or Art/Design Related History Units Units 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 18 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Narrative Design Workshop II Game Design Workshop II Introduction to Game Programming Introduction to 3-D Animation Supervised Game Design Lab Video Game Analysis II TOTAL Course Numbers GDSN200 GDSN210 GDSN220 GDSN230 GDSN240 GDSN250

16 WEEKS
Studio or Art/Design Related History Units Units 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 3 3 18 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title Course Numbers Studio or Related Units

16 WEEKS
Art/Design History Units Elective Units Total Credit Units

The following courses are mandatory for ALL students: Advanced Game Design Lab I GDSN300 3 0 0 Advanced Game Design Lab II GDSN310 3 0 0 Game Producing Class: GDSN320 3 0 0 Advanced Topics Colloquium Supervised Game Design Lab GDSN330 3 0 0 The following courses are mandatory for students in the GAME WRITING track: Advanced Narrative Design GDSN340 3 0 0 Workshop I Advanced Narrative Design GDSN345 3 0 0 Workshop II The following courses are mandatory for students in the ART & ANIMATION track: NYFA Universal Studios 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Advanced 3-D Art & Animation GDSN350 3 0 0 3 Workshop I Advanced 3-D Art & Animation GDSN355 3 0 0 3 Workshop II The following courses are mandatory for students in the GAME PROGRAMMING track: Advanced Game Programming GDSN360 3 0 0 3 Workshop I Advanced Game Programming GDSN365 3 0 0 3 Workshop II The following courses are mandatory for students in the PRODUCING track: Advanced Project Management GDSN370 3 0 0 3 Workshop I Advanced Project Management GDSN375 3 0 0 3 Workshop II TOTAL 18 0 0 18

SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title Course Numbers Studio or Related Units 3 3 3 3

16 WEEKS
Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units

The following courses are mandatory for ALL students: Advanced Game Design Lab III Advanced Game Design lab IV Supervised Game Design Lab Collaborative Thesis Project GDSN400 GDSN410 GDSN420 GDSN430 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3

The following courses are mandatory for students in the GAME WRITING track: Advanced Narrative Design GDSN440 3 0 0 3 Workshop III Advanced Narrative Design GDSN445 3 0 0 3 Workshop IV The following courses are mandatory for students in the ART & ANIMATION track: Advanced 3-D Art & Animation GDSN450 3 0 0 3 Workshop III Advanced 3-D Art & Animation GDSN455 3 0 0 3 Workshop IV The following courses are mandatory for students in the GAME PROGRAMMING track: Advanced Game Programming GDSN460 3 0 0 3 Workshop III Advanced Game Programming GDSN465 3 0 0 3 Workshop IV The following courses are mandatory for students in the PRODUCING track: Advanced Project Management GDSN470 3 0 0 3 Workshop III Advanced Project Management GDSN475 3 0 0 3 Workshop IV TOTAL 18 0 0 18

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Semester One Narrative Design Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to the art and craft of storytelling. Starting with Aristotle’s Poetics and traveling through history to Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, students are exposed a variety of storytelling forms and theories, from Greek Comedy and Tragedy to Postmodernism and everything in between. With this firm foundation in narrative theory, students are then introduced to the tools, theory and craft of storytelling in an interactive medium. Special attention is paid to the construction of compelling characters and believable dialogue. Finally, students are introduced to the Game Design Document, the “vision” document that guides every game’s development. Students begin work on a Game Design Document of their own, present the work in progress in class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisite: None

Game Design Workshop I

3 Semester Credits

This course begins with an overview of “pre-tech” games such as card games, board games, and puzzle games. The instructor leads the students in supervised gameplay and aids in the analysis and deconstruction of how these games work and what makes them fun and compelling. The course then moves to “paper and dice” games such as Dungeons and Dragons. Each student is required to create their own “paper and dice” game as a way to gain better understanding of what makes these games entertaining and compelling. Finally, the class switches its focus to interactive, electronic game design, starting with an overview of game development as it works in the industry today, by way of a post-mortem of a AAA-level video game, giving students an understanding of the challenges involved in bringing a top tier video game from concept to finished project. Near the end of the semester, the students begin collaborative, in-class development of the Year One Game, which is a workable, playable game and is a core requirement of the Game Design program. Prerequisite: None

Video Game Analysis I

3 Semester Credits

As its name implies, the focus of this course is the study and deconstruction of video games. Each week focuses on one game, ranging from early titles like PONG to the biggest hit games of the past few years. The game is played in class, with the instructor leading a discussion about what works and what doesn’t work. Every game genre is deconstructed: first person shooter, role playing game, massively multiplayer online game, etc. Video game franchises like Super Mario Brothers and Grand Theft Auto are also discussed, with special attention paid to franchises that exist in multiple mediums (Chronicles of Riddick, Lara Croft, etc.) The goal of this course is to give students a core understanding of what makes interactive electronic games entertaining and compelling by forcing them to deconstruct every element of the gameplay experience. This is a twosemester course.
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Prerequisite: None

Introduction to 3-D Art

3 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to Autodesk’s “Maya” Animation, Visual Effects, and Compositing software, a robust application used throughout the video game industry for the creation of art assets. In this first of two courses, students learn how to optimize the Maya interface for enhanced productivity. They are introduced to polygon tools and taught polygonal modeling in a hands-on environment. Students create models and character designs using the techniques taught in this class, that can then be used in their Game Design Documents and utilized in the Year 1 Game. In addition, life drawing classes are offered to help students better understand anatomy and movement. Prerequisite: None

Game Producing Class

3 Semester Credits

This course gives students a “lay of the land” look at the modern day video game industry, and prepares them to navigate the business of video games after graduation. Even more so than Hollywood, the video game industry is a collaborative beast. No matter what your specific job is at a video game company, everyone is expected to take part in the creative development of the game. This class introduces students to the myriad of players who help bring a game to life: creative director, project manager, gameplay designer, writer, character designer, environment artist, tools programmer, animation artist, game engine engineer, publicity and advertising, etc. Special topics such as the film – video game connection and “how to take a successful meeting” are also covered. Prerequisite: None

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least four hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advice, critiques and assistance while they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the Year 1 Game. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Narrative Design Workshop II
4 Semester Credits

Picking up where the first semester left off, students continue to develop their Game Design Document, with continued in-class workshopping of the document. Focus is placed on a step-by-step approach to turning the “big idea” into a workable game concept and, eventually, a script. In addition, more advanced topics in interactive storytelling are explored, including: game properties as franchises; inside the creative process of the game writer; the writer’s role in the development team; the dynamics of story changes in game development; and the analysis and deconstruction of selected video game story lines, as a tool for students to know what makes a great video game narrative. At the end of the year, students will have a polished and “shovel ready” Game Design Document.
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Prerequisite: Narrative Design Workshop I

Game Design Workshop II

4 Semester Credits

Game Development Workshop II continues the collaborative development of the Year 1 Game that began during semester one, and includes frequent design reviews with senior faculty members who help guide and shepherd the development of this collaborative degree requirement. Other topics include a more in-depth look at the process of game development from the point of view of a major publisher, the difference between alpha, beta, and gold, populating a game with characters, game testing, and game flowcharts and storyboards. This semester concludes with the successful completion of the Year 1 Game. Prerequisite: Game Development Workshop I

Introduction to Game Programming

4 Semester Credits

This course is designed to give students an introduction to all the facets of programming a video game, from the software tools used across the industry, to the science and substance of the game engine itself. The focus of this class is the C++ programming language, and includes the following topics: the history and development of C++; the philosophy of object-oriented programming; the mechanics of creating a program; basic C++ programming. Because this is an introductory course, students should not expect to master C++ by the end of this course. They should, however, have a strong foundation in C++ upon which to build more advanced skills in the second year, should they choose to do so. This is a two semester course. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to 3-D Animation

4 Semester Credits

Building on the Maya work from semester one, students now incorporate full motion animation into their skill set. The course begins with the art of presenting ideas in storyboard form and the study of animated movies from early Disney through Pixar to fully understand the range and applicability of animation and what makes great work. Students then unlock the full potential of Maya by learning how to keyframe and animated, create characters who walk and talk, culminating in a short animated film that demonstrates their understanding of the techniques taught in this course. Prerequisite: Introduction to 3-D Art

Video Game Analysis II

3 Semester Credits

This is the second semester of game analysis class. As with last semester, each week focuses on one game, ranging from early titles like PONG to the biggest hit games of the past few years. The game is played in class, with the instructor leading a discussion about what works and what doesn’t work. Every game genre is deconstructed: first person shoorter, role playing game, massively multiplayer online game, etc. Video game franchises like Super Mario Brothers and Grand Theft Auto are also discussed, with special attention paid to the franchises that exist in multiple mediums (Chronicles of Riddick, Lara Croft, etc.) The goal of this course is to give students a core understanding of what makes interactive electronic games entertaining and compelling by forcing them to deconstruct every element of the gameplay experience. This is a two-semester course.
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Prerequisite: Video Game Analysis I

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least four hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advice, critiques and assistance while they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the Year 1 Game. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER THREE Advanced Game Design Lab I
3 Semester Credits

This two-semester, applied lab is the “home base” or “homeroom” of the second year program. Every student, regardless of their chosen concentration, attends this class, in which the most important thesis requirement, the Collaborative Thesis Project, is developed. The first week of the second year is Pitch Week, during which teams of four (one writer, one artist, one programmer, and one producer) are formed around studentpitched game concepts. Senior faculty members are present for Pitch Week, and they assist the formation of thesis teams by ranking the pitched ideas based on each game concepts viability, commerciality, and projected cost. The bulk of class time is devoted to supervised, in-class design lab where thesis teams can work together on their Collaborative Thesis Project. Teams have access to their instructor for questions and advice. Once a week, each design team gives a “status review” on every aspect of their game to the class. Teams receive notes and suggestions from the instructor and fellow students. At the end of the first quarter, teams submit their work in progress to a design review panel comprised of the senior faculty members. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Advanced Game Design Lab II

3 Semester Credits

With the large amount of work due in students specific concentration workshop classes, the Advanced Game Design Lab becomes an important and essential opportunity for the Collaborative Thesis Teams to meet and refine their thesis project. As in the first quarter, during the second quarter the bulk of class time is devoted to supervised, in-class design lab where thesis teams can work together on their Collaborative Thesis Project. Teams have access to their instructor for questions and advice. Once a week, each design team gives a “status review” on every aspect of their game to the class. Teams receive notes and suggestions from the instructor and fellow students. At the end of the semester, teams submit their work in progress to a design review panel comprised of the senior faculty members. During this “50%” design review, teams are given a green light to proceed with development, or a red light indicating there are significant concerns that must be addressed before the team will be allowed to proceed with development in semester four. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Development Lab I
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Game Producing Class: Advanced Topics Colloquium 3 Semester Credits
Our Master-in-Residence, A-list game writer Flint Dille (Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay; Ghostbusters) hosts this master class that brings the biggest names in games and entertainment to the New York Film Academy. The goal of this class is to expose students to the brightest minds across a spectrum of fields, imparting their wisdom and advice as a source of knowledge, insight and inspiration. This is a two semester course that is shared with both first year and second year students. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least six hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advice, critiques and assistance while they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the Collaborative Thesis Project. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

GAME WRITING TRACK ONLY: Advanced Narrative Design Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

Building on the lessons of year one, students who choose the Game Writing track during their second year enter a fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a quarter) that focuses less on elements and theory, and more on hands on application and execution of their thesis projects, using last year’s lessons as a foundation. Students develop a concept for the first of two thesis-level Game Design Documents, and pitch that concept to a board of senior faculty members who give notes that guide further refinement and redevelopment of the initial concept. Students present their work in progress in class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. In addition, Advanced Narrative Design Workshop I also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class writing lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Writing track. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Advanced Narrative Design Workshop II

3 Semester Credits

Students continue to work on their first Game Design Document in the second quarter of semester one. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the document moves from rough draft, to first draft, and eventually to a final, polished draft. Great care is taken to simulate the iterative process that takes place in the development of an actual video game at a top game development company. Like its predecessor, Advanced Narrative Design Workshop II also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class writing lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. At the end of the semester, students submit their completed Game Design Document to a committee of senior faculty members, who give a final grade to this first of two thesis-level documents. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Writing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Narrative Design Workshop I
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ART & ANIMATION TRACK ONLY: Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop I

3 Semester Credits

Building on the lessons of year one, students who choose the Art and Animation track during their second year enter a fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a quarter) that is a combination of advanced elements and theory, combined with a more hands on application and execution of their thesis projects, using last year’s lessons as a foundation. Starting with advanced topics, students study and master the Maya techniques of texturing, rigging, and particle systems. In a comprehensive lecture series, they learn Mel, the programming language of Maya, and in hands-on workshops they apply what they learn to demonstrate their mastery of the programming language. Students present initial, hand-drawn concept art for their thesis-level character portfolio in class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. Students also present an initial, hand-drawn storyboard for their 10-minute animated thesis film. As with their character portfolio, students receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. In addition, Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop I also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class art lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. This class is only taken by students who choose the Art and Animation track. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop II

2 Semester Credits

Students continue to work on their thesis-level character portfolios and 10-minute animated thesis film storyboards in the second quarter of semester one. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the students move from the initial, hand-drawn art and storyboards to early Maya modeling of their characters, eventually using those assets in the production of their animated films. The final advanced Maya techniques are presented during the second quarter, including hair, fur, cloth, fluids, lighting and sound. Like its predecessor, Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop II also includes a weekly, supervised, inclass art lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. At the end of the semester, students submit their work in progress to a design review by senior faculty members, who give a semester grade to their work. This class is only taken by students who choose the Art and Animation track. Prerequisite: Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop I

GAME PROGRAMMING TRACK ONLY: Advanced Game Programming Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

Building on the lessons of year one, students who choose the Game Programming track during the second year enter a fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a quarter) that is a combination of advanced elements and theory, combined with a more hands on application and execution of their thesis project, using last year’s lessons as a foundation. The semester begins with a review of C++ functions for the first year program, then dives into more advanced concepts, including memory models and namespaces, procedural and object-oriented programming, and dynamic memory allocation. Students are given weekly programming assignments that are then “debugged” by the instructor in front of
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the entire class, with students receiving notes and possible fixes from the instructor and fellow students. Programming students must produce a playable game on their own as part of their thesis requirements, and in this class they pitch their game concept to a panel of senior faculty members. In addition, Advanced Game Programming Workshop I also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class programming lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice as they revise and edit their game code and weekly programming assignments. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Programming track. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Advanced Game Programming Workshop II

3 Semester credits

Students continue to work on their personal thesis game in the second quarter of semester one. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and “debugging” by the instructor and fellow students, the students move from early game concepts to finished code. Students continue to receive weekly programming assignments, which are presented in-class as in the first quarter and is also “debugged” by the instructor and fellow students. The final advanced C++ concepts are discussed, culminating in a C++ final exam at the end of the semester. The second quarter also includes part one of the “Mobile Platforms Programming Intensive”, where students are introduced to the versatile iPhone Software Developers kit, Javascript, and other tools necessary for creating games for mobile platforms. Like its predecessor, Advanced Game Programming Workshop II also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class programming lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice as they revise and edit their game code and weekly programming assignments. At the end of the semester, students submit their work in progress to a design review by senior faculty members, who give a semester grade to their work. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Programming track. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Programming Workshop I

PRODUCING TRACK ONLY: Advanced Project Management Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

The Producing Track is focused around this practical workshop in which students learn how to produce a video game through a variety of methods. First, “post mortems” of top tier video games, usually with the producer who produced the game present in class. Featured games include BioShock, LittleBigPlanet, Ratchet & Clank, Ghostbusters, Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay, and Sin City. Producing students must also complete four post mortems of their own, on previously released games of their choosing. The first of the four “post mortems” is researched during a weekly, supervised, in-class research session. In addition, Producing students must generate an original Game Design Document for a top tier game they plan to develop after graduation. Students pitch their game concept to a board of senior faculty members, and then begin development of that document during the first quarter. Students present their work in progress in class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. Finally, inclass “mock meetings” are held to improve student communication and pitching skills, vital talents for all would be project managers. This class is only taken by students who choose the Producing track.
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Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Year One Requirements

Advanced Project Management Workshop II

2 Semester Credits

Students continue to work on their Game Design Document in the second quarter of semester one. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the document moves from rough draft, to first draft, and heading towards the final, polished draft that will be due at the end of the next semester. The second of four “post mortems” is researched during a weekly, supervised, in-class research session. Producing students must serve as the project manager for at least one collaborative thesis project, and this second quarter of Advanced Project Management Workshop provides an in-class troubleshooting opportunity in which students receive suggestions and advice from the instructor and fellow students on how to solve and avoid potential production issues. The in-class “mock meetings” continue, with special attention paid to pitching the game or games the student is currently producing. This class is only taken by students who choose the Producing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Project Management Workshop I

SEMESTER FOUR Advanced Game Development Lab III
2 Semester Credits

The “home base” or “homeroom” course of the second year program continues during the final semester. As the end of the year looms closer and closer, this class becomes more essential than ever for students who are developing a game with a very hard deadline. The bulk of class time is still devoted to a supervised, in-class design lab where thesis teams can work together on their Collaborative Thesis Project. Teams have access to their instructor for questions and advice. Once a week, each design team gives a “status review” on every aspect of their game to the class. Teams receive notes and suggestions from the instructor and fellow students. At the end of the third quarter, teams submit their work in progress to a design review panel comprised of the senior faculty members. During this “75%” design review, teams are given a green light to proceed with development, or a red light indicating there are significant concerns that must be addressed before the team will be allowed to proceed with development in the final quarter. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Development Lab II

Advanced Game Development Lab IV

2 Semester Credits

This eight week course represents the creative climax of the students’ two years of work. At this point, the students’ focus is almost entirely fixed on the execution of the Collaborative Thesis Project. With this in mind, these final weeks of classes are exclusively devoted to applied lab time. Teams have access to their instructor for questions and advice. Once a week, each design team gives a “status review” on every aspect of their game to the class. Teams receive notes and suggestions from the instructor and fellow students. At the end of the semester, teams submit their finished game to the thesis design review committee comprised of the senior faculty members who give a final grade to each Collaborative Thesis Project. After the final design review, students then have an additional week to tweak the final bugs from the game before the
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culmination of their two years of work, the Student Game Showcase, where students show off playable versions of their game to family, friends, invited industry guests and the New York Film Academy as a whole. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Development Lab III

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least six hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advise, critiques and assistant which they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the collaborative Thesis Project. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

Collaborative Thesis Project

3 Semester Credits

In addition to their concentration-specific thesis requirements that form the foundation of their Advanced Workshop grades, every student is required to participate in at least one Collaborative Thesis Project, which is a fully-functional video game for mobile platforms, consoles, PC or internet. Thesis teams are comprised of four students, one from each concentration. Students are permitted to work on more than one Collaborative Thesis Project, and in some cases they will be required to. For example, if there are less Producing students than other concentrations, then producers will to project manage more than one Collaborative Thesis Game (something that happens in the video game industry all the time). Successful completion of the Collaborative Thesis Project is required to receive a degree.

GAME WRITING TRACK ONLY: Advanced Narrative Design Workshop III
3 Semester Credits

For students in the Game Writing track, this fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a quarter) continues, with the focus remaining exclusively on hands-on application and execution of their thesis projects. Students pitch their idea for their second thesis-level Game Design Document to a board of senior faculty members who give notes that guide further refinement and redevelopment of the initial idea. Similar to last semester, students present their work in progress to the class and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. New this semester is the development of sample game scripts, essential part of the game writer’s portfolio and a thesis requirement for all students in the Game Writing track. Like the Game Design Documents, these sample script pages are presented to the class and workshopped by the instructor and fellow students. Advanced Narrative Design Workshop 3 also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class writing lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Writing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Narrative Design Workshop II

Advanced Narrative Design Workshop IV

3 Semester Credits

Students continue to work on their second Game Design Document and sample script pages in the fourth quarter of semester two. Through continued in-class presentation of
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work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the design document and sample script pages move from rough draft, to first draft, and eventually to a final, polished draft. Great care is taken to simulate the iterative process that takes place in the development of an actual video game at a top game development company. Like every other quarter of this class, Advanced Narrative Design Workshop 4 also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class writing lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. At the end of the semester, students submit their completed Game Design Document to a committee of senior faculty members, who give a final grade to this second of two thesis-level documents. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Writing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Narrative Design Workshop III

ART & ANIMATION TRACK ONLY: Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop III
3 Semester Credits

For students in the Art and Animation track, this fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a quarter) continues, and the focus remains a combination advanced elements and theory, combined with hands on application and execution of their thesis projects. Students refine and redevelop their first semester work (character designs and animation projects) based on notes received from the semester three senior faculty design review. Students continue to present their Maya-based character portfolio work, storyboards and rough animation tests to the class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. The elements education continues this quarter, with practical workshops on Adobe After Effects (a powerful special effects suite), Adobe Photoshop (professional grade image creation and editing software), and Final Cut Pro (the editing software students will use to assemble their 10-minute animated film). This quarter of Advanced 3-D Art and Animation also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class art lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. This class is only taken by students who choose the Art and Animation track. Prerequisite: Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop II

Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop IV

3 Semester Credits

In this final quarter of coursework, students complete their thesis-level character portfolios and 2-minute animated thesis films. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the students polish and refine their work until it is of a high enough quality to serve as a calling card in the video game industry. One more piece of software is covered this quarter: Shake, which is essential for any special effects project. Like every other quarter of this class, Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop 4 also includes a weekly, supervised, inclass art lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice. At the end of the semester, students submit their completed character art portfolio and 10minute animated film to a design review committee comprised of senior faculty members, who give a final grade to this compilation of their second year work. This class is only taken by students who choose the Art and Animation track. Prerequisite: Advanced 3-D Art and Animation Workshop III

GAME PROGRAMMING TRACK ONLY:
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Advanced Game Programming Workshop III

3 Semester Credits

For students in the Game Programming track, this fully-immersive workshop (80 hours a week) continues and is split into two parts. In part one, students take part in the second half of the “Mobile Platforms Programming Intensive” that began last semester. In this second half of the intensive course of study, students learn advanced tools and techniques that help refine their ability to program for mobile platforms. A combined written and applied mobile platforms programming exam is given to gauge students understanding of the material. In part two of Advanced Game Programming Workshop 3, the class is devoted solely to programming, programming, and more programming. By this time in the semester, Game Programming students are working on at least two games at the same time (their personal thesis project and at least once Collaborative Thesis Project). For this reason, Advanced Game Programming Workshop 3 becomes a full-time applied workshop. Once a week, students present their work in progress to the class, and their code is “debugged” by the instructor and fellow students, who also offer notes and possible fixes. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Programming track. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Programming Workshop II

Advanced Game Programming Workshop IV

3 Semester Credits

In this final quarter of coursework, Advanced Game Programming Workshop continues to be a full-time applied workshop. Once a week, students present their work in progress to the class, where it is “debugged” by the instructor and fellow students, who also give notes and suggest possible fixes. Both the personal thesis game and the Collaborative Thesis Project(s) are discussed in these weekly debugging sessions. Like every other quarter of this class, Advanced Game Programming Workshop 4 also includes a weekly, supervised, in-class programming lab, giving students access to their instructor for questions and advice as they revise and edit their game code. At the end of the semester, students submit their finished, playable thesis project to a design review by senior faculty members, who give a final grade to their work. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Programming track. Prerequisite: Advanced Game Programming Workshop III

PRODUCING TRACK ONLY: Advanced Project Management Workshop III
3 Semester Credits

For students in the Producing track, this fully-immersive, practical workshop (80 hours a week) continues in the fourth semester. The third of four required “post mortems” of top tier video games is researched during a weekly, supervised, in-class research session. Producing students also continue developing their Game Design Document. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes given by the instructor and fellow students, the design document moves from first draft towards the final, polished draft that will be due at the end of the semester. Weekly troubleshooting sessions are held in which students receive suggestions and advice from the instructor and fellow students on how to solve and avoid potential production issues in the game or (more likely) multiple games they are now producing for other students in the program. In-class “mock meetings” continue to be held in order to improve student communication and
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pitching skills, vital talents for all would-be project managers. This class is only taken by students who choose the Producing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Project Management Workshop II

Advanced Project Management Workshop IV

3 Semester Credits

Producing students continue to work on their Game Design Document in this final quarter of coursework. Through continued in-class presentation of work in progress, and notes from the instructor and fellow students, the document transforms into the final, polished draft that is due at the end of the semester. The final of four “post mortems” is researched during a weekly, supervised, in-class research session. In-class troubleshooting sessions continue in this semester, with special attention paid to “emergencies” that crop up as the various game projects approach their deadline and stress levels rise as a result. The in-class “mock meetings” continue, with special attention paid to pitching the game or games the student is currently producing. At the end of the semester, students submit their completed Game Design Document and four game “post mortems” to a committee of senior faculty members, who give a final grade to each student’s thesis portfolio. This class is only taken by students who choose the Game Writing track. Prerequisite: Advanced Project Management Workshop III

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ASSOCIATE OF FINE ARTS IN PRODUCING
Total Credit Units: 76

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) in Producing is a conservatory-based two year program designed for full-time study over the course of four or five semesters. The New York Film Academy provides a creative setting with which to develop, challenge and inspire the talents of dedicated prospective producers in a total immersion, professional environment. By combining seminars, lectures and intense hands-on film shoots, students acquire a sound understanding and appreciation of motion picture arts and learn to integrate knowledge and professional experience. Our prescribed four semester producing curriculum serves to address the following core competencies: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Introduction to the roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Gain understanding of the physical and post production processes. Master storytelling concepts of elements, conventions, structure and style. Understand basic principles of entertainment law. Introduction to filmmaking from the perspective of the screenwriter, director, actor and cinematographer. Analyze and master key elements of effective producer’s craft. Develop and write original film and television pilot treatments. Introduction and practice of effective pitching and public speaking skills. Learn critical elements of effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. Explore story and storytelling through an in-depth study of the elements, conventions, structure, style and traditional forms of the art. Identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators. Explore the post-production process. Case study analysis of successful feature film business plans and television show bibles. Further advanced study of cinematic innovators. Advanced hands-on study in camera, lighting and sound.

Students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. The curriculum is extremely comprehensive, teaching students the creative aspects of producing, as well as the more technical side of line producing. Students gain a practical understanding of the entertainment industry and the tools needed to successfully navigate it. During the second half of the program, AFA in Producing candidates must complete a series of advanced classes and deliver a completed and well-executed Thesis Project in order to successfully complete the program and graduate with an Associate of Fine Arts in Producing. Students are required to pursue one of three thesis options for the
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remainder of the degree program. While the thesis options differ in length of time for completion, they are equivalent in scope and content. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions besides their own. Those who select Thesis Option C will also be required to enroll in a paid fifth semester to complete their project.

DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
In addition to providing a solid foundation of general education and specified upper-level knowledge, the educational objectives of the Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) in Producing Degree Program are to teach students the skills and craft of producing and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the art of producing.

YEAR ONE
During their first year, students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. The Year One curriculum is extremely comprehensive, teaching students the creative aspects of producing, as well as the more technical side of line producing. Students gain a practical understanding of the entertainment industry and the tools needed to successfully navigate it.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
Producers are confronted with a number of visual, dramatic, financial, legal, logistical, managerial, and technical challenges. From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education on how to work through these challenges. Through an intensive sequence of classes and workshops, and with encouragement from their instructors, students rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to produce film and television. Learning Goals: 1. Introduction to the roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. 2. Gain understanding of the physical and post production processes. 3. Master storytelling concepts of elements, conventions, structure and style. 4. Understand basic principles of entertainment law. 5. Introduction to filmmaking from the perspective of the screenwriter, director, actor and cinematographer. Production Goals: 1. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a short film on the Universal lot. 2. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a reality television segment. 3. Each student will write, prep, shoot and edit his or her own short film.

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SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their production abilities artistically and technically. Producing students are instructed in the craft of writing and championing dramatic treatments; in pitching story ideas to a variety of audiences; and presenting industry-standard written proposals in support of the feasibility of their projects. This semester culminates in each student pitching and presenting a film or television project at the Producers Pitch Fest. Learning Goals: 5. Continue to analyze and master key elements of effective producer’s craft. 6. Develop and write original film and television pilot treatments. 7. Introduction and practice of effective pitching skills. 8. Learn critical elements of effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. Production Goals: 4. In collaborative groups, produce a short documentary or news segment. 5. Produce a short film for a NYFA filmmaker. 6. Develop an effective pitch and feature film business plan or TV show bible.

YEAR TWO
AFA in Producing candidates must complete a series of advanced classes and deliver a completed and well-executed Thesis Project in order to successfully complete the program and graduate with a Associate of Fine Arts in Producing. Students are required to pursue one of three thesis options for the remainder of the degree program. While the thesis options differ in length of time for completion, they are equivalent in scope and content. All students are expected to have a role in multiple thesis productions besides their own. Those who select Thesis Option C will also be required to enroll in a paid fifth semester to complete their project. Prior to entering into thesis production all candidates, regardless of thesis option, must pass a final evaluation by the thesis committee and faculty chair, ensuring that all academic requirements and standards for the previous semesters have been achieved.

SEMESTER THREE OBJECTIVES
Semester Three focuses on perfecting craft, exposing students to emerging media and technology, and exposing them to the realities of the film industry and the business of filmmaking. Emphasizing professionalism, the third semester is designed to prepare AFA students for their thesis projects as well as for a life in the industry after graduation. Throughout this semester, students meet individually with their Thesis Advisor, as well as the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department to discuss the progress of their thesis projects. Learning Goals: 1. Explore story and storytelling through an in-depth study of the elements, conventions, structure, style and traditional forms of the art. 2. Identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators.
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3. Explore the post production process. 4. Case study analysis of successful feature film business plans and television show bibles. Production Goals: 1. Develop and write a first draft feature screenplay. 2. Develop and write a TV pilot episode. 3. Each student will write, prep, shoot and edit his or her own new media or documentary project. 4. Introduction to the production demands of web episodes, commercials and music videos. 5. Begin in-depth research and development of the AFA Thesis Project.

SEMESTER FOUR OBJECTIVES
In Semester Four, students devote much of their time to their AFA Thesis Projects and thesis requirements. Throughout this semester, the Thesis Committee, chaired by the Producing Department Faculty Chair, meets with students and advises them through the successful completion and final presentation of their AFA Thesis Projects. Learning Goals: 1. Further advanced study of cinematic innovators. 2. Advanced hands-on study in camera, lighting and sound. 3. Further analysis of successful film and television development strategies. Production Goals: 1. Successfully develop and present the AFA Thesis Project.

SEMESTER FIVE OBJECTIVES
Students who choose to complete Thesis Option C will complete their thesis in a paid fifth semester. During Semester Five, each candidate will produce a feature length film or television show pilot and will navigate each phase—development, prep, shoot and post production—of their selected project. Students will be involved in all aspects of each phase of the film or television pilot’s production execution, including development of script, casting and talent negotiations, budgeting, scheduling, locations, hiring of crew, payroll, contracts and deal memos, equipment rentals, applicable Union regulations and contracts, and post production including delivery requirements.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
With the exception of electives and the thesis option, the AFA in Producing does not provide for multiple tracks of study. The AFA is a full-time program only. The degree may not be obtained in less than four semesters for Thesis Option A and B, or less than five semesters for Thesis Option C. Students who elect Thesis Option C are required to register for a paid fifth semester of study in order to complete their thesis requirements. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 76 semester credits. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner and receive a passing grade for the
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thesis production requirement. Those pursuing Thesis Option C must enroll in a paid fifth semester to successfully complete all requirements for the AFA degree. The school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the AFA degree will be withheld until the graduate meets all academic and financial obligations.

OTHER COSTS
Film and Video Stock, Processing, Telecine, Art Supplies and other production related expenses are not included in tuition, and vary from student to student. Students must pay a refundable fee of $30 for a magnetized Student ID Badge that is required for access to several areas of the campus.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
The proposed Associate of Fine Arts in Producing (as in the existing Associate of Fine Arts degrees at the New York Film Academy), and is intended as a General Education transfer degree. In spirit with the traditions of the AFA degree, the curricular structure of the proposed degree programs focuses heavily on professional artistic development. Also in line with many AFA degrees, the general education requirements generally incorporated into a traditional AA, BA, or even BFA degree, are not satisfied upon conferral of the degree. Although designed to meet the transfer requirements of many institutions, the AFA degree does not complete the full general education requirements generally accepted by NASAD standards for the successful completion of an Associate of Arts (AA) degree. It does, however, provide 10-15 % of the total degree in art history and film studies. The AFA degree allows qualified, career-oriented students to properly focus on their intended majors earlier than the Associate of Arts degree allows.

CREDIT TRANSFER
The New York Film Academy makes no representation whatsoever that credit earned in the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Programs or any non-degree program or workshop operated by the New York Film Academy will be accepted or applied toward the completion of any degree or certificate by any other postsecondary institution. The acceptance of transfer credits is always governed by the receiving school.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester:
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Total Cost:

$68,000

DEGREE PROGRAM OUTLINE
Undergraduate Degree-Granting Program (Associates of Fine Arts)
Program Title: Number of Years to Complete the program: Program Submitted for: Program Supervisors: Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 50 69.4%
Associates of Fine Arts in Producing

2 years (4 semesters) Plan approval M. Young, L. Cedrone

Art/ Design History Units 12.5 17.3%

General Elective Units
9.5 13%

Total Number of Units 72 120%

*Percentages are based on NASAD’s 60 semester credit requirement for Associates of Fine Arts degrees.

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Producers Craft I Producers Roundtable I Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop Finance, Marketing and Distribution Directing for Producers Cinematography and Lighting for Producers Editing for Producers Entertainment Law Introduction to Screenwriting Producing Reality Television Short Film Production I Art History I TOTAL Course Numbers PROD100 PROD110 PROD120 PROD130 PROD140 PROD150 PROD160 PROD170 PROD180 PROD190 PROD198 ARTD100

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 3 1 0 12.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 3 17.5

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SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Producers Craft II Producers Roundtable II Pitching for Producers Producing Documentaries and News Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment Developing the Feature Film Treatment Business Affairs Short Film Production II Industry Speaker Series Developing the Feature Business Plan and TV Show Bible Developing the Pitch Internship Art History II TOTAL Course Numbers PROD200 PROD210 PROD220 PROD230 PROD240 PROD250 PROD260 PROD270 PROD280 PROD290 PROD295 PROD298 ARTD200

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 13 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 0 0 0 3 3.5 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.5 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 3 0.5 2 1 1 3 18

SEMESTER THREE
Course Title
Thesis Development Workshop I Writing the Feature Screenplay Writing the Situational Comedy or Drama for Television Producing Commercials, Webisodes and Music Videos Entertainment Accounting Cinema Studies I Post Production for Producers Acting for Producers The Production Crafts: A Deeper Look Advanced Pitching Workshop I Internship II New Media Documentary TOTAL Course Numbers PROD300 PROD310 PROD320 PROD330 PROD340 PROD350 PROD360 PROD370 PROD380 PROD390 PROD398 PROD301 PROD302

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 3 1.5 2 1.5 0 0 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 0 0 12.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 Total Credit Units 3 1.5 2 1.5 1 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 1

AFA candidates must pursue ONE of the following electives: 2 18.5

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SEMESTER FOUR
Course Title
Thesis Development Workshop II Finance, Marketing and Distribution II Branding and Developing a Production Company Website Entertainment Law II Advanced Pitching Workshop II Cinema Studies II Directing for Producers II Advanced Camera and Lighting for Producers Sound Workshop for Producers Internship III Thesis Option A Thesis Option B Thesis Option C* TOTAL PROD400 PROD410 PROD420 PROD430 PROD440 PROD450 PROD460 PROD470 PROD480 PROD490 PROD401 PROD402 PROD403

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 0.5 1 1 0 1 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 6 6 6 12 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 General Elective Units 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Total Credit Units 0.5 1 1 3 1 3 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 6 6 6 18

AFA candidates must select ONE of the following Thesis Options:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Producers Craft I
2 Semester Credits

This core introductory course outlines the essential roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include navigating the studios, television networks and emerging media and the relationship between the producer and the unions, guilds and talent agencies. Prerequisite: None

Producers Roundtable I

0.5 Semester Credit

In a roundtable setting and from the producer’s perspective, students will discuss and analyze their current projects in development or in production. Current newsworthy events in the entertainment industry will be presented and analyzed. Prerequisite: None

Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop

1 Semester Credit

This workshop introduces students to the industry-standard software used to schedule and budget productions. In a hands-on lab setting, students are instructed in the use of Entertainment Partners (EP) Movie Magic Scheduling and Budgeting software programs, including established scheduling and budgeting techniques. Prerequisite: None
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Directing for Producers

1 Semester Credit

Effective producers create a collaborative and artistic production environment that enhances each director’s skills and provide the support needed to make the best possible film or television show. In this course, producing students learn to use basic production documents and to audition, cast and work with actors. In hands-on sessions, students will break down a short script into a shooting plan and direct a scene with actors on digital video. Students will work in collaborative groups to develop and shoot a short film. Prerequisite: None

Cinematography & Lighting for Producers

1 Semester Credit

In a hands-on workshop environment, producing students are instructed in the basic techniques of cinematography and lighting. Prerequisite: None

Editing for Producers

1 Semester Credit

In a hands-on lab environment, producing students are instructed in the basics techniques of digital editing. Prerequisite: None

Entertainment Law

2 Semester Credits

This course is an overview of contract law and how it impacts the entertainment industry. Producing students will study legal issues regarding television, films, recordings, live performances and other aspects of the entertainment industry. Topics include copyright law, intellectual property and talent representation. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Screenwriting

1 Semester Credit

Producing students will gain firsthand knowledge of fundamental screenwriting techniques and will develop strategies in communicating with the producer’s key collaborator in story development, the screenwriter. Each student will develop and write a five-page original script to be produced in the Short Film Production course. Prerequisite: None

Producing Reality Television

3 Semester Credits

Producing students learn the basics of producing reality television. Working in teams, producing students develop and shoot a reality show teaser episode. They will prep, shoot and edit their reality shows for presentation and critique. Prerequisite: None

Short Film Production I

1 Semester Credit

Producing students will prep and shoot their own individual short films, using the screenplays each has developed in Introduction to Screenwriting. Working in teams, students will function and crew members on each other’s productions. Prerequisite: None
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Art History I

3 Semester Credits

This course emphasizes the language of visual culture with a particular focus on the symbols, strategies and messages employed in major works. Incorporating the methods of art analysis, the course introduces students to different forms of visual culture (television, advertising, fashion, gaming, architecture and the media), while comparing and contrasting these within a philosophical and historical setting. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Producers Craft II
2 Semester Credits

This course continues the study of the essential roles of and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include optioning and developing material, film festivals, networks and ratings, studio and independent marketing and distribution and analyzing film tax incentive and rebate programs. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I

Producers Roundtable II

0.5 Semester Credit

This course is designed to further facilitate analysis of topics relevant to the students’ current coursework and experience at NYFA. Class work and homework assignments are designed with a focus on the students’ internship search; producer collaborations with NYFA filmmakers; and Producers Pitch Fest preparation. Prerequisite: Producers Roundtable I

Pitching for Producers

1 Semester Credit

Through in-class examples, students are exposed to effective pitching styles and instructed on how to develop basic pitching skill. Prerequisite: None

Producing Documentaries & News

1.5 Semester Credits

This course offers producing students an introductory exposure to documentary filmmaking and news reporting. Working in collaborative teams, students will produce a short documentary or news segment. Prerequisite: None

Television Producing & Developing the TV Pilot Treatment
1.5 Semester Credits

Students will learn how the television industry operates and how television programs are pitched and developed. Each student will develop and write a television pilot treatment and the basis outline of a television show bible. Prerequisite: None

Business Affairs

1.5 Semester Credits

Students analyze and discuss legal topics such as contract negotiations, marketing projects to financiers and distributors, and audience and research testing.
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Prerequisite: None

Short Film Production II

1 Semester Credit

In this course, producing students will further develop critical line producing skills. Working with filmmaking students in the NYFA Filmmaking Program, producing students will line produce a filmmaker’s short film. Prerequisite: None

Industry Speaker Series

0.5 Semester Credit

These informative sessions feature discussions with producers and other relevant industry professionals. Each session includes a Q&A, providing each student access to firsthand impressions of real-world circumstances faced by working industry professionals. Prerequisite: None

Developing the Feature Business Plan & TV Show Bible 2 Semester Credits
Through lectures and analysis of case studies, students will learn the critical skills to develop effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. The feature business plan or television show bible developed in this course will be presented at the Producers Pitch Fest. Prerequisite: Television Producing and Developing the TV Show Bible

Developing the Pitch

1 Semester Credit

Through rigorous in-class exercises, students will develop a brief and effective pitch of the material they choose to pitch at the Producers Pitch Fest. Each student will practice and gain critical and fundamental pitching skills. Prerequisite: Pitching for Producers, Television Producing & Developing the TV Show Bible

Internship

1 Semester Credit

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post production and marketing and distribution. An alternate research assignment is available for students who opt not to undertake an internship. Prerequisite: None

Art History II

3 Semester Credits

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.
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Prerequisite: Art History I

SEMESTER THREE Thesis Development Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

Students begin to conceptualize and develop a detailed outline of their MFA Thesis projects. Topics include loglines, story and character development, marketing strategy and analyzing comparable films or television shows and developing effective comparisons. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I

Writing the Feature Screenplay

1.5 Semester Credits

In a workshop setting, each student will develop and write a first draft feature screenplay. Structure, style, character development and arcs are some of the topics that will be discussed and put into practice throughout this course. Prerequisite: Developing the Feature Film Treatment

Writing the Situational Comedy or Drama for TV

2 Semester Credits

In a collaborative workshop setting, each producing student will develop an original drama or situational comedy pilot. Prerequisite: Television Producing & Developing the TV Pilot Treatment

Producing Commercials, Webisodes and Music Videos 1.5 Semester Credits
This course focuses on producing alternate media, including commercials, web episodes and music videos. Through in-class discussion and samples, students will be exposed to trends in these arenas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Entertainment Accounting

1 Semester Credit

This course provides an overview of the financial, cost and managerial accounting functions specific to the film industry, with application to other areas of media production, including television, commercials, web episodes and music videos. Students analyze techniques and control procedures for accurate preparation and presentation for financial statements. Topics include budgeting, cost reporting and film accounting terminology. Prerequisite: Line Producing

Cinema Studies I

1 Semester Credit

This course is an intense film studies seminar in which students are taught to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of filmmaking. The course explores ways hat the craft of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting and editing have developed. Through screenings and discussions, students grow to understand how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I
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Post Production for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

This course explores the entire post production workflow for both film and digital formats. In addition to the technical aspects of physical post production, the artistic and managerial aspects are also addressed. Post production for all current exhibition venues, including DVD, theatrical, cable and satellite will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Editing for Producers

Acting for Producers

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students will develop a critical understanding of the acting process and what each actor brings to the collaborative process of filmmaking. Prerequisite: None

The Production Crafts: A Deeper Look

1 Semester Credit

This course offers an in-depth look into the production crafts such as production design and art direction, wardrobe design and make-up. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I and II

Advanced Pitching Workshop I

0.5 Semester Credit

This course exposes students to a variety of successful pitch styles and formats in a workshop setting. Students will acquire techniques to develop and execute. Prerequisite: Pitching for Producers

Internship II

0.5 Semester Credit

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post-production and marketing and distribution. Students may choose an alternate research project in order to meet this course requirement. Prerequisite: Internship I

Elective: New Media

2 Semester Credits

It is essential for producers to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new media outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis. In addition to instruction in these areas, each student will develop and produce his or her own new media project. Prerequisite: None

Elective: Documentary

2 Semester Credits

Students will delve deeper into the world of documentary filmmaking, with a concentration in analyzing the different filmmaking styles, producing and fundraising strategies, and marketing and distribution paths of successful documentaries. In addition, each student will develop and produce his or her own documentary short film. Prerequisite: None

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SEMESTER FOUR Thesis Development Workshop II
0.5 Semester Credit

Students will workshop and critique working drafts of their MFA Thesis projects. Comparable films and television shows are researched and presented, and marketing and distribution strategies are analyzed. Prerequisite: Thesis Development Workshop I

Finance, Marketing and Distribution II

1 Semester Credit

Focusing on domestic, international and independent marketing and distribution, and using case studies of actual campaigns, this course focuses on successful strategies for each of these vital aspects of producing. Prerequisite: Finance, Marketing and Distribution I

Branding & Developing a Production Company Website 1 Semester Credit
As students prepare to launch their careers, this workshop offers branding techniques and step-by-step instructions on how to develop a dynamic and innovative production company website. Prerequisite: None

Entertainment Law II

3 Semester Credits

This course offers a deeper analysis of contract law and critical issues raised in contract negotiations. Copyright law and the protection of intellectual property are further analyzed. Prerequisite: Entertainment Law I

Advanced Pitching Workshop II

1 Semester Credit

Continuing from Semester Three, this course provides further exposure to pitching techniques. Students will practice perfecting their own pitching styles and methods so that they will be comfortable using these skills in a professional environment. Prerequisite: Advanced Pitching Workshop I

Cinema Studies II

3 Semester Credits

A broad cross-section of the film community is represented in this screening series, including directors, producers, directors of photography, editors, screenwriters, production designers, post-production coordinators and casting directors. Students are exposed to multiple avenues for potential employment in the film industry. All lectures are followed by Question & Answer sessions. Prerequisite: Cinema Studies I

Directing for Producers II

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students will analyze a variety of directing styles and techniques. Through examples and in-class exercises, students will gain a deeper understanding of the director’s integral creative role. Prerequisite: Directing for Producers I
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Advanced Camera & Lighting for Producers

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students take a deeper look at the role of the cinematographer and learn advanced camera techniques and lighting concepts. Prerequisite: Cinematography and lighting for Producers

Sound Workshop for Producers

0.5 Semester Credit

In a workshop setting, students learn the fundamentals of production sound recording. Prerequisite: Cinematography and lighting for Producers

Internship III

0.5 Semester Credit

This practicum gives students hands-on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post-production, casting, post-production and marketing and distribution. Students may choose an alternate research project in order to meet this course requirement. Prerequisite: Internship I and Internship II

Thesis Option A

9 Semester Credits

AFA in Producing candidates choose the Feature Film or Television Track, and based on the chosen track, produce and deliver a complete production element and a complete written proposal of their projects. For the Feature Track, students produce and deliver a film trailer of the feature film project in addition to a full developed business plan. For the Television Track, students produce and deliver a television spot of the television series in addition to a fully developed television show bible. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Thesis Option B

9 Semester Credits

AFA in Producing candidates develops one (1) feature film business plan and pitch, one (1) television show bible and pitch, and a third (3rd) project of the candidate’s choosing including the pitch. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Thesis Option C

9 Semester Credits

AFA in Producing candidates produce a feature film or television show pilot. Students choosing this option will be required to enroll in an additional semester to complete their projects. Students will develop and produce in a feature length film or television show pilot. With the guidance of an appointed faculty member, they will enter pre-production of the film or pilot in Semester Four and will produce and deliver their final product in an additional fifth semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AND WORKSHOPS

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ADMISSIONS POLICY FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS AND WORKSHOPS
All applicants to New York Film Academy programs and workshops must have a high school diploma or acceptable equivalent by the time of the course start date. There is no minimum GPA required; however, students must speak English and express a serious desire to explore the art and craft of moving pictures. Students applying for One- and Two-Year Programs may be interviewed by an Admissions Committee member by phone or in person. All students must possess the drive and commitment necessary to complete a rigorous, total immersion program. They must be able to communicate well and work collaboratively with others in an artistic environment. In addition to completing the application, students must submit the following: Sealed Official Academic Transcripts from Prior Institution(s) sent directly from the issuing institution to the NYFA Registrar’s Office.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students may be declined admission if the workshop they are applying for does not have space available for the date selected for attendance, or if they have not earned a high school diploma or acceptable equivalent. Students who do not speak English will also be declined admission to the workshops, given that all instruction in the Academy is conducted in English. Students who are unable to meet the financial obligations of the workshop, one month prior to the start date, will also be declined admission.

CREDIT TRANSFER POLICY
Qualified Students** enrolled in programs or workshops offered by the New York Film Academy or an affiliated institution may request that their studies and course work be considered for transfer credit or an award of credit by the New York Film Academy’s west coast headquarters at Universal Studios, California. **To be a qualified student, one must meet all admissions criteria, standards of course work, attendance, and the course of study must have been deemed equivalent to an approved course at the New York Film Academy at Universal Studios, California. The New York Film Academy makes no representation whatsoever that credits awarded by the New York Film Academy at Universal Studios, California will be accepted or applied toward the completion of any degree or certificate by any other postsecondary institution. The acceptance of transfer credits is always governed by the receiving school. NYFA will accept a maximum of 18 credit units in General Education and Art/Design History subjects for the AFA. NYFA requires that these be distributed in the same ratio as those in our current General Education curriculum. The ratio for the BFA is: Foundation studies (18).

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SEMESTER CREDIT UNIT DEFINITION
At the New York Film Academy, one semester credit consists of 48 hours of instruction or, as is customary in studio-based visual and performing arts postsecondary institutions, three Seminar/Lecture, Studio/Lab, or Studio/ Practicum hours of instruction per week for a period of sixteen weeks. Instructional class hours are 60 minutes.

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ONE-YEAR FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 36

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
Based on an academic year, the curriculum is divided into two semesters. During the first semester, students will learn the art and technique of visual storytelling. Courses held during the first eight weeks include: Director’s Craft, Cinematography, Screenwriting, and Editing. Students will use this knowledge to write, direct, and edit four short 16mm films. Soon thereafter, students are given instruction on the fundamentals of digital video production and digital editing. Students will then write, direct, and edit three digital shorts. Within their screenwriting class, students will begin developing a script for their year one final film. This script will be the basis of the film project of the second semester. The goal of the thesis project is to enable students to make a fully conceived and executed film with dialogue. Students have the option of shooting in 16mm or 35mm film, or digital video. The second semester is divided into three phases. The first phase is devoted to intensive instruction, demonstration, group sync-sound directing exercises, individual consultations, and pre-production (including casting, rehearsal, and location scouting). During this phase, students will have one-on-one consultations as they work with scenes from their scripts. In the second or production phase, each student directs his/her own One Year Final Film and crews on his/her classmates’ films. The third phase of the program is devoted to post-production. During this phase, students edit, receive instruction, and screen rough-cuts of the One Year Final Films. Students will also receive feedback and finish their films for a final group screening. Toward the end of the semester, students attend classes focusing on “Life after the New York Film Academy,” where they meet guest speakers from the film industry. Lecturers will discuss strategies for those students interested in exploring filmmaking careers after completion of the program. Students will spend an additional twenty to forty hours a week beyond class-time on the production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours; however, they are still necessary to successfully complete the program. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student. Students are responsible for making their own film project schedule, which must be supervised and approved by an instructor. Students also need to collaborate with their fellow students and postproduction supervisors to ensure that their projects are completed during the designated times.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the One-Year Filmmaking Certificate Program are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.
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EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this program include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. • An in-depth knowledge of 16mm and Digital Video cameras and motion picture production. • A working knowledge of 35mm cameras and 35mm film production. • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay. • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions. • Mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software. • Knowledge of film history and film studies. • Knowledge of aesthetic film theory and experience with practical application of the same.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The One-Year Filmmaking Program requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirement: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film Project 3 - Music Film Project 4 - Fourth Film project in non-synch 16mm or DV Project 5 - Digital Improv Film Project 6 - POV project Project 7 - Digital Dialogue Film Project 8 - One Year Final Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to The New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 36 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s One-Year Filmmaking Program. The New York Film Academy One-Year Filmmaking Program is an accelerated full-time study program and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized program, and there are no majors or minors. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours, lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

OTHER COSTS:
Film and Video Stock, Processing, Telecine, and Other Production Related Expenses are not included in tuition, and vary from student to student.

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TUITION:

1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total Tuition :
* Additional Equipment Fee

$16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $36,000

OTHER COSTS: FILM, PROCESSING & PRODUCTION EXPENSES
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total: Total Cost of Program: $1,000 $3,500 ($1,000 if shot digitally) $4,500 $40,500

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE:

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Director’s Craft I A Director’s Craft I B Cinematography I Digital Editing I Digital Production Workshop Screenwriting I Acting for Directors Critical Film Studies I TOTAL Course Numbers FILM100 FILM101 FILM110 FILM120 FILM130 FILM140 FILM150 ARTD101

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 3 2 3 2 2 1 0 17 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 3 2 3 2 2 1 1 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Director’s Craft II Line Producing Cinematography II Synchronous Sound Production Workshop Digital Editing II Screenwriting II One Year Final Film Production One Year Final Film Crew Participation NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers FILM105 FILM165 FILM115 FILM135 FILM125 FILM145 FILM290 FILM291

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 2 1 2 1 1 1 6 2 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 1 2 1 1 1 6 2

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One Year Final Film Post Production TOTAL

FILM292

2 18

0 0

0 0

2 18

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Director’s Craft I A
4 Semester Credits

The core of the first semester, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will take part in several in-class workshops and will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films. Prerequisite: None

Director’s Craft I B

3 Semester Credits

A continuation of Director’s Craft I B in the first semester. Students expand upon lessons already learned and complete an additional three short film projects. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I B

Cinematography I

2 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture and video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles. Prerequisite: None

Digital Editing I

3 Semester Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer. Prerequisite: None

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Digital Production Workshop

2 Semester Credits

Students stage and shoot complex dramatic exercises under the guidance of the instructor. They design shots to heighten the emotion of a sequence, then shoot the sequence on digital video in a supervised environment. The relationship between text and subtext is explored in depth through classroom sessions, screen and critiques and in the field production exercises. Prerequisite: None

Screenwriting I

2 Semester Credits

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea, treatment, and outline to a rough draft and finally a shooting script. Instruction focuses on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue. Prerequisite: None

Acting For Directors

1 Semester Credit

This course adheres to the philosophy that in order to direct actors one must understand and experience acting as art and methodology. Directing students will become actors. Students learn how to identify a screenplay’s emotional “beats” and “character objectives” in order to improve their actors’ performances. Students are prepared to not only communicate and collaborate with their actors, but to actualize the best emotional outcome of a scene. Prerequisite: None

Critical Film Studies I

1 Semester Credit

This seminar teaches students to identify the techniques used by cinematic innovators throughout the history of filmmaking. Through screenings and discussions, students will grow to understand how filmmakers have approached the great challenge of telling stories with moving images from silent films to the digital age. The course explores ways that the crafts of directing (particularly shot construction), cinematography, acting, and editing have developed. Students are then challenged to place themselves within that development with regard to their on-going film projects. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Director’s Craft II
2 Semester Credits

Building upon knowledge and skills acquired in Director’s Craft I, this course is a concentrated examination and analysis of the aesthetic elements of the director’s toolkit as it applies to shot choice, composition, setting, point of view, character, and camera movement. Students learn how to cover complex dialogue scenes with a series of shots and practice different approaches to coverage by breaking down scenes from their own
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scripts. Students are encouraged to develop their own directorial style drawing from the elements presented in this class. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Line Producing

1 Semester Credit

Line Producing leads students through the entire process of pre-production, including scouting and securing of locations, permits, and casting. The producing instructor and students design a production schedule for the entire class. The instructor encourages students to form realistic plans for successfully making their films. Using script breakdowns, students learn how to plan and keep to a schedule and budget for their productions. They use their own finished scripts in class as they learn how to take advantage of budgeting and scheduling forms and methods. Prerequisite: Director’s Craft I

Cinematography II

2 Semester Credits

This class immerses students in the technical and creative demands of cinematography. They will learn to go beyond simply ‘getting an image’ and focus on the nuances of visual storytelling. Topics include: Arriflex 16SR camera and accessories, High Definition Camera, Use of Color and Light, and 35mm cameras. In addition to being trained to operate advanced camera equipment, students study basic color theory and learn to control the color palette of their projects. Special attention is given to the emotional attributes that can be assigned to an image by changing the hue, saturation, and contrast of any given image. Students learn to incorporate these theories into their projects, and gain a greater understanding of aesthetic image control. Prerequisite: Cinematography I

Synchronous Sound Production Workshop

1 Semester Credit

This hands-on course challenges students to interpret and apply all theory and practice of the first semester curriculum in a series of sync-sound production exercises. Students shoot complex dramatic scenes on 16mm film and high definition video from their own scripts with the guidance and critique of the instructor. Students must determine what adjustments to make to their scripts and shooting plans before entering into production. These practice scenes are expected to be fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, rehearsed and pre-lit) and executed at a professional level. Prerequisite: Digital Production Workshop

Digital Editing II

1 Semester Credit

This course teaches students to edit their sync-sound projects. Students are encouraged to expand upon previously mastered techniques to establish a consistent editing design, dialogue rhythm, and sense of pacing and continuity that compliments the story as a whole. Prerequisite: Digital Editing

Screenwriting II

1 Semester Credit

In addition to providing an in-depth study and exploration of dialogue in film, Screenwriting II focuses on the writing, rewriting, and polishing of the One-Year Final
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Film scripts. Students will conduct live readings of their screenplays and engage in instructor-led discussions of the work. The goal of this seminar is to increase the writer’s mastery of those aspects of screenwriting as outlined in Screenwriting I. Prerequisite: Screenwriting I

Final Film Production

6 Semester Credits

Semester Two culminates in the pre-production and production of the One-Year Final Film. This film project is the capstone project of the One Year program. All students are challenged to incorporate lessons from all other courses in the design and execution of these films. These projects may be up to 15 minutes in length of any genre style and may be produced either on 16mm film, 35mm film or High Definition Video. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Film Crew Participation

2 Semester Credits

By participating as crewmembers during their classmates’ One-Year Final Films, students will gain further on-set experience and become more intimate with the nuts-and-bolts aspects filmmaking. By understanding the role of each key member of the crew, students will greatly improve their ability to manage a large production as a director. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

Final Film Post-Production

2 Semester Credits

In this course students will apply the knowledge so far gained through editing and postproduction courses to finish their One-Year Final Film. They will be assessed on their ability to take a film from rough assembly to locked picture to a finished product with sound mix and titles. Excellent problem-solving skills will be necessary to steadily improve each cut of the film on the way to achieving one’s vision. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Semester Two

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ONE-YEAR ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 32.5

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
Based on an academic school year, the curriculum in the one-year Acting for Film program is divided into two semesters. The first semester concentrates on building a foundation in the acting craft, and the second semester works on applying it to screen acting. During the first semester, students participate in a broad array of class work that introduces them to, and trains them in, the leading acting techniques. First semester courses include: Acting for Film, Scene Study, Voice and Movement, and Shakespeare. These courses build towards a fully realized performance in a staged production. The first semester, students are armed with the techniques and confidence they need to create believable performances for the camera in the second semester and beyond. In the second semester, in addition to attending classes, students apply what they have learned to a series of on camera exercises. The camera exercises are designed to develop their screen acting ability. Second semester courses build on the work done in the first semester. At the end of the semester each student in good standing performs in a digitally taped production, which will be edited and can become a part of his or her acting reel. In addition, students will participate in a presentation performed in front of an invited audience, instructors, and classmates.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the One-Year Acting for Film Certificate Program are to instruct students in the art and craft of acting for film and television by offering a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops designed to help them excel in the creative art of acting.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this program include: • • • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. In-depth knowledge of and experience with the art and craft of acting for film. Experience with multiple modern and classical approaches to performance, script interpretation, and character formation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
Students must study and perform scenes that demonstrate that they have gained a working knowledge of the following skills: • • • Acting for Film Meisner Voice
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• • • •

Movement Film Craft Scene Study Improvisation

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to The New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 32.5 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s One-Year Acting for Film Program. The One-Year Acting for Film Program is an accelerated full-time study program and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized program, and there are no majors or minors. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. All classes are mandatory.

OTHER COSTS:
Students must pay a refundable fee for a magnetized Student ID Badge. This ID is required for access to several areas of Universal Studios. If badges are lost or damaged, the deposit will not be returned. Students may elect to rent a parking space within the perimeter of Universal Studios for a monthly fee. There may also be expenses incurred for books, props and wardrobe, and permits and locations.

TUITION:

1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total Tuition :

$13,500 $13,500 $27,000

YEAR ONE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM
Students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film acting that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education. They rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to act in motion pictures. All students participate in an intensive sequence of classes in Acting Technique, Scene Study, Text Analysis, Acting for Film, Meisner Technique, Voice and Movement, Speech, Shakespeare, Psychology of Acting and Film Craft (master lectures in Directing, Cinematography, Writing, Producing and Editing and an in-class film shoot). Learning Goals: 1. Understand the fundamental principles of acting for film. 2. Grounding in classical scene study and acting techniques. 3. Fundamentals of script and text analysis. 4. Survey and examination of film studies from a film actor’s perspective. 5 Exposure and practice in a variety of vocal techniques.
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Production Goals: 1. Perform in a live monologue or scene presentation. 2. Perform an in-class Shakespeare presentation. 3. Shoot in-class on camera scenes for weekly critique. 4. Participate in a Film Craft shoot.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester of the Year One Program enables students to continue developing as actors by challenging their range, and moving beyond their “comfort zone”. The second semester consists of a sequence of classes in Scene Study II, Acting Technique II, Voice and Movement II and Improvisation. Acting for Film students will also have the opportunity to collaborate with film students on Sync Sound Production Workshop projects, learn about playwrights and screenwriters and shoot a short film project on location with professional staff. All instruction and film exercises are geared towards helping students complete their individual projects and production goals. A series of Special Lectures by Industry Professionals will also be held. Learning Goals: 1. Intermediate training in acting principles. 2. Grounding in intermediate scene study and acting for film. 3. Intermediate training in Vocal, Movement and Improvisation work. 4. Exposure to basic visual media production. Production Goals: 1. Perform in a short film. 2. Perform in a taped in-class Meisner presentation 3. Perform in a taped, year-end, in-class live presentation.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE
ONE YEAR ACTING FOR FILM

Ensemble/Laboratory

Art/Design History Units 0

Total Number of Units 32.5

32.5

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SEMESTER ONE
Course Title Acting Technique I Scene Study I Acting for Film I Meisner I Voice and Movement I Speech I Film Craft Comedy and Improvisation I Psychology of Acting Shakespeare Text Analysis TOTAL Course Numbers ACTI100 ACTI110 ACTI120 ACTI130 ACTI140 ACTI150 ACTI160 ACTI170 ACTI180 ACTI190 ACTI198

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 15.5 Studio Electives 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 0.5 2 3.5 3 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 15.5

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Acting Technique II Scene Study II Acting for Film II Meisner II Voice and Movement II Speech II Comedy and Improvisation II Stage Combat Playwrights/ Screenwriters TOTAL

All courses are mandatory

Course Numbers
ACTI105 ACTI115 ACTI125 ACTI135 ACTI145 ACTI155 ACTI175 ACTI185 ACTI195

Studio or Related Units
1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 17

Studio Electives
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Art/Desig n History Units
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Credit Units
1.5 3.5 4.5 3.5 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 17

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Acting Technique I
0.5 Semester Credit

Students will be introduced to and practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances. Exercises will be taped for in-class
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critique.

Scene Study I

2 Semester Credits

Students learn to analyze scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop a solid grounding in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students in good standing will incorporate all of the various disciplines learned in all other courses into a taped live presentation at the end of semester. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week.

Acting for Film I

3.5 Semester Credits

Acting for Film provides students with an environment to facilitate getting comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in a supervised Production Workshop with film students.

Meisner I

3 Semester Credits

A study of the approach to acting formulated by the late Sanford Meisner. Largely based on listening and observation, the Meisner technique helps actors to act and react truthfully by being grounded in the reality of the moment.

Voice and Movement I

1.5 Semester Credits

In the “Voice” segment of this course, students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension. During the “Movement” portion, students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught to help the student find expression and freedom within the physical and vocal instrument.

Speech I

0.5 Semester Credit

In this introductory class, students work with basic elements of speech, such as auditory awareness and how sound is being created. Students also work toward creating Neutral American Speech.

Film Craft

1 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will participate in an in-class shoot, utilizing skills gained in the course.

Comedy and Improvisation I

0.5 Semester Credit

In order to truly be effective actors, students must learn how to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses. Through a variety of exercises designed to help cast off inhibitions, actors experiment with group dynamics and individual expression vital to vibrant and truthful performances.
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Psychology of Acting

0.5 Semester Credit

Students will learn about the etiquette, stamina and understanding required to effectively explore the craft of acting in an open-minded and productive manner. This class is designed to allow students to deepen the practice of their craft while maintaining a healthy balance in school and personal life. Interpersonal communication as well as understanding the demands placed on the individual within the group dynamic will be explored.

Shakespeare

1 Semester Credit

Students are exposed to a historical perspective of the writings of William Shakespeare to better understand these classic works of theatre. In order to gain a better appreciation of this master playwright, text analysis will be done using a variety of approaches including scansion, the Freeman method (using the First Folio text), soundings, and poetic and rhetorical devices. Students in good standing will perform in a taped semester end in-class presentation.

Text Analysis

1.5 Semester Credits

This course teaches the core skills necessary for creating a fully realized performance, respecting the written text and assessing how to maintain the integrity of the performance while shooting out of sequence. Students will work on a variety of texts and, through class discussion and written analyses, practice this essential skill set necessary for all professional acting jobs.

Dialect Workshop (Year-Round)

0 Semester Credits

In this year-round optional workshop, film actors can practice IPA work and delve into the art of dialects. Students will develop their ability to find character voices that are still grounded in solid vocal technique to promote full control and stamina, allowing for dynamic work in television, film and voice-over. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of speech and diction for actors, and to basic dialects that are used most commonly in contemporary dramatic texts. The course emphasizes the embodiment of a spontaneous relationship to the creative imagination that informs spoken communication, and the clear expression of the text supported by the film actor.

SEMESTER TWO Acting Technique II
1.5 Semester Credits

Through further practice of Acting Techniques developed in Semester One, students continue to refine their toolbox of choices available to them for their work on increasingly complex material in other classes. Exercises will be taped for review in class. Prerequisite: Acting Technique I

Scene Study II
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3.5 Semester Credits

Students continue developing the skills gained in Scene Study I, with an emphasis on
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classical or stylistically different material. Students learn how to be emotionally honest in a universe that is markedly different from their own. Students, having met academic and attendance requirements, will participate in an end-of-year taped live presentation in front of an invited audience. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week. Prerequisite: Scene Study I

Acting for Film II

4.5 Semester Credits

Students apply the training learned in Semester One to in-class exercises. On a weekly basis, they will prepare a script and digitally tape the scene. Students learn the basics of editing, applying these skills towards editing their own scenes to better understand how the mechanics of a performance effect the final edit. Scenes will be screened for critique in class. Students are required to attend a series of Special Lectures by Industry Professionals and submit essays. Actors in good standing will participate in a sync sound workshop with filmmaking students, and will also prepare for a year-end shoot shot by an on-staff professional DP and Director. Prerequisite: Acting for Film I

Meisner II

3.5 Semester Credits

A continuation of Meisner I, students learn to apply the “moment-to-moment” work to characters outside of their own experience. Students deepen the practice by advancing from exercises into scene work, to be presented and taped in-class at the end of the course. Prerequisite: Meisner I

Voice and Movement II

1.5 Semester Credits

In this continuation of the two first semester courses, students will focus on using the techniques learned in Voice and Movement I and continue with ever more demanding physical work designed to heighten performances. They will begin exploring the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) in order to prepare for successfully mastering dialects in later speech classes. In addition, elements of period movement and dance are addressed for specific works that require historical accuracy. Prerequisites: Voice and Movement I

Speech II

0.5 Semester Credit

In this course, students train their ear and learn to identify and duplicate proper pronunciation elements. They also deepen the study of Standard American Speech and IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) begun in Voice and Movement II in order to neutralize regional dialects and attain more resonant speech. This allows for the beginning practice of dialects including (but not limited to) Standard British, Cockney, and Brooklyn. Prerequisite: Speech I

Comedy and Improvisation II

0.5 Semester Credit

Following the Semester One course, Comedy and Improvisation II encourages students to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses through a variety of individual and group exercises.
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Prerequisite: Comedy and Improvisation I

Stage Combat

0.5 Semester Credit

Students learn how to safely portray choreographed fights for the screen. Elements of various martial arts are employed to create interesting fight sequences that keep the actor safe from injury. Prerequisite: None

Playwrights/Screenwriters

1 Semester Credit

Students examine contemporary playwrights and screenwriters, examining style as it relates to current forms and genres. Text analysis and plot structure are treated as fundamental tools for rehearsal and performance. Students learn how to use certain given elements of writing, like mood and sub-text, to enhance performance. Written work is an integral part of this class. Prerequisite: Shakespeare

Special Lectures I
In this series of lectures, industry guests and professionals assist students in understanding the current trends in headshots, resumes, representation, reels, and casting. Students will be exposed to such topics as marketing skills, tools necessary for securing interviews with casting directors and agents, as well as proper etiquette for dealing with industry professionals under a variety of circumstances. Guests include casting associates, agents, and working actors, among others. Students submit an essay after each special lecture for grading and the class work is applied toward the Acting for Film grade. Attendance is mandatory.

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ONE-YEAR SCREENWRITING
Total Credit Units: 34

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The One-Year Screenwriting program offers a comprehensive look at the art of screenwriting through writing courses, as well as courses in film studies and screenplay analysis. Students will be assigned several writing projects, which will be critiqued by their peers during in-class workshops.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
During Semester One, students will be introduced to the tools and skills necessary for writing successful screenplays. Students are encouraged to be creative, but are also taught to think of the screenplay as the definitive industry tool for articulating ideas or concepts to a production team, including producers, financiers, directors, and actors. Clarity can be as important as creativity. Standard formatting and industry expectations will be studied and analyzed during writing workshops and lectures. Students will also study the Business of Screenwriting and how to navigate the entertainment industry. Learning Goals: 1. In-depth study of classic screenplay structure, character arcs, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voiceover, subtext, style, tone, visualization, discipline, and genre. 2. Entertainment industry methods, practices, and players. 3. WGA format and copyright law. 4. In-depth look at treatment writing. 5. Standard conventions of TV writing and the TV industry. Production Goals: 1. Write 2 treatments for feature length films. 2. Write a first draft of a speculative (“spec”) feature length screenplay. 3. Write a script for a one-hour television drama spec episode.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second and final semester challenges students to develop their craft artistically and technically, and to progress beyond their earlier experiments with the feature length screenplay. In an advanced workshop, students will write a first draft of a second original spec feature length screenplay and will then choose between revising that screenplay or the screenplay from Semester One. Students will also study acting and write, direct, and edit their own short films in order to achieve a better understanding of how the written word translates to the screen. Moving on from one-hour television, students will write a half-hour television spec script, as well as a pilot script for an original television series. Finally, in order to gain deeper knowledge of how the entertainment industry works, each student will participate in an internship within the industry or write a 15-page research paper on a topic related to the business of screenwriting.

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Learning Goals 1. Fundamentals of film directing. 2. In-depth study and practice of the pitch. 3. Critical concepts in film history and genre. 4. Theory and practice of acting. 5. Half-hour television writing. 6. Original television series pilot writing. Production Goals 1. Write a first draft of a second feature length screenplay. 2. Revise a draft of one of the two screenplays generated up to this point. 3. Direct a short film. 4. Write a half-hour television spec script. 5. Write an original television series pilot script. 6. Secure and participate in an entertainment industry internship or write a research paper on the industry.

Year-End Staged Readings
One-Year Writing students will celebrate the completion of their program with a night of staged readings of their written work. The readings will be developed in conjunction with actors and will be held at a nearby professional stage theater.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The New York Film Academy One-Year Screenwriting program is a highly specialized program and all courses are mandatory. The program does not provide for multiple tracks of study and must be pursued full-time over the course of two semesters. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 34 semester credits. The school Registrar ensures that the student has fulfilled all academic requirements for the entire program, as well as all financial obligations to the school. Student transcripts showing the awarding of the One-Year Certificate of Completion will be withheld until the student meets all academic and financial obligations.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester : Total Tuition $13,500 $13,500 $27,000

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
Certificate-Granting Program
Program Title: Number of Years to Complete the program: Total Number of Semester Credits: Program Supervisors: One-Year Screenwriting 1 year (2 semesters) 34 M. Young, S. Calderon

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Elements of Screenwriting Advanced Story Generation The Business of Screenwriting I Writing for Television I (1-Hour Drama) Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE100 SCRE110 SCRE120 SCRE130 SCRE140

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 3 3 4 4 18 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 3 3 4 4 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II The Business of Screenwriting II Writing for Television II (1/2Hr Comedy + Pilot) Script to Screen (Acting for Writers + 1wk Seminar in Digital Filmmaking) Genre Studies TOTAL Course Numbers SCRE200 SCRE210 SCRE220 SCRE230 SCRE240

All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 4 4 4 2.5 0 14.5 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 1.5 1.5 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 4 4 4 2.5 1.5 16

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Elements of Screenwriting
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Utilizing lectures, in-class exercises, outside readings, classroom discussions, and film viewings, this course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting. Screenplay
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formatting will be a major focus, and students will learn how to write scene description, to describe characters and locations, and to develop action sequences. Topics will also include: Classic screenplay structure, the Elements of the Scene, Developing the Character, Character Arcs, Antagonists, Dialogue, Writing the Visual Image, Introduction to Final Draft, Theme, Conflict, Flashbacks, Fantasy Sequences and Dream Sequences, Voiceover, Text and Subtext, Developing Your Writing Style, Tone and Genre, Visualization, Revealing Exposition, Creating a Compelling Second Act, Climaxes and Resolutions, and Scene Beats. Prerequisite: None

Advanced Story Generation

3 Semester Credits

Advanced Story Generation is designed to help writers become what the film industry needs most: prolific sources of movie ideas. Through in-class exercises and out-of-class projects, students will develop skills for generating viable stories for feature films of various genres. They will workshop ideas in class in order to come up with the best possible version of their stories. The idea is to become versatile, adaptable, and creative, providing the best “product” to the industry when called upon to generate new ideas to fill various needs. In the second half of the course, students will commit to one of their story ideas and develop it into a treatment to be used for writing the Quarter 3 screenplay. Prerequisites: Elements of Screenwriting; Writing the Feature Screenplay I

The Business of Screenwriting I

3 Semester Credits

There are many “angles” to understand when approaching "the deal," and they differ from one medium to the next. It is crucially important for a writer to protect his or her work both through Copyright Registration and registration through the Writers Guild of America. Next, the writer must strategize about how to get his or her script into the right hands, in the correct manner, and for the appropriate market. An overview of topics include: Agents, What Is Copyright?, How Do I Enforce My Copyright?, How to Register with the Writer's Guild of America?, Getting Your Script in the Right Hands, What To Do If You Don’t Have an Agent, If the Deal Goes Through What You Need to Know, Options, Pay for Rewrites, Writing on Spec or for Hire, How a Television Deal Differs from a Film Deal. Classes will be supplemented with special lectures by industry professionals. Prerequisite: None

Writing for Television I: The One-Hour Drama

4 Semester Credits

This television workshop is a fast-paced, intensive workshop program that introduces students to the fundamentals of the TV world and TV writing. The class work consists of individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. By the end of the course, each student will have written a Studio/Network draft (which is a second draft, in the TV world) of a one-hour television spec script for an existing show. Students will be encouraged to write through difficult spots with the belief that getting to “The End” is more important than polishing along the way Workshop sessions will simulate a TV writers’ room, and will be an environment in which students evaluate their own and their classmates’ work. A constructive, creative and supportive atmosphere will prevail, where students will guide and encourage each other in their writing. Prerequisite: None
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Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I is a fast-paced, intensive workshop that introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting. The classes consist of in-class writing exercises, individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. Students will apply knowledge gained from Elements of Screenwriting and apply it to the creation of their own feature-length scripts. By the end of the course, students will develop and write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Writing the Feature Film Screenplay II
4 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Screenplay II builds upon knowledge gained in Writing the Feature Screenplay I and Advanced Story Generation, in which students wrote a feature-length film script and a treatment for a second feature-length film script, respectively. This course is divided into two components: in the first, students will take the treatment written in Advanced Story Generation and write a draft of that script. In the second half of the course, students will choose one of their two feature scripts and revise it more thoroughly than they have with any project in the program so far. Each week, students will bring in a sequence of their scripts to be workshopped. Prerequisite: Writing the Feature Film Screenplay I

The Business of Screenwriting II

4 Semester Credits

Building on last semester’s work, the second semester of Business of Screenwriting features a more in depth study of the life of a writer. Guest speakers will be invited to illuminate a variety of areas in the world of the screenwriter, and practical workshops in pitching will give the students the tools they need to walk The Way of the Writer in the World of Hollywood. As part of this course, in the fourth and final quarter of the year, students will take part in an industry internship or may instead choose to write an industry-related research paper. Students may intern at a film or television production company, film or television studio, management company, or talent agency. Students are encouraged to choose their internship wisely based on their interests and strengths honed during the program. The Business of Screenwriting instructor is responsible for approving internships. Any internship considered as enhancing and/or enriching the student¹s understanding of the film or television industry may be an option. Students will be expected to write reports on their internship experiences, and internship supervisors will assess the students' performance at the work site. Students should keep in mind as they choose their internship sites that this position is likely to be their entree into the entertainment industry, so it is imperative that they be responsible and recommended that they foster as many positive relationships as possible. Instead of an internship, students may write a Research Project. Students may opt to write a research paper that will investigate a specific topic related to the entertainment
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industry. All research papers must be approved by the Business of Screenwriting instructor, and must address a topic that directly relates to the field, such as the Studio System, histories of specific entertainment companies or movements, depictions of writers and filmmakers in popular culture, etc. Papers must be at least 15 pages in length and must reference a comprehensive list of research sources. Prerequisite: The Business of Screenwriting I

Writing for Television II: The Half-Hour Spec and the Pilot
4 Semester Credits

In the first half of the course, students will become familiar with the half-hour television industry, styles of half-hour television writing, and the current crop of viable series from which to draw the spec they will write. Each student will then draft a professional-caliber spec for a half-hour show. In the second half of the course, students will create an original episodic television series, including completing the script for the pilot episode. Topics will include: introducing your central character and core cast, creating a series "template," creative solutions to providing back story, and building the show's world and tone. Students will learn from individual writing, group workshops, short lectures, television screenings, and story analysis to create two pieces of writing. The workshop portion of the class will be constructed to simulate a TV writers’ room, with students reading, evaluating, and assisting each other from “breaking story,” building outlines, all the way to a completed draft. The primary goal of the class will be for students to leave with a full draft of a television pilot script for an original show, either one-hour or half-hour. Prerequisite: Writing For Television I

Script to Screen

2.5 Semester Credits

Script to Screen is designed to help writing students see what happens to their words when actors interpret them in front of the camera. The class is divided into two components: Acting for Writers and The One-Week Digital Filmmaking Seminar. Acting for Writers introduces students to the theory and practice of the acting craft, using Stanislavski Method, improvisation, and scene and monologue work as starting points. By exploring how actors build characters and performances based upon the information provided in a film script, writers will learn how to write more powerful dialogue, develop more memorable characters, and create more effective dramatic actions. Through inclass acting exercises and writing, as well as filmed exercises, students will learn what truly makes for great dialogue and action writing. The Digital Filmmaking Seminar trains students in the fundamentals of film directing, which in turn facilitates an understanding of the filmmaking process as it relates to screenwriting. It is our belief that a student who actually picks up a camera, blocks a scene and directs actors from a script is far better prepared to then write a screenplay. If a writer has actually translated a shot on the page into a shot in the camera, then the writer has a much sharper perspective on the writing process. Hands-on classes in directing, editing, cinematography, and production cover the creative and technical
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demands of telling a story with moving images. Then, working in small crews, students will make short films or shoot scenes from one of their screenplays using digital video cameras. Afterward, students will edit their footage on Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: None

Genre Studies

1.5 Semester Credits

Genre and Storytelling is a critical studies course focused on exploring eight different genres of film. Through out-of-class screenings, lectures, and in-class scene breakdowns, students will begin to identify the models and audience expectations of these different genres. Prerequisite: None

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ONE-YEAR PRODUCING
Total Credit Units: 38

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The Producing Program is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the contemporary realities of how producing works for film and television with an emphasis on creative thinking and strategic leadership skills. Students undergo a thorough regimen of class work and film production that lays the groundwork for a professional life in the film arts. The curriculum is extremely comprehensive, teaching students the creative aspects of producing, as well as the more technical side of line producing. Students gain a practical understanding of the entertainment industry and the tools needed to successfully navigate it.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES
Producers are confronted with a number of visual, dramatic, financial, legal, logistical, managerial and technical challenges. From the first day of class, students are immersed in a hands-on education on how to work through these challenges. Through an intensive sequence of classes and workshops, and with encouragement from their instructors, students rapidly learn the fundamental creative and technical skills they need to produce film and television. Learning Goals: 1. Introduction to the roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. 2. Gain understanding of the physical and post production processes. 3. Master storytelling concepts of elements, conventions, structure and style. 4. Understand basic principles of entertainment law. 5. Introduction to filmmaking from the perspective of the screenwriter, director, actor and cinematographer. Production Goals: 1. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a short film on the Universal lot. 2. In collaborative groups, students develop, prep, shoot and edit a short reality television segment. 3. Each student will write, prep, shoot and edit his or her own short film.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
The second semester challenges students to develop their production abilities artistically and technically. Producing students are instructed in the craft of writing and championing dramatic treatments; in pitching story ideas to a variety of audiences; and presenting industry-standard written proposals in support of the feasibility of their projects. This semester culminates in each student pitching and presenting a film or television project at the Producers Pitch Fest.
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Learning Goals: 1. Continue to analyze and master key elements of effective producer’s craft. 2. Develop and write original film and television pilot treatments. 3. Introduction and practice of effective pitching skills. 4. Learn critical elements of effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. Production Goals: 1. In collaborative groups, produce a short documentary or news segment. 2. Produce a short film for a NYFA filmmaker. 3. Develop an effective pitch and feature film business plan or TV show bible.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The One-Year Producing Program requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: • Develop and produce a short film as a collaborative group. • Develop and produce a short reality television project as a collaborative group. • Develop and produce an original short film. • Develop and produce a short documentary or news segment in a collaborative group. • Produce and/or line produce a short film for a NYFA filmmaker. • Develop an effective pitch and feature film business plan or TV show bible. In order to graduate, students must successfully complete each required course for a total of 37.5 semester credits. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. The One-Year Producing Program is an accelerated full-time study program and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours, lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total Tuition: $16,000 $16,000 $32,000

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE: SEMESTER ONE
Course Title Producers Craft I Producers Roundtable I Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop Finance, Marketing and Distribution Directing for Producers Cinematography and Lighting for Producers Editing for Producers Entertainment Law Introduction to Screenwriting Producing Reality Television Short Film Production I TOTAL All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Numbers Related Units History Units PROD100 PROD110 PROD120 PROD130 PROD140 PROD150 PROD160 PROD170 PROD180 PROD190 PROD195 2 0.5 1 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 2 1 3 3 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 1 1.5 1.5 1.5 2 1 3 3 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Producers Craft II Producers Roundtable II Pitching for Producers Producing Documentaries and News Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment Developing the Feature Film Treatment Business Affairs Short Film Production II Industry Speaker Series Developing the Feature Business Plan and TV Show Bible Developing the Pitch Internship TOTAL PROD156 PROD115 PROD125 PROD135 PROD145 PROD155 PROD166 PROD195 PROD176 PROD186 PROD196 PROD185

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Related Units History Units 2 0.5 1 3 1.5 1.5 1.5 3 2 1 2.5 19.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 0 0 0 0.5 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 3 1.5 1.5 1.5 3 0.5 2 1 2.5 20

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE

Producers Craft I

2 Semester Credits

This core introductory course outlines the essential roles, tasks and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include navigating the studios, television networks and emerging media and the relationship between the producer and the unions, guilds and talent agencies.

Producers Roundtable I

0.5 Semester Credit

In this roundtable setting and from the producer’s perspective, students will discuss and analyze current projects in development or production. Current newsworthy events in the entertainment industry will be presented and analyzed.

Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop

1 Semester Credit

This workshop introduces students to the industry-standard software used to schedule and budget productions. In a hands-on lab setting, students are instructed in the use of Entertainment Partners (EP) Scheduling and EP Budgeting software programs, including established scheduling and budgeting techniques.

Finance, Marketing and Distribution

1 Semester Credit

Using produced films as case studies, this course focuses on successful strategies employed in the finance, marketing and distribution of studio and independent films.

Directing for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

Effective producers create a collaborative and artistic production environment that enhances each director’s skills and provide the support needed to make the best possible film or television show. In this course, producing students learn to use basic production documents and to audition, cast and work with actors. In hands-on sessions students will break down a short script into a shooting plan and direct a scene with actors on digital video. In addition, students will work in collaborative groups to develop and shoot a short film.

Cinematography and Lighting for Producers

1.5 Semester Credits

Producing students receive hands-on instruction in basic cinematography and lighting techniques.

Editing for Producers Entertainment Law

1.5 Semester Credits

Students are instructed in the basic techniques of digital editing.
2 Semester Credits

This course is an overview of contract law and how it impacts the entertainment industry. Producing students will study legal issues regarding television, films, recordings, live
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performances and other aspects of the entertainment industry. Topics include copyright law, intellectual property and talent representation.

Introduction to Screenwriting

1 Semester Credit

Producing students will gain firsthand knowledge of fundamental screenwriting techniques and will develop strategies in communicating with the producer’s key collaborator in story development, the screenwriter.

Producing Reality Television

3 Semester Credits

Working in teams, producing students develop and shoot a reality show teaser episode. They will prep, shoot and edit their reality shows for presentation and critique. Prerequisites: Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop and Editing for Producers

Short Film Production I

3 Semester Credits

Producing students will develop, prep and shoot their own individual short films. Working in teams, students will function as crew members on each other’s productions. Prerequisites: Line Producing Essentials: EP/Movie Magic Workshop, Editing for Producers, and Introduction to Screenwriting

SEMESTER TWO Producers Craft II
2 Semester Credits

This course continues the study of the essential roles of and obstacles faced by film and television producers. Topics include optioning and developing material, film festivals, networks and ratings, studio and independent marketing and distribution and analyzing film tax incentive and rebate programs. Prerequisite: Producers Craft I

Producers Roundtable II

0.5 Semester Credit

In roundtable discussions, students analyze and discuss development, production, marketing and distribution obstacles of their Year One Thesis Projects. In workshops, students brainstorm to develop effective solutions. Prerequisite: Producers Roundtable I

Pitching for Producers

1 Semester Credit

Through in-class examples, students are exposed to effective pitching styles and instructed on how to develop basic pitching skill.

Producing Documentaries and News

3 Semester Credits

This course offers producing students an introductory exposure to documentary filmmaking and news reporting. Working in small collaborative teams, students will produce a short documentary or news segment. Prerequisite: Short Film Production I
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Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment

1.5 Semester Credits

Students will learn how the television industry operates and how television programs are pitched and developed. Each student will develop and write a television pilot treatment and the basic outline of a television show bible. Prerequisite: Introduction to Screenwriting

Developing the Feature Film Treatment

1.5 Semester Credits

Through in-class instruction and critique, students will develop storytelling skills within the industry-standard format of the film treatment. In a workshop setting, each student will develop and write a detailed feature film treatment. Prerequisite: Introduction to Screenwriting

Business Affairs

1.5 Semester Credits

Students analyze and discuss legal topics such as such as contract negotiations, marketing projects to financiers and distributors, and audience and research testing. Prerequisite: Entertainment Law I

Short Film Production II

3 Semester Credits

In this course, producing students will further develop critical line producing skills. Working with filmmaking students in the NYFA Filmmaking Program, producing students will line produce a filmmaker’s Year One Film. Prerequisite: Short Film Production I

Industry Speaker Series

0.5 Semester Credit

These informative sessions feature discussions with producers and other industry professionals. Each session includes a Q&A, providing each student access to firsthand impressions of real-world circumstances faced by working industry professionals. Prerequisites: Producers Craft I and Producers Roundtable I

Developing the Feature Business Plan and TV Show Bible

2 Semester Credits

Through lectures and analysis of case studies, students will learn the critical skills to develop effective feature film business plans and television show bibles. The feature business plan or television show bible developed in this course will be presented at the Producers Pitch Fest. Prerequisites: Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment, Developing the Feature Film Treatment

Developing the Pitch

1 Semester Credit

Through rigorous in-class exercises, students will develop a brief and effective pitch of the material they choose to pitch at the Producers Pitch Fest. Each student will practice and gain critical and fundamental pitching skills. Prerequisites: Pitching for Producers, Television Producing and Developing the TV Pilot Treatment, and Developing the Feature Film Treatment
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Internship

2.5 Semester Credits

This practicum gives students hands on experience in the entertainment industry. Typical internship areas include literary and talent management, development, production, casting, post production and marketing and distribution. During this practicum, student Interns often read scores of scripts, participate in client meetings and are responsible for individualized work assignments. Students who are not able to secure an internship must complete an alternate project in order to meet this course requirement. Topics for this assignment can vary and must be approved by the Faculty Chair of the Producing Department. Prerequisite: Producers Craft II and Producers Roundtable II ATTENTION Students in F-1 visa status: Prior to starting any off-campus internship/employment, you must first obtain authorization for curricular practical training (CPT). Please visit the International Students Office for details.

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ONE-YEAR DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 39.5

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW:
The One-Year Documentary Filmmaking Program is an accelerated, hands-on, certificate program designed to immerse students in the study and profession of nonfiction filmmaking. Based on an academic year, the curriculum is divided into two semesters. During the first semester, students will learn the art and technique of visual storytelling through both in class instruction, lectures and hands-on workshops. As the year progresses, students will produce films of increasing complexity and depth. By the end of the second semester, students will have produced six documentary films, including one group project and a final thesis. While the emphasis of the program is on hands-on immersion in the art of documentary filmmaking, students will also receive instruction on writing, film studies, and the industry as a whole.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
The overall educational objective of the One-Year Documentary Filmmaking Certificate Program is to provide a structured, creative environment for students to develop and evolve as artists. Within that broad description are several specific educational objectives. Students will learn to develop, direct, shoot and edit their own film projects and be given the opportunity to further enhance their skills by acting as a crewmember on their peers’ films. Film structure and history will be examined during in class lectures. Students will be assigned six film projects, which they will be expected to deliver on deadline.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
While students do not need any documentary filmmaking experience to attend this program, it is strongly recommended that they come to the first day of class with at least one idea for a nonfiction observational project. These ideas will serve as a starting point for subsequent work in the program. If students do not have a story idea, they will be assisted by the instructor to formulate one. Students should be ready, willing, and able to work hard and learn within a fast-paced and focused environment. Skills learned as a result of successful completion of the program include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment • An in-depth knowledge of Digital Video cameras and sound equipment • Documentary craft and production • The ability to write and pre-visualize a documentary project • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions • Mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software • Knowledge of documentary film history and film studies • Knowledge of aesthetic film theory and experience with practical application of the same
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The One-Year Documentary Filmmaking Program requires successful completion of 36 Semester Credit Units and the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirement: Project 1: Observation Film Each student produces a visual portrait of a person, place, or activity. Students are challenged to observe the subject closely, and find the most effective shots for revealing the subject to an audience. Use of camera angle, shot-size, focal length, and editing patterns are emphasized. Each student directs, shoots, and edits a film of up to 2 minutes. Project 2: New Media Each student creates personal cyber-films for distribution on the Internet. Students are challenged to utilize the intimate dimensions of the player window to their advantage and attract the interest of the web-surfing audience. Each student directs, shoots, and edits three vlogs, each of up to 60 seconds. Project 3: Character Film Each student is challenged to reveal an extraordinary or extremely ordinary person using image and sound to build a portrait. Students are challenged to record life as it happens rather than staging scenes or interviewing the subject. Each student directs, shoots, and edits a film of up to 8 minutes. Project 4: Investigative Film This project should be on a social issue or topic. Students will research their subject matter extensively before beginning. They must use both interviews and narration as building blocks for this project. Students may provide a fresh perspective on a political issue or document a local story that has larger implications. Each student writes, shoots, directs, and edits a film of up to 10 minutes. Project 5: Reality Program Working in teams, students will produce a seed or pitch an episode for an original reality program. Using documentary techniques learned throughout the first semester students will be challenged to structure a show that obeys classical story conventions. Team projects may be up to 15 minutes in length. Project 6: Thesis Film, Independent Documentary The culmination of the one-year documentary program is a thesis film of the student’s own choosing. Through extensive research, writing, and planning, each student produces a thesis film of up to 30 minutes in length. Students must successfully complete every course of study with a “Satisfactory” grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to The New York Film Academy.
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TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total Tuition:
* Additional Equipment

$14,000 + $ 2000 * $14,000 + $ 2000 * $32,000

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE:
SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Documentary Craft I Film Dynamics Intro to Entertainment Law & New Media Documentary Production Workshop Cinema Studies I Camera and Lighting I Introduction to Editing Writing for the Documentary I Sound I TOTAL All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Numbers Related Units History Units Units Units DOCU100 DOCU110 DOCU120 DOCU130 DOCU140 DOCU150 DOCU160 DOCU170 DOCU180 4 2 1.5 1 0 2 1.5 2 1 15 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 1.5 1 3 2 1.5 2 1 18

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Documentary Craft II New Media II Entertainment Law II Writing for the Documentary II Documentary Producing Cinema Studies II Advanced Editing Camera and Lighting II Sound II Final Documentary Film Project TOTAL

All courses are mandatory Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Course Units Numbers Related Units History Units Units DOCU105 DOCU115 DOCU116 DOCU175 DOCU125 DOCU145 DOCU145 DOCU155 DOCU156 DOCU165 3 1.5 3 1 1 0 2 2 1 4 18.5 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1.5 3 1 1 3 2 2 1 4 21.5

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Documentary Craft I
4 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to the craft of documentary filmmaking, establishing a foundation for all future projects. Through lectures and screenings, the instructor will highlight a specific documentary topic for students to analyze and discuss. Topics include observational film, character-driven documentary and social issues/investigative film (three assignments) Cinema Verite”, propaganda, reenactments, ethical considerations of working with documentary subjects, investigative techniques, journalistic objectivity, chronology and “real time,” as well as the point of view of the filmmaker, and directorial manipulation of documentary subjects. A vlog (at least three episodes) as an introduction to the New Media is an additional assignment. The course guides step-by-step through the process of making the short documentaries: Developing story ideas, how and where to research, how to write a logline, synopsis and treatment, and how to shoot a documentary. Prerequisite: None

Film Dynamics

2 Semester Credits

This course is designed to further students’ knowledge of the intricacies of feature-length documentary filmmaking by surveying the language and grammar of film, including the shot, sequences, mise-en-scène, continuity, axis, camera angles, composition and montage. Even in the most observational, objective style documentaries, the filmmaker chooses where to point the camera, and which shots to use in the edited film. The choices the director makes ultimately determine whether or not it is a coherent story. This course will teach students how to make the correct choices through the mastering of visual storytelling techniques and understanding the forces behind successful films. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Entertainment Law & New Media

1.5 Semester Credits

Documentary, once thought of as dull textbook-style filmmaking, is the most vital and exciting form of filmmaking today. As the popularity of the form has grown, so have the complexities of the business overall. This course is a comprehensive look at the business aspects of documentary filmmaking. The producer of the documentary often has the primary creative voice of the project. In this sense, students are the producers of all of the work they complete in the program. Subjects covered include financing projects, writing proposals, contracts, budgets, film festivals, rights and distribution. Since it is essential for producers and filmmakers to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new media outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis, there will be a part of this course dedicated to introduce New Media. Prerequisite: None

Documentary Production Workshop

1 Semester Credit

Workshop sessions are group experiences focusing a certain topic. Students will go out and mutually shoot. Workshop I is an observational experience with a 16 mm film
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camera. Students will shoot a “behind the scenes” on the lot. Workshop 2 focuses on interviews and the third one will serve the actual needs and desire of the students. Workshops are student-driven classes in which student work is evaluated and critiqued. Workshops give students the opportunity to experiment and explore the medium within a learn-by-doing environment. Prerequisite: None

Cinema Studies I

3 Semester Credits

The Cinema Studies course introduces students to the critical concepts in documentary filmmaking through lectures, screenings, group discussions and guest speakers. It also provides an overview of film history. Each session will give students the chance to consider a documentary film or a documentary filmmaker with historical significance within the genre. Documentaries with groundbreaking style and/or structure will be a priority. Prerequisite: None

Camera and Lighting I

2 Semester Credits

Digital camera and lighting class sessions are designed to help students master the many elements of digital video photography, including white balance, shutter speed, focus, video latitude, gels, and filters. Through hands-on exercises, students will explore the possibilities of digital video. Other subjects include apertures, frame rates, and scene menus. Lighting classes help students maximize the use of available and natural light, as well as traditional studio lighting, for interviews and controlled situations. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Editing

1.5 Semester Credit

Documentary films, or films with nonfiction content, often find their true form in the editing room. This makes the editing process extremely important because a story may take a different shape after the footage is reviewed. This class, in edition to teaching students the fundamentals of editing with Final Cut Pro, will also teach students how to deal with the particular challenges of documentary editing. Some class hours will be devoted to guiding students through the process of editing their own films. Prerequisite: None

Writing for the Documentary

2 Semester Credits

This course will cover the role of writing, as a storytelling and planning tool, in a documentary film. Not only narratives, but also documentaries, tell stories. Students will master the basic story elements of a documentary and be introduced to characters, conflicts, story development, dramatic arc and three-act storytelling. The course will introduce different storytelling: with words (commentary, narration) and without words (character voice, scenes, situations.) It will define loglines, exposes, treatments and how to write them, as well as defining a documentary shooting script. Prerequisite: None

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Sound I

1 Semester Credit

This course will demonstrate the basic and most common devices for digital recording. And it will provide training in using this equipment and in the importance of acquiring usable location sound for a smooth transition into post-production. The course will also define a sound effect, an ambient sound, and how to record dialogue & interview versus recording narration. And it will raise the questions: What do I have to record while shooting? What do I have to add for a successful mix? Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Documentary Craft II
3 Semester Credits

The foundation of the Documentary Filmmaking Program continues. Through lectures and screenings, students will understand the use and appearance of different genres and styles of documentaries. From event-centered film, progressive film, travelogue, biography and the film essay to mockumentary or rockumentary. Foreign films are included. Highlights of this course are guest speakers and screenings, with the director or producer/director followed by Q&A.
Prerequisite: Documentary Craft

New Media II

1 Semester Credit

It is essential for producers to keep abreast of evolutions in new media technology and the many new media outlets for distribution that continually emerge on an increasingly rapid basis. The objective of this course is for students to develop an introductory sense of the filmmaking challenges and opportunities presented by new digital/viral media, including podcasting, marketing films, and producing for the web/handhelds. Through readings, discussions, and hands-on production, students will develop critical and pragmatic insights into critiquing and designing new media experiences. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking/New Media

Entertainment Law II

3 Semester Credits

During this course, students will be enabled to meet the challenges of producing and realizing profit from motion pictures and television programs with the legal and businessoriented approach necessary for any successful documentary filmmaker. This course is designed to help students become more generally skilled in responding effectively to issues and problems that are likely to arise in the course of their functioning as filmmakers, with emphasis on legal issues and business practices of immediate concern to documentary filmmakers. Subjects included: Copyright, plagiarism, contracts, location agreements, release forms and many more. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking/ New Media

Writing for the Documentary II

1 Semester Credit

This course goes deeper into the process of writing a documentary film. From research to shooting to editing, the subject matter continues to reveal itself and evolve over time.
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However, the director is still responsible for delivering a narrative, finding the arc, and (in some cases) constructing the story from true events and/or “characters.” This means documentary filmmakers must go into a project as prepared as possible and with a strong sense of the story they want to tell. Writing narration and voice-over is a topic covered extensively, as well as the use of titles, story boarding, outlines, reenactments, reconstruction, and docu-drama. Prerequisite: Writing For The Documentary I

Documentary Producing

1 Semester Credit

This course will name the duties and responsibility of the director and the producer — in the field of documentary filmmaking, the writer/director is often the producer as well. The producer makes the project happen by ironing out the specifics: scouting, breakdowns, budgets, permits, schedules, and legal issues. This course examines the job of producer by matching tasks and challenges with strategies to approach them. As students start to produce their own projects, the challenges will become clear and some class time will be devoted to specific production “hurdles.” Students will hone group problem-solving skills (a film industry must-have) and learn through sharing real examples. All students will be required to turn in a detailed project description followed by a full budget. Prerequisite: The Business of Documentary Filmmaking/New Media and Documentary Craft

Cinema Studies II

3 Semester Credits

In continuation of Cinema Studies from the first semester, students use this class to discuss documentary filmmaking technique with in-class screenings of classic and groundbreaking documentary film and television. The course also highlights filmmakers with extraordinary achievements. The focus is on award-winning documentaries and hybrids between documentaries and narrative filmmaking. Prerequisite: Cinema Studies I

Advanced Editing

2 Semester Credits

In this course, students will learn advanced editing techniques used in documentary films. Through the exploration of Final Cut Pro, students will learn its many possibilities as a tool for transforming raw material for a broad audience. The goal is for students to master the program and process so that they have a wealth of tools by which to express themselves creatively in their own evolving documentary projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Editing

Camera and Lighting II

2 Semester Credits

Students will be introduced to HD cameras and hybrid cameras (still & video). Throughout several workshops, they will focus on working with existing light, setting light for interviews, and shooting with green screens. Framing and composition will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: Camera and Lighting I

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Sound II

1 Semester Credit

This is the advanced class for sound recording. Documentary filmmakers are often working in difficult and uncontrollable environments. Students will be introduced to challenges that might run encounter and will learn about different microphones, recording techniques and playback, with a focus on how to record sync sound with external recorders. The theory of sound and soundtracks will be presented with samples. Prerequisite: Sound I

Final Documentary Film Project

4 Semester Credits

The culmination of the one-year documentary program is a thesis film of the student’s own choosing. Through extensive research, writing, and planning, each student produces a thesis film of up to 30 minutes in length. During the 5-part Thesis Development Workshop, two instructors will work with the students to broaden their perspective. Each student will create a written logline, synopsis and treatment, followed by a budget and schedule. A committee of at least three NYFA instructors will oversee the thesis project. During shooting and postproduction, instructors are available for consultation. Prerequisite: The five previous documentary film and production workshops.

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ONE-YEAR DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Total Credit Units: 30

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy (NYFA) One-Year Digital Photography Certificate Program is a two semester (16-weeks per semester) conservatory-based, full-time study nondegree program. The curriculum is designed to immerse prospective Digital Photographers in all aspects of the discipline. The One-Year Digital Photography Certificate Program provides a practical and creative setting with which to challenge, inspire, and nourish the talents of its student body. Students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning goals. Based on photography workshops designed to challenge the individual photographer beyond their status quo, the program concentrates on the composition, narrative thrust and aesthetic impact of each frame. The strength of the NYFA One-Year Digital Photography Certificate Program is in its combination of photographic studies, fine art photography, documentary photography, photojournalism, and the hands-on direct application of each.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The educational objectives of the One-Year Digital Photography Certificate Program are to teach students the art and craft of professional Digital Photography and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of digital photography. Students receive a comprehensive look at the art of Digital Photography through courses in the history and theory of photography, fine art photography, documentary photography, and photojournalism. Students will also be assigned several photographic projects. These projects will be subject to critique by instructors and by peers during in-class workshops.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will be introduced to the tools and skills necessary for researching, composing, and capturing Digital Photographic Projects. Students are encouraged to be creative but are also taught to think of each project as a concise statement of artistic, documentary, and/or journalistic intent. Clarity can be as important as creativity. Learning Goals: 1. The ability to work independently in a high-pressure, creative environment. 2. An in-depth knowledge of digital SLR cameras, lighting, and printing. 3. Research a documentary subject or news story and visualize it through photography. 4. Ability to correctly expose and meter 35mm negative film. 5. Mastery of Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite.
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6. Knowledge of the history of photography. 7. Knowledge of aesthetic theory of photography and experience with practical application of the same. Production Goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. Completion of Fine Arts Photography Projects I and II. Completion of Photojournalism Projects I and II. Studio Practice Production Workshops. Written Research Projects I and II (History and Theory of Photography).

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Satisfactory completion of 30 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s One-Year Digital Photography Program. The New York Film Academy One-Year Digital Photography Program is an accelerated full-time study program and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized program, and there are no majors or minors. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours, lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION AND COSTS:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: 3rd Semester: 4th Semester: Total Tuition (4 Semesters): OTHER COSTS:
Students are encouraged to purchase their own Digital SLR camera and lens(es), which they can continue to use after they receive their degree. However, the New York Film Academy does provide access to school-owned DSLR cameras and lenses, as well as other related equipment, to all NYFA photography students. If students wish to use other cameras or lenses not supplied in the DSLR package provided by the school, the cost for any additional rental/purchase is not included in tuition.

$16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $16,000 + $ 2000 * $72,000

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE
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SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Studio Practice I History and Theory of Photography I Fine Art Photography I Documentary Photography and Photojournalism I TOTAL

All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Numbers Related Units History Units Units Units DIGI100 DIGI110 DIGI120 DIGI130 6

0
3

0
3 3 12

0 0
3

0 0 0 0
0

6 3 3 3 15

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Studio Practice I History and Theory of Photography I Fine Art Photography II Documentary Photography and Photojournalism II TOTAL

All courses are mandatory Course Studio or Art/Design Elective Total Credit Numbers Related Units History Units Units Units DIGI105 DIGI115 DIGI125 DIGI135 6

0
3

0
3 3 12

0 0
3

0 0 0 0
0

6 3 3 3 15

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Studio Practice I
6 Semester Credits

An introduction to digital cameras, lights, and digital printing technology. Subjects include aperture, shutter speed, focal length, contrast, diffusion, filters, and photo imaging and printing using Adobe Photoshop. Through a series of lectures, seminars, and studio workshops, basic principles of photography are covered, including the use of f-stops, depth-of-field, and three-point lighting. Beginning with a technical and applied exploration of black-and-white image-making, followed by the introduction of aesthetic tools made available through use of color, students will learn to both expand and control the expressive quality of their photographic prints. Prerequisite: none

History and Theory of Photography I

A survey of the development of photography from its 19th Century origins to the mid 20th Century. This history includes technological, artistic, social, and journalistic fields of the medium. Prerequisite: none
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3 Semester Credits

Fine Art Photography I

3 Semester Credits

An exploration of photography as a creative art form, this course examines the techniques and methodology of master practitioners including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Man Ray, Ansel Adams, Sally Mann, and Robert Mapplethorpe, among others, as touchstones for students' own work. Students create and present work for critique on a weekly basis throughout the semester. The work will be evaluated based on application of concepts covered in class, such as composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: none

Documentary Photography & Photojournalism I

3 Semester Credits

The seminal work of photographers such as Walker Evans, Berenice Abbott, Brassai, Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Capa, Margaret Bourke-White, and Roman Vishniac, among others, will inform students’ own work as journalism and social commentary. Subjects include journalism ethics and standards, as well as first amendment rights and legal issues pertaining to both photojournalism and documentary photography. Students will create and present black-and-white and color work for critique on a weekly basis throughout the semester. Prerequisite: none

SEMESTER TWO Studio Practice II
6 Semester Credits

This course covers intermediate and advanced use of digital cameras, lights, digital printing and technology. Subjects include full spectrum photography (including infrared and ultraviolet), composite imaging, and advanced editing and printing using Photoshop. Through a combination of lectures and studio workshops, this course will explore the many creative advantages to digital processing, augmentation, color correction, photographic effects, and photo finishing. Prerequisite: Studio Practice I

History and Theory of Photography II

3 Semester Credits

Continued study of the development of photography in relation to technology, art, and popular culture. This course will look at the impact of photography since the mid-20th Century as a socio-political form, as well as its use in the field of journalism. Prerequisite: History and Theory of Photography I

Fine Art Photography II

3 Semester Credits

This course is continues the exploration of photography as a creative art form. Advanced lighting and digital processing techniques are applied to students' weekly work. Each student creates an art photography portfolio for exhibition at the end of the first year. Students’ work will be evaluated in part on their application concepts taught in class including photographic composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: Fine Art Photography I
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Documentary Photography & Photojournalism II

3 Semester Credits

Research, investigation, and storytelling methodologies are taught and employed by students as they pursue news stories and documentary subjects. New Media applications of non-fiction photography are examined as students post their work to a class website. Students’ work will be evaluated in part on their application concepts taught in class including photographic composition, camera placement, subject placement, traditional and non-traditional framing. Prerequisite: Documentary & Photojournalism I

Final Portfolio and Website
Before graduation, students are required to create and present a bound portfolio and online website of their work. These portfolios must display competency in Photojournalism, Fine Art Photography and use of Adobe Creative Suite.

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ONE-YEAR CINEMATOGRAPHY
Total Credit Units: 46

DEGREE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy (NYFA) One-Year Cinematography Certificate Program is a two semester conservatory-based, full-time non-degree program. The curriculum is designed to immerse prospective Cinematographers in all aspects of the discipline. The One-Year Cinematography Certificate Program provides a creative setting with which to challenge, inspire, and develop the talents of aspiring Cinematographers. Students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning goals. This regimen presupposes no prior knowledge of Cinematography, but aims to have students confident in the fundamentals of exposure, composition, set-etiquette and lighting by the end of the year. Throughout the program, a combination of classroom experience, practical hands-on workshops, individual and collaborative projects, and instructor-led productions provide a rigorous forum for students to develop their technical skills and artistic identities. In the spirit of fostering collaboration, there will be a screening hosted each semester to showcase the cinematographer’s work to NYFA Directing and Producing students. In the first semester students will develop their lighting and cinematography skills for a number of formats including 35mm still photo, 16mm black and white and color film, and high definition video. Directing and Cinema History classes provide further insight into the craft of storytelling. Students will also photograph three individual projects, collaborate on a music video, and have the option to shoot a filmmaker’s semester one film. These projects will allow students to practice their skills in the field as well as develop essential collaborative skills with the filmmakers. Semester two builds in complexity, introducing 35mm and the Red One camera system, soundstage lighting techniques, as well as more advanced lighting and grip instruments. Instructor-led productions mentor students on these new systems in the field stressing professionalism and industry-standard set operations. All the while, students prepare to embark on more ambitious individual films and additional collaborations with the film students. At the end of the second semester, each student will have photographed three individual films using Red, 16mm and 35 mm film for their showcase reel. Collaboration with a filmmaking student on a thesis project provides an opportunity for the student to put their skills into practice on a complex narrative film. Students will follow a rigorous program of classroom study, self-directed projects, instructor-led Production Workshops and school-facilitated collaboration with NYFA colleagues. Upon graduation, students will be proficient with many of the state of the art camera systems and able to confidently supervise the creation of sophisticated lighting schemes. Most importantly, they will be able to effectively harness the visual tools of cinema to tell meaningful stories.

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SEMESTER ONE:
During the first semester students learn the fundamentals of the art and craft of Cinematography. Topics covered will include optics, incident and spot light metering techniques, exposure loading and utilizing 16mm and HD video cameras, basic lighting, fundamentals of composition, color theory and film chemistry, and dolly movement. Cinematography students will be expected to complete four projects during their first semester. The first will be a story told with stills photographed on 35mm black & white film. The second project will be a ‘Mise-en-scène’ photographed on 16mm film with basic on set lighting. In the third project, the ‘Continuity Film’, students will shoot with the 16mm Arriflex SR camera, and will utilize more sophisticated grip and light-shaping techniques. This project will focus on shot design and creating a scene which can “cut together” elegantly. Collaboration with directors and musicians plays a major role in the fourth project, filmed in High Definition. By filming a music video in HD, students are introduced to the unique director-cinematographer relationship in the real world context of in-the-field film production. For their final project of the semester, Cinematography students have the option of shepherding their own sync-sound film, or to collaborate with another New York Film Academy student on their Semester One film. This project will be their first introduction to sync-sound dialogue-based projects as well as longer narrative form (up to ten minutes). When working in conjunction with Directing students, One Year Cinematography students must act as either a Director of Photography on one Filmmaking Semester One Project or as a Camera Operator.

SEMESTER ONE OBJECTIVES:
Learning Goals: 1. The ability to design and execute images specific to narrative media productions. 2. The capacity to choose the proper film stock and the proper development techniques to achieve the desired quality. 3. A working knowledge of optics and depth of field. 4. Accurate exposure of both film and video using the incident meter, spot meter, histogram and waveform monitor. 5. Experience in preproduction planning – including shotlisting, creation of overhead diagrams, scheduling and storyboarding. 6. Skill in the important roles of Camera Assistant, Gaffer and Key Grip. 7. Familiarity with fresnel and open faced based lighting technology. 8. A working knowledge of the Arriflex S, Arriflex SR, HD cameras. Production Goals: 1. Photograph two short films on 16mm, a still photo project, and a music video on Hi Definition video. 2. Crew on eight of your colleagues films as Gaffer, Camera Assistant, Key Grip or Operator. 3. Photograph or operate camera on a NYFA semester one film.
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SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES:
The second semester in the Cinematography program is designed to help students move beyond simply “capturing an image” and instead begin “painting with light.” As students’ ability increases so does their tool set. Students learn how to build and operate a professional 35mm camera package as well as advanced High Definition equipment. Students will be assured the chance to both photograph their own projects with a 35 mm camera system, and also be given the extraordinary opportunity to work with 35mm camera package on the Universal Studios backlot. The RED Camera System provides another core platform around which the second semester is centered. Students will have multiple opportunities during class time to master the extraordinary tools the RED Camera offers filmmakers, including speedramping, 100 fps slow motion, and the 4k production workflow. Sophisticated High Definition cameras will round out the tools available to Cinematography students for digital image capture. Proper operation of wave form monitors, histograms and IRE/ISO calculations will be covered in depth in a practical hands-on classroom environment. These three camera systems, 35mm film, Red One and High Definition are the camera systems available for the three individual projects in this semester. While each project must be initiated and photographed by the Cinematography student, they may be directed by another student from the Film program. Form and content are determined by the Cinematography student. Examples of format include commercials, music videos or short narrative. Ideally these three projects will contribute to an impressive show reel for the emerging graduate. In addition to the above classes, students are introduced to new classes including lighting and cinematography in a sound stage environment, working with steadicam and a series of on-location “production workshops”. These classes allow students to work on their preproduction planning skills and their set operating procedures under the supervision of an experienced professional. At the end the year, New York Film Academy Cinematography students are required to either photograph the thesis film of a fellow NYFA student or to create their own selfdirected short film of up to 15 minutes in length and on any format with which the student worked during the academic year.

SEMESTER TWO OBJECTIVES
Learning Goals: 1. The ability to constructively collaborate with a director and a crew in a highpressure creative environment. 2. Further knowledge of image creation incorporating additional elements of visual style specific to the narrative script. 3. The creative capacity to previsualize a cinematographic style and the technical ability to execute it consistently over the course of several days of production. 4. A working knowledge of the Panaflex 35mm, the RED Camera System, and High Definition camera systems.
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5. An understanding of lighting techniques for day exterior, day interior and night interior scenes. 6. Knowledge of the postproduction workflow for film, HD video and 4k R3D files, including telecine and color correction. Production Goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. Photograph a showcase film utilizing either 35mm or Super 16mm film. Photograph a RED camera showcase film. Photograph a 35mm showcase film. Photograph a one-year thesis film or create an individual film of equivalent complexity.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to graduate, students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. Students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must successfully complete and submit all thesis requirements in a timely manner. Satisfactory completion of 46 Semester Credits is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy One Year in Cinematography Degree Certificate Program. All 46 Semester credits must be undertaken at the New York Film Academy as scheduled. The New York Film Academy One-Year Cinematography Certificate Program is an accelerated full-time study program and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized program, and there are no majors or minors. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours, lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Semester One: Semester Two: Total Tuition (2 Semesters): $16,000 + $2000 * $16,000 + $2000 * $36,000

OTHER COSTS (FILM, PROCESSING, & PRODUCTION EXPENSES):
Year One: Total Other Costs: Total Cost of Program: $3,000 - $15,000* $3,000 - $15,000* $39,000 - $51,000*

*$15,000 for Other Costs is a high estimate, which accounts for potential expenses accrued by students who choose to film an individual project on 35mm. As a norm, students will not spend nearly this much money on their projects. This value was included in order to disclose an estimate for an exorbitantly expensive individual film. While we do not limit the artistic visions of students, the Academy does encourage students to concentrate on solid storytelling rather than exorbitant spending in the design of their films. While the vast majority of individual films will cost far less than $15,000, the potential for artistic NYFA Universal Studios 286

expression in filmmaking is endless, and it is technically possible for students to spend $15,000 or even more of their projects.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE
Studio or Related Area Units (Including Studio Electives) 40 Art/ Design History Units 6 Total Number of Units 46

SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function I Hands-On Camera Fundamentals of Lighting Post-Production for Cinematographers History of Cinematography I Cinematography Practicum Directing for Cinematographers Semester One Cinematography Projects Semester One Project /Filmmaker Collaboration TOTAL Course Numbers CINE100 CINE110 CINE120 CINE130 CINE140 CINE150 CINE160 CINE170 CINE180 Studio or Related Units 2 2 4 2 0 3 2 3 1 19 Art/Design Elective History Units Units 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 2 4 2 3 3 2 3 1 22

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Cinematography, Form and Function II 35mm Cinematography Stage Lighting Workshop Cinematography Practicum II Post-Production for Cinematographers II Advanced Lighting History of Cinematography II Steadicam/Camera Assistant Seminar Hands On Camera II Semester Two Cinematography Projects Semester Two Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaboration or Self Produced Film TOTAL NYFA Universal Studios Course Numbers CINE105 CINE135 CINE115 CINE155 CINE165 CINE125 CINE145 CINE195 CINE198 CINE175 CINE185 Studio or Related Units 2 1 1 3 2 3 0 1 1 4 4 Art/Design Elective History Units Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 1 1 3 2 3 3 1 4 4

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Cinematography: Form and Function I
2 Semester Credits

An exploration of both the technical and artistic elements of film and digital motion picture cinematography. Students will examine paintings and photographs as they relate to form and content, study the work of professional cinematographers and evaluate their work in a workshop environment. Cinematography Form and Function One also serves as a “homeroom” environment providing a forum where students can discuss their experiences on set, plan upcoming shoots, and bring in outside material they find relevant to their studies. This is the place where individual and group projects will also be prepared, screened and critiqued.

Hands-On Camera

2 Semester Credits

In this class, students will learn best-practices for building and utilizing the cameras used in the NYFA cinematography curriculum, including the Arri-S, Arri-SR and HVX-200 cameras. Classes will also cover methods for pulling focus, processing theory and keeping camera reports.

Fundamentals of Lighting

4 Semester Credits

Looking beyond the technical aspects of the art form, students learn how to light for mood and genre. They will learn how to apply learned technical knowledge towards their aesthetic decisions in lighting. High key and low key light, bright and dark scenes, indoor day and night, outdoor day and night, will all be explored from both a subjective and practical approach. Depth of Field, Color Temperature, Focal Length, deep and flat space and more will be demonstrated in this class to provide students the tools they need to create the look and feel required to tell the story.

Post-Production for Cinematographers I

2 Semester Credits

The job of a contemporary cinematographer is no longer complete after the words ‘That’s a Wrap!’ are uttered. A familiarity with editing, post-production workflow and color correction is now essential to maintaining integrity of the creative vision from the production to the final release. This class will teach cinematographers the basics of Final Cut Pro editing, color correction, effects image effects and proper methods for handling digital media.

History of Cinematography I

3 Semester Credits

A look at the development of the art of cinematography, with an eye toward the progression of the cinematographic form from early still photography to modern day digital media. Students will screen classic films and discuss which techniques of storytelling have changed as technology has evolved, and which have stayed the same. By learning the history of the art form, students will be able to supplement the topics learned in other classes as well as draw inspiration for their own films.
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Cinematography Practicum

3 Semester Credits

This is the class where students will be able to take all of the camera, lighting, and storytelling techniques they have been learning and “field test” them. Under direct faculty supervision, students will be given the opportunity to shoot and edit several commercial, music videos and short narrative projects. These practice scenes are fully pre-produced (storyboarded, cast, scouted, and shotlisted) and treated as actual productions. Classmates will rotate through crew-positions each shoot, giving students a chance to work as Gaffer, Camera Assistant and Key Grip in a real-world situation.

Directing for Cinematographers

2 Semester Credits

Through lectures, discussions, in-class exercises, outside readings, and film viewings, students will learn the basic elements of format, premise, structure and plot found in contemporary screenplays. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting screenplays from a Director of Photography’s perspective, in order to communicate narrative, character, theme, and tone through the tools of lighting, blocking, image choices and camera technique.

Semester One Cinematography Projects

3 Semester Credits

Students develop and photograph four individual projects during Semester One:, Still Photo, Mise- En- Scene, Continuity, and Music Film. These projects allow students to develop their own visual sensibility, and will generate essential material for their portfolio reels. Students will employ the technical tools of Cinematography and develop the organizational skills and creative vocabulary to realize their vision. Additionally they will be expected to crew on and support their colleague’s projects throughout the semester.

Semester One Project /Filmmaker Collaborations

1 Semester Credit

Collaboration is key to the successful cinematographer. In this larger scale project, cinematography students act as either the Director of Photography or Camera Operator for a filmmaker’s semester one project. Moving beyond the classroom experience, and the knowledge gained from completing self-directed projects, students collaborate directly with a directing student in the field. The experience will help prepare them to express themselves in “real world” sets for directors and producers as well as further collaborations in semester two. The student has an alternate option of creating and shepherding their own Sync-Sound project.

SEMESTER TWO Cinematography: Form and Function II
2 Semester Credits

Continuing to function as a ‘home-room’ for the cinematography students, this course remains the forum for students to prepare and screen their individual projects, evaluate the work of professional cinematographers, and examine contemporary issues in the world of professional motion picture photography. Here students will learn the RED One
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and the HPX-500 camera systems before they have the opportunity to use them in the Advanced Practicum.

Hands-On Camera II

1 Semester Credit

Here students will learn the 35 mm, Red one and the HPX-500 camera systems before they have the opportunity to use them in the Advanced Practicum and their individual projects.

35mm Cinematography

1 Semester Credit

Students are trained in the proper use and operation of 35mm cameras and accessories, applying the skills they have learned in 16mm and digital photography to the standard in professional motion picture film photography. This class will demystify the process of designing, shooting, and editing scenes on 35mm. Students will learn how the wider frame and higher resolution of 35mm affects their shot design, framing, composition, staging, camera movement, lens choice, and lighting.

Stage Lighting Workshop

1 Semester Credit

Focusing on the specific craft of set lighting, students will learn the fundamentals of designing shots and lighting for a sound stage. Under the supervision of an experienced Director of Photography, students will gain first-hand experience with designing daytime, nighttime, interior and exterior lighting schemes inside the controlled environment of a soundstage.

Cinematography Practicum II

3 Semester Credits

Combining together all the elements of the second semester program in a practical hands-on workshop, these production exercises allow students to shoot scenes with a NYFA Instructor serving as Director. The more sophisticated tools available to students during the second semester will allow even greater creative options for the team to explore. Once again, students will rotate through crew positions, allowing them to cultivate their ‘real-world’ experience with the 35mm and RED camera packages.

Post-Production for Cinematographers II

2 Semester Credits

Color grading, or correction, is a technology that has been developing over the last decade into its own discipline, combining elements of compositing techniques and traditional optical methods into a new form called Digital Intermediate. As a cinematographer, knowledge of these new color sciences and the manipulations that are possible in post-production are important skills to develop. Students will explore the world of post-production from a cinematographer’s perspective by examining post production workflows for emerging new formats such as HD and Red One as well as participating in a professional color correction session.

Advanced Lighting

3 Semester Credits

Building upon the basic skills of exposure, composition, and shot design students learned in the first semester, students expand both their skill and toolsets. Working with new
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equipment such as HMI Lights and Kino Flo fluorescent fixtures, students will learn how to create sophisticated and nuanced lighting setups.

History of Cinematography II

3 Semester Credits

In this continuation of History of Cinematography One, students focus on the masters of cinematography. Students will screen the work of the great DPs, such as Gregg Toland (Citizen Kane), Gordon Willis (The Godfather), and Roger Deakins (No Country for Old Men), and examine how these pivotal cinematographers have influenced the art form over the years. Assignments and discussions will analyze the elements of visual style employed by these masters in both classic and contemporary films.

Camera Assistant Seminar

1 Semester Credit

The critical and challenging vocation of professional Camera Assistant is about more than simply loading the camera and getting focus. Led by an experienced camera assistant this seminar exposes students to the details of the trade. Topics discussed will include: proper slating technique, film and video camera checkout, advanced focus pulling, calculating for speed ramps, proper marking etiquette, and best practices for film inventory and paperwork.

Semester Two Cinematography Projects

4 Semester Credits

Students photograph three individual projects during the semester on three formats: HD, Red, and 35mm or Super 16mm film. These projects allow students to develop their own visual sensibility as well as generate essential material for their portfolio reels. Through these projects, students will learn the technical tools of Cinematography and develop the organizational skills and creative vocabulary to realize their vision. In addition, students serve in ‘Key’ functions in the Electric, Grip, and Camera Departments of their colleagues’ films. In the roles of Gaffer, Key Grip, and 1st AC, students will learn marketable trades to take out into the professional world, and have the opportunity to see the craft of Cinematography from a variety of different vantage points. By furthering their understanding of lighting, grip, and camera, students will emerge as more complete Directors of Photography and will have provided invaluable help to their classmates in the process.

Semester Two Cinematography/Filmmaker Collaborations

4 Semester Credits

Increasing both the scope and the complexity of the filmmaker/cinematographer collaboration, students will DP a filmmaker’s thesis or year one project. Students are expected to participate in the scouting, shot planning, production and post-production of the film. Students who do not participate in this collaboration may produce a self-initiated project of equivalent complexity. This Self-Produced Project need not be directed by the student, however it must bear their creative fingerprint and be driven by their own initiative. The film may be on any format with which the student has worked throughout the year.

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ONE - YEAR GAME DESIGN
Total Credit Units: 36

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The New York Film Academy (NYFA) One Year in Game Design is a two semester (15weeks per semester) conservatory-based, full-time study certificate program. The curriculum is designed to immerse gifted and energetic prospective Game Writers and Designers in all aspects of the discipline. The New York Film Academy One Year Certificate in Game Design provides a creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body. Students follow an intensive curriculum and achieve multiple learning goals. The strength of the NYFA One Year Certificate in Game Design is in its combination of storytelling studies, game design theory, game arts education, game programming education, and the hands-on direct application of each. Based on a high concentration of intense game narrative and game design workshops designed to challenge the individual student beyond his or her status quo and into a new realm, the program is further enhanced by concentrating on the commercial realities of the medium, real world education through internships, externships, and NYFA’s collaboration with industryleading game development companies on a game designed and deployed by a team of students who work hand-in-hand with working professionals in the game industry. CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The educational objectives in the One Year Certificate in Game Design are to give students an introductory education in the art and craft of professional game writing and design, and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of game writing & design.

YEAR ONE
In Year One, students receive a comprehensive look at the art of Game Writing & Design through courses in the history and theory of game design, game writing, game art and game programming. Students are assigned multiple projects in the concentrations of game writing, game art, game programming, and game design. These projects will be subject to critique by senior instructors and by peers during in-class workshops. YEAR-ONE EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES: One Year Certificate in Game Design students at NYFA will be introduced to every facet of game design, from writing to art to development to programming. They are expected to create their own 20-30 page game design document (complete with art and game mechanics), a portfolio of their game art, and demonstrate their knowledge of game programming by passing a final exam on the subject. Students are encouraged to be creative but are also taught to think of each game design milestone as one part of a
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larger game. Students knowing their place in a collaborative game design environment is just as important as completing their individual projects. Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this program include: 9. The ability to work collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. 10. An in-depth knowledge of the theories of narrative storytelling in video games 11. An introductory knowledge of the techniques and practices of game art and animation 12. An introductory knowledge of the language and processes of game programming 13. A firm foundation in the theories, methods and execution of game development, through participation in the creation of a working video game. 14. Intermediate understanding of the Maya 3-D Art Software 15. Intermediate understanding of the C++ Programming Language 16. Knowledge of the history of video games • YEAR-ONE REQUIREMENTS: One Year Certificate in Game Design requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirement: Year 1 Game Design Document 3-D Art Portfolio 3-D Animation Portfolio Passing Grade, Programming Final Exam Participation in the development of the Year 1 Game Project Satisfactory Participation in Narrative Design Workshop Satisfactory Participation in Game Development Workshop

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Satisfactory completion of 36 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s One Year Certificate in Game Design. The New York Film Academy One Year Certificate in Game Design is an accelerated full-time study program that provides a single curriculum of study over the course of two semesters. The program may not be completed in less than two semesters. Classes are taught in either a lecture, workshop, or laboratory format.

TUITION:
1st Semester: 2nd Semester: Total Tuition: $17,000 $17,000 $34,000

ONE - YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OUTLINE
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SEMESTER ONE
Course Title
Narrative Design Workshop I Game Design Workshop I Video Game Analysis I Introduction to 3-D Art Game Producing Class Supervised Game Design Lab Course Numbers GDSN100 GDSN110 GDSN120 GDSN130 GDSN140 GDSN150

ALL COURSES MANDATORY Studio or Related Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 General Education Units 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

TOTAL

SEMESTER TWO
Course Title
Narrative Design Workshop II Game Design Workshop II Introduction to Game Programming Introduction to 3-D Animation Supervised Game Design Lab Video Game Analysis II GDSN200 GDSN210 GDSN220 GDSN230 GDSN240 GDSN250

ALL COURSES MANDATORY
Studio or Art/Design Related Units History Units General Total Credit Studies Units Elective Units

TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SEMESTER ONE Narrative Design Workshop I
3 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to the art and craft of storytelling. Starting with Aristotle’s Poetics and traveling through history to Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, students are exposed to a variety of storytelling forms and theories, from Greek Comedy and Tragedy to Postmodernism and everything in between. With this firm foundation in narrative theory, students are then introduced to the tools, theory and craft of storytelling in an interactive medium. Special attention is paid to the construction of compelling characters and believable dialogue. Finally, students are introduced to the Game Design Document, the “vision” document that guides every game’s development. Students begin work on a Game Design Document of their own, present the work in progress in class, and receive notes from the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisite: None

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Game Design Workshop I

3 Semester Credits

This course begins with an overview of “pre-tech” games such as card games, board games, and puzzle games. The instructor leads the students in supervised gameplay and aids in the analysis and deconstruction of how these games work and what makes them fun and compelling. The course then moves to “paper and dice” games such as Dungeons and Dragons. Each student is required to create their own “paper and dice” game as a way to gain better understanding of what makes these games entertaining and compelling. Finally, the class switches its focus to interactive, electronic game design, starting with an overview of game development as it works in the industry today, by way of a post-mortem of a AAA-level video game, giving students an understanding of the challenges involved in bringing a top tier video game from concept to finished project. Near the end of the semester, the students begin collaborative, in-class development of the Year One Game, which is a workable, playable game and is a core requirement of the Game Design program. Prerequisite: None

Video Game Analysis I

3 Semester Credits

As its name implies, the focus of this course is the study and deconstruction of video games. Each week focuses on one game, ranging from early titles like PONG to the biggest hit games of the past few years. The game is played in class, with the instructor leading a discussion about what works and what doesn’t work. Every game genre is deconstructed: first person shooter, role playing game, massively multiplayer online game, etc. Video game franchises like Super Mario Brothers and Grand Theft Auto are also discussed, with special attention paid to franchises that exist in multiple mediums (Chronicles of Riddick, Lara Croft, etc.) The goal of this course is to give students a core understanding of what makes interactive electronic games entertaining and compelling by forcing them to deconstruct every element of the gameplay experience. This is a twosemester course. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to 3-D Art

3 Semester Credits

This course introduces students to Autodesk’s “Maya” Animation, Visual Effects, and Compositing software, a robust application used throughout the video game industry for the creation of art assets. In this first of two courses, students learn how to optimize the Maya interface for enhanced productivity. They are introduced to polygon tools and taught polygonal modeling in a hands-on environment. Students create models and character designs using the techniques taught in this class, that can then be used in their Game Design Documents and utilized in the Year 1 Game. In addition, life drawing classes are offered to help students better understand anatomy and movement. Prerequisite: None

Game Producing Class

3 Semester Credits

This course gives students a “lay of the land” look at the modern day video game industry, and prepares them to navigate the business of video games after graduation. Even more so than Hollywood, the video game industry is a collaborative beast. No matter what your specific job is at a video game company, everyone is expected to take part in the creative development of the game. This class introduces students to the
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myriad of players who help bring a game to life: creative director, project manager, gameplay designer, writer, character designer, environment artist, tools programmer, animation artist, game engine engineer, publicity and advertising, etc. Special topics such as the film - video game connection and “how to take a successful meeting” are also covered. Prerequisite: None

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least four hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advice, critiques and assistance while they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the Year 1 Game. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

SEMESTER TWO Narrative Design Workshop II
3 Semester Credits

Picking up where the first semester left off, students continue to develop their Game Design Document, with continued in-class workshopping of the document. Focus is placed on a step-by-step approach to turning the “big idea” into a workable game concept and, eventually, a script. In addition, more advanced topics in interactive storytelling are explored, including: game properties as franchises; inside the creative process of the game writer; the writer’s role in the development team; the dynamics of story changes in game development; and the analysis and deconstruction of selected video game story lines, as a tool for students to know what makes a great video game narrative. At the end of the year, students will have a polished and “shovel ready” Game Design Document. Prerequisite: Narrative Design Workshop I

Game Design Workshop II

3 Semester Credits

Game Design Workshop II continues the collaborative development of the Year 1 Game that began during semester one, and includes frequent design reviews with senior faculty members who help guide and shepherd the development of this collaborative degree requirement. Other topics include a more in-depth look at the process of game development from the point of view of a major publisher, the difference between alpha, beta, and gold, populating a game with characters, game testing, and game flowcharts and storyboards. This semester concludes with the successful completion of the Year 1 Game. Prerequisite: Game Development Workshop I

Introduction to Game Programming

3 Semester Credits

This course is designed to give students an introduction to all the facets of programming a video game, from the software tools used across the industry, to the science and substance of the game engine itself. The focus of this class is the C++ programming language, and includes the following topics: the history and development of C++; the philosophy of object-oriented programming; the mechanics of creating a program; basic
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C++ programming. Because this is an introductory course, students should not expect to master C++ by the end of this course. They should, however, have a strong foundation in C++ upon which to build more advanced skills in the second year, should they choose to do so. This is a two-semester course. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to 3-D Animation

3 Semester Credits

Building on the Maya work from semester one, students now incorporate full motion animation into their skill set. The course begins with the art of presenting ideas in storyboard form and the study of animated movies from early Disney through Pixar to fully understand the range and applicability of animation and what makes great work. Students then unlock the full potential of Maya by learning how to keyframe and animated, create characters who walk and talk, culminating in a short animated film that demonstrates their understanding of the techniques taught in this course. Prerequisite: Introduction to 3-D Art

Video Game Analysis II

3 Semester Credits

This is the second semester of game analysis class. As with last semester, each week focuses on one game, ranging from early titles like PONG to the biggest hit games of the past few years. The game is played in class, with the instructor leading a discussion about what works and what doesn’t work. Every game genre is deconstructed: first person shooter, role playing game, massively multiplayer online game, etc. Video game franchises like Super Mario Brothers and Grand Theft Auto are also discussed, with special attention paid to franchises that exist in multiple mediums (Chronicles of Riddick, Lara Croft, etc.) The goal of this course is to give students a core understanding of what makes interactive electronic games entertaining and compelling by forcing them to deconstruct every element of the gameplay experience. This is a two-semester course. Prerequisite: Video Game Analysis I

Supervised Game Design Lab

3 Semester Credits

Every week, students have at least four hours of supervised time in the game design lab, where they have access to senior faculty members for advice, critiques and assistance while they work on their assignments for their classes. This work is oftentimes performed in teams, especially when it becomes time to design and create the Year 1 Game. This supervised lab time is mandatory for all students. Prerequisite: None

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EIGHT-WEEK FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 8.5

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop is divided into two four-week sections. The first four weeks of the workshop are divided between in-class hands-on instruction and the production of three short films by each student. Students will take classes in Directing, Hands on Camera, Writing, and Editing. Students will learn to use Arriflex 16mm cameras, Lowell lighting packages, and digital editing with Final Cut Pro. The first week students will learn the basic tools or filmmaking and begin shooting a series of film projects. Following production and post-production, students screen their work with their classmates and instructors and engage in critiques and discussion. All films in the first four weeks are non-synchronous, with the third film accompanied by a music track. During the second four weeks of the workshop the student devotes his or her time solely to the Final Film project- a film of up to ten minutes with one or two tracks of sound. Students edit their project using Final Cut Pro on Macintosh computers. Students will spend an additional twenty to forty hours a week on production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours, however they are still necessary to successfully complete the workshop. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Eight-Week Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment • An in-depth knowledge of 16mm cameras and motion picture production • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions • Sufficient mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software • Knowledge of and experience with practical application of aesthetic film theory.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Eight-Week Filmmaking Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film Project 3 - Music Film Project 4 - Checkovian Film Project 5 - Final Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 8.5 Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Eight-Week Filmmaking Workshop. The Eight-Week Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than eight weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Tuition: Equipment Rental Fee: Total Tuition: $5040 $1000 $6040

OTHER COSTS:
Film, Processing, etc: Total Cost of Workshop: $1200 $7240

Editing Writing TOTAL

WEEKS 1 - 4 Course Title

0.5 0.5 4.5 Studio or Related Units 2 1.5

0 0 All courses are mandatory 0 0 0 0 Art/Design Elective Units History Units 0 0 0 0

0.5 0.5 4.5 Total Credit Units 2 1.5 299

Directing Hands-On Camera NYFA Universal Studios

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
WEEKS 1 - 4 Directing
2 Semester Credits

The core of the Eight Week Program, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn to concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in
WEEKS 5 - 8 Course Title
Advanced Directing Advanced Hands-On Camera Advanced Editing Advanced Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 0.5 4 All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 2 0.5 1 0.5 4

0 0 0 0 0

terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing three short films.

Hands-On Camera

1.5 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Editing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

NYFA Universal Studios

300

Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea to script with an emphasis on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue.

WEEKS 5 - 8 Advanced Directing
2 Semester Credits

A continuation of Directing. Students expand upon lessons already learned with a focus on the preproduction of their Final Film projects.

Advanced Hands-On Camera

0.5 Semester Credit

Students continue their study of cinematography by learning the basics of digital video and color photography. In addition, students take a two-session Production Sound tutorial where they are introduced to equipment used in sync-sound production.

Advanced Editing

1 Semester Credit

This course prepares students for the challenges inherent in cutting a more complex narrative film with dialogue and multiple sound tracks. Finally, students will participate in a session entitled “Building the Reel.”

Advanced Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

Students in this course learn to incorporate what they’ve learned about visual storytelling with the art of crafting dialogue for a sync-sound film. Scripts for the Final Film will be written, and revised in a workshop environment.

NYFA Universal Studios

301

EIGHT-WEEK ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 6

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop will emphasize the theory and practice of the acting craft. Students will study various acting methods and techniques, and learn to apply those lessons to scene and monologue work.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • • • Experience working independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. Knowledge of and experience in the art and craft of acting for film. Exposure to multiple modern and classical approaches to performance, script interpretation and character formation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
In the Eight-Week Acting for Film workshop students must study and perform scenes that demonstrate that they have gained a working knowledge of the following skills: • • • • • Scene Study Technique Voice Movement Acting for Film

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. The Eight-Week Acting for Film Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than eight weeks.

NYFA Universal Studios

302

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

8-Week Acting for Film
Course Title Acting for Film Scene Study Acting Technique Voice Audition Technique Monologues Movement Film Craft Improvisation Shakespeare TOTAL

All courses are mandatory. Studio or Related Units 40 40 10 20 20 10 20 2.5 2.5 2.5 167.5 Total Units 1.3 1.3 .32 .80 .80 .32 .80 .08 .08 .08 6.00

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $5,250

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Acting for Film
1.3 Semester Credits

Acting for Film provides students an environment to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in Production Workshop with film students. In the Production Workshop, students experience on-set shoots in collaboration with student filmmakers. Students are introduced to a first-hand experience in set etiquette, shooting out of sequence and understanding the actor’s role in a shoot.

Scene Study

1.3 Semester Credits

Students learn to analyze scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop a grounding in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students will incorporate all of the disparate disciplines learned in all other courses in a live, filmed scene presentation at semester end. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week.

Acting Technique

0.32 Semester Credits

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from
NYFA Universal Studios 303

theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances. Exercises will be taped for in-class critique.

Voice

.80 Semester Credit

Students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension.

Audition Technique

.80 Semester Credit

Students learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop the audition and cold-reading skills necessary for landing roles in the highly competitive field of acting. Students will work in a mock audition format that will be videotaped for instructor and peer critique.

Monologues

.32 Semester Credit

Students will work on assigned and chosen monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills learned thus far. Students will understand the structure and particular elements that make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be audition ready.

Movement

.80 Semester Credit

Students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught to help the students find expression and freedom within the physical instrument.

Film Craft

.08 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will create a short-in class shoot.

Improvisation

.08 Semester Credit

In order to truly be effective actors, students must learn how to skillfully nurture their instincts and freely release their creative impulses. Through a variety of exercises designed to help cast off inhibitions, actors experiment with group dynamics and individual expression vital to vibrant and truthful performances.

Shakespeare

.08 Semester Credit

Students are exposed to a historical perspective of the writings of William Shakespeare to better understand these classic works of theatre. In order to gain a better appreciation of this master playwright, text analysis will be done using a variety of approaches including scansion, the Freeman method (using the First Folio text), soundings, and poetic and rhetorical devices. Students will perform in a live, filmed in class presentation.

NYFA Universal Studios

304

EIGHT-WEEK SCREENWRITING
Total Credit Units: 7

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This intensive course is a full-time eight-week commitment to learning the craft of screenwriting. With strict adherence to the rituals of writing and learning, students will have the opportunity to develop a feature length screenplay of 90 to 120 pages. The course is divided into two classes: The Elements of Screenwriting (lecture/seminar) and Screenwriting Workshop. Classes stress fundamental writing concepts and techniques. Topics covered during the course will include: • Classic screenplay structure • Character arcs • Heroes • Dialogue • Theme • Conflict • Flashbacks • Voiceover • WGA format • Subtext • Style and tone • Visualization • Discipline • Genre • Dramaturgy • Cinematic syntax

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Eight-Week Screenwriting Certificate Workshop are to fully immerse students in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing and meeting deadlines in addition to learning the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of concepts such as story, structure, character, conflict and dialogue.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will gain knowledge of and hands-on experience with screenwriting, the process of revision, writing dialogue, the business of screenwriting, classic screenplay structure, character arcs, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voice-over, subtext, style and tone, visualization, discipline, genre, and WGA format.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Eight-Week Screenwriting Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: • Complete a first draft of a feature length screenplay
NYFA Universal Studios 305

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 7 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Eight-Week Screenwriting Workshop. The Eight-Week Screenwriting Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study. Eight-Week Screenwriting Workshop does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All classes are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. Classes are Lecture, Seminar, and/or Studio based. As is customary in visual arts studies, Lab and Practicum instructional hours are treated as studio hours. The workshop may not be completed in less than eight weeks.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $3,150

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

8-Week Screenwriting
Course Title
Elements of Screenwriting Screenwriting Workshop TOTAL Studio or Related Units 4 3 7

All courses are mandatory. Art Design History Units 0 0 0

Elective Units 0 0 0

Total Credit Units 4 3 7

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Elements of Screenwriting
4 Semester Credits

Utilizing lectures, in-class exercises, outside readings, classroom discussions, and film viewings, this course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting. Screenplay formatting will be a major focus, and students will learn how to write scene description, to describe characters and locations, and to develop action sequences. Topics will also include: Classic screenplay structure, the Elements of the Scene, Developing the Character, Character Arcs, Antagonists, Dialogue, Writing the Visual Image, Introduction to Final Draft, Theme, Conflict, Flashbacks, Fantasy Sequences and Dream Sequences, Voiceover, Text and Subtext, Developing Your Writing Style, Tone and Genre, Visualization, Revealing Exposition, Creating a Compelling Second Act, Climaxes and Resolutions, and Scene Beats.

NYFA Universal Studios

306

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay

3 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay is a fast-paced, intensive workshop that introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting. The classes consist of in-class writing exercises, individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. Students will apply knowledge gained from Elements of Screenwriting and apply it to the creation of their own feature-length scripts. By the end of the course, students will develop and write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay.

NYFA Universal Studios

307

SIX-WEEK FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 7.5

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop is divided into two periods. The first period of the workshop is divided between in-class hands-on instruction and the production of three short films by each student. Students will take classes in Directing, Hands on Camera, Writing, and Editing. Students will learn to use Arriflex 16mm cameras, Lowell lighting packages, and digital editing with Final Cut Pro. The first week students will learn the basic tools or filmmaking and begin shooting a series of film projects. Following production and post-production, students screen their work with their classmates and instructors and engage in critiques and discussion. All films in the first four weeks are non-synchronous, with the third film accompanied by a music track. During the second period of the workshop the student devotes his or her time solely to the Final Film project- a film of up to ten minutes with one or two tracks of sound. Students edit their project using Final Cut Pro on Macintosh computers. Students will spend an additional twenty to forty hours a week on production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours, however they are still necessary to successfully complete the workshop. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Six-Week Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. • An in-depth knowledge of 16mm cameras and motion picture production. • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay. • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions. • Sufficient mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software. • Knowledge of and experience with practical application of aesthetic film theory.

NYFA Universal Studios

308

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Six-Week Filmmaking Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film Project 3 - Music Film Project 4 - Final Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 7.5 Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Six-Week Filmmaking Workshop. The Six-Week Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than six weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: Equipment Fee: Total Cost: $3,950 $750 $4,700

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

WEEKS 1-4 Course Title
Directing Hands-On Camera Editing Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

0 0 0 0 0

NYFA Universal Studios

309

WEEKS 5-6 Course Title
Advanced Directing Advanced Hands-On Camera Advanced Editing Advanced Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 1 0.5 1 0.5 3

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units

0 0 0 0 0

1 0.5 1 0.5 3

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
WEEKS 1 - 4 Directing
2 Semester Credits

The core of the Six Week Program, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn to concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing three short films.

Hands-On Camera

1.5 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non-sync motion picture cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Editing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software, which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

NYFA Universal Studios

310

Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea to script with an emphasis on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue.

WEEKS 5 - 6 Advanced Directing
1 Semester Credit

A continuation of Directing. Students expand upon lessons already learned with a focus on the preproduction of their Final Film projects.

Advanced Hands-On Camera

0.5 Semester Credit

Students continue their study of cinematography by learning the basics of digital video and color photography. In addition, students take a two-session Production Sound tutorial where they are introduced to equipment used in sync-sound production.

Advanced Editing

1 Semester Credit

This course prepares students for the challenges inherent in cutting a more complex narrative film with dialogue and multiple sound tracks.

Advanced Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

Students in this course learn to incorporate what they’ve learned about visual storytelling with the art of crafting dialogue for a sync-sound film. Scripts for the Final Film will be written, and revised in a workshop environment.

NYFA Universal Studios

311

FOUR-WEEK FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 4.5

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop is structured around the production of three short films. Students will take classes in Directing, Hands on Camera, Writing, and Editing. Students will learn to use Arriflex 16mm cameras, Lowell lighting packages, and digital editing with Final Cut Pro. The first week students will learn the basic tools or filmmaking and begin shooting a series of film projects. Following production and post-production, students screen their work with their classmates and instructors and engage in critiques and discussion. All films are non-synchronous, with the third film accompanied by a music track. Students will spend an additional twenty to forty hours a week on production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours, however they are still necessary to successfully complete the workshop. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Four-Week Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment • An in-depth knowledge of 16mm cameras and motion picture production • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions • Sufficient mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software • Knowledge of aesthetic film theory and experience with practical application of the same

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Four-Week Filmmaking Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film Project 3 - Music Film
NYFA Universal Studios

312

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 4.5 Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Four-Week Filmmaking Workshop. The Four-Week Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than four weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Tuition: Equipment Fee: Total Tuition: $3,150 $500 $3,650

OTHER COSTS:
Film, Processing, etc.: Total Cost of Workshop: $450 $4,100

Four Week Filmmaking Course Title
Directing Hands on Camera Editing Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 0 0 0 Total Credit Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NYFA Universal Studios

313

Four Week Filmmaking Directing
2 Semester Credits

The core of the Four Week Program, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn to concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing three short films.

Hands on Camera

1.5 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Editing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea to script with an emphasis on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue.

NYFA Universal Studios

314

FOUR-WEEK DIGITAL FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 4.5

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
In this workshop, students are taught the language of filmmaking and the director’s craft as applied to the digital format. This workshop is structured around the production of three short films. Students will take classes in Directing, Hands on Camera, Writing, and Editing. Students will learn to use digital video cameras, Lowell lighting packages, and digital editing with Final Cut Pro. The first week students will learn the basic tools or filmmaking and begin shooting a series of film projects. Following production and post-production, students screen their work with their classmates and instructors and engage in critiques and discussion. All films are non-synchronous, with the third film accompanied by a music track. Students will spend an additional twenty to forty hours a week on production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours, however they are still necessary to successfully complete the workshop. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. • An in-depth knowledge of digital video cameras and motion picture production • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay. • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions. • Sufficient mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software. • Knowledge of and experience with practical application of aesthetic film theory.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film Project 3 - Music Film
NYFA Universal Studios 315

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 4.5 Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop. The Four-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than four weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Tuition: Equipment Fee: Total Tuition: $3,150 $500 $3,650

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Four Week Digital Filmmaking Course Title
Directing Hands-On Digital Camera Editing Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5 All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

0 0 0 0 0 2 Semester Credits

Directing

The core of the Four Week Digital Program, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn to concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down
NYFA Universal Studios 316

their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films.

Hands-On Digital Camera

1.5 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the digital video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Editing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea to script with an emphasis on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue.

NYFA Universal Studios

317

FOUR-WEEK DIGITAL EDITING
Total Credit Units: 3.75

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop is designed to immerse students comprehensively in both the technical craft and the conceptual art of digital postproduction. Students learn the fundamentals of non-linear editing on their own Final Cut Pro Station. During the first week, students become acquainted with the basic project settings including logging and capturing of audio and video, and setting scratch disks. Each student will receive raw footage for scenes which he/she will be working on throughout the course. Additional sessions will focus on editing within the timeline, toolbox functions, and advanced techniques such as the trim window. Editorial concepts and theories such as match cuts, jump cuts, and temporal and spatial continuity will be covered in depth. Tools and techniques for building better performances as well as mood and effect will be examined in class exercises. Sound design, media management, output options, alternative media types, and other sophisticated tools will be reviewed in the later weeks. The final component of the course consists of an in depth examination of the other programs contained within the Final Cut Pro Studio system. This includes DVD Studio Pro, Soundtrack Pro, Compressor, and Motion. Students will also learn some fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to assist in the creation of their final project: a professional-quality DVD that integrates the projects created in Final Cut Pro.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Four-Week Digital Editing Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of digital editing and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of digital editing.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students gain an in-depth understanding of Final Cut Pro, DVD Studio Pro, Adobe Photoshop, Compressor, and Motion software. They gain hands-on experience in multiple aspects of the art and craft of digital editing.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Four-Week Digital Editing Workshop requires successful completion of several editing assignments. Students will be thoroughly evaluated in their progress as artistic film editors. Students will complete assigned projects and export a reel to DVD in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements. Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New
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York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 3.75 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the Four-Week Digital Editing Workshop. The Four-Week Digital Editing Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than four weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Tuition: Equipment Fee: Total Cost of Program: $3,675 $500 $4175

COURSE OUTLINE:
4 Week Digital Editing Course Title
Digital Editing Theory and Practice TOTAL FILM050 Studio or Related Units 3.75 3.75 All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 Total Credit Units

3.75 3.75

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Digital Editing Theory and Practice
3.75 Semester Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software including DVD Studio Pro, Motion, Compressor, Soundtrack Pro and Adobe Photoshop. Advanced technical elements including sound design, color correction, DVD menu creation, and working with multiple media types will be investigated in depth. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

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FOUR-WEEK ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 3.25

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop will emphasize the theory and practice of the acting craft. Students will study various acting methods and techniques, and learn to apply those lessons to scene and monologue work.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • • • Experience working independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. Knowledge of and experience in the art and craft of acting for film. Exposure to multiple modern and classical approaches to performance, script interpretation and character formation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
In the Four-Week Acting for Film workshop students must study and perform scenes that demonstrate that they have gained a working knowledge of the following skills: • Scene Study • Technique • Voice • Movement • Acting for Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade (‘C’) or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. The Four-Week Acting for Film Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses scheduled are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than four weeks.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $3,675

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

4 WEEK ACTING FOR FILM
Course Title
Acting for Film Scene Study Acting Technique Voice Audition Technique Monologues Movement Film Craft TOTAL: 20 20 10 10 10 10 10 2.5 102.5

All classes are mandatory
Studio or Related Units Total Credit Units

0.80 0.80 0.32 0.32 0.32 0.32 0.32 0.08 3.25

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Acting for Film
.80 Semester Credit

Acting for Film provides students an environment to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in Production Workshop with film students. In the Production workshop, students experience on-set shoots in collaboration with student filmmakers. Students are introduced to a first-hand experience in set etiquette, shooting out of sequence and understanding the actor’s role in a shoot.

Scene Study

.80 Semester Credit

Students learn to analyze scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop a solid grounding in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students will incorporate all of the disparate disciplines learned in all other courses in a live, filmed scene presentation at semester end.

Acting Technique

.32 Semester Credit

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances. Exercises will be taped for in-class critique.

Voice

.32 Semester Credit

Students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension.

Audition Technique
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Students learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop the audition and

cold-reading skills necessary for landing roles in the highly competitive field of acting. Students will work in a mock audition format that will be videotaped for instructor and peer critique.

Monologues

.32 Semester Credit

Students will work on assigned and chosen monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills learned thus far. Students will understand the structure and particular elements, which make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be audition ready.

Movement

.32 Semester Credit

Students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught to assist students in finding freedom and expression in the physical instrument.

Film Craft

.08 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will create a short-in class shoot.

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TWELVE-WEEK EVENING FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 8

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop comprises evening classes and weekend production sessions that take place over a twelve-week period. Students will take classes in Directing, Hands on Camera, Writing, and Editing. Students will learn to use Arriflex 16mm cameras, digital video cameras, Lowell lighting packages, and digital editing with Final Cut Pro. After each screening classmates and instructors engage in critiques and discussion. Throughout the Evening Workshop, students meet with instructors for one-on-one consultations. All films are non-synchronous but the final film will include multiple sound tracks. Following production and post-production of the final project, students screen their work with their classmates, instructors, and invited guests. Students will spend an additional ten to forty hours a week beyond class time on production of their film projects. Production or practicum hours are considered separate from lab and lecture hours, however they are still necessary to successfully complete the workshop. The Academy recognizes, as should the students, that these hours will vary from student to student.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • The ability to work independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. • An in-depth knowledge of 16mm cameras and motion picture production. • The ability to write and pre-visualize a screenplay. • In-depth experience working as a director, producer, assistant director, director of photography, assistant cameraperson, gaffer, and grip on student productions • Sufficient mastery of Final Cut Pro digital editing software. • Knowledge of and experience with practical application of aesthetic film theory.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Workshop requires successful completion of the following creative projects in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements: Project 1 - Mise-en-scène Film Project 2 - Continuity Film
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Project 3 - Music Film Project 4 - Final Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 8.0 Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Workshop. The Twelve-Week Evening Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than twelve weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Tuition: Additional Equipment Fee: Total Tuition: $3,150 $500 $3,650

OTHER COSTS:
Film Stock, processing, etc: Total Tuition: $1,000 $4,750

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:

WEEKS 1 - 5
Course Title
Directing Hands on Camera Editing Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 2 1.5 0.5 0.5 4.5

0 0 0 0 0

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WEEKS 6 - 12
Course Title
Advanced Directing Advanced Hands on Camera Advanced Editing Advanced Writing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2 0.5 1 0.5 4

All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 1.5 0.5 1 0.5 3.5

0 0 0 0 0

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
WEEKS 1 - 5 Directing
2 Semester Credits

The core of the Twelve Week Evening program, this course introduces students to all major aspects of filmmaking. Students will learn to concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats, shot selection and composition, and budgeting and scheduling. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing four short films.

Hands-On Camera

1.5 Semester Credits

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of the 16mm non sync motion picture cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Editing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

This course introduces the established tools and language used in writing a film project. Students will take a story from initial idea to script with an emphasis on the fundamentals
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of visual storytelling. The intersection of story structure, theme, character, tension, and conflict is examined through detailed scene analysis. In-class discussion provides students with constructive analysis and support. Students are encouraged to tell their stories visually, rather than relying on dialogue.

WEEKS 6 - 12 Advanced Directing
1.5 Semester Credits

A continuation of Directing. Students expand upon lessons already learned with a focus on the preproduction of their Final Film projects.

Advanced Hands-On Camera

0.5 Semester Credit

Students continue their study of cinematography by learning the basics of digital video and color photography. In addition, students take a two-session Production Sound tutorial where they are introduced to equipment used in sync-sound production.

Advanced Editing

1 Semester Credit

This course prepares students for the challenges inherent in cutting a more complex narrative film with dialogue and multiple sound tracks. Finally, students will participate in a session entitled “Building the Reel.”

Advanced Writing

0.5 Semester Credit

Students in this course learn to incorporate what they’ve learned about visual storytelling with the art of crafting dialogue for a sync-sound film. Scripts for the Final Film will be written, and revised in a workshop environment.

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TWELVE-WEEK EVENING DIGITAL EDITING
Total Credit Units: 3.5

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop is designed to immerse students comprehensively in both the technical craft and the conceptual art of digital postproduction. Students learn the fundamentals of non-linear editing on their own Final Cut Pro Station. During the first six weeks, students become acquainted with the basic project settings including logging and capturing of audio and video, and setting scratch disks. Each student will receive raw footage for scenes which he/she will be working on throughout the course. Additional sessions will focus on editing within the timeline, toolbox functions, and advanced techniques such as the trim window. Editorial concepts and theories such as match cuts, jump cuts, and temporal and spatial continuity will be covered in depth. Tools and techniques for building better performances as well as mood and effect will be examined in class exercises. The second half of the course encompasses sound design, media management, output options, alternative media types, and other sophisticated tools. The final component of the course consists of an in depth examination of the other programs contained within the Final Cut Pro Studio system. This includes, DVD Studio Pro, Soundtrack Pro, Compressor and Motion. Students will also learn some fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to assist in the creation of their final project, a professional-quality DVD that integrates projects created in Final Cut Pro.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Twelve-Week Evening Digital Editing Certificate Workshop are to teach students the art and craft of digital editing and to instruct students through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of digital editing.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students gain an in-depth understanding of Final Cut Pro, DVD Studio Pro, Adobe Photoshop, Compressor, and Motion software. They gain hands-on experience in multiple aspects of the art and craft of digital editing.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Twelve-Week Digital Editing Workshop requires successful completion of several editing assignments. Students will be thoroughly evaluated in their progress as artistic film editors. Students will complete assigned projects and export a reel to DVD in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements. Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy.
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Satisfactory completion of 3.5 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Twelve-Week Digital Editing Workshop. The Twelve-Week Evening Digital Editing Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. This workshop may not be completed in less than twelve weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $3,675

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:
12 Week Evening Digital Editing Course Title
Evening Digital Editing Theory and PracticeEvening TOTAL FILM051 Studio or Related Units 3.5 3.5 All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 Elective Units 0 0 Total Credit Units 3.5 3.5

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: Digital Editing Theory and Practice-Evening
3.5 Semester Credits

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software including DVD Studio Pro, Motion, Compressor, Soundtrack Pro and Adobe Photoshop. Advanced technical elements including sound design, color correction, DVD menu creation, and working with multiple media types will be investigated in depth. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer. Prerequisite: None

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TWELVE-WEEK EVENING ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 4

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop will emphasize the theory and practice of the acting craft. Students will study various acting methods and techniques, and learn to apply those lessons to scene and monologue work.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • • • Experience working independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. Knowledge of and experience in the art and craft of acting for film. Exposure to multiple modern and classical approaches to performance, script interpretation and character formation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
In the Twelve-Week Evening Acting for Film workshop students must study and perform scenes that demonstrate that they have gained a working knowledge of the following skills: • Scene Study • Technique • Voice • Movement • Acting for Film Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. The Twelve-Week Evening Acting for Film Workshop is an accelerated evenings only course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than twelve weeks.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $3,150

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CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:
12 Week Evening Acting for Film
Course Title Acting for Film Scene Study Acting Technique Voice Audition Technique Monologues Movement Film Craft Production Workshop TOTAL All courses are mandatory Studio or Related Units 20 20 10 10 10 10 10 2.5 12 102.5 Total Units 0.75 0.75 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.09 0.54 4.00

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Acting for Film
.75 Semester Credit

Acting for Film introduces students to an environment where they can begin to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in Production Workshop with film students. In the Production Workshop, students experience on-set shoots in collaboration with student filmmakers. Students are introduced to a first-hand experience in set etiquette, shooting out of sequence and understanding the actor’s role in a shoot.

Scene Study

.75 Semester Credit

Students learn the process of analyzing scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop an initial foundation in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students incorporate all of the disparate disciplines learned in all other courses in their scenes for class work. Scheduled rehearsals average five hours per week.

Acting Technique

.375 Semester Credit

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances.

Voice

.375 Semester Credit

Students learn to access the natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension.
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Audition Technique

.375 Semester Credit

Students learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop their audition and cold-reading skills.

Monologues

.375 Semester Credit

Students will work on assigned and chosen monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills learned thus far. Students will understand the structure and particular elements which make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be audition ready.

Movement

.375 Semester Credit

Students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work. Elements of various approaches will be taught to assist students in finding freedom and expression in the physical instrument.

Film Craft

.09 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective, including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing. Learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances. Students will create a short-in class shoot.

Production Workshop

.54 Semester Credit

In the Production Workshop, students experience on-set shoots in collaboration with student filmmakers. Students are introduced to a first hand experience in set etiquette, shooting out of sequence and understanding the actor’s role in a shoot.

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TWELVE-WEEK EVENING SCREENWRITING
Total Credit Units: 6

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop focuses on the fundamental writing concepts and techniques. Topics covered during the course include: classic screenplay structure, character arcs, heroes, dialogue, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voiceover, WGA format, subtext, style and tone, visualization, discipline, genre, dramaturgy, and cinematic syntax. During this time, students have the opportunity to develop a feature length screenplay idea under the supervision of a professional screenwriter. Students will engage in discussion and critique of their writing and their classmates’ writing at each workshop.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the Twelve-Week Evening Screenwriting Certificate Workshop are to fully immerse students in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing and meeting deadlines in addition to learning the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of concepts such as story, structure, character, conflict and dialogue.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will gain knowledge of and hands-on experience with screenwriting, the process of revision, writing dialogue, the business of screenwriting, classic screenplay structure, character arcs, theme, conflict, flashbacks, voice-over, subtext, style and tone, visualization, discipline, genre, and WGA format.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The Twelve-Week Evening Screenwriting Workshop requires that each student prepare a draft of an original screenplay in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements. Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 6 Semester Credit Units is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s Twelve-Week Screenwriting Workshop. The Twelve-Week Screenwriting Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than twelve weeks. Classes are taught in either a lecture, seminar or laboratory format. Students are also scheduled for hours of practicum. For the designation of instruction hours lab and practicum are treated as “studio hours” as is customary in visual arts studies.

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TUITION:
Total Tuition: $2,625

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:
12 Week Evening Screenwriting Course Title
Elements of Screenwriting Screenwriting Workshop TOTAL Studio or Related Units 2.25 3.75 6 All courses are mandatory. Art/Design History Units 0 0 0

Elective Units 0 0 0

Total Credit Units 2.25 3.75 6

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Elements of Screenwriting
2.25 Semester Credits

Utilizing lectures, in-class exercises, outside readings, classroom discussions, and film viewings, this course introduces students to the craft of screenwriting. Screenplay formatting will be a major focus, and students will learn how to write scene description, to describe characters and locations, and to develop action sequences. Topics will also include: Classic screenplay structure, the Elements of the Scene, Developing the Character, Character Arcs, Antagonists, Dialogue, Writing the Visual Image, Introduction to Final Draft, Theme, Conflict, Flashbacks, Fantasy Sequences and Dream Sequences, Voiceover, Text and Subtext, Developing Your Writing Style, Tone and Genre, Visualization, Revealing Exposition, Creating a Compelling Second Act, Climaxes and Resolutions, and Scene Beats.

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay

3.75 Semester Credits

Writing the Feature Film Screenplay is a fast-paced, intensive workshop that introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting. The classes consist of in-class writing exercises, individual writing, reading aloud of student work in class, and workshop discussions. Students will apply knowledge gained from Elements of Screenwriting and apply it to the creation of their own feature-length scripts. By the end of the course, students will develop and write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay.

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ONE-WEEK DIGITAL FILMMAKING
Total Credit Units: 1

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop begins with an intensive study in filmmaking, which encompasses both directing and screenwriting, and camera and lighting. The fourth day is dedicated to production when students will direct their own projects and assist their classmates as key crewmembers on theirs. Each student will write, direct, and edit their own project. These individual film projects are edited on Final Cut Pro under the supervision of an instructor. Following production and post-production, students screen their work with their classmates, instructors, and invited guests and engage in critiques and discussion.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:
The educational objectives in the One-Week Digital Filmmaking Certificate Workshop are to introduce students to the art and craft of filmmaking and to instruct students through a strict regimen of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of filmmaking.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • Experience working independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment • Knowledge of digital cameras and motion picture production • In-depth experience working as both director and cinematographer on student productions • Experience with Final Cut Pro digital editing software • Knowledge of aesthetic film theory and experience with practical application of the same

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
The One-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop requires that each student complete one film project in partial fulfillment of the graduation requirements. Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better in order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. Satisfactory completion of 1 Semester Credit Unit is required for graduation from the New York Film Academy’s One-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop. The One-Week Digital Filmmaking Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized
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workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than one week.

TUITION:
Tuition: Additional Equipment Fee: Total Tuition: $1,450 $125 $1,575

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:
1 - Week Evening Digital Filmmaking Course Title
Filmmaking Hands-on Camera & Lighting Hands-On Editing TOTAL Studio or Related Units 0.5 0.25 0.25 1.0 All courses are mandatory Art/Design History Units 0 0 0 0 Elective Units Total Credit Units 0.5 0.25 0.25 1.0

0 0 0 0

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Filmmaking
0.5 Semester Credit

The core of the One Week Program, this course introduces students to the basic principles of writing and directing the short film. As writers, students will shepherd a story from initial idea through the treatment, outline, and finally shooting script. As directors, students will focus on the fundamentals of visual storytelling. They will learn concepts to help achieve maximum psychological impact by studying the director’s decisions in camera placement, blocking, staging, and visual image design. Students will be challenged to think comprehensively about their film projects in terms of the economic realities of low budget student production. Using their own film projects as prototypes, students will learn to break down their film scripts in terms of story and emotional beats as well as shot selection and composition. This course will be the forum for preparing, screening and critiquing one short film.

Hands-On Camera and Lighting

0.25 Semester Credit

In this course, students undergo intensive training in the use of digital video cameras and their accessories. Through hands-on workshops and film tests, they will also learn fundamental lighting techniques. As they progress through the workshop, they learn how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles.

Hands-On Editing

0.25 Semester Credit

This course presents students with multiple aesthetic approaches to editing film and video. Students will learn how to apply concepts such as temporal continuity and spatial
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continuity, as well as less traditional discontinuous editing techniques to their work. The course will also discuss the psychological and emotional effects of editing on the overall story. Additionally, students will learn to operate Final Cut Pro digital editing software, which they will use to edit their own films. Classes are supplemented with individual consultations at the computer.

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ONE-WEEK ACTING FOR FILM
Total Credit Units: 1

CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
This workshop will emphasize the theory and practice of the acting craft. Students will study various acting methods and techniques, and learn to apply those lessons to scene and monologue work.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this workshop include: • • • Experience working independently and collaboratively in a high-pressure creative environment. Knowledge of and experience in the art and craft of acting for film. Exposure to multiple modern and classical approaches to performance, script interpretation and character formation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
In the One-Week Acting for Film workshop students must study and perform scenes that demonstrate that they have gained a working knowledge of the following skills: • • • • • Scene Study Technique Voice Movement Acting for Film

Students must successfully complete every course of study with a passing grade or better. In order to graduate and receive a Certificate of Completion, students must also adhere to the Academy’s Attendance Policy and Code of Conduct. Additionally, students must fulfill all financial obligations to the New York Film Academy. The One-Week Acting for Film Workshop is an accelerated full-time course of study and does not provide for multiple tracks of study. All courses are mandatory. This is a highly specialized workshop, and there are no majors or minors. The workshop may not be completed in less than one week.

TUITION:
Total Tuition: $1,050

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CERTIFICATE WORKSHOP OUTLINE:
One-Week Acting for Film
Course Title Acting for Film Scene Study Acting Technique Voice and Movement Monologues Film Craft Production Workshop Special Lecture: Audition Technique Special Lecture: Comedy & Improvisation TOTAL All courses are mandatory. Studio or Related Units Total Credit Units 5 0.16 5 0.16 2.5 0.08 2.5 0.08 2.5 0.08 2.5 0.08 6 0.20 2.5 0.08 2.5 0.08 26 1

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Acting for Film
0.16 Semester Credit

Acting for Film introduces students to an environment where they can begin to get comfortable acting in front of the camera. The primary emphasis of the class is the practice of the subtlety and nuance of film acting including learning to adjust the performance for specific shot size, finding the arc of the character and learning to maintain the integrity of the script while shooting out of sequence. Film set terminology and etiquette are also addressed. Students participate in Production Workshop with film students.

Scene Study

0.16 Semester Credit

Students learn the process of analyzing scripts and break them down into units or “beats”. They develop an initial foundation in establishing a character based on their own experiences and imagination. Students incorporate all of the disparate disciplines learned in all other courses in their scenes for class work.

Acting Technique

0.08 Semester Credit

Students will practice the tools necessary to hone and focus their acting skills when they do not have a scene partner on which to rely. Students will work on monologues from theatre and film sources that will help them learn how to command attention at auditions and professional performances.

Voice & Movement

0.08 Semester Credit

In the “Voice” part of this workshop students learn to access their natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension. In “Movement” students experiment with different ways of becoming physically “present” in their work.
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Monologues

0.08 Semester Credit

Students will work on monologues to practice text analysis, and character creation skills. Students will understand the structure and particular elements that make a successful monologue and prepare pieces to be audition ready.

Film Craft

0.08 Semester Credit

An exploration of filmmaking from the actor’s perspective (including directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting, and editing.) Students will learn the roles of all the players on a film set, which dramatically increases the actor’s ability to collaborate with filmmakers in developing dynamic performances.

Production Workshop

0.20 Semester Credit

In the Production Workshop, students experience on-set shoots in collaboration with student filmmakers. Students are introduced to a first hand experience in set etiquette, shooting out of sequence and understanding the actor’s role in a shoot.

Special Lectures

0.08 Semester Credit

In the Special Lectures, professional speakers make students understand the value of nurturing their instincts and freely release their creative impulses. They also learn the protocol of auditioning and are challenged to develop skills for auditions.

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INSTRUCTORS
FILMMAKING DEPARTMENT
JOHN TERREY
CHAIR, FILMMAKING MFA, AFI

MICHAEL PESSAH
CHAIR, CINEMATOGRAPHY

PETRA HAFFTER
CHAIR, DOCUMENTARY.

KENNETH JOHNSON
Directing

ADAM NIMOY
Directing/Acting for Film

NICK SIVAKUMARAN
Directing

MATT KOHNEN
Directing

TIMOTHY GREENWOOD
Editing

IGOR TORGESON
Editing

RANDI FELDMAN
Filmmaking MFA, NYU

LARRY LEAHY
Directing MFA, NYU

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ACTING DEPARTMENT
NORA STONE
CHAIR, ACTING BA, UC Santa Barbara

DAVID BROOKS
Acting For Film

SCOTT FERRARA
Shakespeare

MARIA GOBETTI
Meisner, Scene Studies, Monologues

JACK HUANG
Stage Combat

VALORIE HUBBARD
Entry to Acting Industry MFA, DePaul University

KELLY HUGHES
Acting For Film & TV, Monologues

SUZANNE KENT
Science Study, Comedy & Improv

RICK KOSTENICK
Audition Technique

ANTHONY MONTES
Meisner Technique

CAITLIN MUELDER
Voice

AMY CHAFFEE
Acting MFA, The Old Globe Theatres/USD

JOHN HENRY RICHARDSON
Acting For Film

BA, UCLA
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SCREENWRITING DEPARTMENT
SONNY CALDERON CHAIR, SCREENWRITING
MFA, University of Southern California

ERIC CONNER Screenwriting
MFA, USC

MICHAEL CONNORS Screenwriting
BA, Harvard University MFA, Columbia University

ADAM MOORE
Screenwriting

CRICKETT RUMLEY Screenwriting
MFA Columbia University

PRODUCING DEPARTMENT
LYDIA CEDRONE
CHAIR, PRODUCING MBA, New York University BA, Boston College

DAVID BRESENHAM Producing/Reality Television
MFA, University of Southern California JD, Harvard Law School BA, Wofford College

DENISE CARLSON, Producing MARK DEVENDORF Producing/New Media
MA, San Diego State University BA, University of California at Santa Cruz

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ADAM FINER Producing/Marketing And Distribution MITCHELL GUTMAN
Producing MFA, Columbia University BA, University of California at Berkeley

LONNIE HALOUSKA
Producing/Entertainment Law MS, University of Southern California

TOM HAMMOCK
Producing/Marketing And Production Design MFA, American Film Institute BA, University of California at Berkeley

JONATHAN LONDON
Producing

SEAN MULLIN
Producing MFA, Columbia University BS, The U.S. Military Academy At West Point

DAN STURMAN
Producing Documentaries BA, Harvard University

BRIAN UDOVICH
Producing MFA, American Film Institute BA, Illinois Wesleyan University

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ADMINISTRATION
PRESIDENT/FOUNDER
Jerry Sherlock

SENIOR DIRECTOR
Jean Sherlock

BURSAR
Kristen Abitabile

PROVOST
Michael Young

POST-PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
Brad Ben-Hain

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
Daniel Mackler

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS
John Nodilo

INTERNATIONAL ADVISER
Becky Hernandez

ACADEMIC DEAN
Patricia Beckmann-Wells

HEAD COUNSELOR, SUMMER PROGRAM
Trent Olsen

ADMISSIONS
Brennan Barnes

EQUIPMENT ROOM MANAGER
Rodrigo Patino

REGISTRAR
Vince Voskanian

LIBRARIANS
Mara Burns Mike Salerno

PROGRAM COORDINATOR
Renee Weber

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