Y

o
u
r

k
e
y
s

t
o

d
r
i
v
i
n
g

i
n

Q
u
e
e
n
s
l
a
n
d
J
a
n
u
a
r
y

2
0
1
0

Q
T
L

3
2
0
0
For more information visit
www.tmr.qld.gov.au
Your keys
to driving
in Queensland
No. 12: January 2010 r.r.p $11.50
9 771443 417021
12
ISSN 1443-4172
Your keys to driving in Queensland
Published by
The Department of Transport and Main Roads
PO Box 673
Fortitude Valley 4006
© The State of Queensland (Department of Transport and Main Roads) 2000-2010
Copyright protects this material. Except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968
(Cwlth), reproduction by any means (photocopying, electronic, mechanical,
recording or otherwise), making available online, electronic transmission or other
publication of this material is prohibited without the prior written permission
of the Department of Transport and Main Roads. Enquiries should be addressed
to copyright@transport.qld.gov.au or to the Department of Transport and Main
Roads at the postal address shown above.
Information in this guide is current as at January 2010. For the latest road
rules please refer to the Department of Transport and Main Roads website
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
Please note: The notes and information contained in this guide are an
interpretation of current traffic law and should not be used for a legal
interpretation.
ISSN 1443-4172
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................3
Queensland licensing ..................................................................................5
Licence types .................................................................................................................................................6
Graduated licensing system .....................................................................................................................7
Licence classes, codes and conditions .................................................................................................10
Upgrading your licence .......................................................................................................................... 12
Applying for a licence ............................................................................................................................. 14
Eyesight test ............................................................................................................................................... 17
Medical conditions affecting driving ................................................................................................. 18
Road rules test ........................................................................................................................................... 20
Learning to drive .......................................................................................................................................21
L plates ......................................................................................................................................................... 23
The compulsory Queensland learner logbook ................................................................................. 23
Sample questions - learner licences ................................................................................................... 25
Q-SAFE practical driving test................................................................................................................ 26
Provisional licences .................................................................................................................................. 32
Sample questions —provisional licences ........................................................................................... 36
Open licences ............................................................................................................................................. 37
Probationary and restricted licences .................................................................................................. 37
Motorbikes .................................................................................................................................................. 39
Sample questions—motorbikes............................................................................................................. 48
Heavy vehicles ........................................................................................................................................... 48
General provisions .................................................................................................................................... 52
Non-Queensland driver licences .......................................................................................................... 52
Road rules ................................................................................................. 57
Signs and signals ...................................................................................................................................... 58
Sample questions—signs and signals .................................................................................................. 67
Speed limits ................................................................................................................................................ 68
Sample questions—speed limits ............................................................................................................70
Making turns ...............................................................................................................................................71
Roundabouts .............................................................................................................................................. 73
Indicating and signalling ....................................................................................................................... 75
Sample questions—turns, roundabouts and signalling ................................................................. 76
Giving way .................................................................................................................................................. 77
Sample questions—giving way ............................................................................................................. 84
Road positioning ....................................................................................................................................... 85
Sample questions—road positioning ...................................................................................................91
Hazardous localities ................................................................................................................................. 92
Alcohol and drugs .................................................................................................................................... 96
Sample questions—hazardous localities, alcohol and drugs ..................................................... 101
Heavy vehicles ......................................................................................................................................... 102
Sample questions—heavy vehicles .................................................................................................... 112
Other rules and responsibilities ......................................................................................................... 113
Sample questions—other rules and responsibilities ..................................................................... 121
Rules for other road users ................................................................................................................... 122
Safe road use ......................................................................................... 129
Sharing with other road users ............................................................................................................ 130
Sample questions—sharing with other road users ....................................................................... 135
Stopping .................................................................................................................................................... 136
Hazards ...................................................................................................................................................... 138
Driver fatigue........................................................................................................................................... 142
Correct seatbelt and child restraint use .......................................................................................... 143
4WD driving ............................................................................................................................................. 144
Towing a trailer or caravan ................................................................................................................. 145
What to do at a crash ........................................................................................................................... 147
Offences and penalties ......................................................................... 151
Enforcement ............................................................................................................................................. 152
Licence suspensions ............................................................................................................................... 157
Unlicensed and disqualified driving ................................................................................................. 165
Your vehicle ............................................................................................ 169
Buying a used vehicle ........................................................................................................................... 170
Registering your vehicle ....................................................................................................................... 171
Insuring your vehicle ............................................................................................................................. 175
Looking after your vehicle ................................................................................................................... 175
Organ Donation ..................................................................................... 177
Index ....................................................................................................... 179
Introduction
Your keys to driving in Queensland is a publication for Queensland drivers that
combines important information about the Queensland driver licensing system
and the Queensland road rules.
This book is essential reading for anyone wanting to learn to drive. Questions you
may find in your road rules test are featured at the end of some sections.
Your keys to driving in Queensland is not just for learner drivers—it is important
for everyone who uses the road, regardless of their level of experience, to read the
book to update their knowledge of the road rules and road safety.
You will be able to find information easily—there’s an index at the back and each
section is colour coded for quick reference.
The information in this guide is an interpretation of the rules applying
to road use in Queensland. For the complete picture of the Queensland road
rules, visit the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at
www.legislation.qld.gov.au. To purchase a copy of the Transport Operations
(Road Use Management—Road Rules) Regulation 1999 contact The Government
Bookshop at www.bookshop.qld.gov.au.
For further information visit www.tmr.qld.gov.au, contact your nearest Department
of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or call the Department of
Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80.
Please note: Higher rates apply when calling 13 or 1800 phone numbers from
mobile phones. If calling from outside Queensland, STD rates will apply.
3
4
Queensland licensing
 Licence types
 Graduated licensing system
 Licence classes, codes and conditions
 Applying for a licence
 Learning to drive
 Q-SAFE practical driving test
 Provisional licences
 Open licences
 Probationary and restricted licences
 Motorbikes
 Heavy vehicles
 General provisions
 Non-Queensland driver licences
5
Licence types
Before you drive, or learn to drive, any class of motor
vehicle on a road in Queensland, you must hold a
current driver licence allowing you to drive, or learn to
drive, that class of vehicle.
The types of Queensland driver licences are:
 learner licence
 provisional licence
 probationary licence
 restricted licence
 open licence.
Learner licence
Before learning to drive any class of motor vehicle you must hold either a learner,
provisional, probationary or open licence that allows you to learn to drive that
vehicle. Licence classes, codes and conditions on page 10 provides information
about learning to drive another class of vehicle under your provisional,
probationary or open licence. Applying for a licence on page 14 provides
information about getting your learner licence. Learning to drive on page 21
outlines the conditions for driving with a learner licence and helps you get ready
for your Q-SAFE practical driving test or Q-Ride assessment.
Provisional licence
Queensland has a two-stage provisional licence—P1 and P2—as part of a graduated
licensing system.
After you have held your learner licence for at least one year, you may go for your
Q-SAFE practical driving test. Depending on how old you are when you pass your
test, you will get either a P1 or P2 provisional licence, which you must hold for a
minimum period before you can progress to the next stage—see Provisional
licences on page 32.
Probationary licence
You will only be eligible for a probationary licence if you have been disqualified
from holding or obtaining a driver licence by a court and you have now served the
period of disqualification—see Probationary licences on page 37.
Restricted licence
If you are convicted of drink driving but need a licence to earn a living, you may
ask the court that convicts you to grant you a restricted licence, commonly known
as ‘work’ licence—see Restricted licences on page 38.
6
Open licence
You may be eligible for an open licence if you have held your provisional licence for
the required period—see Open licences on page 37.
Graduated licensing system
Statistics show that drivers aged 17 to 24 have the highest risk of being involved
in crashes resulting in death or injury.
As a result, the Queensland graduated licensing system has been designed to give
novice drivers more supervised on-road driving experience, including identifying
and dealing with hazards, to improve their driving skills with minimal distraction.
For learner drivers aged 23 and under, there are six steps before you get your
open licence.
Written road rules test
Learner licence
Q-SAFE practical driving test
P1 provisional licence
Hazard perception test
P2 provisional licence
Open licence
Under the graduated licensing system, you can get your learner licence at 16, and if
you meet all the requirements for each stage, you may get your open licence by the
time you are 20.
For a learner licence
 You may only get a car learner licence at 16.
 You will need to pass a road rules test.
 Your learner licence will be issued for three years.
 You must hold your learner licence for at least one year before you can take
your Q-SAFE practical driving test.
 You must carry your learner licence with you at all times while learning to drive.
 L plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of the car you are
learning to drive—see L plates, page 23.
 Restrictions on mobile phone use apply to you, your supervisor and
passengers—see Mobile phones, page 35.
7
 A three-month licence suspension applies if you accumulate 4 or more demerit
points in a continuous one year period while holding a learner licence.
 If you are a learner driver under 25, you must:
- complete 100 hours of supervised on-road driving (including at least
10 hours of night driving) recorded in your Queensland learner logbook—
see The compulsory learner logbook, page 23
- pass the Q-SAFE practical driving test to progress to your P1 provisional
licence—see Q-SAFE practical driving test, page 26.
For a P1 provisional licence
 You may only get a provisional licence at 17
 Your first provisional licence will be issued as a P1 licence
 You are required to hold your P1 licence for at least one year
 Red P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of your car
(rear only for motorbikes)—see P plates, page 34
 Mobile phone restrictions apply to you and your passengers during your
P1 period—see Mobile phones, page 35
 Restrictions on driving high-powered vehicles (such as those with eight or more
cylinders, or those with turbo, super-charged or modified engines) apply
—see High-powered vehicles, page 35
 If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a continuous one year period,
a three month licence suspension and late night driving restrictions apply
—see Demerit points, page 36
 Peer passenger restrictions apply to you during your P1 period, page 35
 If you are under 25 when you get your P1 provisional licence, you will be
required to pass a hazard perception test before you can progress to a P2
provisional or open licence—see Hazard perception test, page 33.
For a P2 provisional licence
 You may get your P2 licence after you have held your P1 licence for at least one
year and have passed your hazard perception test—see Hazard perception test,
page 33
 You are required to hold your P2 licence for at least two years
 Green P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of your car
—see P plates, page 34
 Restrictions on driving high-powered vehicles (such as those with eight or more
cylinders, or those with turbo, super-charged or modified engines) apply
—see High-powered vehicles, page 35
8
 A three month licence suspension and late night driving restrictions apply if you
accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a continuous one year period—see
Demerit points, page 36
 You are required to hold your P2 licence for at least two years if you got your
P1 licence when you were under 23 years and your P2 licence when you were
under 25 years. In any other case, one year.
For an open licence
 You may get your open licence after you have held:
- your P1 licence for at least one year if you got your P1 licence when you
were at least 24 years but under 25 years
- your P2 licence for at least two years if you got your P1 licence when you
were under 23 years and your P2 licence when you were under 25 years
- your P2 licence for at least one year if you got your P2 licence when you
were at least 24 years.
 Licence suspensions apply if you accumulate 12 or more demerit points in
a continuous three year period—see Accumulation of demerit points
—Queensland licence holders, page 158.
Learner licence for motorbike
 You may apply for a class RE motorbike learner licence after you have held your
car licence for at least one year—see Motorbikes, page 39
 When you are learning to ride a motorbike, an L plate must be displayed at the
rear of your motorbike or on the back of a vest worn while riding
—see L plates, page 23
 You may only learn to ride a learner approved motorbike
—see Learner approved motorbike (LAM), page 39
 Restrictions on passengers apply—see Pillion passenger restiction for learner
riders, page 40.
Minimum period for licence types
If you are required to hold your licence for a stated period, and your licence expires
or is suspended (including SPER suspensions) or you are disqualified from holding
or obtaining a driver licence by order of an Australian court, the stated period will
be extended.
9
Licence classes, codes and conditions
You need a particular class of licence to drive certain vehicles. Your licence will
show the licence class and, if required, the code for any conditions that you are
required to comply with.
Your licence will show only the highest class of vehicle you are authorised to drive.
This means you are allowed to drive each class of vehicle under that class of licence.
However, motorbike classes RE or R and the specially constructed vehicle class UD
will appear separately on the licence.
Authority to learn
If you hold a provisional, probationary or open licence for a particular class of
vehicle, you are authorised to learn to drive the higher class of vehicle—see the
table below.
Also, if you hold a provisional, probationary or open licence for a particular class
of vehicle, you are authorised to learn to drive that class of vehicle with either an
automatic or manual transmission or with a synchromesh gearbox. For example,
If you hold an automatic car licence, you are authorised to learn to drive a car with
a manual gearbox.
If you are authorised to learn to drive a class of vehicle under your provisional,
probationary or open licence, you must be accompanied by a person who holds
an open licence for the class of vehicle you are learning to drive and has held that
licence for at least one year. You risk a fine if you drive unaccompanied, or with
a person not appropriately licensed.
Note: L plates must be displayed while learning to drive the higher class of vehicle.
Driver licence classes
This table shows what class of licence you need to drive a particular vehicle.
Licence class Class of vehicle
RE (motorbike) You may ride:
 a learner approved motorbike that is a moped
 a learner approved motorbike, other than a moped, with or
without a trailer—see Learner approved motorbike (LAM), page 39.
You must have held a class C car provisional licence for at least one
year to be eligible for a motorbike (class RE) learner licence.
You may learn to ride a class R motorbike once you have held
your class RE provisional, probationary or open licence for at
least one year.
R (motorbike) You may ride:
 a class RE motorbike
 a motorbike with unlimited engine size, with or without a trailer.
10
C (car) You may drive:
 a moped
 a car, with or without a trailer
 a specially constructed vehicle of not more than 4.5 tonne gross
vehicle mass (GVM), with or without a trailer
 a vehicle, e.g. a minivan, not more than 4.5 tonne GVM, built or
fitted to carry no more than 12 adults, including the driver.
 You may learn to drive a class LR, MR, HR or UD vehicle.
LR (light rigid) You may drive:
 a class C vehicle
 a bus of not more than 8 tonne GVM, with or without a trailer of
not more than 9 tonne GVM
 a truck (including a prime mover) of not more than 8 tonne GVM,
with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM
 a specially constructed vehicle of not more than 8 tonne GVM,
with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM.
You may learn to drive a class MR, HR or UD vehicle.
MR (medium rigid) You may drive:
 a class LR vehicle
 a bus of more than 8 tonne GVM with not more than two axles,
with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM
 a truck (including a prime mover) with not more than two axles,
with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM
 a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM with
not more than two axles, with or without a trailer of not more
than 9 tonne GVM.
You may learn to drive a class HR, HC or UD vehicle.
HR (heavy rigid) You may drive:
 a class MR vehicle
 a bus, with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM
 an articulated bus
 a truck (including a prime mover), with or without a trailer of not
more than 9 tonne GVM
 a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM, with or
without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM.
You may learn to drive a class HC, MC or UD vehicle.
HC (heavy
combination)
You may drive:
 a class HR vehicle
 a truck (including a prime mover), with or without a trailer
 a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM, with or
without a trailer.
You may learn to drive a class MC vehicle.
11
Driver licence classes cont.
Licence class Class of vehicle
MC (multi-
combination)
You may drive:
 a class HC vehicle
 a B-double
 a road train.
UD You may drive a specially constructed vehicle.
Licence codes and conditions
Code Licence condition
A You may only drive the class of vehicle with automatic transmission.
B You may only drive the class of vehicle with synchromesh gearbox.
I You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, an order under the
Penalties and Sentences Act 1992, part 5, division 1.
M You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, your medical
certificate.
S You may only drive while wearing corrective lenses.
V You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, your vehicle
modification notice.
XI You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, your order under
section 87 or 88 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995.
X3 You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, a special hardship
order and any special hardship order variation order.
X4 You may only drive while carrying, and in accordance with, a section 79E order
and any section 79E variation order.
Upgrading your licence
To upgrade your licence to the next higher class, you must:
 complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal form (F3000) and produce your
driver licence. You will be required to declare any traffic offences for which you
have been convicted
 provide evidence of identity and residence if required
—see Evidence of identity, page 14
12
 pass an eyesight test if required—see Eyesight test, page 17
 pass a road rules test if required. To pass the heavy vehicle test, you will need to
answer eight out of ten questions correctly. For the motorbike test, you must
answer four out of five questions correctly
 pay the Q-SAFE practical driving test fee and pass the test if required
 pass a hazard perception test if required.
Minimum periods for licence classes
You must have held a provisional, probationary or open licence for a minimum
period before you can upgrade to another licence class.
Licence class Minimum period
RE (motorbike) You must have held a class C provisional, probationary or open
licence for at least one year.
R (motorbike) You must have held a class RE provisional, probationary or open
licence for at least one year.
LR (light rigid) You must have held a class C provisional, probationary or open
licence for at least one year.
MR (medium rigid) You must have held a class C provisional, probationary or open
licence for at least one year.
HR (heavy rigid) You must have held:
 a class C provisional, probationary or open licence for at least
two years
 a class LR or MR provisional, probationary or open licence for at
least one year.
HC (heavy or open
combination)
You must have held a class MR or HR provisional, probationary or
open licence for at least one year.
MC (multi-
combination)
You must have held a class HR or HC provisional, probationary or
open licence for at least one year.
13
Applying for a licence
To apply for a licence you must:
 visit a Department of Transport and Main Roads licence issuing centre or
Queensland Government Agent Program (QGAP) licence issuing office (not all
QGAP offices can issue licences). In some rural or remote areas, Queensland
police stations may issue the licence
 complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal form (F3000)
 provide evidence of identity and evidence of Queensland residency
 provide a medical certificate (if required)—see Medical conditions affecting
driving, page 18
 pass an eyesight test (if required)—see Eyesight test page 17
 pay the licence fee.
Learner licence
 To apply for a learner licence, you will also need to pay the road rules test fee
and pass the test if required.
Provisional licence
To apply for a provisional licence you will also need to:
 complete 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience recorded in a
Department of Transport and Main Roads learner logbook (if required)—see The
compulsory Queensland learner licence logbook, page 23
 pay the hazard perception test fee and pass the test (if required)—see Hazard
perception test, page 33.
If you hold an interstate or foreign licence and need to get a Queensland licence,
see Obtaining a Queensland driver licence, page 54.
Evidence of identity
You will need to comply with the evidence of identity requirements when you are
applying for a Queensland driver licence for the first time, or when you are
renewing your licence and are unable to show your Queensland driver licence
(current or expired less than two years).
You will also need to comply with these requirements when you are applying for a
replacement of your licence if it has been lost, stolen, destroyed or defaced. If you
have changed your name and you want your new name shown on your driver
licence, you must show an official change of name document—see Change of name
documents, page 16.
14
Evidence of identity documents
You will need to show three evidence of identity documents. These documents must
include at least either of the following:
 one category A document and two category B documents
 two category A documents and one category B document.
At least one of these documents must include your signature. Each document must
be an original.
All documents must be current unless otherwise stated. Evidence of identity
documents may be verified with the issuing authority.
If you cannot show any of the evidence of identity documents, you should
discuss this with staff at a Department of Transport and Main Roads licence
issuing centre. For more information, contact the Department of Transport
and Main Roads on 13 23 80.
Category A documents
These documents establish the legal existence of your name and date of birth.
They include:
 Australian Births, Deaths and Marriages birth certificate—full, including a
Bicentennial birth certificate issued for births in 1988 (other commemorative
certificates, extracts, acknowledgment of birth, photocopies or certified copies
of original documents are not acceptable)
 Australian or foreign passport (current or expired less than two years)
 Australian citizenship certificate or naturalisation certificate
 Department of Immigration and Citizenship travel document, for example,
resident visa (valid up to five years after issue)
 Department of Immigration and Citizenship Certificate of evidence of resident
status
 Australian photo driver licence (current or expired less than two years)
 Australian Defence Force photo identity card (excluding civilians)
 Queensland or federal police officer photo identity card
 Queensland Card 18+ (issued after 1 January 1992)
 The Department of Transport and Main Roads Driver Authorisation, e.g. for bus,
taxi and limousine drivers (current or expired less than two years)
 The Department of Transport and Main Roads Accreditation, for example, driver
or rider trainers, pilot vehicle drivers (current or expired less than two years).
15
Category B documents
These documents establish the use of your name in the community. They include:
 Australian Medicare card
 financial institution debit/credit card with signature and embossed name
 education institution student identity document (must be issued in Australia
and include photo or signature)
 Department of Veterans Affairs/Centrelink pensioner concession card (including
Health care cards)
 Australian security guard or crowd controller licence (with photo)
 Australian firearm licence (with photo).
Note: If you have any documents in a foreign language, you must include a
recognised English translation. For a list of approved recognised translators,
contact the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters
(NAATI) at website www.naati.com.au and access the Practitioners directory.
Change of name documents
If you have changed your name, or the details of your name are different on the
documents to be shown, you must also show an official change of name document
such as:
 Australian marriage certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births, Deaths
and Marriages (excluding ceremonial certificate)
 Australian change of name certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births,
Deaths and Marriages
 Australian birth certificate (amended or with notations)
 divorce papers decree nisi or absolute (must show the name being reverted to)
 deed poll (issued before 1 February 2004).
An official overseas marriage certificate may only be accepted if it has a
registration number and official crest and is accompanied by one category A
document in your married name or two category B documents in your married
name.
Evidence of Queensland residential address
If your current Queensland residential address is not shown on either category A or
category B documents, you will need to show another document that does provide
evidence of your Queensland residential address. They include:
 contract of purchase, lease or rental document, mortgage or land
ownership certificate
 Queensland vehicle registration certificate
16
 Queensland driver licence or vehicle registration renewal notice
(for the coming period)
 Queensland local government rates notice
 Queensland land tax valuation notice
 Australian Taxation Office assessment (last or current financial year)
 Australian Taxation Office tax file number confirmation advice
(valid up to two years)
 electricity, gas or telephone account.
If providing documentation from the Australian Taxation Office, please black out all
personal information other than your name and residential address (for example,
black out information such as your tax file number).
If you are genuinely unable to show one of these documents, you may do any
of the following:
 complete the Queensland Residency Declaration form (F4208)
 show a statement from your employer
 if you are a student of an education institution, show a statement from the
institution’s administrator
 show a bank statement (issued from the same financial institution as debit/
credit card supplied).
Visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/licensing or contact the Department of Transport
and Main Roads on 13 23 80 for more information or to get a copy of the
Queensland Residency Declaration form (F4208).
Eyesight test
You may be required to undertake an eyesight test before you get your licence. To
pass the test, you must be able to read the eyesight chart from a distance of six
metres and not make more than two errors. If you are required to take the test, you
must meet these standards:
Driver licence class Eyesight standard
Private vehicle driver—RE, R, C, LR You must be able to read line 12 or
smaller with both eyes.
Commercial vehicle driver Eyesight standard
MR, HR, HC, MC—includes any class of
vehicle used for commercial purposes (e.g.
taxi, limousine or a driver trainer vehicle)
You must be able to read line 9 or
smaller with one eye and line 18 or
smaller with the other eye.
17
If you need to wear corrective lenses when driving, bring them with you and wear
them during the test. The code S will be shown on your licence, requiring you to
wear corrective lenses while driving.
If you have any eyesight problems, you may be required to obtain a medical
certificate from a doctor, optometrist or ophthalmologist certifying your sight
meets the approved standard for the class of licence you want.
If you only have vision in one eye (monocular vision), you will be required to obtain
a certificate from an optometrist or ophthalmologist confirming the extent of the
loss of your visual acuity and visual fields, regardless of whether you are a private
or commercial vehicle driver.
If you do not meet the eyesight standards, you will not be granted the licence.
Medical conditions affecting driving
You should talk to your doctor if you believe you have a medical condition that is
likely to adversely affect your ability to drive safely.
You must promptly inform the Department of Transport and Main Roads of any
long-term or permanent medical condition that is likely to adversely affect your
ability to drive safely. You must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads as
soon as a condition develops or if there is a long-term increase or aggravation to
an existing condition. You cannot wait until you renew your licence.
When you apply for a Queensland driver licence for the first time, you must tell the
Department of Transport and Main Roads about any medical condition that may
adversely affect your ability to drive safely. You will need a medical certificate
confirming your fitness to drive. Your doctor may also recommend that your licence
be subject to conditions.
Common medical conditions that may affect driving include, but are not limited to:
 Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias
 arthritis and other joint problems
 diabetes (early and late onset)
 eye problems (for example, cataracts)
 epilepsy
 hearing problems
 heart disease
 injuries and disabilities
 loss or partial loss of a limb
 lung disease
18
 psychiatric disorders
 sleep disorders
 stroke.
If you have a medical condition that is likely to adversely affect your ability to
drive safely and you already hold a driver licence, you can notify the Department
of Transport and Main Roads by completing the Medical Condition Notification
form (F4355).
If you are unsure about your medical condition, talk to your doctor.
You must promptly give your medical certificate to the Department of Transport
and Main Roads if your doctor completes a Medical Certificate for Motor Vehicle
Driver form (F3712), stating in their opinion:
 you meet the medical standards for a driver licence but with stated condition(s)
 your driver licence should be subject to condition(s) that differ to the
condition(s) already shown on your licence
 you are medically unfit to drive.
In most cases, having a medical condition will not stop you from driving. Your
doctor must determine whether you are:
 fit to drive with no conditions
 fit to drive under stated conditions (for example, only driving during daylight or
in a vehicle with automatic transmission)
 not fit to drive.
If you fail to notify the Department of Transport and Main Roads of a medical
condition that adversely affects you ability to drive safely, you risk a fine of up to
$6,000 and you may also be disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence
for a period of time.
If you are 75 years of age or older, you also need to provide evidence you are
medically fit to drive. You will need to hold, and carry while driving, a Medical
Certificate for Motor Vehicle Driver form (F3712) completed and signed by your
doctor stating that you are medically fit to drive a motor vehicle safely.
If your licence shows the code M, or you are 75 years of age or older, you must
carry a current medical certificate when you drive. You must comply with any
conditions imposed on your licence. If you don’t, you risk a fine of up to $2,000.
You must also show it to a police officer if asked to do so.
If you have a medical condition and are only able to drive a specially modified
vehicle, you must carry a medical certificate. You may also be required to carry a
vehicle modification notice when driving. For more information about driving
specially modified vehicles, contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads
on 07 3253 4851.
19
If you drive vehicles with a GVM of at least 4.5 tonne, public passenger vehicles
(for example, buses or taxis) or vehicles carrying dangerous goods, you must meet
the commercial driver standards in the Assessing Fitness to Drive publication,
available from the Austroads website at www.austroads.com.au.
For more information, or to obtain forms relating to medical conditions, contact
your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or
driver licence issuing centre, or call the Department of Transport and Main Roads
on 13 23 80, or visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/medicalconditions. Forms may also
be available from your doctor.
Road rules test
You can take the road rules test at a driver licence issuing centre when you apply
for your learner licence. You pay a fee for each test. If you pass your test, you will
get a learner licence. If you fail your test, you cannot take it again until the next
working day.
Allow at least 30 minutes to complete your road rules test. Once you pass your road
rules test, the result is valid for five years. If you apply for an additional licence
class, you may need to pass a specific road rules test for that class.
Class C general road rules test
There are 30 questions in the general road rules test. The questions have multiple
choice answers—this means each question has a number of possible answers and
you must mark the correct answer. The test has two main sections. In the first
section, you must correctly answer at least nine out of 10 questions. In the second
section, you must correctly answer at least 18 out of 20 questions.
Class RE or R (motorbike) road rules test
You will have to correctly answer at least four out of the five additional questions
specific to motorbikes to pass the test.
Class UD, LR, MR, HR, HC or MC (heavy vehicle) road rules test
If you hold a car or motorbike licence, you will have to correctly answer at least
eight of the 10 additional questions specific to heavy vehicles to pass the test.
Practice test questions
Before you sit the road rules test, you can test your knowledge for all licence
classes by completing the practice road rules test online at www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
This will give you an indication of the areas you need to focus on before you try
and pass the road rules test.
20
Learning to drive
Learner licence conditions
Now you have your car learner licence, there are a number of
requirements and restrictions that you must be aware of.
If you are under 25, you must:
 obey the conditions shown on your learner licence
 ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving
—see L plates, page 23
 gain 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience recorded and certified
in your learner logbook by your supervisor, including 10 hours of night driving,
prior to taking your practical driving test—see The compulsory Queensland
learner logbook, page 23
 not use a mobile phone, including hands-free function or Bluetooth accessories
while learning to drive. Your supervisor and any passengers are also banned
from using mobile phones on the loudspeaker function—see Mobile phones,
page 24
 drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration see Drink driving, page 96
 always carry your learner licence when you are driving
 be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held
their open licence for at least one year. If you are learning to drive a manual car,
your supervisor must hold a manual car licence, but if you are learning to drive
an automatic, your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic
car licence
 ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration
for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and
drugs, page 96
 ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger
seating capacity
 hold your learner licence for at least one year, excluding periods of suspension,
disqualification or cancellation, before applying to do your Q-SAFE practical
driving test to progress to a P1 provisional licence.
If you are 25 or older, you must:
 obey the conditions shown on your learner licence
 ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving
—see L plates, page 23
 drive with a blood alcohol concentration below 0.05. However, the Department
of Transport and Main Roads recommends you only drive with a zero blood
21
alcohol concentration for optimum safety during the learning period—see
Alcohol and drugs, page 96
 always carry your learner licence when you are driving
 be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held
their open licence for at least one year. If you are learning to drive a manual car,
your supervisor must hold a manual car licence, but if you are learning to
drive an automatic, your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic
car licence
 ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration
for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and
drugs, page 96
 ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger
seating capacity
 hold your learner licence for at least one year, excluding periods of suspension,
disqualification or cancellation, before applying to do your Q-SAFE practical
driving test to progress to a P2 provisional licence.
For learner drivers aged 25 and over, the requirement to gain the 100 hours of
supervised on-road driving experience is voluntary, but you are encouraged to
complete this for improved road safety.
If you obtained your learner licence before 1 July 2007, you must:
 obey the conditions shown on your learner licence
 ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving
—see L plates, page 23
 drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration if you are under 25, or a blood
alcohol concentration below 0.05 if you are 25 or older—see Alcohol and drugs,
page 96
 always carry your learner licence when you are driving
 be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held
their open licence for at least one year. If you are learning to drive a manual
car, your supervisor must hold a manual car licence, but if you are learning to
drive an automatic, your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic
car licence
 ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration
for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and
drugs, page 96
 ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger
seating capacity.
If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points over a continuous one year period on
your learner licence, you will be required to choose between:
22
 a three-month driving suspension
 a good driving behaviour option for one year—see Accumulation of demerit
points—Queensland licence holders, page 158.
L plates
An L plate is a sign that measures 146 mm x 146 mm and shows a black uppercase
letter ‘L’ on a yellow background.
When you are learning to drive a car, you must clearly display L plates at the front
and rear of the car. When you are learning to ride a motorbike, an L plate must be
clearly displayed at the rear of the motorbike.
You risk a fine if the L plates are not easily seen by anyone
looking at the front and rear of the car, or in the case of a
motorbike, at the rear of the motorbike.
You can buy L plates from service stations, major retailers and
automotive outlets. Check with your local supplier for cost.
You can also download and print a colour template from
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
A person driving or riding a motor vehicle, other than as a
learner driver or rider, must not display L plates on the vehicle.
The compulsory Queensland learner logbook
International research shows there is a significant link between the amount of
supervised on-road driving experience that new drivers gain and improvements
in road safety.
All learner drivers under the age of 25 must gain 100 hours of supervised on-road
driving experience (including at least 10 hours night driving) and record it in an
approved Department of Transport and Main Roads learner logbook.
When you are issued with your learner licence, you will receive a learner logbook.
Replacement learner logbooks will be available for a fee. If you require a new
learner logbook please contact a Department of Transport and Main Roads
customer service centre.
Learner drivers and supervisors can also use an online electronic logbook system
that has been developed by RACQ to record the 100 hours driving experience.
(Visit www.tmr.qld.gov.au for more information.)
Before you book your Q-SAFE practical driving test, the Department of Transport
and Main Roads must verify your logbook entries.
There are a number of ways in which you can gain your 100 hours of supervised
23
on-road driving experience:
 undertake driving experience with a supervisor other than an accredited
trainer, and record these hours in your Department of Transport and
Main Roads logbook
 undertake driving experience with an accredited driver trainer, and record these
hours in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook. This can
reduce the 100 hour requirement. A one-hour lesson will count as three hours
in your logbook, up to a maximum of 10 actual hours (30 logbook hours)
 undertake a combination of driving experience with a supervisor and an
accredited driver trainer, and record these hours in your Department of
Transport and Main Roads logbook
 if you have undertaken driving experience elsewhere under an Australian or
New Zealand learner licence—a combination of that experience recorded on a
Prior Driving Experience Declaration form (F4450) and driving experience
recorded in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook
 if you have undertaken driving experience other than in Australia or New
Zealand on a foreign learner licence—a combination of that experience
recorded on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration form (F4450) (no more than
50 hours) and driving experience gained on Australian roads recorded in your
Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook (at least 50 hours, including
the required 10 hours of night driving).
If you are unable to gain your 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience,
you may be eligible for an exemption. If an exemption is granted, you must hold
your learner licence for two years before undertaking your driving test.
Your initial logbook will be issued to you when you get your learner licence, and the
cost will be included in your learner licence fee. Replacement or additional
logbooks may be purchased through the Services online section at www.transport.
qld.gov.au or a customer service centre.
Your supervising driver must sign every entry in your logbook. If you are submitting
a Prior Driving Experience Declaration, your supervising driver(s) must also sign
this form.
When you have completed 100 hours, you will need to sign a declaration that the
logbook entries are true and correct. Penalties apply to you and your supervisor if
you record false or misleading information in your logbook. Your Department of
Transport and Main Roads logbook contains all the information and instructions
you will need.
Mobile phones
Mobile phones can be a major distraction to young drivers. This is why learner
licence and P1 licence holders under 25 are banned from using mobile phones at
24
any time while driving. This includes using hands-free
kits, Bluetooth accessories and loudspeaker functions
Your supervisor and any passengers are also banned
from using mobile phones on loudspeaker function. If
you are under 25, a learner licence holder and need to
use your mobile phone, you may use it only when you are legally and safely parked.
Ready to drive—for the learner
When you receive your learner licence you will be given a learner driver kit, which
includes the logbook for you to record your 100 hours of supervised on-road
driving experience (including at least 10 hours night driving). You will also be
provided with information to help you get your provisional licence. This information
will give you helpful tips and explain the step-by-step process of upgrading from a
learner licence to a provisional licence.
Remember that taking risks and driver inexperience are key factors in many fatal
crashes involving young drivers. While learner drivers are not generally prone to
having crashes, once you get your provisional licence, you are then a solo driver
and are much more likely to have a serious crash than other motorists. Don’t fall
into the trap of taking risks and becoming a statistic by doing something stupid.
Use your time as a learner to make yourself the best possible driver. It’s a bit like
sport and other interests. You don’t want to just pass. You want to be the best
driver you can be.
Sample questions - learner licences
1. What is the maximum blood alcohol concentration for a learner driver under 25?
(See page 21)
A. 0.05
B. 0.02
C. 0.00
D. 0.08
2. If you are driving a car on a learner licence, you: (See page 23)
A. must ensure one L plate is fitted to your car so that it can be clearly seen from the
front of the car.
B. must ensure one L plate is fitted to your car so that it can be clearly seen from the
rear of the car.
C. are not required to display L plates when you are accompanied by a
supervising driver.
D. must ensure two L plates are fitted to your car so that they can be clearly seen
from the front and the rear of the car.
25
3. Which one of the following statements is true for a learner driver? (See page 21)
A. You must have only one passenger in the car.
B. You must only drive during daylight hours.
C. You need to complete the required number of hours of supervised on-road driving
experience before you can undertake your Q-SAFE practical driving test.
D. You can drive without a supervisor, but it will not contribute to your
logbook hours.
4. Which one of the following statements is true for a learner driver? (See page 24)
A. You may use a mobile phone while driving, provided you use a hands-free or
Bluetooth accessory.
B. You may use a mobile phone while driving, provided you do not become distracted.
C. You may only use a mobile phone in the car you are driving if you are legally and
safely parked.
D. You must never use a mobile phone in your car.
5. How long must you hold your learner licence for before you take your Q-SAFE
practical driving test? (See page 7)
A. Six months
B. 12 months
C. Six months if you are 25 or over, and 12 months if you are under 25.
Q-SAFE practical driving test
Booking your Q-SAFE practical driving test
If you have an accredited driver trainer, they may arrange an appointment time for
your Q-SAFE practical driving test at a testing centre. If not, you’ll need to do this
yourself. You will be required to pay the driving test fee. You can make a booking
by contacting 13 23 90 or visiting the website.
If you are a learner licence holder under 25 years of age, you must lodge your
completed and certified logbook at Australia Post at least 14 days before your
Q-SAFE practical driving test. The Department of Transport and Main Roads will
carefully check and record your logbook, and will then notify you of your result.
Your logbook must be approved before you can take your Q-SAFE practical
driving test.
For more information about booking a Q-SAFE practical driving test, call the
Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 90, visit Services online at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au, or check the information in your logbook.
Note: If you wish to obtain a motorbike licence or heavy vehicle licence, see pages
39 and 48 respectively.
26
Test vehicles
The standard test vehicle for a class C licence is a vehicle (other than a motorbike)
not more than 4.5 tonne GVM, built or fitted to carry no more than 12 adults
including the driver.
The vehicle must be registered and pass a basic safety check conducted by the
driving examiner. Before turning up for your test, make sure the vehicle would pass
the safety check by having:
 signalling devices, horn and stop lights that are all working
 brakes and tyres that are in good condition
 mirrors and internal sun visors that are adjustable
 windows that are clean and able to be opened and shut
 windscreen and wipers in good condition
 seatbelts and head restraints fitted to both front seats.
Convertible-style vehicles must have the roof closed. All doors must be able
to be opened from inside and outside the vehicle and be fitted with suitable
door handles.
If you are under 25 and do your Q-SAFE practical driving test in a high-powered
vehicle such as one with eight or more cylinders, or one with a turbo, super-
charged or modified engine, you will not be able to drive it out of the testing centre
after you pass the Q-SAFE practical driving test unless you have an exemption.
This is because P1 drivers (which you will then be) are restricted from driving
high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles, page 35.
Before the Q-SAFE practical driving test
Bring your:
 learner licence or current licence if you are being tested for another
class of licence
 L plates if you are using your own vehicle
 Driving test appointment sheet (F3910)
 Examiner’s authority to drive test vehicle section of the application form or
appointment sheet, signed by the registered owner, authorising a Department
of Transport and Main Roads driving examiner to drive the vehicle if necessary
 vehicle
 glasses or contact lenses, if needed (if you have to wear corrective lenses when
driving you must wear them during your driving assessment)
 P plates to attach to your vehicle after you pass the test and get your
provisional licence—red P plates if you are under 25 years of age or
27
green P plates if you are 25 years or over. See P plates on page 34 for
information on where to buy P plates or how to download them from
www.transport.qld.gov.au/youngdrivers.
You should arrive at least ten minutes before your test with the Driving test
appointment sheet and driver licence application fully completed by you and the
registered operator of the test vehicle. Your signature on the form must be
witnessed by a customer service officer. Failure to be ready for the test at the
scheduled time may result in the cancellation of your driving test and the forfeiture
of your driving test fee. You will then be required to book and pay for another
driving test. Make sure that you give at least two working days notice if you need
to alter or cancel your appointment.
Your driving test may be cancelled for any of these reasons:
 your vehicle is modified (unless the modifications have been approved by the
Director-General of the Department of Transport and Main Roads)
 anything (such as a tow bar) obscures the number plate
 your number plate cannot be read from 20 m away
 your vehicle does not meet the minimum standards for test vehicles
 your vehicle does not pass a basic safety check
 L plates are not displayed on the vehicle
 the registered operator of the vehicle has not signed the Examiner’s
authority to drive test vehicle section on the driver licence application
or appointment sheet
 you failed a driving test for the same class of licence earlier the same day
 you did not sign the declaration attached to the application form (F3000)
 you are under 25 and your learner licence logbook has not been checked
and passed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
Your Q-SAFE practical driving test fee will not be refunded if:
 you fail your driving test
 you don’t give two working days notice before altering or cancelling your
appointment or cannot take your driving test at the set time, possibly because
you arrived late
 you do not have the vehicle owner’s permission for the vehicle to be used for
the test
 your test vehicle failed the basic safety check
 you are under 25 and your learner licence logbook has not been checked and
passed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
28
During your Q-SAFE practical driving test
The on-road test time for a class C licence will be not more than 35 minutes, but
you should allow at least one hour for your on-road test and administrative
activities.
When you arrive for your driving test, you will be informed on how the test will be
conducted. Turn off your mobile phone as soon as you arrive at the testing centre,
and leave it off for the duration of the test.
A message from your driving examiner
When you meet your driving examiner they will make the following statements to
you before you start your driving test:
Q-SAFE is designed to evaluate your ability to drive safely and correctly in
different driving situations, which may include a variety of speed zones.
I will be asking you to perform a series of driving tasks throughout your
assessment. You will be given clear directions in ample time.
If I don’t give you any specific directions, please follow the road and be directed
by road signs, signals and road markings.
Do you have any questions?
Then you have a chance to ask questions before your on-road test starts.
The driving examiner will carry out a basic safety check on your vehicle. After the
safety check, the driving examiner will go through a pre-drive check, which
assesses your knowledge of the vehicle’s controls.
Additional information
 You will be expected to perform the driving tasks according to the road rules.
 At no time during your test will you be asked to perform any driving tasks that
are illegal or unsafe.
 If your vehicle is fitted with blind spot mirrors, you must still look over your
shoulder to make sure there are no vehicles in the blind spot.
 Once your driving test has begun, the driving examiner cannot answer any
questions that may influence your driving performance.
 As you drive, the driving examiner will make notes about how well you
complete each task; don’t assume you have made a mistake. It is the driving
examiner’s job to assess your ability to drive safely, but they are also there to
help—so don’t feel intimidated or nervous.
29
Q-SAFE practical driving test
When you do a Q-SAFE practical driving test for a car you will be assessed on a
number of tasks.
Pre-drive check
The pre-drive check asks you to locate and explain the operation of a range of
vehicle controls including wipers, washers, demister, air conditioner, seat
adjustment, hazard lights, mirrors and headlights.
On-road driving test
In your on-road driving test, the driving examiner will check that you perform the
following procedures correctly:
 stopping—use of the vehicle’s parking or foot brake when stopped
 giving way—give way, slow down or stop and give way to vehicles or pedestrians
so they do not have to slow down, stop or take action to avoid your vehicle. This
also applies to reversing your vehicle
 signs, signals and road markings—obey all traffic signs, signals and road
markings, including any warning and guide signs
 moving off, changing direction or lane changing—follow this sequence:
1. look in mirrors
2. indicate your intention
3. check the vehicle’s blind spot by turning your head
4. check traffic, your road position and speed
5. when beginning to move, check for changed traffic conditions
 clutch—control the clutch so that there is a smooth take-up of power to the
drive wheels and smooth gear changing; no clutch coasting
 gears—demonstrate the correct use of gears appropriate for speed, vehicle and
driving conditions
 braking—drive to avoid harsh or abrupt movement by slowing the vehicle
smoothly and progressively. The parking brake is used when the vehicle is
stationary
 speed—drive at a speed that suits the road and traffic conditions (even 10 km/h
can sometimes be too fast)
 observation and scanning—be on guard, always looking for traffic hazards and
possible problems. Look left, right, ahead and behind when approaching a
hazard, then use a driving ‘system’ to deal with it in time—see Hazards, page
138
 mirrors—check rear vision mirrors, including both side mirrors, frequently
30
 following vehicles—in good conditions, travel at least two seconds behind the
vehicle in front of you. Double this gap in poor conditions—see Safe following
distance, page 136
 marked lanes—keep within lane markings. Change lanes only after signalling and
if it is safe to do so
 road position—keep as far left as safe and practical when driving on a road
without marked lanes
 signalling and indicators—give other road users sufficient warning of what you
intend to do—see Indicating and signalling, page 75
 steering—always keep control of the steering wheel. Never:
- put your hands inside the rim of the wheel
- remove your hands or let the wheel ‘go free’
- hold the wheel with your arms crossed or so that the movement of the wheel
is restricted
- operate the wheel with one hand unnecessarily (for example, one arm resting
on the door)
- palm the wheel with one hand
- operate the wheel with the vehicle stationary (‘dry’ steering).
 manoeuvres (classes C or CA)—perform three of the listed manoeuvres (at least
one with a reversing component):
- reverse parking—park the vehicle parallel to and within 45 cm of the
kerb. You can have one attempt with a maximum of two reverse and
one forward movements
- reverse—steer a steady course (in an approximate straight line), starting and
finishing within 50 cm of the kerb. The observation should be predominantly
by turning your head and looking through the rear window
- turn around—within the width of a street, turn the car around with a
minimum number of forward and reverse movements. Do not turn the wheel
when the vehicle is stopped
- U-turn—give way to all other vehicles and pedestrians and have a clear view
of all approaching traffic
- hill start—position the car parallel to and within 50 cm of the kerb and move
off without rolling backwards
- gear changing in automatics—if you are driving an automatic car, you may be
asked to select a lower gear and re-select drive.
31
After the Q-SAFE practical driving test
After you have completed all the driving tasks, the driving examiner directs you
back to the testing office. The examiner will tell you at the end of your test
whether you have passed or failed. You also get feedback on any errors, and a copy
of your Driving assessment report. If you have passed, you pay the licence fee and
have your photo taken. You then get a P1 licence if you are under 25 years of age,
or a P2 licence if you are 25 years of age or older.
You risk a fine if you do not display the correctly coloured P plate on your vehicle
before you start driving.
Note: If you already hold a provisional or open licence, and are upgrading your
licence, it will be re-issued with the new licence class stated on it.
If you failed, don’t panic
Come back after more practice and try again. Before you leave, make sure you
know exactly what you did wrong and how you can improve. You can take the test
as many times as you like, but you must pay each time and can’t re-take the test on
the same day. Your learner licence is current for three years and it is easily renewed.
Don’t push yourself if you are not ready. You have many people to help you
through one of the most important challenges you’ll ever take on. So take
your time.
Provisional licences
Once you have passed your practical driving test, you will get a provisional licence.
Under the graduated licensing system, the type of provisional licence you receive
will depend on how old you are.
If you are under 25, you will get a P1 provisional licence. If you are 25 or older,
you will get a P2 provisional licence.
P1 provisional licence requirements
If you hold a P1 provisional licence and you are under 25, you:
 must display red P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving (rear
only for motorbikes)
 must not use your mobile phone when driving, including hands-free functions
or Bluetooth accessories. Your passengers are banned from using mobile phones
on the loudspeaker function—see Mobile phones, page 35
 may only carry one peer passenger under 21 years (excluding immediate family
members) between 11.00 pm and 5.00 am—see Peer passengers, page 35
32
 are not allowed to drive high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles,
page 35
 must drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration—see Alcohol and drugs,
page 96
 must always carry your licence when you are driving.
If you are 24 years of age when you get your P1 licence, full P1 restrictions will
apply to you until you turn 25. When you turn 25, fewer restrictions will apply for
the balance of the P1 period.
Getting your P2 licence
If you hold a P1 licence and are under 24, to get your P2 licence you will need to:
 hold your P1 licence for at least one year (not including licence suspensions
or cancellations)
 obtain green P plates
 pass a hazard perception test—see below
 pay the hazard perception test fee
 visit a driver licence issuing centre—Department of Transport and Main Roads
customer service centre, Queensland Government Agent Program office or
licence issuing police station.
Note: You must remove the red P plates from your vehicle and replace them with
green P plates before you start driving as a P2 licence holder.
Hazard perception test
In order to graduate to a P2 or open licence, all P1 licence holders must pass
a hazard perception test. The hazard perception test is an additional test that
complements the road rules test and the practical driving test.
The hazard perception test assesses whether your hazard perception skills are
sufficiently advanced to allow you to upgrade from a P1 licence to a P2 or
open licence.
The hazard perception test is an online computer-based test that measures a
driver’s ability to recognise and appropriately respond to potentially dangerous
situations (traffic conflicts) while driving. A traffic conflict is a situation where your
vehicle is on course to hit another road user. If your vehicle needs to slow down or
change course to prevent a crash, then there is a traffic conflict.
When it is time for you to sit the hazard perception test, the Department of
Transport and Main Roads will send you a letter outlining eligibility requirements
and instructions on how to take and prepare for the test. The test is only available
through the Department of Transport and Main Roads website (it is not available at
driver licence issuing centres).
33
Once you have passed the hazard perception test and held your P1 licence for 12
months, you are eligible to upgrade your licence at a driver licence issuing centre.
If you pass the hazard perception test, you will not be required to sit this test again.
Importantly, you will never be able to exit the P1 provisional licence until you have
successfully passed the hazard perception test.
Visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/hpt for more information.
P2 provisional licence requirements
If you hold a P2 provisional licence and you are under 25, you must:
 display green P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving (rear only
for motorbikes)
 not drive high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles below
 drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration—see Alcohol and drugs, page 96
 always carry your licence when you are driving.
If you are aged 25 or over, you must:
 display green P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving.
Provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007
If you obtained your provisional licence before 1 July 2007, you must:
 drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration if you are under 25, or a blood
alcohol concentration below 0.05 if you are 25 or older—see Alcohol and drugs,
page 96
 always carry your licence when you are driving.
P plates
The first year of driving poses the greatest risk of crashes for
young drivers. P plates have been reintroduced to remind
young or inexperienced drivers that they are novices and still
developing their on-road experience. They also help other road users to exercise
caution around P-plated drivers.
A P plate is a sign that measures at least 146 mm x 146 mm and features an
uppercase red letter ‘P’ or an uppercase green letter ‘P’ on a white background. You
can buy P plates from service stations, major retailers and automotive outlets. Check
with your local supplier for cost. You can also download and print a colour template
from www.transport.qld.gov.au/youngdrivers. If you are a P1 or P2 licence holder, you
must not drive a car or ride a motorbike unless a P plate can clearly be seen from:
 the front and rear of the car
 the rear of the motorbike.
34
High-powered vehicles
Research shows that drivers take more risks such as speeding deliberately and driving
recklessly when they are behind the wheel of high-powered or ‘performance’ cars.
That’s why provisional licence holders under the age of 25, whether holding P1 or P2
licences, are not allowed to drive high-powered vehicles, such as those with:
 an engine with a power output of more than 200 kW
 eight or more cylinders
 a turbo-charged or super-charged engine (except a diesel-powered engine)
 a modified engine requiring approval under the Transport Operations (Road Use
Management Vehicle Standards and Safety) Regulation 1999
 a rotary engine that has a capacity of more than 1146 cc.
Check your vehicle’s power specifications on the vehicle manufacturer’s website,
or a car guide website such as www.redbook.com.au or www.carsguide.com.au.
You may request an exemption, but exemptions are considered on a case-by-case
basis in accordance with strict guidelines. If you breach the high-powered vehicle
restriction, a fine and 3 demerit point penalty will apply.
Mobile phones
All drivers are banned from using a mobile phone that is held in the hand while
driving (see page 120). Additionally, the restrictions that apply to learner licence
holders under 25 and their passengers still apply during the P1 period. P1 licence
holders under 25 are banned from using mobile phones at any time while driving,
and this includes using hands-free kits, Bluetooth accessories and loudspeaker
function. Passengers of P1 licence holders are also banned from using mobile phones
on the loudspeaker function.
If you’re under 25, a P1 licence holder and need to use your mobile phone, you may
use it only when you are legally and safely parked—otherwise you risk a fine and 3
demerit points.
Peer passengers
Research shows that the risk of having a crash is higher when a young driver
is carrying more than one passenger of a similar age to them (their peers) in
their vehicle.
When you are driving on your P1 licence, you may only carry one passenger aged
under 21 (excluding immediate family members) between 11.00 pm and 5.00 am. You
may request an exemption, but exemptions are considered on a case-by-case basis
in accordance with strict guidelines. You risk a fine and 3 demerit points if you do
not comply with this restriction.
35
Demerit points
If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points over a one-year period, you will have
the choice between:
 a three-month driving suspension
 a good driving behaviour option for one year.
Further restrictions will be imposed during the good driving behaviour period, or
when you resume driving after the suspension, if you are under 25—see Licence
suspensions, page 157.
If your licence has expired, is suspended, or you are disqualified by a court from
holding or obtaining a driver licence during the provisional licence period, this time
will not contribute to the time for which you must hold that licence.
Sample questions —provisional licences
1. What is the maximum blood alcohol
concentration for a provisional licence
holder under 25? (See page 33)
2. If you are under 25 and hold a
P1 provisional licence, how many
passengers under 21 (other than
family members) are you allowed to
have in the car between 11.00 pm and
5.00 am? (See page 32)
A. 0.05
B. 0.02
C. 0.00
D. 0.08
A. None
B. 1
C. 2
D. 4
3. Which two of the following statements are true for a driver with a P1 provisional
licence? (See page 32)
A. You may use a mobile phone while driving, provided you use a hands-free or
Bluetooth accessory.
B. You may not use a mobile phone while driving, but your passengers can, provided
they do not use the loudspeaker function.
C. You may use a mobile phone while driving, provided you do not become distracted.
D. You may only use a mobile phone in the car when you are legally and safely parked.
4. If you hold a provisional licence, your licence will be suspended or you will have
to comply with a good driving behaviour option if you accumulate how many
demerit points? (See page 36)
A. 4 or more over a one-year period.
B. 4 or more over a three-year period.
C. 12 or more over a one-year period.
D. 12 or more over a three-year period.
36
Open licences
You may be eligible for an open licence if you have held your P1 or P2 licence for
the required period:
 If you were under 23 when you got your P1 licence, you must hold your P2
licence for at least two years (not including licence suspensions or
cancellations) to progress to an open licence.
 If you were 23 when you got your P1 licence, you must hold your P2 licence for
at least one year (not including licence suspensions or cancellations) to progress
to an open licence.
 If you were 24 when you got your P1 licence, you must hold your P2 licence for
at least one year (not including licence suspensions or cancellations) to progress
to an open licence.
 If you were 25 or over when you passed your practical driving test, you would
have been issued with a P2 licence with certain conditions. To graduate to an
open licence you will not be required to undertake the hazard perception test.
Conditions for open licence holders
 You must remove any P plates once you get your open licence.
 Always keep your licence with you when driving, and show it to any police
officer who asks you to do so.
 You must drive with a blood alcohol concentration below 0.05—see Alcohol and
drugs, page 96.
 If you accumulate 12 or more demerit points over a three-year period, this will
result in a minimum three-month suspension, or you will have to observe a
good driving behaviour period for one year—see Accumulation of demerit
points—Queensland licence holders, page 158.
If you pass a Q-SAFE practical driving test for an additional or higher class of
licence and you already hold a Queensland open driver licence, your licence will be
re-issued to you showing the additional or higher licence class.
Probationary and restricted licences
Probationary licences
If you were disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by a court and
you have now served the period of disqualification, you will be issued with a
probationary licence.
37
If you held a P1 or P2 licence before you were disqualified, you must continue to
display the respective coloured P plates on your vehicle if you are driving under a
P1 or P2 probationary licence.
If you held a P provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007 before you were
disqualified, you are not required to display P plates if you are driving under
a P probationary licence.
If you are over the age of 25 and held an open licence before you were disqualified,
you are not required to display P plates on your vehicle while driving under a
probationary licence.
Conditions for probationary licence holders
You must:
 carry your licence at all times when driving
 if you are under 25 years of age, have a zero blood alcohol concentration when
driving—see Alcohol and drugs, page 96.
You may:
 drive any class of vehicle shown on your licence
learn to drive a higher class vehicle as long as you are with someone who holds an
open licence for that class vehicle and has held that licence for at least one year—
see Licence classes, codes and conditions, page 10.
Restricted licences
If you are convicted of a low range drink driving offence but need a licence to earn
your living, you may ask the court that convicts you to grant you a restricted
licence, commonly known as a ‘work’ licence. You must apply to the court for this
licence before the Magistrate decides your period of disqualification.
You are not eligible to apply for this licence if any of the following apply to you:
 You have had another drink driving offence in the past five years.
 You are under 25 years of age and hold a learner or provisional driver licence.
 You did not hold a Queensland provisional or open driver licence at the time
you committed, or were convicted of, the drink driving offence.
 You were driving a motor vehicle that you were not authorised to drive under
your Queensland provisional or open driver licence.
 When tested, your blood alcohol concentration was 0.15 or greater—see Alcohol
and drugs, page 96.
38
 In the past five years, you have had your licence suspended or cancelled, or you
have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence. Note: This
five-year period is calculated backwards from the day your application is made
to the court.
In all cases, you must be able to prove to the court that you need a driver licence to
earn your living.
Conditions for restricted licence holders
 You must hold the restricted licence for the same period as the disqualification
period imposed by the court.
 You may only drive the class of vehicle shown on the licence and drive
the vehicle while carrying and in accordance with conditions stated on
the court order.
 You may also be required to hold a probationary licence for a required
period of time before being eligible for an open licence.
Motorbikes
Class RE
To be eligible for a motorbike (class RE) learner licence, you must have held a
provisional or open licence for another class of vehicle for at least one year during
the past five years.
Class RE licence holders (learners, P1, P2, P type and open licence holders) are only
able to ride a motorbike that is a learner approved motorbike (LAM).
A LAM is a production motorbike that is fitted with an electric motor, or has an
internal combustion engine with an engine capacity of not more than 660mL, and:
 has a power to weight ratio of not more than 150 kW per tonne
 has not been modified other than for an allowable modification
 is stated to be a learner approved motorbike in a list kept by the chief executive
and published on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
To help identify motorbikes that can be legally ridden under a class RE licence, a
LAM indicator will be included on the registration label of approved motorbikes.
A full list of approved motorbikes and more information about the LAM scheme
is available on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
39
You may choose to get your class RE motorbike provisional or open licence through
Q-Ride or by passing the Department of Transport and Main Roads Q-SAFE
practical driving test. The main differences are outlined in the table below.
Q-SAFE Q-Ride
You must hold your class RE learner licence
for six months before you are eligible to apply
for your class RE licence.
You do not need to hold your class RE
learner licence for six months before you
are eligible to apply for your class RE
licence.
You must pass a practical riding test before
you are issued with your class RE licence.
While learning to ride you are assessed
in four competency based units, and
you may get your class RE licence once
you receive your Q-Ride certificate
(competency declaration) from your
Q-Ride provider.
Class R
You must have held your class RE provisional or open licence for at least one year
before learning to ride a class R motorbike.
You may also choose to obtain your class R motorbike licence (provisional or open)
through Q-Ride or by passing the Q-SAFE practical driving test on a class
R motorbike.
A class R provisional or open licence allows you to ride a motorbike of any engine
capacity including a learner approved motorbike and a moped.
Pillion passenger restriction for learner riders
Class RE and R learner licence holders are prohibited from carrying pillion
passengers (including their supervisor) when learning to ride a motorbike on a road.
A learner is still required to be supervised by an appropriately licensed person when
riding a motorbike. If the motorbike has a sidecar, the supervisor may accompany
the learner by being safely seated in the sidecar. If the motorbike does not have a
sidecar, the supervisor may follow at a safe distance on another motorbike or in
another vehicle.
P plates on motorbikes
If you hold a P1 or P2 type licence, you will need to clearly display a red or green
P plate on the rear of your motorbike (including a moped) when riding.
If you already hold an open licence when you get your class RE or R licence,
you will not need to display a P plate when riding.
40
The Q-SAFE method
Conditions for learning to ride
You must:
 obey the conditions shown on your learner licence
 always carry your learner licence when you are learning to ride
 only be taught by a person who holds an open class RE or class R licence and
has held this licence for at least one year
 only learn to ride a learner approved motorbike
 always display an L plate on the rear of the motorbike you are riding or on the
back of a vest worn while riding—see L plates, page 23.
Your first motorbike licence will be for a class RE, which will allow you to ride a
learner approved motorbike. After you have held your class RE provisional or open
licence for at least one year, you may learn to ride a class R motorbike with any
engine capacity under this licence, but you may only be taught by a person who
holds an open class R licence and has held this licence for at least one year.
Note: A learner is still required to be supervised by an appropriately licensed person
when riding a motorbike. If the motorbike has a sidecar, the supervisor may
accompany the learner by being safely seated in the sidecar. If the motorbike does
not have a sidecar, the supervisor may follow at a safe distance on another
motorbike or in another vehicle.
Special rules about mopeds
If you have a class C learner licence and you want to learn to ride a moped,
you must:
 always carry your learner licence when you are learning to ride
 be accompanied by, or ride under the direction of, a person who holds an
open class C, RE or R licence and has held this licence for at least one year.
You cannot take the practical driving test on a moped because it is not
representative of the class of vehicle that may be driven under a class C
or RE licence.
Note: if you hold a C, RE or R provisional or open licence, you are already
authorised to ride a moped without supervision.
41
Q-SAFE practical riding test
You must pass a Q-SAFE practical riding test or a Q-Ride competency
assessment before your provisional or open licence will be upgraded to
include a motorbike class.
For information on booking your practical test, see page 26.
Test vehicles
For your test, you must ride a motorbike that is a standard test vehicle for the
licence you want.
Licence class Vehicle requirement
RE (restricted
motorbike)
A learner approved motorbike.
Note: You cannot take a test on a moped, conditionally registered
motorbike, a motorbike with a sidecar attached or a motortrike.
R (motorbike) A motorbike not stated on the learner approved motorbike list, which is
published on the department’s website.
Note: You cannot take a test on a moped, conditionally registered
motorbike, a motorbike with a sidecar attached or a motortrike.
The vehicle must be registered and pass a basic safety check conducted by the
riding examiner. Before turning up for your test, make sure the vehicle would pass
the safety check by having:
 signalling devices, horn and stop lights that are all working
 brakes and tyres that are in good condition
 mirrors that are adjustable.
If you hold a P1 or P2 provisional licence, bring your P plate to attach to your
motorbike after you pass the test. You will need a red P plate if you hold a P1 type
licence or a green P plate if you hold a P2 type licence. See P plates on motorbikes,
page 40.
Clothing requirements
The Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that you wear the
following clothing when you take your motorbike test:
 pants made from heavy material that cover leg length
 long-sleeved shirt or jacket made from heavy material
 gloves providing appropriate protection
 fully enclosed shoes or boots
 eye protection.
42
You must wear an Australian Standard AS1698 (1988) motorbike helmet when
riding a motorbike, including when taking the test.
A message from your riding examiner
The riding examiner will make the following statements to you before starting your
riding test:
- Q-SAFE is designed to evaluate your ability to ride safely and correctly in
different situations, which may include a variety of speed zones.
- I will be asking you to undertake a series of riding tasks throughout the
assessment. You will be given clear directions in ample time.
- I will follow you during the riding assessment. Please keep me in your vision
and, should we get separated during the assessment, please stop somewhere
safe and legal and wait for me.
- You will be given clear instructions in ample time. Directions will be
given by radio.
- If radio reception of directions given become unclear, pull over somewhere
safe and legal and I will give you further instruction.
- You will be expected to perform the riding tasks when conditions are safe
and in accordance with the road rules.
- Please make any lane changes that are necessary to follow my direction.
- At no time during the assessment will I ask you to perform any riding tasks
that are illegal.
- Once the assessment has commenced, I am unable to answer any questions
that may influence your riding performance.
- Do you have any questions?
43
Pre-ride check
The test will start with the pre-ride check followed by the on-road riding test.
The pre-ride check will involve the riding examiner asking you to locate and explain
the operation of the fuel reserve, choke, kill switch, side stand, horn and headlight/
dip switch.
On-road riding test
The individual on-road test time will be 35 minutes or less for both the class RE and
R licence.
The on-road riding test will include general riding exercises and
low speed manoeuvres.
On your on-road riding test, the riding examiner will check that you do the
following procedures correctly:
 changing road position—giving other road users sufficient warning of what you
intend to do and always checking your mirrors and your vehicle’s blind spot
before changing your position on the road—see Indicating and signalling, page 75
 posture when riding:
- keeping your knees into the tank
- keeping your head up so you are looking well ahead through the corners
- keeping your foot instep on the footrest
- keeping your feet on the footrests except when stopping or moving off
- keeping your feet out and slightly down.
 gear changing—avoiding wheel lock-up by smooth gear changes. A touch to the
accelerator on down changes is recommended
 balance and control—maintaining full balance and control of the motorbike in
all speed and riding conditions
 road position—keeping clear of painted surfaces and metal inspection covers on
the road surface. Beware of oily or loose surfaces, especially near intersections.
The positioning of your motorbike on the road must be suitable for the road
conditions. When in a marked lane, keep within the lane. On a two-way road
where there are no line markings, maintain a road position that enhances
your safety
 required manoeuvres:
- slow ride—riding in a straight line at the speed of a slow walk using the
clutch if necessary to adjust the speed of the motorbike—see Posture when
riding above
- U-turns—giving way to all other vehicles and pedestrians and having a
clear view of all approaching traffic in all directions of travel—see U-turns,
page 72
44
- emergency stop—stopping the motorbike safely with full control from a
speed of no more than 40 km/h. Use all your fingers on the front brake at all
times. Don’t lock the wheels. You are not required to change back through
the gears in this exercise
- hill start—moving off smoothly from a stationary position and travelling
up a moderate incline without the motorbike rolling backwards.
The Q-Ride method
Q-Ride is a competency-based training and assessment program aimed at
improving the quality of learner rider instruction. Q-Ride ensures that participants
continue their training until they can demonstrate they are competent against
set standards.
Q-Ride Registered Service Providers are accredited by the Department of Transport
and Main Roads.
Eligibility
You can sign up for Q-Ride to get your class RE motorbike licence as soon as you
get your class RE learner licence.
Applying for Q-Ride training and assessment
To get your motorbike licence (class RE or R) with Q-Ride, follow these steps:
1. Get started—you need to hold a class RE learner licence to learn to ride a class
RE motorbike, or a class RE provisional or open licence for at least one year to
learn to ride a class R motorbike.
2. Choose—a Q-Ride registered service provider. Your choice may depend on
location, fees and charges.
3. Enrol—in Q-Ride training with a Q-Ride registered service provider. The
registered service provider will ask you to provide some information about your
licence history to determine which class of motorbike you are eligible to learn
to ride.
4. Learn—develop your motorbike riding skills through progressive training. You
must always carry and show your class RE learner, provisional or open licence to
any police officer who asks you to do so. You must only receive instruction
from another rider who holds an open licence for the class of motorbike you are
riding and who has held that licence for at least one year.
5. Certificate—when you have been assessed as attaining the required
competencies by an accredited rider trainer, the Q-Ride registered service
provider may issue you with a competency declaration (Q-Ride certificate) for
the class of motorbike you have successfully learnt to ride.
45
6. Licence—take your Q-Ride certificate together with your driver licence into a
Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre to apply for
either your class RE or R provisional or open licence.
For further information about your local Q-Ride registered service provider, visit
www.transport.qld.gov.au/QRIDE.
Additional road rules for motorbike riders
As a motorbike rider, you are subject to the same road rules that apply to you when
you drive other vehicles. However, because of the different nature of a motorbike,
the following road rules also apply.
 You must wear an approved helmet securely fastened at all times other than
when the motorbike is parked.
 You must always display an L plate on the rear of the motorbike you are
learning to ride or on the back of a vest worn by you while learning to ride—see
L plates, page 23.
 You must sit astride the rider’s seat, face forward and keep your feet on the
rider’s footrests, except to use a foot-operated device on the motorbike or to
remain stable when travelling at low speeds.
 Before carrying a passenger on the class of motorbike you are riding, you must
have held your provisional or open motorbike licence for that class of motorbike
for at least one year.
 You may ride side-by-side with another motorbike rider in one marked lane,
provided you are not more than 1.5 m apart.
Rules for carrying passengers on any motorbike
 Each of your passengers must wear an approved helmet securely fastened at all
times other than when the motorbike is parked.
 You must not carry passengers under eight years of age (except in a sidecar).
 You must not carry more passengers in the motorbike’s sidecar than the sidecar
was designed to carry.
 Your passenger must be seated safely on the pillion seat or in a sidecar attached
to the motorbike.
 Your pillion passenger must not ride on the motorbike unless the motorbike has
a suitable pillion seat and suitable passenger footrests.
 Your pillion passenger on a moving motorbike must sit astride the pillion seat
and face forward with their feet on the passenger footrests.
 Your passenger must not interfere with your effective control of the motorbike.
46
Parking
When parking a motorbike or moped, position at least one wheel as close as
possible to the kerb. Park a motorbike with the sidecar parallel to the kerb.
You must obey the parking rules. For more information, see Parking, page 114.
Preparing to get on the road
You and your passengers (both pillion and sidecar) must wear an Australian
Standard AS1698 (1988) motorbike helmet at all times when riding, unless the
motorbike or moped is parked. It should fit properly (e.g. an adult’s helmet on
a child will offer no protection) and be kept in good condition.
For safety, the Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that both
you and your passengers should wear eye protection, gloves, boots and hard-
wearing, high-visibility clothing, covering legs and arms.
To increase your visibility and safety, the Department of Transport and Main Roads
also recommends you ride your motorbike with the headlight on at all times.
Before riding on the road, check the following safety equipment on your motorbike
is working:
 headlight
 rear and brake light that shows a red light
 rear number plate light (clear)
 rear red reflector
 front and rear brakes
 footrests for you and for the pillion passenger, if the motorbike is registered to
carry a pillion
 muffler
 horn
 chain guard—if the motorbike is chain driven, an appropriate chain guard must
 be fitted
 chain—if the motorbike is chain driven, ensure that the chain is correctly
adjusted and lightly lubricated
 right and left rear-vision mirrors—a left rear-vision mirror is optional if the
motorbike was manufactured before June 1975
 a current registration label on the left side or rear that can be seen clearly from
6 m away
 safe tyres (with a tread at least 1.5 mm deep)
 indicators (if manufactured after 1962).
Note: If you are an employee of, or a contractor or a sub-contractor with Australia
Post, you may ride a motorbike on a footpath or road reserve if:
47
 you are delivering postal articles
 the motorbike engine is not more than 125 mL
 the speed of the motorbike is not more than 10 km/h
 you ride safely, taking care to avoid danger or a crash.
Sample questions—motorbikes
1. As a learner motorbike rider, you: (See page 41)
A. must display one L plate so that it can be seen clearly from the rear of the
motorbike
B. are not required to display L plates
C. must only display L plates when riding on highways
D. are only required to display L plates at night.
2. What type of motorbike can be ridden under a class RE licence? (See page 39)
A. A motorbike with an engine capacity of more than 660 mL.
B. A motorbike with a power to weight ratio of more than 150 kW per tonne.
C. A learner approved motorbike.
3. Motorbike riders must ride: (See page 46)
A. single file in one marked lane
B. no more than two riders side-by-side in one marked lane
C. no more than four riders side-by-side in one marked lane.
4. Is a pillion passenger required to wear a motorbike helmet? (See page 46)
A. Yes.
B. Only if the motorbike has an engine capacity more than 250 mL.
C. No, only the person controlling the motorbike is required to wear a helmet.
Heavy vehicles
To obtain a heavy vehicle licence, you must undergo a practical driving test.
For information on booking your practical test, see page 26.
Test vehicles
For your driving test, you must drive a vehicle that is representative of the class of
vehicle authorised to be driven under the particular class of licence.
The standard test vehicles for each class of licence are:
48
Licence class Vehicle requirement
LR (light rigid) A bus or truck more than 4.5 tonne GVM but not more than 8
tonne GVM.
MR (medium rigid) A bus or truck more than 8 tonne GVM, with not more than
two axles.
HR (heavy rigid) A bus or a truck more than 15 tonne GVM, with at least three
axles.
Note: the test cannot be taken in a bobtail prime mover.
HC (heavy combination) A prime mover more than 15 tonne GVM with at least three
axles and semi-trailer with at least two axles.
A truck more than 15 tonne GVM with at least three axles and
trailer more than 9 tonne GVM with at least two axles.
A vehicle of more than 12 tonne gross vehicle mass (GVM) must be equipped with
at least three portable warning triangles for the test.
On-road diving test times
The on-road driving test times for the different heavy vehicle licence classes are:
 LR—25 to 35 minutes
 MR and HR—60 to 70 minutes
 HC—70 to 80 minutes.
Unless the test is terminated for any reason, the minimum drive time will be
25 minutes for a class LR test, 60 minutes for MR or HR test and 70 minutes
for an HC test.
Uncontrolled and unpredictable events such as road works and traffic crashes may
affect the duration of the test.
Q-SAFE practical driving test
When you do a practical driving test for a heavy vehicle, you will also be assessed
on the following tasks.
Pre-drive check
The pre-drive check asks you to locate and explain a range of vehicle controls
including wipers, washers, demister, air conditioner, seat adjustment, hazard lights,
mirrors, horn and headlights.
On-road driving test
In your on-road driving test, the driving examiner will check that you perform the
following procedures correctly:
49
 reversing exercise—reverse the vehicle around a corner. You can do the
manoeuvre in a left- or right-hand direction. Start and finish reversing parallel
to and within 2 m of the edge of the road. The driving examiner may allow you
two attempts to successfully reverse the vehicle around the corner. Two reverse
movements and one forward movement are allowed for each attempt. The
forward movement for left and right reversing can be as far as the furthest
edge or kerb you are turning from. You should check what you are doing by
looking in your mirrors, although you can glance over your shoulder
occasionally. If you drive a truck with a dog trailer in the test, you may reverse
with or without the trailer steerable axle locked
 gear changing—change down to a lower gear, excluding crawler gears, when the
vehicle is in motion. On a manual vehicle, use the clutch. You must be able to
operate exhaust brakes, two-speed differential, range selector, and so on, if
they are fitted
 hill start—move off smoothly from a parked position and travel up a moderate
incline without the vehicle rolling backwards
 uncouple/recouple requirements—for the class HC licence test, uncouple the
trailer, drive forward approximately 10 m and reverse back onto the trailer to
recouple. Uncouple and recouple the trailer, following all safe practices, in the
correct sequence within 12 minutes. Extra time may be given for some
configurations, e.g. flying saucer type coupling.
Correct sequence and procedure—uncouple
1. Apply the park brake to the vehicle.
2. Alight from the cab facing the vehicle.
3. Secure the wheel chocks (necessary for vehicles that do not have
a spring brake system).
4. Lower trailer/drawbar support legs.
5. Disconnect, retract and secure:
- electric cable
- hydraulic lines
- brake hoses
- chains, where applicable.
6. Release the turntable jaws/pin coupling.
7. Where the vehicle has airbag suspension, operate the air dump valve (where
applicable) to prevent any damage to the vehicle.
8. Drive prime mover or truck forward for a distance of approximately 10 m.
50
Correct sequence and procedure—recouple
1. Ensure pin coupling/jaws are in the correct position for recoupling.
2. Reverse prime mover/truck back towards the trailer. You can stop and check the
position of the prime mover/truck in relation to the trailer coupling. Where
applicable, activate valve to refill airbag suspension.
3. After you have coupled the prime mover/truck and trailer, check that all the
mechanisms are locked by:
- attempting to carefully ease forward against the trailer brakes (i.e. tug test)
- visually checking the coupling to ensure locking pin/jaws have engaged after
first applying the park brake.
4. Connect and check the condition of:
- brake hoses
- hydraulic lines
- electric cables
- chains, if applicable (ensure they are crossed).
5. Wind up trailer support legs and lock in position or secure drawbar leg.
6. Start engine and build up air pressure to operating level.
7. Turn the engine off, walk around the vehicle listening for air leaks and checking
the condition of all tyres.
8. Remove wheel chocks, if appropriate.
9. Check trailer and footbrake stop lights, turn indicators and sound the horn. This
is done to ensure correct functioning of the electrical system.
10. An additional tug test should be conducted on the trailer brake at low speed
after recouple when asked to do so by the driving examiner.
Long vehicle
While driving a long vehicle, you should know the length and height of the
vehicle and your obligations regarding turning, following distance and giving way
to other vehicles.
Synchromesh restriction code
If the driving test is conducted in a vehicle with a synchromesh transmission and
non-synchromesh skills haven’t been displayed in a previous licence test, a licence
condition code B (synchromesh restricted) will be stated on the licence.
For additional road rules for heavy vehicles, see Heavy vehicles, page 102.
51
General provisions
Renewing your licence
To apply for, or renew, your Queensland driver licence, visit a Department of
Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or a driver licence issuing centre.
If you hold an open licence, you may renew your licence online through Services
online at www.tmr.qld.gov.au. The licence may be granted to you for a period up to
five years.
You may renew your licence up to six weeks before it expires, and renewing early
will not reduce your licence period. If your licence has expired, you may have to
show extra identification when you apply to renew it. You will need to pay a fee
when renewing your licence.
If you renew your P1, P2, P type or open licence within five years of the expiry date
of the licence, you will not be required to take another practical driving test before
being granted a further licence of the same class. However, if you are found driving
after your licence expires and before you renew it, you may be charged with
unlicensed driving—see Unlicensed driving, page 165.
Travelling interstate or overseas
If your licence will expire while you are travelling interstate or overseas, and you
still need to drive after it expires and before returning to Queensland, contact the
Department of Transport and Main Roads.
Changing your name or address
If you change your name or address, you must tell the Department of Transport and
Main Roads or its agent within 14 days. Call the Department of Transport and Main
Roads on 13 23 80 for information about what you will need to show to change
your name or address on your Queensland licence.
Alternatively, you can change your address online by visiting Services online at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
Non-Queensland driver licences
Interstate licence
An interstate licence is a driver licence granted to you in another Australian state
or territory. This also includes any external territory of Australia.
52
Foreign licence
A foreign driver licence is a licence to drive a motor vehicle issued to you under a
law of another country. This includes a New Zealand driver licence.
Driving in Queensland
When you may drive in Queensland
If you hold a valid interstate or foreign licence, you are allowed to drive any class of
motor vehicle in Queensland that you are authorised to drive on that licence, as
long as you comply with the conditions (if any) stated on it.
When you are driving, you must have the licence with you and show it straight
away to a police officer when asked to do so.
If your licence is in a language other than English, you should carry a recognised
English translation of it when driving. This translation should be shown to the
police officer at the same time you are required to show your licence. For a list of
approved recognised translators, contact the National Accreditation Authority of
Translators and Interpreting Ltd (NAATI) at website www.naati.com.au.
When you must not drive in Queensland
You must not drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence if:
 your licence is no longer valid because:
- it has expired
- it has been suspended by the issuing authority.
 you have been disqualified by an Australian court from holding or obtaining a
driver licence
 your authority to drive in Queensland on your licence has been suspended
because:
- you have been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit
- you have not paid any fines imposed by a court
- you have gained too many demerit points—see Accumulation of demerit
points—interstate and foreign licence holders, page 162.
 your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because:
- you have a medical condition that adversely affects your ability to drive
safely—see Medical conditions affecting driving, page 18
- the three months residency rule applies to you—see page 54.
53
When the three months residency rule applies
Under the three months residency rule, you can no longer drive on your interstate
or foreign licence, and must obtain a Queensland driver licence to continue driving
in Queensland, if:
 you are an Australian citizen and you have been residing in Queensland for
three months
 you are not an Australian citizen, and:
- before you took up residence in Queensland you were given a permanent visa
or special category visa under the Migration Act 1958 (Cwlth)
- you have now been residing in Queensland for three months.
 you are not an Australian citizen, and:
- after you took up residence in Queensland you were given a permanent visa
or special category visa under the Migration Act 1958 (Cwlth)
- you have now been residing in Queensland for three months since getting
the visa.
Permanent visa and special category visa
A permanent visa and a special category visa allow you to stay indefinitely in
Australia. A visa, such as a student visa, that allows you to stay in Australia for a
limited time, or until a certain event happens or while you have a special status, is not
a permanent visa or special category visa.
If you need to drive in Queensland
If your licence has expired or your authority to drive in Queensland has been
withdrawn because of the three months residency rule and you still need to drive,
you may be eligible to be granted a Queensland driver licence—see Applying for a
licence, page 14.
Obtaining a Queensland driver licence
If you hold an interstate licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same
class as your interstate licence, you will need to:
 show your interstate licence and supporting evidence of identity
 show evidence of your Queensland residence
 surrender your interstate licence.
You may also be required to:
 show evidence that you are medically fit to drive safely
 pass an eyesight test
54
 pay the licence fee, if you wish to purchase an additional period.
If you hold a foreign licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same
class as your foreign licence, you will need to:
 show your foreign licence and a recognised translation of the licence if it is not
in English
 show supporting evidence of identity
 show evidence of your Queensland residence.
You may also be required to:
 show evidence that you are medically fit to drive safely
 pass an eyesight test
 pay the road rules test fee and pass the test
 pay the practical driving test fee and pass the test
 pay the licence fee.
If you have genuine difficulty in understanding or speaking English, you may be
assisted by an approved interpreter while you take your road rules test. The
Department of Transport and Main Roads may organise an interpreter for you.
You must not continue to drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence
once you have been granted a Queensland driver licence.
If any of the following happens, you will not be eligible to be granted a Queensland
driver licence until the period of suspension or disqualification has ended:
 your licence has been suspended by the issuing authority
 you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by an
Australian court
 your authority to drive in Queensland has been suspended because you have:
- been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit
- gained too many demerit points
- not paid any court fines.
For more information about unpaid court imposed fines, contact the State
Penalties Enforcement Registry on 1300 365 635 or view their website at
www.sper.qld.gov.au.
If your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because you have a
medical condition that affects your ability to drive safely, you will not be eligible
for a Queensland driver licence until your doctor gives you a medical certificate
stating that you are medically fit to drive again—see Medical conditions affecting
driving, page 18.
55
My name’s Tegan Crick and a crash on Mothers Day 2007 left me a
C5 paraplegic. If you’ve been injured in a car crash or lost a friend or
family member, now you can tell your story at a very special website.
I’ve already shared my story, please share yours. It could change or
save someone’s life.
q
t
l
h
h

0
0
4
7
Road rules
 Signs and signals
 Speed limits
 Making turns
 Roundabouts
 Indicating and signalling
 Giving way
 Road positioning
 Hazardous localities
 Alcohol and drugs
 Heavy vehicles
 Other rules and responsibilities
 Rules for other road users
57
Signs and signals
Signs
Traffic signs and signals are an essential part of the road traffic system. Paying
attention to traffic signs helps you move around safely and efficiently.
There are three common types of traffic signs:
 regulatory signs
 warning signs
 guide signs.
Regulatory signs
You must obey the instructions on these signs.
Stop
Stop and give way to all other vehicles approaching, entering
or already on the intersection. If you turn at the intersection,
you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you
are entering.
Give way
Slow down or stop and give way to all other vehicles
approaching, entering or already on the intersection. If you turn
at the intersection, you must also give way to pedestrians
crossing the road you are entering.
Roundabout
Slow down or stop
and give way to all
vehicles on the
roundabout.
No U-turn
Do not make a U-turn on
a length of road where
this sign applies.
Wrong way—
go back
This sign warns you
that you are driving in
the wrong direction
along an exit ramp of
a motorway.
No turns
Do not turn right or left
or make a U-turn at the
intersection—you must
only drive in the direction
indicated by the arrow.
58
No left turn
Do not turn left at
the intersection.
Keep left
You must drive to the left
of this sign.
No right turn
Do not turn right or
do a U-turn at the
intersection.
Two way
Vehicles travel in both
directions on this road.
No entry
Do not drive onto the
road beyond this sign.
One way
You must drive only in
the direction indicated
by the arrow.
No overtaking or passing
Overtaking or passing another vehicle is not allowed
from the NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign to:
 a distance past the sign indicated on the sign
 the end of the bridge, if the sign applies
to a bridge
 the end of a narrow length of road, if the sign
applies to a narrow length of road
 an END NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign.
Trucks and buses use low gear
Trucks and buses must drive in a gear low enough to
limit their speed without relying on the primary brake.
Used on steep routes.
Keep left unless overtaking
When you drive past this sign on a multi-lane road,
you must not drive in the right lane unless overtaking,
turning right, making a U-turn, avoiding an obstacle
or driving in congested traffic.
For more regulatory signs, see Hazardous localities, page 92.
59
Speed limit signs
You must not drive
faster than the km/h
speed shown in the
circle. In poor
conditions it is safer
to drive slower than
the speed limit
—see Bad weather,
page 140.
The (speed limit)
AREA sign indicates
the speed limit
within the area you
are about to enter.
The END (speed limit)
sign indicates that
the previous speed
limit has ended and
the general default
speed limit outside a
built up area applies.
The END (speed
limit) AREA sign
indicates you are
leaving the area
covered by the
area speed limit
and re-entering
a general speed
limit area.
Some speed limit signs show times or days that the limit
applies, e.g. in school zones. Other variable speed limit signs
have a changeable electronic display to show the current
speed limit, e.g. around sports venues. These variable speed
limit signs may have different colours to the normal speed
restriction sign.
Shared zone
Give way to
pedestrians and do
not drive faster than
the km/h speed
shown in the circle
between this sign
and the next END
SHARED ZONE sign.
End shared zone
You have reached
the end of a shared
zone and the
previous speed limit
applies. Standard
rules for giving way
to pedestrians apply.
60
Warning signs
These signs warn you of hazards.
Steep descent
or steep
downgrade
Railway level
crossing ahead
Railway level
crossing.
Flashing signal
ahead
Roundabout
ahead
GIVE WAY
sign ahead
STOP
sign ahead
Traffic lights
ahead
Side road
intersection
Crossroad
intersection
T-intersection
Divided road End divided
road
Road narrows Merging traffic
Added lane One-lane
bridge
Arrows indicate
direction
of traffic
Traffic travels
in each
direction
Turn Reverse turns Curve Reverse curves Winding road
61
Sharp
depression in
road
Water flows
across road
Raised area on
road
Road hump Advisory
speed limit
School Pedestrian
crossing
ahead
Pedestrian
crossing
Children could
be on the road
Maximum safe
speed in good
conditions
Children
getting on
and off buses
School bus
turning
People on
bicycles may
be using the
road
Pedestrians
may be using
the road
Trucks
crossing or
entering
Beware of
kangaroos
Low clearance
ahead
Low-flying
aircraft ahead
Hazard ahead.
Be prepared
to take action
Slippery road
62
Hazard markers
You will see these signs on hazards on the road. They show you the direction to
take when driving past the hazard. You must obey these signs. The points of the
V-shaped bars are the direction you must drive.
Unidirectional hazard markers
Drive to the left of the hazard.
Drive to the right of the hazard.
Bidirectional hazard markers
Drive either side of the hazard.
Width markers
These signs are normally used in pairs. They show the width of a bridge, stock grid
crossing or a narrow section of road.
Drive to the right of the sign.
Drive to the left of the sign.
Guide and information signs
These signs give you information about safe road use, routes, directions,
destinations and points of interest.
63
Form one lane
The number of marked lanes for vehicles travelling in the same
direction has been reduced to one. Form a single lane with
other drivers.
Turn left at any time with care
Give way to all bicycles and pedestrians on the slip lane.
Give way to all vehicles on the road you are entering.
Slow vehicles use left lane
You may see this sign at the beginning of a long or steep climb
where a slow-moving vehicle may delay other vehicles. If you are
driving a slow-moving vehicle, use the left lane and leave the
other lane clear for passing vehicles.
No through road
The road you are about to enter is a dead end.
Reduce speed now
The motorway you are on is ending. Slow down from the
motorway speed limit to the much slower speed limit on the
next section of road.
Services
The services shown on this sign are available on the road ahead
or on a side road, and include first aid, tourist information,
caravan parks or meals. The sign may also show your distance
from these services.
Local traffic only
The road past the sign is not intended for through traffic. The
sign may be at the entrance to a local area or at detours where
local traffic is allowed to enter the work area.
Tourist drive information
A scenic drive or route, which connects a
number of tourist attractions, goes this way. The
route may be identified by a particular number.
64
Traffic lights
Traffic lights control the flow of traffic and pedestrians to improve safety and
access to roads. You should drive at a speed that gives you time to react if the
traffic lights change.
If you disobey a red or yellow traffic light, you may receive an infringement notice
from police. If you disobey a red traffic light, you may be sent a Photographic
detection device offence notice in the mail—see Red light cameras, page 153.
For information about how cyclists and pedestrians should respond to traffic lights,
see Rules for other road users, page 122.
Obeying traffic lights
Stop
You must not drive past the STOP line at the red
traffic light or, if there is no STOP line, the
traffic light.
You must not drive in the direction of the
red traffic arrow past the STOP line at the traffic
light or, if there is no stop line, the traffic light.
Stop if it is safe to do so
You must not drive past the STOP line at the
yellow traffic light or, if there is no STOP line, the
traffic light.
If it is unsafe to stop, for example if you are very
close to the light when it changes from green to
yellow, you may proceed through the yellow
light.
65
Drive with caution
If you face a flashing yellow traffic light or arrow, you may drive past it applying
give way rules and caution to avoid a collision with other vehicles and pedestrians.
Drive past the light
Drive past the green
traffic light or
arrow, as long as the
intersection is clear.
Traffic lights showing a
white B light
If you are driving a bus, taxi,
limousine, emergency
vehicle or a bicycle, you may
drive past the white B light.
Obeying lawful directions
Police officers and Department of Transport and Main Roads inspectors
Police officers and Department of Transport and Main Roads inspectors may direct
road users with hand signals. A direction given by a police officer overrules a give
way or stop sign, or a traffic light.
You must obey these signals and any directions given.
Stop where indicated and wait Go as directed
Stop
Traffic controllers
A traffic controller may direct traffic at or through a worksite. You must obey a
lawful direction or signal given by a traffic controller within a designated worksite.
Stop Slow Slow
66
Sample questions—signs and signals
1. What does this sign mean? (See page 59)
A. Danger—road bends sharply to the right.
B. You must not turn right.
C. Speed zone ends.
D. No sharp right hand bends ahead.
2. When a traffic light turns from green to yellow, you should: (See page 65)
A. speed up and go through the lights before they turn red
B. stop, even if you must stop on the intersection and then reverse back
to the stop line
C. stop, even if you are in the intersection
D. stop if you can do so safely before reaching the stop line.
3. What does this sign mean? (See page 58)
A. U-turns allowed.
B. No right turn.
C. Give way to vehicles on the roundabout.
D. Turning area for heavy vehicles ahead—give way.
4. What does this sign mean? (See page 59)
A. Vehicles travel in both directions on this road.
B. No right or left turn.
C. No parking.
D. No U-turns allowed.
5. What does this sign mean? (See page 61)
A. Crossroad intersection ahead.
B. Helicopter landing pad ahead.
C. Ambulance station ahead.
D. Hospital emergency entrance ahead.
67
Speed limits
In Queensland, all speed limits are set in accordance with part 4 of the Manual of
uniform traffic control devices. This approach is aimed at ensuring speed limits are
consistent and credible, and a balance is provided between increased safety, urban
amenity and traffic efficiency for all road users.
The faster you drive, the longer it takes you to stop, and the harder you hit in
the event of a crash. If you drive too fast around corners, you may lose control
of your vehicle.
Speed limit sign
A speed limit sign has a number in a circle on it showing the maximum
speed in km/h that you may drive your vehicle on the road in good
conditions. In poor weather or hazardous conditions, you should drive
at a lower speed to suit those conditions. You must not exceed the
sign posted speed limit even when overtaking.
Learner and provisional licence holders
There are no specified reduced speed limits in Queensland for learner or provisional
licence holders. You may drive according to the speed limit for the area in which
you are driving.
In a built-up area
The default speed limit on a road in a built-up area is 50 km/h. This
means you may only drive at a maximum speed of 50 km/h in a
built-up area, unless you see a speed limit sign on the road showing a
different speed limit.
Not all roads in a built-up area will have a speed limit sign on them. In
that case, you should only drive at a maximum speed of 50 km/h until
you pass a speed limit sign showing a different speed limit.
A built-up area includes any area where there are buildings on land next to a road,
or street lighting, at intervals of not more than 100 m, for a distance of 500 m. If
the road is less than 500 m long, it includes the whole road.
This includes roads in residential, commercial and industrial areas.
Outside a built-up area
The default speed limit on a road outside a built-up area is 100 km/h unless
otherwise signed. On a small number of higher standard roads, you may be allowed
to drive at a maximum speed limit of 110 km/h, but only if a speed limit sign on the
road shows that speed limit.
68
Heavy vehicles over 12 tonne GVM or buses over 5 tonne GVM are restricted to
travelling at a maximum speed of 100 km/h, regardless of any higher speed limit
that may be shown—see Speed limiters, page 104.
Specific speed zones
A length of road that has a specific speed limit applying to it is known
as a speed zone. A speed zone is always defined by a speed limit sign
at the start of the zone and another speed limit sign showing a
different speed limit at the end of the zone. If you turn off this road
into another road before you see another speed limit sign, you should
not drive any faster than the default speed limit on the other road
until you see a speed sign showing a different speed limit.
Variable speed zones
A variable speed zone has different speed limits applying in the zone
at different times of the day or days of the week. These different
speed limits may be shown by special speed limit signs that may be
electronically controlled. These signs have different colours to the
normal speed limit signs.
An example of a variable speed zone is a school zone. The maximum
speed limit in a school zone may be shown either by normal school
zone signs or by special electronic signs, and is usually 40 km/h or 60
km/h. This speed limit only applies on school days between the hours
shown on the sign. At any other time, the speed limit shown on the
last speed limit sign before you enter the school zone still applies. School zone
hours and speed limits may differ between schools, so read the sign, read the time
and read your speed.
See also Speed limit signs, page 60.
Warning sign with advisory speed limit
This sign tells you what the recommended speed, in good driving
conditions, should be through the curves ahead. It is placed where
extra caution is needed and where the speed of your vehicle should
be reduced temporarily.
See also Warning signs, page 61.
69
Sample questions—speed limits
1. What does this sign mean? (See page 68)
A. You must travel more than 60 km/h.
B. You must not travel more than 60 km/h.
C. You are on Highway 60.
D. Children’s crossing—slow down.
2. Can you legally drive over the speed limit? (See page 68)
A. Yes, as long as you do not go over the speed limit by 10 km/h.
B. Yes, when you are overtaking a slower moving vehicle.
C. No.
D. Yes, when you have a good excuse.
3. Speeding is dangerous because: (See page 68)
A. the faster you drive, the more time and space you need to stop
B. increasing speed also increases the severity of crashes
C. driving too fast around a corner can cause you to lose control of your vehicle
D. all of the above.
4. What is the maximum speed limit (unless otherwise sign-posted) in a built-up
area? (See page 68)
A. 70 km/h
B. 80 km/h
C. 50 km/h
D. 60 km/h
5. What does this sign mean? (See page 69)
A. 40 km/h is the advised maximum speed to travel around
the curve ahead under good conditions.
B. Winding road for next 40 km.
C. 40 km/h is the legal maximum speed limit for the curve
ahead when the road is wet.
D. You can only turn right for the next 40 km.
70
Making turns
Turning
Before you turn you must indicate for long enough to tell other road users.
Left turns
 If turning left at an intersection, position your
vehicle so you are close to the far left side of
the road.
 If there is a slip lane, the left turn must be
made from the slip lane.
Turning left on a multi-lane
road with traffic arrows
When you turn left at an intersection from a
multi-lane road, you must approach and enter the
intersection from within the left lane unless:
 there is a slip lane for left turns
 there is an obstruction in the left lane
 road markings allow the turn to be made from
another lane
 your vehicle is showing a DO NOT OVERTAKE
TURNING VEHICLE sign.
Right turns
When turning right into a
two-way road, keep left of
the centre of the road you
enter. If the road is marked
with turn lines to show the
path to take when turning,
follow the turn lines
When turning right from a
one-way street, drive up to
the intersection, keeping
your vehicle close to the
right and parallel to the side
of the road
When turning right from a
one-way street, you must
make the turn as indicated
by the arrows
71
Turning right at unmarked intersections
When you turn right from a two-way road at an
unmarked intersection, pass to the right of the centre of
the intersection unless turn lines indicate differently.
Give way rules apply.
Tips—Turning
When turning:
 check your road position
 check the position of approaching traffic
 check the road markings
 check traffic signs
 check the direction of traffic
 obey the give way rules
 give way to pedestrians
 make sure your entry position is correct.
U-turns
You must only make a U-turn when necessary.
You can make a U-turn if:
 you have a clear view of approaching traffic
 you give way to all traffic and pedestrians
 you can safely make a U-turn without obstructing
the free movement of traffic
 there are no signs or road markings prohibiting
a U-turn.
Do not make a U-turn at traffic lights, unless there is a sign that states you can.
Turning across painted traffic islands
You may drive on or over a painted island surrounded
by one continuous line for up to 50 m to enter or
leave the road or to enter a turning lane that begins
immediately after the painted island.
You must not drive on or over a painted island
surrounded by one continuous line if the island is at a
merge point and separates vehicles travelling in the
same direction or if the island separates parts of a
road to create a slip lane. 72
Roundabouts
 Drive clockwise around
the roundabout.
 Follow the road arrows and
direction signs.
 Drive within marked lanes.
 Indicate when you are going
to change lanes.
This sign means that
you are approaching
a roundabout
This sign means that you
must give way to all
vehicles on the roundabout
Driving on a roundabout with marked lanes
To make a left turn at the roundabout:
1. signal left as you enter the roundabout
2. enter the roundabout from the left marked
lane or line of traffic
3. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
4. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane, drive
in the direction of the arrows. If the arrows
indicate two or more directions, you may drive
in any of the directions
5. continue to signal left as you exit
the roundabout
6. turn off your indicator after you have left
the roundabout.
To drive straight ahead at the roundabout:
1. enter the roundabout from the left or right lane
or line of traffic (do not use your indicator as
you enter the roundabout when going
straight ahead)
2. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
3. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane, drive in
the direction of the arrows. If the arrows indicate
two or more directions, you may drive in any of
the directions
4. signal left as you exit the roundabout
5. turn off your indicator after you have
left the roundabout.
73
To make a right or U-turn at the roundabout:
1. signal right as you enter the roundabout and
continue to signal right while driving on the
roundabout
2. enter the roundabout from the right marked lane
or line of traffic
3. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
4. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane, drive in
the direction of the arrows. If the arrows indicate
two or more directions, you may drive in any of
the directions
5. signal left as you exit the roundabout
6. turn off your indicator after you have left
the roundabout.
Lane changes are permitted on roundabouts as long
as they are conducted legally and safely.
Cyclists may travel around the roundabout in either
lane to exit more than halfway around but when in
the left lane must give way to vehicles exiting
the roundabout.
Only use the left lane to leave the roundabout halfway
around or earlier, unless traffic lane arrows indicate
otherwise. In this diagram, the path taken by
vehicle 1 is illegal.
Giving way at roundabouts
At a roundabout you must give way to vehicles
already on the roundabout.
In this situation, vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1,
because vehicle 1 is already on the roundabout.
Tips—Roundabouts
Keep a special look out for motorbike riders and cyclists as they can be hard to see. Also
watch out for large trucks as they may need more space to complete their manoeuvre.
74
Indicating and signalling
You must signal your intention to:
 stop or slow down—use brake lights or a hand signal
 turn right, move right or make a U-turn—use indicators or hand signal
 turn left or move left—use indicators only (there is no left hand signal).
You must give the change of direction signal for long enough to give sufficient
warning to other drivers and pedestrians. Turn off your indicator after you have
done the manoeuvre. You must signal for at least five seconds when moving off
from a parked position.
If the continuing road at a T-intersection bends to the left or right, you must
indicate left or right if you are turning off the continuing road and going
straight ahead.
Vehicle must indicate right if the
continuing road curves to the left
Vehicle must indicate left if the
continuing road curves to the right
Hand signals
There are two official hand signals.
About to stop or slow down About to turn, move right or
make a U-turn
Using hand signals is the only time when part of your body may protrude outside
the vehicle. Do not use hand signals to tell drivers behind to overtake—this can
be dangerous.
75
Using your horn
You may only use the horn of your vehicle to warn other road users of your
approach or the position of your vehicle.
Sample questions—turns, roundabouts
and signalling
1. You are driving your vehicle towards a multi-lane roundabout. You want to travel
straight through the roundabout to the road opposite. What lane must you take?
(See page 73)
A. You must enter and leave the roundabout in the
left lane.
B. You may enter and leave the roundabout in either
lane.
C. You must enter and leave the roundabout in the
right lane.
D. You must move to the left lane before the
roundabout, then leave by the right lane.
2. You can do a U-turn at an intersection with traffic lights: (See page 72)
A. between 9.00 pm and 6.00 am
B. if there is no oncoming traffic
C. if the traffic lights are green
D. only when there is a U-TURNS PERMITTED sign.
3. Cars A and C are travelling straight ahead, car B is turning right. In what order
should they go through the roundabout? (See page 74)
A. Car B, then car C, then car A.
B. Car B, then car A, then car C.
C. Car A, then car B, then car C.
D. Car C, then car A, then car B.
4. When are you allowed to sound your horn? (See page 76)
A. Only in a built-up area.
B. To say good-bye to friends.
C. At anytime.
D. To warn others of your approach.
76
Giving way
Give way, for a driver or pedestrian means:
 if a driver or pedestrian is stopped—remain stationary until it is safe to proceed
 in any other case—slow down and, if necessary, stop to avoid a collision.
Learners will be tested in detail about giving way, so learn every rule before taking
the written test. Give way rules are designed to allow road users and pedestrians to
move predictably without the danger of a crash. Drivers who don’t give way are
dangerous to themselves and other road users.
GIVE WAY and STOP
GIVE WAY and STOP signs are placed at intersections where extra care is needed
because of limited visibility, or where vehicles on the other road have priority.
STOP lines and GIVE WAY lines on the road have the same meaning as STOP signs
and GIVE WAY signs, in case a sign is missing, e.g. stolen or knocked down. This also
applies at railway level crossings.
GIVE WAY signs
When you face a GIVE
WAY sign or GIVE WAY
line at an intersection,
you must slow down or,
if necessary, stop.
You must then give way
to vehicles approaching,
entering or on the
intersection. If you turn at
the intersection, you must
also give way to
pedestrians crossing the
road you are entering.
Vehicle 2 must give way
to vehicle 1
Vehicle 2 must give way
to vehicle 1
77
Do not drive past a GIVE WAY sign
on a narrow section of road when
a vehicle is approaching.
STOP signs
When you face a STOP sign or STOP line, you must
bring your vehicle to a complete stop just behind the
STOP line. You must give way to vehicles approaching,
entering or on the intersection. If you turn at the
intersection, you must also give way to pedestrians
crossing the road you are entering. If there is no STOP
line, you should stop where you have a clear view of
the intersection before entering it.
Vehicle 2 must stop and
give way to vehicle 1
Giving way at GIVE WAY and STOP signs
When two or more drivers face each other at STOP or GIVE WAY signs at an
intersection, they must first give way to all other vehicles and pedestrians. They
then apply the give way rules—see also Giving way to the right on page 79.
After both vehicles have stopped
and given way to all other vehicles,
vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2
because vehicle 1 is turning right
across vehicle 2’s path
After both vehicles have given way
to all other vehicles and pedestrians,
vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1
because it is turning right across
vehicle 1’s path
Giving way when changing lanes
When you are changing lanes, you must give way to the traffic already in the lane
you are moving to.
78
Giving way to the right
In all these situations, vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2
When you come to a crossroad intersection, you must give way to all vehicles on
your right if they are approaching, entering or on the intersection.
However, you do not have to give way to vehicles:
 coming from the opposite direction and turning right at the intersection
 making a U-turn
 facing a STOP or GIVE WAY sign.
Giving way when merging
Example 1
When lines of traffic
merge, you must
give way to any
vehicle that is ahead
of you.
In example 1, Vehicle
B gives way to
vehicle A.
Example 2
If your lane comes to
an end, you must give
way to traffic already
in the lane you are
moving to.
In example 2, Vehicle A
gives way to vehicle B.
Giving way when making a U-turn
You must give way to all vehicles and pedestrians
when you make a U-turn—see U-turns, page 72.
Vehicle 1 must wait for vehicle 2 to pass before making the
U-turn
79
Giving way to emergency vehicles
You must do everything practical to give way to an emergency vehicle sounding a
siren, bell or flashing warning lights—see also Emergency vehicles, page 130.
Giving way to buses
You must give way to a bus ahead of you with this sign on its
right-hand rear side, when you are in a built-up area and in a
70 km/h or less zone, if the bus is signalling to enter traffic from:
 a bus stop bay
Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus leaving a bus stop in a specially constructed bus bay
 the shoulder of the road
Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus moving away from the road shoulder or the left side of the road
 the bus zone or bus stop
Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus leaving a bus zone or a bus stop
Giving way from a slip lane with or without a
TURN LEFT AT ANY TIME WITH CARE sign at the intersection
When you drive onto a road from a slip lane with or
without a TURN LEFT AT ANYTIME WITH CARE sign on it,
you must give way to all bicycles and pedestrians on the
slip lane and all vehicles on the road you are entering.
Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 3. Vehicle 1 may continue
without giving way
80
Giving way at a T-intersection
Vehicle 1 must give way to
vehicle 2
A T-intersection consists of two roads where one road
continues through the intersection and the other road
ends at the intersection.
If you are driving on the road that ends at a
T-intersection, you must give way to all vehicles
travelling on the road continuing through the
intersection if they are approaching, entering or on the
intersection.
Vehicle 2 must give way to
vehicle 1.
If you are on the road that ends at a T-intersection and
a vehicle on the road continuing through the
T-intersection faces a STOP or GIVE WAY sign, you do
not have to give way to that vehicle.
Reversing
You may reverse only when it is safe to do so and only as far as is reasonable.
Tips—Reversing
You should take extra care when reversing near intersections.
Giving way to pedestrians
When you turn at an
intersection, you must
give way to pedestrians
crossing the road you are
entering.
In both situations, the vehicle must give way to the pedestrian
and wait until the pedestrian has crossed before turning
81
Giving way at pedestrian crossings
You must give way to pedestrians on a
pedestrian crossing or pedestrians on or
entering a children’s crossing. If a vehicle
has stopped to give way at a pedestrian
or children’s crossing, you must not
overtake the stopped vehicle. For more
information about sharing the road with
pedestrians, see Sharing with other road
users—pedestrians, page 133.
Giving way when turning right
In both cases, vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1
If you are turning right at an intersection, you must give way to vehicles coming
from the opposite direction if they are approaching, entering or already on the
intersection and are:
 not turning at the intersection
 turning left at the intersection.
However, you don’t have to give way to a vehicle if
it is:
 oncoming, and it is also turning right
 driving on to the road from a slip lane
 making a U-turn
 facing a STOP or GIVE WAY sign.
You must give way if you are turning across the path
of a vehicle.
82
Giving way when entering or leaving a road
You must give way to
vehicles, bicycles and
pedestrians when leaving
land to enter a road, or
entering land from a road.
In both cases, vehicle B must
give way to vehicle A and the
pedestrian before turning
Giving way when there are multiple vehicles
When there are more than two vehicles at an intersection, you must combine the
give way rules.
Vehicles 1 and 3 are not
required to give way to any
other vehicle. Vehicle 2 must
give way to vehicle 3 coming
on the right
Vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 on the right. Vehicle 2 does
not have to give way to any other vehicle. Vehicle 3 must give
way to vehicle 1 on the right. Vehicles 2 and 3 are not required
to give way to one another as their paths will not cross
Giving way from a parked position
Give way to all other vehicles when you drive out of a parking area on the side of
the road or in a median strip. You must signal for at least five seconds—see Parking,
page 114.
Giving way at a railway level crossing
When you face a GIVE WAY or STOP sign or line at a level crossing, you must give
way to a train approaching the level crossing—see Railway level crossings, page 95.
Giving way to horses
When a person in charge of a horse that appears to be hard to control gives a
signal, by raising a hand and pointing to the horse, you must give way. You should
drive to the side of the road, stop your vehicle and turn off the engine. Keep the
engine off and the car stopped until there is no reasonable chance that the noise of
the engine or movement of your vehicle will further upset the horse.
83
Sample questions—giving way
1. Which car must give way? (See page 79)
A. Car 1
B. Car 2
2. In what order should the cars go through the intersection? (See page 78)
A. Car 1, then car 2, then car 3
B. Car 2, then car 3, then car 1
C. Car 3, then car 2, then car 1
D. Car 3, then car 1, then car 2
3. You are stopped at a children’s crossing displaying orange flags. You can drive on
when: (See page 134)
A. pedestrians are not in your vehicle’s path
B. pedestrians have left the crossing and there is no one
about to enter the crossing
C. pedestrians are about to enter the crossing.
4. Which car goes first? (See page 77)
A. Car 1
B. Car 2
5. You are driving car A in a 100 km/h speed zone. Your lane ends and you need to
change lanes (there are line markings). Which is correct? (See page 79)
A. You have to give way to car B as you are moving into
its lane.
B. Car B has to give way to you as you are travelling
ahead of it.
C. Car B has to give way to you as it is in the right lane.
84
Road positioning
Lanes
Lane markings
There are four types of lane markings that indicate where you must travel on the road:
 lane lines
 dividing lines or centre lines
 edge lines
 arrows.
Lane lines
Lane lines are usually broken (A). You can cross broken lines to
turn or overtake with caution. However, lane lines are continuous
(B) close to a controlled situation, such as traffic lights or a STOP
sign. You must not cross continuous lane lines.
Dividing lines or centre lines
You are allowed to cross a single broken dividing line
to overtake a vehicle, to do a U-turn or to enter or
leave a road.
You are allowed to cross a single continuous dividing
line to enter or leave a road. You must not cross a
single continuous dividing line to overtake a vehicle
or to do a U-turn.
You are allowed to cross a dividing line that has a
broken line to the left of a continuous line to
overtake a vehicle, to do a U-turn or to enter or
leave a road.
You are allowed to cross a dividing line that has a
continuous line to the left of a broken line to enter
or leave a road. You must not cross a continuous line
to the left of a broken line to overtake a vehicle or to
do a U-turn.
You must not cross a dividing line that has two
continuous lines.
In each case, entering or leaving a road includes
turning from one road into another road and
entering or leaving private property.
85
Edge lines
You must not drive on or over a continuous white edge line unless you are:
 overtaking a vehicle that is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of
the road
 driving a slow moving vehicle
 driving a vehicle that is too wide or long to fit within the marked lane to the
left of the centre line.
In addition to the above, there are certain times when you can drive on or over a
continuous white edge line for up to 100 metres only. These are:
 turning at an intersection
 entering or leaving the road
 stopping at the side of the road.
Please note that a driver turning left from a multi-lane road must turn from within
the marked lane (or lanes in the case of a long vehicle). If there is a slip lane
however, the left turn must be made from the slip lane.
Arrows
In a lane marked with arrows, you must drive only in the direction
of the arrows.
Overhead lane control
This sign is used above roads. You must not drive in a lane with the
red X above it, even to overtake another vehicle.
Special purpose lanes
Some lanes are for use only by certain vehicles.
Bus lane
You must not drive in a bus lane unless you are driving a bus, taxi or
limousine, or riding a bicycle.
Transit lane
You must not drive in a transit lane during the hours
of operation (the hours will be marked on the transit
lane sign) unless you are driving a vehicle with a
minimum number of people specified by the sign 86
(including the driver), or you are driving a bus, taxi or limousine, or riding a bicycle
or motorbike.
 Transit lane T2—at least 2 people
 Transit lane T3—at least 3 people.
Bicycle lane
Bicycle lanes are intended for use by cyclists. You may stop or park in
a marked bicycle lane unless there are signs or road markings
prohibiting you from doing so. You must give way to bicycles when
stopping or parking.
Exemptions for driving in special purpose lanes
You may drive in a bicycle lane for up to 50 m and all other special purpose lanes
for up to 100 m to:
 enter or leave a road
 overtake a vehicle that is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of
the road
 enter a marked lane or line of traffic from the side of the road.
Keeping left
When you drive on a two-way road, the basic rule is keep
as close as practical to the left.
When you drive on a multi-lane road where the speed limit
is more than 80 km/h, you must not travel in the far right
lane unless you are:
 overtaking
 turning right
 making a U-turn
 avoiding an obstacle
 entitled to drive in that lane because of an official
traffic sign
 driving in congested traffic.
You could be fined for driving in the right-hand lane.
87
Overtaking
Overtaking on the right
The basic rule is that you overtake on the right.
You may overtake a vehicle only if you have a clear view of any
approaching traffic and you can do it safely.
If you are being overtaken
When you are being overtaken, and the overtaking vehicle is
crossing the centre of the road, do not speed up.
Follow these steps for safer overtaking.
1. Keep a safe following distance behind—see Safe following distance, page 136.
2. Check ahead for approaching traffic and other vehicles.
3. Check behind for other vehicles.
4. Signal right to give sufficient warning to other road users.
5. Accelerate and move right but do not exceed the speed limit.
6. Turn off right indicator.
7. Signal left as you move ahead and clear of the vehicle you are overtaking.
8. Move back to the left lane or line of traffic as soon as it is safe.
9. Turn off left indicator.
10. Overtaking more than one vehicle at a time increases your risk of a crash.
Overtaking on the left
You can overtake a vehicle on the left if:
 you are driving on a multi-lane road and the vehicle can be safely overtaken in
a marked lane to the left of the vehicle
 the vehicle is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road and
is indicating right
 the vehicle being overtaken is stationary and it is safe to do so.
You can overtake
a vehicle on the
left if the vehicle
is stationary and
it is safe to do so
You can overtake a vehicle
on the left on a multi-lane
road if it is safe to do so
You can overtake a vehicle on
the left if the vehicle is turning
right and it is safe to do so
88
Overtake correctly or the results could be fatal. Before overtaking, consider:
 Is it necessary? Could I wait?
 Is it safe? Can I see ahead? What is happening behind?
 Is it legal? What are the road markings? What is my speed?
Overtaking or passing
NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING
 You must not drive past this sign when a vehicle is approaching from the
opposite direction.
 You must not overtake another vehicle going in the same direction when you
have passed this sign.
NO OVERTAKING ON BRIDGE
You must not overtake any vehicle on a bridge where
a NO OVERTAKING ON BRIDGE sign appears.
Overtaking long vehicles
You must not overtake a vehicle displaying a DO NOT OVERTAKE
TURNING VEHICLE sign if the vehicle is signalling its intention
to turn left or right, unless you can do it safely.
A long vehicle on a multi-lane road may use the left-hand lane
or the marked lane next to the left lane to turn left—see
Sharing with other road users—Heavy vehicles, page 130.
Overtaking cyclists
You must leave a safe distance between your vehicle and a cyclist when you are
overtaking or passing—see Sharing with other road users—Cyclists, page 132.
89
Motorway/highway driving
Motorways and highways are divided roads designed for
fast-moving vehicles.
For safety reasons, slower vehicles and pedestrians are not
allowed on these roads. Most motorway entrances list the
vehicles not allowed to travel on the road.
If you face the sign, WRONG WAY—GO BACK, as you enter a
motorway, stop and reverse back when it is safe to do so—you
are on an exit ramp.
On a motorway you must:
 be prepared to give way to vehicles already on the motorway as you enter along
the on-ramp
 not stop except in an emergency or if you break down. If you must stop, use the
emergency lane or bay and switch on your hazard lights
 not travel in the emergency lane
 not make U-turns
 not drive in the right lane unless overtaking, avoiding an obstruction or
travelling in congested traffic
 check behind and signal before you overtake
 signal for long enough to give sufficient warning to other road users before you
change lanes
 enter the exit lane and slow to the appropriate speed when you are about to
leave the motorway.
Tips—Motorway driving
 Plan your route before you enter a motorway.
 When entering the motorway, look for a gap between the vehicles in the closest
lane and safely build up speed on the on-ramp so you enter at the motorway
traffic’s speed.
 Watch for other vehicles entering the motorway from an on-ramp and adjust your
speed to allow them to enter safely.
 Be ready and in the correct lane as your exit approaches.
 If you miss your exit, continue to the next exit.
90
Sample questions—road positioning
1. When entering a freeway using an on-ramp: (See page 90)
A. give way to vehicles on the freeway and adjust your speed accordingly
B. vehicles on the freeway should give way to you
C. stop and wait for a gap.
2. What distance are you allowed to drive in a special purpose lane, not being a
bicycle lane when entering or leaving a road? (See page 86)
A. Not at all
B. 25 m
C. 50 m
D. 100 m
3. Where the road is marked with two continuous dividing lines, when may you
cross the double lines? (See page 85)
A. To overtake a vehicle in front.
B. To turn into a driveway.
C. Not at any time.
D. To do a U-turn.
4. You are driving car 1. In what direction must you travel? (See page 86)
A. Turn right or go straight ahead.
B. Turn right only.
C. Straight ahead only.
D. Turn left only.
5. You are driving behind a truck that is signalling and starting to turn left. The
truck is displaying a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign and is in the
second lane from the left side of the road. You also want to turn left. What must
you do? (See page 89)
A. If it is unsafe to overtake, allow the truck to complete
its turn before you turn left.
B. Use the far left lane to pass the truck and turn left.
C. Sound your horn and quickly pass the truck on the left
before it turns.
D. Indicate and quickly pass the truck on the right-hand
side before it turns.
91
Hazardous localities
Roadwork sites
Roadworks improve the roads for everyone, ensuring a safe, more efficient and
more convenient road network.
Safety around roadworks
Driving safely through roadwork sites requires road users to reduce speed and
increase attention.
 Drive to suit the changed road conditions.
 Keep an eye out for roadworkers.
 Stay calm. Be patient.
 Expect the unexpected.
 Be alert. Always follow road signs and traffic controller instructions.
 Keep to the reduced speed limit throughout the roadworks.
 Observe the roadworks signs. If you don’t see someone working there, they may be
out of view.
 Ensure you are in the correct lane to avoid last minute lane changes.
 Plan your trip ahead to ease any delays—check the RACQ website at www.racq.com.
au or the website of the relevant local authority to see if any roadworks are identified
along the route of your trip.
 Keep a safe distance between your vehicle and other vehicles, traffic barriers,
construction equipment and roadworkers.
 Consider using an alternative route.
When travelling through roadworks, remember you can’t control the traffic conditions,
only your reaction to them.
Roadwork signs
Roadwork signs are provided to ensure everyone’s safety, and are enforceable and
regulated by law. Disobeying roadworks signs means:
 you are committing an offence, which may lead to fines and licence demerit
points
 you may be liable for damage caused to roadwork equipment and materials
 your insurance claim may be void
 vehicles may be damaged by loose stones and gravel.
The ROADWORK AHEAD sign gives advance warning of
roadwork sites.
Be prepared for changed road conditions and slow down
if required.
92
The WORKERS sign is a temporary sign that warns motorists that
there are roadworkers ahead on or adjacent to the travelled
path. This sign is only used while workers are in the area.
Drive with due care and attention for your own and
roadworkers’ safety.
This multi-message sign gives advance warning of roadwork
sites, and imposes a speed limit that applies until the next speed
limit sign.
You are required to reduce speed to, or below the speed limit
indicated.
This multi-message sign warns motorists that there are
roadworkers ahead on or adjacent to the road, and imposes a
speed limit that applies until the next speed limit sign.
You are required to reduce speed to, or below the speed limit
indicated.
The SPEED LIMIT sign is used at roadworks to create a temporary
speed zone, and indicates the speed limit that applies until the
next speed limit sign.
You MUST obey all speed limit signs.
The STOP/SLOW bat is used by a traffic controller.
You must stop at a safe distance from the traffic controller and
wait when facing a STOP bat. You may proceed with caution
when faced with a SLOW bat.
The TRAFFIC CONTROLLER AHEAD/PREPARE TO STOP sign gives
advance warning that traffic may be required to stop in
compliance with the directions of a traffic controller. It is only
used when a traffic controller is on duty.
This multi-message sign gives advance warning that traffic may
be required to stop in compliance with the directions of a traffic
controller.
Do not overtake other vehicles when approaching the traffic
controller.
The PREPARE TO STOP and SIGNALS AHEAD signs give advance
warning of temporary traffic signals.
93
You should be prepared to obey the traffic signals ahead.
The STOP HERE ON RED SIGNAL sign is used to indicate where
traffic must stop when faced with a red light and there is no
stop line marked on the road.
The TRAFFIC HAZARD AHEAD sign is only used for emergency
purposes to warn motorists of an unexpected hazard ahead.
Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions.
The SLIPPERY ROAD sign warns motorists of hazardous road
surface conditions ahead.
Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions.
The LOOSE STONES sign warns motorists of hazardous road
surface conditions ahead.
Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions.
The LANE STATUS signs give motorists advance warning that one
or more lanes of a multi-lane roadway are closed ahead. The
‘bars’ indicate the closed lanes, while the arrows indicate lanes
available to traffic.
The LINE MARKERS ON ROAD and SURVEYORS AHEAD signs
warn motorists that there are line markers or surveyors working
ahead on or adjacent to the road. This sign is only used while
workers are in the area.
Drive with due care and attention for your own and
roadworkers’ safety.
The ROAD PLANT AHEAD sign is used at work sites where
machinery is working on the roadway.
Take care and be prepared for plant being operated on the road
without any form of delineation or traffic control.
The ROAD WORK supplementary plate may be used with a
SPEED RESTRICTION sign at roadworks.
94
The END ROADWORK sign may be used to define the end of
a worksite. This sign does not cancel out any previous speed
restriction. You should be aware that roadwork speed limits
continue to apply until the next speed restriction sign.
This multi-message sign defines the end of a worksite and
reinstates the speed limit.
You may now travel in a safe manner up to the speed
limit indicated.
Reduced speed limits through roadworks
Reduced speed limits in and around roadworks are in place to protect the road user
and roadworker.
 Speeding vehicles are a very real threat to the safety of other drivers and
roadworkers.
 The road condition may have changed, but you may not be aware of this. While
under construction or repair, the road surface may not be safe to drive on at
the normal speed.
 Loose gravel on the road surface may cause damage to vehicles.
 The road surface may be uneven.
 The road lanes may have narrowed.
 Often hidden from view are kilometres of utilities such as drainage pipes,
electrical and telecommunication lines. When roads are widened, many of these
have to be relocated. Relocation takes time.
 Some roadwork activities are mobile, such as line markings, road patching and
mowing. The roadworker may be moving through the zone and needs a reduced
speed limit for safety reasons.
 Roadworkers may not always be visible when working in the road area.
Railway level crossings
Disobeying the road rules near railway level crossings
can be fatal.
Crashes at railway level crossings are generally more
severe than other types of crash because trains are
heavy and fast.
95
Stopping and giving way at a level crossing
You must stop at a STOP sign or STOP line and give way
to any trains approaching or entering the crossing.
You must give way at a GIVE WAY sign or GIVE WAY line
to any train approaching or entering the crossing.
Entering or leaving a level crossing
You must not enter a level crossing if:
 warning lights, warning bells or boom gates are
operating
 you can see or hear a train approaching the crossing
 the road beyond the crossing is blocked or your
whole vehicle cannot immediately clear the crossing.
You must get off the crossing as soon as you can do so safely.
At a level crossing where boom gates or flashing lights are not installed, extra care
should be taken.
 Slow down, or stop if facing a STOP sign, and look both ways and listen for trains.
 Take extra care if the sun, fog, vegetation or buildings obscure your view of the
train tracks.
 If you have stopped for a train, don’t move off until warning lights (if installed) have
stopped flashing, and you have checked that another train is not following or coming
the other way.
Alcohol and drugs
Alcohol
Drink driving
Drinking alcohol impairs your ability to drive safely. Alcohol affects your judgment,
vision, coordination and reflexes. It also increases your risk of having a crash.
If you have consumed alcohol, you must not drive a motor vehicle if the level of
alcohol in your blood or breath is over the alcohol limit for your age and for the
type of licence you hold or the type of vehicle that you want to drive.
96
When you are over the alcohol limit
There are three alcohol limits:
 no alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol in
your blood or breath is more than zero
 general alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol
in your blood or breath is equal to or more than 0.05
 high alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol in
your blood or breath is equal to or more than 0.15.
What your alcohol limit is
If you are under 25 years of age and hold a learner, probationary or provisional
licence
0.00
(zero)
If you do not hold a driver licence and you are driving, or in charge of, any
motor vehicle
0.00
(zero)
If you hold a restricted licence (see Restricted licences, page 38) 0.00
(zero)
If you are driving, or in charge of, a truck, bus, articulated motor vehicle,
B-double, road train, vehicle carrying a placard load of dangerous goods, taxi,
limousine, tow truck, pilot or escort vehicle escorting an oversize vehicle, or a
vehicle being used by you as a driver trainer to give driver training
0.00
(zero)
If you hold an open licence and you are driving, or in charge of, any other
motor vehicle
Below
0.05
If you are 25 or over and hold a provisional licence and you are driving, or in
charge of, any other motor vehicle
Below
0.05
Police regularly carry out random breath tests to detect and deter drink drivers.
Refusing to take a roadside breath test is an offence. For more information, see
Random breath testing, page 154.
If you drive when over your alcohol limit
If you drive when over your alcohol limit, you may be charged. If you are convicted,
you face serious penalties and consequences:
 your Queensland driver licence will be cancelled
 you will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a further Queensland driver
licence for a stated period
 you will be fined and may be jailed as well.
If you crash the vehicle when driving with the level of alcohol in your blood or
breath over your alcohol limit, your comprehensive insurance cover will not apply.
97
You will have to pay for any damage caused.
Your compulsory third party insurance (CTP) may also be affected. See the Motor
Accident Insurance Act 1994 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary
Counsel website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au.
Standard drinks rule
= = =
One standard
drink of full
strength beer
(285ml)
One standard
drink of wine
(100ml)
One standard
drink of spirits
(30ml nip)
in a mixer
One standard
drink of spirits
(30ml nip)
Use the standard drinks rule as a guide to stay under the limit. This is a guide
only—some people can drink less and still be over the limit.
Men can generally have two drinks in the first hour and one drink every hour after
that. Women can generally have one drink in the first hour and one every hour
after that.
Common myth:
I can reduce my alcohol level by sleeping, chewing gum, drinking coffee, having a shower
or exercising.
Truth:
The only thing that reduces your alcohol level is time. The majority of alcohol you drink is
broken down in your liver. It takes about one hour to break down the alcohol content of a
single standard drink. It is possible for you to have an alcohol level over the legal limit the
day after you’ve been drinking.
Tip—How to avoid drink driving
 If you’re planning to drink, plan alternative travel—catch a taxi or public transport,
get a lift with a non-drinking driver or plan to stay overnight.
 Discourage friends or family from driving when they have been drinking.
 Nominate one person in your group as the non-drinking driver.
 Serve non-alcohol and low alcohol drinks at parties. Let people ask for a refill rather
than continually topping up their drinks. This way they can count how many drinks
they have consumed.
 Do not mix drugs and alcohol.
98
Drink walking
Many people assume walking is a safe alternative to drink driving. However, alcohol
also impairs your ability to walk safely and judge traffic situations correctly. If you
are walking while drunk, take care to ensure you make it home safely.
 Plan travel arrangements to avoid walking or driving home.
 Catch public transport, a courtesy bus, a taxi or get a lift home with a non-
drinking driver.
 Walk with a sober friend or in a group, if possible. A group or a pair is more
visible than one person.
 Always walk on the footpath rather than the road. If there isn’t one, walk on
the left- or right-hand side of the road, as close to the edge as possible, facing
oncoming traffic.
 Cross at traffic lights, crossings or crosswalks.
 Don’t expect drivers to see you at night. Carry or wear something light in
colour. If possible, wear reflective clothing or reflective bands to increase
visibility. Cross under a streetlight if there are no marked crossings, crosswalks
or signals.
For more information about road rules for pedestrians, see Rules for other road
users—pedestrians, page 125.
Common myth:
Walking when intoxicated is safe.
Truth:
Each year, around 17 intoxicated pedestrians are killed on Queensland roads.
Drugs and driving
Many drugs can impair your ability to drive. It is important to be aware of the
effects drugs can have on your driving ability. They can affect your vision, mood,
judgment, muscle control, reflexes, coordination and level of alertness. This can
increase your risk of having a crash. If you combine drugs with alcohol, the risk is
even greater.
99
Over-the-counter and prescribed medications
Common myth:
If you can buy a medication without a prescription, or if you have been prescribed a
medicine, then it must be okay to drive after taking it.
Truth:
Many over-the-counter and prescription drugs can reduce your ability to drive safely. This
can occur even if you take the recommended dosage.
 Always ask your doctor or pharmacist if the medication could impair your driving.
 Avoid driving if you are taking prescription or over-the-counter medications that
could affect your driving ability.
 Always ask for advice from your doctor or pharmacist if you’re taking more than
one medication or want to change the amount you are taking.
Illegal drugs
 Many other drugs (including illegal drugs such as cannabis, speed, ecstasy and
heroin) can affect your driving.
 Never drive when you’ve consumed recreational or illegal drugs.
Mix at your own risk
 Mixing drugs, or drugs and alcohol, can seriously affect your ability to drive safely.
If you are caught drug driving
Drug driving is treated as a serious offence. If a police officer reasonably suspects that
your driving ability has been impaired by any drug (prescription or illegal) you may be
required to provide a specimen of blood for analysis.
Police also conduct random roadside saliva tests for illegal drugs such as marijuana,
speed, ice and ecstasy. There is no legal limit for driving with any of these drugs in your
system. Any trace of illegal drugs in your system and you will be penalised.
For more information, see Random roadside drug testing, page 154.
If you fail to provide a specimen as required or a drug is detected, you will be charged
and you could face serious penalites and consequences:
 your Queensland driver licence will be cancelled
 you will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a further Queensland driver
licence for a stated period
 you will be fined and may be jailed as well.
If you crash while driving under the influence of drugs, your comprehensive insurance
does not apply. You will have to pay for any damage. 100
Your CTP insurance may also be affected. See the Motor Accident Insurance Act
1994 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at
www.legislation.qld.gov.au.
For more information, visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/safety.
Sample questions—hazardous localities, alcohol
and drugs
1. What is the maximum blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) for a learner driver
under 25 years of age? (See page 97)
A. 0.05%
B. 0.02%
C. 0.08%
D. 0.00%
2. What does this sign mean? (See page 93)
A. Road workers on the road. You must not travel any more than 60
km/h.
B. You can travel at the speed that normally applies to the road—it is
only a warning sign suggesting that you slow down.
C. You can travel at any speed—it only applies to road construction
vehicles.
D. You can travel at any speed if you are driving to or from work.
3. What does this sign mean? (See page 94)
A. Left lane closed, right lane open.
B. Left lane opened, right lane closed.
C. Trucks must use right lane.
D. T-intersection ahead.
4. At a railway crossing, when the boom gates are down and the red lights are
flashing, you should: (See page 96)
A. drive on once the boom gates begin to rise
B. drive around the boom gates once the train has passed
C. drive around the boom gates if you can see that the train is not
close
D. wait until the red lights stop flashing before driving on.
5. Can a police officer stop you and require you to undergo a random breath test
for alcohol when you are driving? (See page 97)
A. No.
B. Yes.
C. Only after a crash.
D. Only if you cannot walk in a straight line.
101
Heavy vehicles
Maximum vehicle dimensions
Height 4.3 m (except as specified below)
4.6 m (vehicles built to carry cattle, sheep, pigs or horses)
4.4 m (double-decker bus)
4.6 m (loaded height of a multi-deck car carrier only when loaded with
vehicles on the upper deck).
Length 12.5 m (rigid vehicles)
18 m (rigid bus)
19 m (combination vehicles such as a rigid vehicle and trailer. Does not
include B-doubles and road trains, which are covered by a Queensland
Transport guideline).
Width 2.5 m (the maximum width of a vehicle does not include any anti-skid
device mounted on wheels, central tyre inflation systems, lights, mirrors,
reflectors, signalling devices and tyre pressure gauges). Vehicles
exceeding these dimensions are required to operate under specific
guidelines or permits.
Long vehicles
Vehicles 7.5 m or more in length (which
would include a car towing a normal
caravan) showing the sign DO NOT
OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE may turn
left from, or partly from, the lane next
to the left lane.
From a one-way street, the vehicles can
turn right from, or partly from, the lane
next to the right lane.
If driving a long vehicle (7.5 m or longer):
 you must drive at least 60 m behind another long vehicle in front of you, unless
you are driving on a multi-lane road, or on a length of road in a built-up area,
or overtaking
 you must drive at least 200 m behind another long vehicle travelling in front of
you, if in a road train area.
Note: Only vehicles 7.5 m or more in length are allowed to show a DO NOT
OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign.
102
Loading your vehicle
Drivers who fail to secure loads safely on a heavy vehicle risk injuring themselves
and other road users, as well as running up a large damages bill.
Incorrect positioning Correct positioning
Correct positioning
Incorrect positioning
These diagrams show examples of the incorrect and correct way of loading a
heavy vehicle.
The load of a heavy vehicle must not be more than the regulated mass for an axle
or axle group or the vehicle’s GVM/GCM (whichever is the least), or the registered
seating capacity.
If your vehicle has a GVM of more than 4.5 tonne, you must enter a weighbridge
checking station if the station is open, or if directed by an authorised officer.
All loading must be fastened safely and correctly. If you are carrying iron, timber,
piping or similar material, it should be fastened so it will not flap or sway. It should
be parallel with the sides of the vehicle as far as practical. If you are carrying a
loose load such as gravel or quarry products, it must be loaded or covered so that
no part of the load can fall or dislodge from the vehicle during transport.
103
If you carry freight containers, you should be aware of the difference in the height
of some containers. The safest way to secure containers is by using twist locks.
All freight containers transported by road must be accompanied by a container
weight declaration.
Load your vehicle so you have a good view of other vehicles to the front and on
both sides and, using mirrors, behind.
If for any reason a load or equipment falls from your vehicle, you must remove this
from the road as soon as possible.
Queensland law requires all loads to be restrained to the performance standards of
the Load Restraint Guide. The guide outlines the safety principles that should be
followed to ensure the safe carriage of loads, and all heavy vehicle drivers should
have a copy. The guide can be downloaded from the National Transport Commission
website at www.ntc.gov.au.
Parking restrictions for heavy and long vehicles
If you drive a heavy vehicle (GVM of 4.5 tonne or more) or a long vehicle (7.5 m or
more in length), you must not stop for more than one hour in a built-up area unless
otherwise permitted to do so by signs, or you are actively dropping off or picking
up goods.
Your local government may make provision for you to stop longer than this under a
local law.
Warning signs
If you are driving a vehicle that is required to display a sign with the words ROAD
TRAIN, LONG VEHICLE, OVERSIZE, OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD or SLOW VEHICLE
because of a condition of a guideline, permit or authorisation, you must remove or
cover any sign that is no longer required.
For more information about vehicle dimensions and mass limits, please refer to the
Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Mass, Dimensions and Loading)
Regulation 2005 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel
website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au.
Speed limiters
Heavy vehicles over 12 tonne GVM or buses over 5 tonne GVM are restricted to
travelling at a maximum speed of 100 km/h, regardless of any higher speed limit
that may be shown on road signs.
Speed limiters are compulsory for trucks over 12 tonne GVM, with engines up to
300 hp (224 kw), built after 1 July 1991, and for higher horsepower engines built
after 1 January 1991.
104
Buses over 14.5 tonne GVM or prime movers are to be fitted with speed limiters if
they were manufactured after 1987.
Buses over 5 tonne GVM and up to 14.5 tonne GVM have speed limiters fitted from
1 July 1991.
Any heavy vehicle driven in excess of 115 km/h will be issued a defect notice
requiring it to comply with Australian Design Rule ADR 65/00. The vehicle will not
be allowed to operate on the road until all repairs/modifications have been
completed and cleared by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
Transporting dangerous goods
Rules, procedures and guidelines govern the transport of dangerous goods.
They affect everyone involved in this transport, including:
 consignors
 prime contractors
 vehicle owners
 packers and loaders
 drivers.
The laws and rules for the transport of dangerous goods by road are found in the
Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Dangerous Goods) Regulation 2008
(the dangerous goods regulation) and the Australian Dangerous Goods Code—7th
edition (ADG Code). Not complying with these rules is an offence and penalties
apply.
For more information on the ADG Code refer to the National Transport
Commission website.
What are dangerous goods?
Dangerous goods are substances or articles with hazardous properties, which may,
if handled incorrectly:
 explode
 burn
 poison
 pollute the environment
 asphyxiate
 make explosive mixtures
 severely damage skin or corrode metal
 become unstable if mixed with other products.
105
Dangerous goods are allocated a class. The pictures and captions below show the
different classes of dangerous goods, and the diamond label for each class.
Explosives Flammable gases Non-flammable,
non-toxic gases
Toxic gases Flammable liquids Flammable solids
Spontaneously combustible Dangerous when wet Oxidising substances
Organic peroxides Toxic substances Infectious substances
106
Radioactive substances Corrosives Miscellaneous dangerous goods
Carrying dangerous goods
Vehicles transporting a placard load of dangerous goods must display, as a
minimum, the correct class diamonds (see above) at the front and rear of
the vehicle.
A load of dangerous goods is a placard load if it contains:
 dangerous goods in a receptacle with a capacity of more than 500 L or more
than 500 kg (both the driver and the vehicle must be licensed to carry
dangerous goods)
 packaged dangerous goods of particular classes in certain quantities (defined
in the ADG Code and the dangerous goods regulation).
Portable warning signs
A vehicle (including a combination of vehicle and trailer) either carrying a placard
load of dangerous goods or weighing more than 12 tonne must carry three portable
triangular, red, reflectorised warning signs.
These signs must be displayed if the vehicle has broken down or has lost some or
all of its load, and the vehicle or load are not visible in all directions for 200 m.
The correct way to display warning signs if
your heavy vehicle has broken down outside
a built-up area
The signs must be displayed as follows:
 one triangle should be placed at least
50 m but not more than 150 m in
front of the vehicle
 one triangle should be placed at least
50 m but not more than 150 m to the
rear of the vehicle
 one triangle should be placed to the
side of the vehicle, or fallen load, in a
position that gives sufficient warning
to other road users of the position of
the vehicle or fallen load. 107
The national work diary
All drivers of commercial buses (with a seating capacity of more than 12 adults,
including the driver) and heavy vehicles (with a vehicle mass of more than 12
tonne) must record driving, working and rest times in the national work diary
during any trip that takes them further than 200 km from their driver base. The
driver base is the place from which you normally work and receive instructions.
The national work diary is available from any Department of Transport and Main
Roads customer service centre, or any of the agencies listed on page 174.
When applying for a national work diary:
 present your current driver licence, and work diary if you have one
 complete an application form provided in the front of the work diary in the
presence of the issuing officer
 pay the application fee.
For further information, please contact the Department of Transport and Main
Roads on 13 23 80 or visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/heavyvehicles.
Standard hours
Time Work Rest
In any period
of...
A driver must not
work for more than a
maximum of…
And must have the rest of that period off work
with at least a minimum rest break of...
5 ½ hours 5 ¼ hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
8 hours 7 1/2 hours work time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous
minutes
11 hours 10 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous
minutes
24 hours 12 hours work time 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*(A)
7 days 72 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time
14 days 144 hours work time 2 x night rest breaks*(B) and 2 x night rest
breaks taken on consecutive days
108
Basic fatigue management
Time Work Rest
In any period of... A driver must not
work for more than
a maximum of...
And must have the rest of that period off
work with at least a minimum rest break of...
6 ¼ hours 6 hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
9 hours 8 ½ hours work
time
30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15
continuous minutes
12 hours 11 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15
continuous minutes
24 hours 14 hours work time 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*(A)
7 days 36 hours long/night
work time*(C)
14 days 144 hours work
time
24 continuous hours stationary rest time
taken after no more than 84 hours work time
and 24 continuous hours stationary rest time
and 2 x night rest breaks*(B) and 2 x night
rest breaks taken on consecutive days
*(A) Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a regulated heavy
vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary regulated heavy vehicle.
*(B) Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between
the hours of 10.00 pm on a day and 8.00 am on the next day (using the time zone
of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.
*(C) Long/night work time is any work time in excess of 12 hours in a 24 hour
period or any work time between midnight and 6.00 am (or the equivalent hours in
the time zone of the base of a driver).
Advanced fatigue management
Parameter Normal operating
limits
Frequency for
exceeding normal
operating limits
Outer limits
Minimum break in a
24 hour period
Operator to propose Operator to propose 6 continuous hours
or 8 hours in 2 parts
Minimum
continuous 24 hour
period free of work
Operator to propose Operator to propose 4 periods in 28 days
109
Advanced fatigue management cont.
Parameter Normal operating
limits
Frequency for
exceeding normal
operating limits
Outer limits
Minimum
opportunity
for night sleep
(between 10pm and
8am)
Operator to propose Operator to propose 2 periods in 14 days
Maximum hours
work in a 24 hour
period
Operator to propose Operator to propose 16 hours (except
NSW and Victoria)
Maximum work in
14 days
Operator to propose Operator to propose 154 hours
Maximum work in
28 days
Operator to propose Operator to propose 288 hours
Normal operating limits are used to guide operators when developing everyday
schedules and driver rosters taking into account all foreseeable contingencies and
reflecting the inherent fatigue risks (e.g. the amount of night driving balanced
against longer rest breaks).
Outer limits represent the point at which further work poses an unacceptable
fatigue risk. The national outer limit of 16 hours cannot be exceeded. This limit is
based on robust advice from fatigue experts, and experience from current
transport industry practices.
Fatigue offence demerit points and penalties
Fatigue
management work
and rest offence
category
Demerit points Penalty Maximum court
penalty
Minor risk Zero $150 $1,500
Substantial risk Zero $300 $3,000
Severe risk 2 $450 $4,500
Critical risk 3 $600 $6,000
Other fatigue offences also attract fines and demerit points. Information on these
offences can be found on the fatigue management page at www.transport.qld.gov.
au/heavyvehicles. Generally, demerits apply to offences that have a potential
110
impact on a driver’s safety, including failing to record work and rest, or providing
false information in a work diary, or falsely claiming to be in an accreditation
scheme. There are no penalties for spelling mistakes or correcting your own
incorrect entry in a work diary.
Passenger transport
Passenger transport (or a public passenger service) is a service provided for
transporting members of the public for a fare or consideration, or in the course
of a trade or business, and includes a courtesy or community transport service.
Examples of passenger transport services are:
 school buses
 taxis and limousines
 tourist services
 charter bus services
 scheduled bus services.
If you drive a vehicle that provides a passenger transport service to the public, you
are required to hold the appropriate class of driver licence for driving that type of
public passenger vehicle, and a Queensland Driver Authorisation.
The purpose of Driver Authorisation is to maximise public confidence in passenger
transport and to ensure the protection of children and other vulnerable members
of the community. This includes ensuring that drivers of public passenger vehicles:
 are suitable people, having regard to their need to provide for the personal
safety of passengers and their property, and the public
 conduct themselves reasonably with passengers and the public
 are responsible drivers and capable of safely operating a public
passenger vehicle
 are aware of their customer responsibilities
 are accountable for complying with standards.
To apply for Driver Authorisation, you must have held a driver licence continuously
for at least three years. For tourist, transfer or charter bus services, you must have
held an Australian driver licence for two years of the three-year period.
In addition to the driver licence requirements, drivers of vehicles that provide a
passenger transport service must meet the requirements contained in the Transport
Operations (Passenger Transport) Act 1994, Transport Operations (Passenger
Transport) Regulation 1994 and Transport Operations (Passenger Transport)
Standard 2000 regarding traffic and criminal history checks and medical fitness.
For further information about Driver Authorisation, contact your nearest
Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or Passenger
111
Transport Office, or call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80.
For more information about the legislation, visit the Office of the Queensland
Parliamentary Counsel website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au.
School buses
School buses have flashing yellow warning lights fitted to the front and rear of the
bus. If you drive a school bus, you must flash its warning lights when children are
being picked up or set down.
You must also ensure the vehicle’s doors are closed while the bus is moving.
Sample questions—heavy vehicles
1. Does a school bus have to operate flashing warning lights when picking up and
setting down passengers? (See page 112)
A. No.
B. Yes.
C. Only when road conditions are bad.
2. What is the maximum speed allowed for a heavy vehicle over 12 tonne GVM?
(See page 104)
A. 60 km/h
B. 10 km/h under the signed speed limit
C. 100 km/h
3. When travelling outside a built-up area on single-lane roads (but not in a
road train area), what is the minimum distance to be maintained between long
vehicles? (See page 102)
A. 60 m
B. 100 m
C. 10 m for every 10 km/h you are travelling
4. If you are driving a heavy or long vehicle, you must not park for more than one
hour in a built-up area unless: (See page 104)
A. no other vehicles are close by
B. it is after 5.00 pm and before 8.00 am
C. a sign permits it, or you are actively involved in loading or unloading.
5. What is the minimum rest period for a solo driver of a fatigue regulated heavy
vehicle, who has completed 12 hours work operating under standard work and
rest arrangements? (See page 109)
A. 6 continuous hours
B. 7 continuous hours
C. 8 continuous hours
D. 12 continuous hours
112
Other rules and responsibilities
Use of lights
When you drive at night (between sunset and sunrise) or in hazardous weather
conditions, your vehicle’s headlights, rear lights and rear number plate light must
be switched on and clearly visible. You should turn your headlights on when you
cannot clearly see people or vehicles.
While you may drive with your headlights on high beam in a built-up area, you
must dip your headlights when:
 an oncoming vehicle is within 200 m
 you are within 200 m of the vehicle ahead.
You may only drive with fog lights on if you are in fog or hazardous
weather conditions causing reduced visibility. If you are caught using fog lights
where conditions are not hazardous, or where visibility is not reduced, you can
be fined $40.
Tips—Headlights
To see better at night, you may switch your headlights to high beam or drive more slowly
so that you have time to react to traffic conditions.
Wearing tinted glasses reduces your vision. Only wear tinted glasses at night when an eye
specialist has prescribed them for night driving.
Keep left and look to the side if oncoming lights dazzle you. If you are unable to drive
safely, slow down and stop until the other vehicle has passed.
Following distance
You must drive at a sufficient distance behind another vehicle so that you can, if
necessary, stop safely to avoid a collision with the vehicle—see Safe following
distance, page 136.
113
Following other long vehicles
When towing a caravan or trailer, if your towing vehicle combined with the length
of the caravan or trailer is 7.5 m or longer, it is considered to be a long vehicle—see
Long vehicles, page 102. You must leave at least 60 m between your vehicle and
another vehicle 7.5 m or longer in front of you on single-lane roads outside
built-up areas.
If you tow a caravan in road train areas, leave at least 200 m between your vehicle
and another long vehicle. Vehicles towing caravans driving too close together make
it hard for other motorists to overtake safely.
Towlines
If you are towing a car with a towline, the towline must not be more than 4 m long.
Parking
Parking is regulated and enforced by local governments. Parking is also enforced by
the Queensland Police Service.
How to park
You must obey an official sign or line marking telling you how to park. If there is no
sign or line marking, park the left side of your vehicle parallel to and as close to the
left side of the road as you can safely. This is called parallel parking.
You must park facing the same direction as traffic in the adjacent lane or
line of traffic.
If you are in a one-way street (not a divided road), you may park parallel to and as
close to the left or right side of the road as you can safely.
Where parking spaces are marked on the road, you must not take up more than a
single space, unless your vehicle is longer than the length of space.
You must not park closer than 1 m to any other vehicle in front of or behind
your vehicle.
Parking signs
Signs indicate where you can and cannot park. If these signs
show hours or days, directions given by the signs apply during
those hours and days. For example, this sign indicates you can
park on this section of road for no more than two hours
between 7.00 am and 6.30 pm Monday to Friday and between
7.00 am and noon Saturday, but that there are no restrictions
at other times. These signs may also state the types of vehicles
that must not be parked in an area, e.g. heavy vehicles may be
restricted.
114
Certain vehicles (e.g. those belonging to local residents) may be excluded from a
sign’s parking restrictions. These exceptions will be shown on the sign.
The letter P alone means there is no time limit. You can park anytime for any length
of time. If there is a time limit, it is shown by the number in front of the P.
Regulated parking
Regulated parking means there is a limit to how long you can park
in this area. The time limit is shown by the number in front of the
P. For example, 2P means two-hour parking. The sign may also
show the times and days when this time limit applies. Parking in
this area is free, except where there is a metered space. If certain
hours and days apply to the meters, you can park in this section
for free outside these times.
There are several different types of metered parking in Queensland, including:
 single meters—located at the front of individual parking bays
 multi-bays, controlling up to four parking bays—located on the footpath central
to all bays
 pay and display, controlling up to ten parking bays—coupons are dispensed from
a machine located on the footpath near the bays, and must be displayed on
your vehicle’s dashboard.
To operate a meter or coupon dispenser, follow the instructions. You must insert
coins even if there are coins already in the meter.
Some metered parks become clearways during peak hours. Always check the traffic
signs before leaving your vehicle—see Clearway, page 116.
LOADING ZONES
You must not stop in a loading zone, unless you are a:
 bus that is dropping off or picking up passengers
 truck that is dropping off or picking up passengers or goods
 motor vehicle displaying a commercial vehicle identification
label
 vehicle that is dropping off or picking up goods
(no longer than 20 minutes)
 vehicle that is dropping off or picking up passengers
(no longer than two minutes).
115
NO PARKING
You are not allowed to park in this area at any time. You may stop
only to pick up or set down passengers or goods for a maximum of
two minutes, unless the sign allows a longer time. You must not
leave the vehicle unattended.
NO STOPPING
You must not stop your vehicle at any time where a NO STOPPING
sign is placed, except when obeying an official direction,
e.g. a traffic light, or if you have to stand or stop for safety.
CLEARWAY
Vehicles are not allowed to stop on this section of road, though
buses, taxis and limousines may pick up or set down passengers.
This sign usually applies in peak-hour traffic—the sign will show
the hours that it applies. If you park or stop in a clearway, you
may be fined and have your vehicle towed away.
Angle or centre parking
You may only angle or centre park where there is an official traffic sign permitting
it. Park at the angle shown by the road markings for the parking space. Park in the
direction stated on the parking sign.
When moving out of a centre parking area, you must enter and leave the parking
area by driving forward unless a traffic sign indicates otherwise.
116
Leaving your vehicle
When you open the car door, you must check that there is no one on the road, such
as a cyclist, close enough to hit your door.
Secure your vehicle before you leave it unattended and if you are going to be more
than 3 m away. You must:
 apply the parking brake
 switch off the engines
 remove the ignition key
 close the windows if possible (a gap of 5 cm or less from the top of the window
frame is permitted)
 lock the doors if possible.
However, if somebody over 16 years of age is staying in the vehicle, the doors do
not need to be locked and the ignition key may be left with them. Never leave
children younger than 16 years, or animals, unattended in a vehicle.
Disability parking
If you hold a current blue parking permit for people with
disabilities, which is issued by the Director-General of the
Department of Transport and Main Roads, you are permitted to
park in a regulated parking space free of charge if the time limit
specified for the space is more than 30 minutes.
A red permit entitles a holder to access disability parking spaces in off-street
carparks such as shopping centres. On-street parking privileges are not available to
red permit holders unless authorised by the council.
Check with your local council for details of any available parking concessions.
Queensland disability parking permits are recognised in other Australian states and
territories. You should check with the relevant authority for details of parking
concessions.
If you are caught misusing or parking illegally in a disability parking space, you
could be fined up to $2,000.
Prohibited parking places
Unless there is an official sign saying you can, you must not park or stop:
 on a road with a yellow edge line
 on a painted island
 less than 10 m from an intersection without traffic lights
 less than 20 m from an intersection with traffic lights
117
 less than 20 m before and 10 m after a children’s crossing or pedestrian crossing
 less than 20 m before and 10 m after a bus stop
 less than 20 m from a level crossing
 on the crest of a hill or curve outside a built-up area unless the rear of the
vehicle is visible for at least 100 m
 within 1 m of another parked car
 where you would have less than 3 m of road between your car and the other
side of the road, or any continuous marked centre line or double lines
 where you will be in the way of other vehicles
 in a mail zone
 in a special purpose lane other than a bicycle lane
 between the centre of the road and another vehicle already parked (known as
double parking), except when centre parking
 if your vehicle has a GVM of 4.5 tonne or more, or is 7.5 m or more in length,
you must not park it in a built-up area for more than one hour unless otherwise
signed, or if you are actively engaged in dropping off or picking up goods
 within 1 m of a fire hydrant or fire plug indicator
 in an emergency lane on a motorway, unless this is necessary for safety
 on a safety ramp or arrester bed, unless necessary for safety
 in a loading zone, except if you are setting down or picking up goods or
passengers, or if you are driving a motor vehicle displaying an appropriate
commercial vehicle identification label
 in between signs that mark a bus zone.
Prohibited parking places
Also, ensure your vehicle is not blocking or
partly blocking:
 an intersection
 a footpath
 a pedestrian crossing
 a traffic light-controlled crosswalk
You must ensure your vehicle
is not blocking or partly
blocking a driveway
 a railway level crossing
 a bicycle path
 a driveway or property entrance, except for up to two minutes when you are
dropping off or picking up passengers or goods
 vehicles moving from one road to another road, ferry, wharf or driveway
 a tunnel or underpass.
118
Prohibited parking places
119
Seatbelts and child restraints
Everyone in a vehicle must wear a fastened seatbelt at all times.
The only exceptions are if:
 you are reversing the vehicle
 you are driving a taxi, and there is a passenger/s in the taxi
 you carry a medical certificate that states you cannot wear a seatbelt for
medical reasons. The medical certificate must have an end date no later than
12 months from the date it was given
 you are required to get in and out of the vehicle frequently, while engaged
in door-to-door pick up or delivery of goods, and you drive at no more than
25 km/h.
Under Queensland law, if you are the driver, you are responsible for ensuring that
every passenger regardless of age wears a correctly fitted child restraint or
seatbelt. Passengers 16 years or older who fail to wear a seatbelt will also be fined
(in addition to the driver) and accumulate 3 demerit points.
For further information, see Correct seatbelt and child restraint use, page 143 and
Double demerit points, page 161.
Mobile phones
Using a mobile phone that is held in the hand is illegal when driving, even when
you are stopped at traffic lights. This includes making and receiving calls and text
messaging. You must pull over and park in a safe place to make or receive a call.
If you are found using a hand-held mobile phone while driving, you will be given a
ticket for this offence. Demerit points will be recorded against your traffic history—
see Demerit points offences, page 163.
Tips—Mobile phones
You may use a hands-free mobile phone, CB radio or any other two-way radio when
driving. However, you must drive with extreme care and attention and not allow yourself
to be distracted.
See Learning to drive, page 21, and Provisional licences, page 32 for special
conditions relating to learner drivers and provisional licence holders.
Animals
A driver must not have an animal in the driver’s lap while operating a vehicle.
A person riding a motorbike must not carry an animal on the petrol tank of
the motorbike.
120
It is recommended that pets do not ride unrestrained in either the front or back
seats of any vehicle. A special pet harness can be attached to your vehicle’s
seatbelt. Smaller pets can also be transported in pet carriers. Pets can be put in the
back of a station wagon with a cargo barrier that complies with Australian
standards. Dogs should not ride unrestrained in the back of trucks or trailers;
special pet restrainers for dogs travelling in utes can restrain your dog safely.
Sample questions—other rules and
responsibilities
1. As a driver, you must wear a seatbelt: (See page 120)
A. when travelling over 60 km/h
B. when the vehicle is moving or stationary in traffic, unless you are reversing
C. when the vehicle is parked
D. when convenient.
2. What does this sign mean? (See page 116)
A. You cannot stop for more than five minutes to pick up or drop
off passengers.
B. You must not stop at any time.
C. You cannot stop during the times and days stated.
D. You can only stop during the times and days stated.
3. When towing a car with a towline, what is the maximum permissible length of the
towline? (See page 114)
A. 4 m
B. 6 m
C. 10 m
D. 15 m
4. You can use a mobile phone that is held in your hand when sitting in the driver’s
seat: (See page 120)
A. at any time when you are driving an automatic vehicle
B. at any time when the phone call is less than five minutes long
C. when you are stopped at traffic lights or stopped in traffic
D. only when your vehicle is parked.
5. Are you permitted to drive with your lights on high beam in a built-up area?
(See page 113)
A. Yes, but not within 200 m of another vehicle.
B. Yes, but not within 100 m of another vehicle.
C. No.
121
Rules for other road users
Cyclists
A bicycle is a legal vehicle, and cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities
as any other driver on the road. However, there are also some road rules just
for cyclists.
As a cyclist, you are legally required to:
 wear an Australian Standard 2063.1 and 2063.2 bike helmet, correctly fitted
and fastened—it will reduce your chances of suffering head injuries in a crash
by 80%
 fit your bike with a working bell, horn or similar warning device and at least
one effective brake
 obey all traffic signs and lights—see Signs and signals, page 58
 keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times
 use hand signals when turning right
 have a red reflector at the rear of your bike that can be seen for at least 50 m.
If riding at night, have a flashing or steady front white light and rear red light
fitted to your bike that can be seen for at least 200 m
 fasten any luggage safely and securely
 not double anyone unless the bicycle is designed to carry more than one person
and each person wears a helmet
 use a bicycle lane where provided, unless it is impractical to do so
 when riding in a bicycle lane that is next to traffic, travel in the same direction
(that is, don’t travel against the general traffic flow)
 dismount and walk your bike across a pedestrian crossing, children’s crossing or
marked foot crossing
 give way to pedestrians on footpaths and shared use paths—keep to the left
 never ride on that part of a separated footpath designed for pedestrians.
People can ride bicycles on roads and footpaths unless otherwise signed. Local
governments may make local laws prohibiting the use of bicycles on specific
footpaths within the local government area. These footpaths must be identified by
NO BICYCLE signs.
When riding on roads, you must ride as near as practical to the far left side of the
road, especially when there are no marked lanes. You must not ride closer than 2 m
to the rear of a moving motor vehicle continuously for more than 200 m.
Two cyclists may legally ride beside each other as long as they are not more than
1.5 m apart. If necessary, another cyclist can overtake these cyclists.
122
On a multi-lane road or a road with two or more lines of traffic travelling in the same
direction, you can occupy a lane and travel in the right-hand lane where necessary
(for example, to make a right turn).
Bicycle storage areas may be provided at an intersection with traffic lights. A bicycle
storage area opens from a bicycle lane and has one or more bicycle symbols painted
on the road between two parallel stop lines.
Special rules apply to you when using a bicycle storage area, including:
 you must enter a bicycle storage area from a bicycle lane (unless it is impractical
to ride in this bicycle lane)
 you must give way to any vehicle that it in the bicycle storage area
 where there is a green or yellow light in front of the bicycle storage area, you
must give way to any vehicle entering the area.
As a cyclist, you can:
 ride in bus lanes, transit lanes and bicycle storage areas
 overtake a vehicle on the left, unless the vehicle is turning left
 travel in the left lane of a multi-lane roundabout if leaving more than halfway
around a roundabout, but must give way to vehicles exiting from the roundabout.
Penalties
If you are 17 years of age or older and disobey any road rule while riding a bicycle,
you may be given an infringement notice by a police officer. While you may be
required to pay a fine for disobeying a road rule, you cannot accumulate any demerit
points because they don’t apply to bicycle offences.
You may be arrested for drink riding if the level of alcohol in your blood or breath is
over the high alcohol limit—see Drink driving, page 96.
If you are under 17 years of age, you may receive a number of cautions before
being fined.
Optional hook turn by a bicycle rider
You may turn right at an intersection on your bicycle using a hook turn unless
prohibited by a NO HOOK TURN BY BICYCLES sign.
To make the turn:
1. Approach and enter the intersection from as near as
practical to the far left side of the road you are leaving.
2. Move forward until you are as near as practical to the far
side of the road you are entering. Keep as near as possible
to the far left side of the intersection. Keep clear of any
marked foot crossings. Keep clear of any driver turning
left from the intersection.
123
3. If there are traffic lights, wait until you are facing a green light before
moving forward.
4. If there are no traffic lights on the intersection, give way to approaching drivers
on the road you have just left, then move forward.
Obeying traffic lights
Stop
Do not ride past the red traffic light. You can
cross the road if another traffic light you are
facing shows a green WALK, walking
pedestrian or bicycle symbol. However, you
must dismount and walk across the
pedestrian crossing—do not ride across the
pedestrian crossing.
Stop if it is safe to do so
Do not ride past the yellow traffic light
unless you are so close to the yellow traffic
light when it changes from green to yellow
that you can’t stop safely.
If you face a flashing yellow traffic light or
arrow, this is a warning to use caution near
the traffic light when you enter the road,
and to follow the general give way rules.
Go
Ride past the green traffic light if you can do
it safely.
Tips—Cyclists
To stay safe, you should:
 check your bike’s tyres and brakes regularly
 be courteous to motorists and ride in a predictable manner so that road users know
what you are doing
 be seen. Light coloured clothing can make you more visible to motorists. At night, use
lights and reflectors on your bike and wear reflective clothing or reflective wrist and
ankle bands to attract motorists’ attention.
124
Motorised bicycles
A motorised bicycle is a bicycle with an auxiliary electric motor of 200 watts output
or less.
Riding a bicycle powered by an internal combustion engine is illegal on
Queensland roads.
You do not require a licence to ride a motorised bicycle and they are exempt from
registration and CTP insurance.
Motorised bicycles fall under the same road rules as bicycles and have the same
rights and responsibilities as a bicycle.
Pedestrians
We are all pedestrians at some time. Pedestrians include people:
 walking
 using wheelchairs (including registered motorised wheelchairs that cannot
travel faster than 10 km/h)
 on rollerblades, skateboards, rollerskates and other wheeled
recreational devices.
Staying safe
 Always cross at the safest possible point—at a crossing, lights, refuge or where
you can see drivers and they can see you.
 When crossing a road, STOP, LOOK for traffic, LISTEN for approaching cars and
WAIT until there is a safe break in traffic before crossing.
 Obey traffic signals.
 Cross the road by the most direct route.
 Allow yourself enough time to cross the road.
 Always walk on the footpath. If there isn’t one, you must walk as close to the
edge of the road as possible, facing oncoming traffic.
Tips—Pedestrians
 Take care if walking after drinking alcohol, for more information—see Drink walking,
page 99.
 You should always keep to the left when walking on a footpath.
 Cross the road with a group, if possible. A group or a pair is more visible than
one person.
 Don’t expect drivers to see you at night. Carry or wear something light in colour and
cross under a streetlight if there are no marked crossings, crosswalks or signals.
 Do not travel on a dedicated bicycle path, or on that part of a separated path
designated for bicycles, unless you are in or pushing a wheelchair, or you are using
a wheeled recreational device—see Rollerblades, skateboards and other wheeled
recreational devices, page 126.
125
Motorised wheelchairs
If you are using a motorised wheelchair, extra rules apply to you.
 Use footpaths at all times or, if there is no footpath, travel as close as possible
to the left- or right-hand side of the road. (Note: Be aware that your smaller
size and slower speeds often make you less visible in traffic.)
 Cross the road by the most direct route.
 Pay attention to others’ safety.
Motorised wheelchairs can be registered to an individual or an organisation.
For more information about registering, see How to register a motorised
wheelchair, page 173.
Rollerblades, skateboards and other wheeled recreational devices
If you are using rollerblades, rollerskates, a skateboard or other wheeled
recreational devices, extra rules apply to you. These rules also apply to children
under 12 years of age using a wheeled toy such as a pedal car, scooter or tricycle.
 Do not travel on a road where the speed limit is 50 km/h or more.
 Do not travel on roads with a white centre line or median strip or where there
are marked lanes.
 Do not travel on a road at night (you may, however, travel on a footpath and
cross a road by the most direct route at night).
 Do not use wheeled recreational devices where a sign prohibits their use.
 Give way to cyclists on a footpath, bicycle path or separated path.
 Keep to the far left side when travelling on a road or footpath.
 Give way to pedestrians on a footpath or shared path.
Local council laws may affect wheeled recreational devices. Check the by-laws in
the local area.
For more information about the responsibilities of road users, see the Road user
code of behaviour at www.transport.qld.gov.au/pedestrian.
Motorised foot scooters
A motorised foot scooter is a scooter that has an electric motor of 200 watts
output or less attached. The manufacturer of the scooter must certify that the
power output does not exceed 200 watts, by either attaching a plate to the motor
or engraving it.
You do not require a licence to ride a motorised foot scooter, and it is exempt from
registration and CTP insurance.
126
A motorised foot scooter is a wheeled recreational device. In addition to the rules
for wheeled recreational devices:
 You must wear an approved bicycle helmet.
 You cannot ride where there is a sign prohibiting the use of motorised foot
scooters.
Pedestrians obeying traffic lights
Stop
If you face a red DON’T WALK or
illuminated red pedestrian symbol, do not
cross the road.
Walk
If you face a green WALK or illuminated
green pedestrian symbol, start to cross the
road with care.
Caution
If you face a flashing red DON’T WALK or flashing red illuminated pedestrian
signal, complete the crossing if you have started—do not start to cross the road.
127
Safe road use
 Sharing with other road users
 Stopping
 Hazards
 Driver fatigue
 Correct seatbelt and child restraint use
 4WD driving
 Towing a trailer or caravan
 What to do at a crash
129
Sharing with other road users
Emergency vehicles
Police, fire and ambulance vehicles are emergency vehicles.
If an emergency vehicle is coming towards you and is sounding an alarm or showing
flashing red or blue lights, you must move out of the path of the emergency vehicle
as soon as you can do so safely—see Giving way to emergency vehicles, page 80.
Do not drive onto the wrong side of the road or drive through a red traffic light
or arrow to get out of the way of the emergency vehicle.
You should:
 slow down
 move left to give the vehicle a clear run down the middle of the road. If you cannot
move left safely, stay where you are and let the emergency vehicle overtake you
 not move your vehicle suddenly or make an illegal turn
 not drive into the path of the emergency vehicle.
Emergency vehicles at intersections
Emergency vehicles often stop or slow down when they enter intersections to check if
they can pass through safely. You must give way to, and not drive into the path of, an
emergency vehicle that is sounding an alarm or showing flashing red or blue lights, even
if you are facing a green traffic light or arrow and the emergency vehicle appears to
have stopped or slowed down.
Watch out for emergency vehicles by looking ahead and in your rear vision
mirrors regularly.
Heavy vehicles
You can share the road with heavy vehicles more safely by following a few simple tips.
Overtaking a heavy vehicle
 Allow sufficient time to overtake.
 Stay back at the recommended minimum following distance, without crossing the
centre line, when preparing to overtake—see Safe following distance, page 136.
 When it is safe to overtake, indicate, accelerate and overtake quickly, without
exceeding the speed limit. Changing down a gear may give you enough engine
power to get past.
 After overtaking, maintain your speed because slowing down too soon will force
the heavy vehicle to brake.
 Do not overtake a heavy vehicle at an intersection when it is turning, unless it
is safe to do so.
130
Sharing the road safely with heavy vehicles
 Do not cut in front of a heavy vehicle because you will reduce the driver’s
braking distance.
 Maintain a consistent speed when a heavy vehicle overtakes you.
 If you are behind a heavy vehicle and you cannot see the driver in its side
mirrors, the driver cannot see you.
 Do not tailgate a heavy vehicle, you cannot see what is ahead of it and you
won’t be able to react in time.
 Remember that heavy vehicles accelerate slowly.
 When a heavy vehicle is turning, keep back from the intersection because the
heavy vehicle needs more road space to turn than other vehicles.
 Give way to buses displaying this sign (left) when
required to do so—see Giving way to buses, page 80.
 Heavy vehicles that show the sign DO NOT OVERTAKE
TURNING VEHICLE are allowed to take up more than
one lane to turn—see Overtaking, page 88.
 If you are towing a caravan or trailer and a heavy
vehicle wants to pass you, do not speed up. Allow
the heavy vehicle to maintain speed and pass safely.
Pilot vehicles
If a heavy vehicle is wider than 3.5 m, a pilot or escort vehicle will precede or
follow it along the road. A pilot vehicle has yellow flashing lights and an OVERSIZE
LOAD AHEAD sign on its roof. An escort vehicle has yellow flashing lights and
yellow/white wig wag lights and an OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD sign on its roof.
In general, the bigger the vehicle and its load, the more pilot or escort vehicles
it will have.
When you see a pilot or escort vehicle approaching with its warning lights flashing:
 slow down
 move over if necessary
 respond to gestures by the driver of an escort vehicle
 give way to the oversize vehicle.
If you are following an oversize vehicle, wait until the rear pilot vehicle operator
signals you can overtake. Pass both pilot or escort vehicles and the oversize vehicle
in one manoeuvre within the speed limit.
Performance guidelines for pilot and escort vehicles and drivers are available from
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
131
You can also get these guidelines, along with the Critical areas and roads
in Queensland map, by contacting The Government Bookshop at
www.bookshop.qld.gov.au.
Motorbikes
Motorbike riders have the same rights and responsibilities as other vehicle
drivers. Apply the same road rules, such as giving way, when you share the
road with motorbikes.
Sharing the road safely with motorbikes
 Always scan the traffic for motorbikes—front, rear, left, right—especially when
changing lanes and at intersections.
 Use your lights in poor visibility—it helps motorbike riders see you.
 Check your blind spot for motorbikes—look in mirrors and over your shoulder.
 Be aware that motorbikes can accelerate quickly.
 Avoid dropping oil and debris on the road—it’s hazardous to all road users.
 Motorbike riders have a right to take up an entire lane. You must overtake a
motorbike as you would overtake any other vehicle.
 Give motorbikes plenty of room—in good driving conditions, keep a two second
gap between you and the vehicle ahead. For more information about
maintaining a safe following distance—see Safe following distance, page 136.
Common myth
Motorbike riders must ride single file.
Truth
Two motorbike riders may ride side-by-side in one marked lane, as long as they are not
more than 1.5 m apart.
Cyclists
Cyclists are road users, sharing the same rights as larger vehicles and deserving the
same respect and courtesy. However, some motorists fail to obey the road rules or
apply common sense when sharing the road with cyclists.
Remember, every person riding a bicycle means one less car on the road, which
means reduced traffic and pollution.
 The give way rules apply to cyclists. You must give way to cyclists at
intersections, just as you would give way to a car—see Giving way, page 78.
 Cyclists can legally ride on any part of the lane—leave them enough room and
only overtake when you can do it safely.
132
 Leave a safe distance between your vehicle and a cyclist when passing
or overtaking.
 Check for cyclists at intersections.
 Signal your intentions by indicating when required so cyclists can react.
 Check your blind spot for cyclists—look in mirrors and over your shoulder.
 Check for cyclists before opening your car door.
 Do not sound your horn at cyclists—it may startle them and make them fall.
 Anyone can legally cycle on the footpath, so look for cyclists when entering
or leaving a driveway.
Common myth
Cyclists must ride single file.
Truth
Two cyclists may legally ride beside each other on the road, as long as they are not more
than 1.5 m apart.
Pedestrians
Always be aware of pedestrians. Pedestrians include people:
 walking
 using wheelchairs (including registered motorised wheelchairs)
 on rollerblades, skateboards, rollerskates and other wheeled recreational devices.
Sharing the road safely with pedestrians
 When driving a vehicle or riding a bicycle, you must give way to pedestrians
when they’re crossing at pedestrian crossings, children’s crossings or marked
foot crossings—see Giving way at pedestrian crossings, page 82.
 When you are turning at an intersection, you must give way to pedestrians
crossing the road you are turning into.
 You must give way to pedestrians in shared zones.
 Allow a person with a disability or senior pedestrians longer to cross the road.
 Lower your speed at night and be alert for people suddenly walking out on the
road, especially around where alcohol may be served.
 Take care driving in areas where there are children, especially near schools
and playgrounds. Watch out for children running out onto the road.
 If you see another vehicle stop or slow down near a pedestrian or children’s
school crossing or crosswalk, prepare to stop because pedestrians may
be crossing.
133
Common myth
At traffic lights, drivers who are turning on a green light do not have to give way to
people crossing at a pedestrian crossing.
Truth
Drivers turning must give way to pedestrians crossing the road that they are entering,
even when the driver is facing a green traffic light or arrow.
Schools
School zones
Common myth
School zones apply every day.
Truth
School zones do not apply on weekends, public holidays or during school holidays. You
should always refer to the sign for hours of operation.
You can identify school zones by signs near the school. Speed limits are
lower in school zones on school days, generally in the morning and the
afternoon. Lower speed limits reduce the risk of death or injury to
pedestrians using the roads at these times. Speeds and times depend
on the area, so you must always check the sign carefully.
For more information about speed limits in school zones, see Variable
speed zones, page 69.
Crossings at schools
There are two types of school crossings:
 single or dual children’s school crossings with CHILDREN CROSSING flags
 zebra or pedestrian-activated signal crossings.
Some children’s crossings are supervised by the Department of
Transport and Main Roads crossing supervisors. Children’s
crossings are temporary, and are only in operation at certain
times of the day when the flags are displayed. This is usually for
an hour in the morning and half an hour in the afternoon. Where
supervised, a crossing supervisor will step onto the road and
display the STOP sign.
You must wait until the pedestrians have crossed the road and the
crossing supervisor has returned to the footpath.
134
If you come to an unsupervised children’s crossing, you must stop before the stop
line and wait while any pedestrian is on or entering the crossing. You must not
begin to accelerate until all pedestrians are safely on the footpath on either side of
the road. If a vehicle has stopped to give way to pedestrians at a crossing, do not
overtake the vehicle while it is stationary.
School buses
Transporting children safely in school buses is part of school life.
Buses used only or primarily for taking children to or from school display either the
words SCHOOL BUS or an image of two children. The signs have black letters or
images on a yellow background.
School buses have flashing yellow warning lights fitted to the front and rear of the
bus. The driver of a school bus must flash its warning lights when children are being
picked up or set down.
You should slow down when approaching a school bus, especially when the yellow
lights are flashing, and pass with care. Watch for children who may run across the
road from in front of or behind the bus.
Sample questions—sharing with other road users
1. If you are turning at an intersection, must you give way to pedestrians that are
crossing the road you are turning into? (See page 134)
A. Yes.
B. Only if the pedestrians are under 16 years of age.
C. Only if the pedestrians are over 16 years of age.
D. No.
2. Which one of the following statements is true? (See page 134)
A. The speed limit in school zones does not apply if there are no
children around.
B. The speed limit in school zones only applies to children from within
that school.
C. The speed limit in school zones applies on weekends only.
D. The speed limit in school zones applies on school days during
designated times.
3. An emergency vehicle (eg ambulance or fire engine) is sounding its siren and
quickly approaching your vehicle from behind. You must: (See page 130)
A. immediately turn on your vehicle’s hazard lights
B. immediately sound your horn to warn other vehicles of the approaching emergency
vehicle
C. immediately accelerate
D. move out of the path of the emergency vehicle as soon as you can do so safely.
135
4. You may be faced with this sign, held by a school crossing supervisor, as you
approach a school crossing. What should you do? (See page 134)
A. Slow down until all pedestrians are clear of your vehicle.
B. Stop and remain stopped until the supervisor has returned to the
footpath.
C. Stop and remain stopped for children only.
5. You are at an intersection without signs, road markings or traffic lights. A cyclist
is approaching from your right. Which one of the following statements is true?
(See page 132)
A. The cyclist must slow down so you can continue.
B. The cyclist must give way to you.
C. You must give way to the cyclist.
D. If you wave the cyclist on, you should wait for them to pass, otherwise the cyclist
must wait for you.
Stopping
Safe following distance
If you drive too close to the vehicle in front of you, what will you do if they
brake suddenly? You are likely to crash. Keep far enough back so that you can
stop in time.
How far should you travel behind?
 A car should drive at least two seconds behind the vehicle in front in
ideal conditions.
 A heavy vehicle should drive at least four seconds behind the vehicle in front.
 A vehicle towing a trailer or caravan should allow two seconds, plus one second
for each 3 m of trailer.
 Double this following distance in poor conditions.
 Use the time-lapse method to keep a safe distance behind the vehicle in front.
Time-lapse method
1. Pick a mark on the road or an object close to the left-hand side of the road,
such as a power or light pole.
2. When the rear of the vehicle ahead passes the object, count ‘one thousand one,
one thousand two’ (this takes about two seconds). If the conditions are bad,
count ‘one thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three, one thousand
four’ (this takes about four seconds).
136
3. If the front of your vehicle passes the object before you finish counting, you are
too close, so drop back.
Braking
How quickly could you stop your vehicle in an emergency? The time for you to see
and react (reaction distance) plus the time for you to apply the brakes to stop your
vehicle (braking distance) may not be enough to avoid a crash.
Reaction distance + braking distance = total stopping distance
Total stopping distance
The faster you go, the further you travel before you stop. The following graph
shows how much quicker you stop if you travel at lower speeds.
By the time a car travelling at 50 km/h has stopped, a car braking from 60 km/h
would still be travelling at about 40 km/h. If you hit a pedestrian at this speed, they
have an almost 60% chance of being killed.
keactlcn dlstance
8raklne dlstance
V
e
h
i
c
l
e

s
p
e
e
d
Distance in metres
80km/h
¸¸ çç
88m
90km/h
¸; ;o
107m
100km/h uz 8ç 127m
zç ¸1
56m 60km/h
z¤ uz
71m 70km/h
110km/h u6 1ou 150m
160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0
Your vehicle’s stopping distance is also affected by:
 your reaction time (average of
1.5 seconds)
 your experience and age
 average deceleration of your car
 physical condition of your car
 braking capacity of your car
 condition of the tyres
 nature of the road
 weather conditions
 your behaviour at the time
of the incident.
137
Your stopping distance will increase when the road is wet, muddy, slippery,
has a loose surface or if you are travelling downhill, so always ensure you drive
for the conditions.
Note: If your vehicle is fitted with an anti-lock braking system (ABS), you should refer
to the owner’s handbook to familiarise yourself with how the system operates.
Hazards
Approaching hazards
A hazard can be a physical feature or a situation such as an intersection, roundabout,
or pedestrians or animals near a roadway.
Young drivers do not detect hazards as well as experienced drivers. That is why the
hazard perception test is being introduced for drivers under 25 years of age.
For information about Hazard perception testing, see page 33.
Young drivers also react more slowly to avoid a hazard. However, if you follow the
system of vehicle control, you will always be in the correct position on the road,
travelling at the correct speed and in the correct gear so you can deal with any
hazard safely.
As a driver you should:
 recognise the hazard (scan continuously)
 know what action to take (system of vehicle control)
 act in time (give other drivers behind you ample warning).
System of vehicle control
Use this system when approaching any traffic situation:
1. Identify the hazard (e.g. intersection, pedestrian).
2. Ask, ‘Is my position on the road correct for the hazard ahead?’
3. Mirrors and signals—check the rear vision mirrors to see where other vehicles
are. If you need to indicate, do it now.
4. Approaching speed—check your speed is appropriate. Reduce or increase your
speed as necessary.
5. Gears and mirrors—if you change speed, you may need to change gears. Check
the rear vision mirrors again to see what other vehicles are doing.
138
6. Evasive action—just before you
come to the hazard, check to see
if it is still safe to drive in the way
and direction you planned. Ask,
‘Do I have to take some action?’
This may mean stopping, slowing
down or sounding the horn.
7. After passing the hazard, resume
the appropriate speed.
Hazardous situations
A hazardous driving situation
includes brake failure, animals or
debris on the road, tyre blowouts,
skidding or aquaplaning.
In a hazardous situation, apply
the system of vehicle control
described above.
Skidding
To prevent a skid, follow the
ABC plan:
 Accelerate smoothly
 Brake smoothly
 Corner smoothly.
Skidding is caused by one or a combination of
these factors:
 driving too fast for the circumstances
 too much acceleration
 sudden or too much braking or faulty brakes
 loose or wet road surface
 turning the steering wheel too sharply or too
much so that the wheels lose traction and the
vehicle skids.
Wet surfaces and gravel roads increase the risk of skidding. When you are driving in
these conditions, reduce your speed and allow the tyres to grip the road. Tyres with
inadequate tread may also skid or aquaplane in wet conditions.
Always ensure your tyres have a tread depth of at least 1.5 mm across the full
width of the tyre.
Aquaplaning
Aquaplaning is where there is a build-up of water between the road surface and
the tyres, causing them to lose contact with the road surface.
139
To reduce the danger of aquaplaning:
 don’t use cruise control
 reduce speed.
Bad weather (e.g. rain, fog, dust)
Only use your hazard lights if you are driving in hazardous weather conditions and
you are driving slowly and likely to obstruct other vehicles, or your vehicle is stopped
and is obstructing the path of other vehicles or pedestrians.
When driving in bad weather:
 keep your windscreen and all lights clean
 turn your headlights on when you cannot clearly see people or vehicles
 keep headlights on low beam—in fog you can see better on low beam than high beam
 during the day, you may drive in fog or other hazardous weather conditions
without your headlights on if you turn on your front fog lights (if fitted)
 you may only drive with fog lights on if you are in fog or hazardous weather
conditions causing reduced visibility
 use your air conditioner or demister to keep the windscreen clear
 slow down—remember the signed speed limit is the maximum safe speed for
good conditions
 double your following distance to allow for longer reaction time and subsequent
greater stopping distance—see Safe following distance, page 136.
After driving through deep water, drive slowly with your foot on the brake for a
short distance. This helps the brakes dry out.
Tyre blowouts
If a tyre does blow out, your vehicle will pull to the side of the damage for a front
tyre and sway to the sides for a rear tyre.
If this happens:
 grip the steering wheel firmly
 do not press on the footbrake and do not apply the handbrake
 do not take your foot off the accelerator
 provide some additional power through the accelerator to continue momentum
 compensate for the pull by counter steering.
Once the vehicle is under control:
 ease off the accelerator and let the vehicle slow down gradually
 look for a safe place to pull over and stop.
140
Animals at night
Animals can be hypnotised by the glare of your headlights. If an animal is on
the road:
 slow down, apply the
system of vehicle control
 be prepared to brake
 flash your headlights
 sound your horn (if necessary)
 keep control of the vehicle and do not swerve.
Also, watch for animals on the side of the road because they may cross the road
without warning.
Footbrake failure
The Australian Design Rules require modern cars to be fitted with a dual braking
system. If either the front or rear braking system fails and you are having trouble
stopping the car due to reduced braking efficiency, you may need to:
 ease the handbrake on and increase the pressure gradually—sudden pressure
may lock the rear wheels and cause skidding
 change to a lower gear
 use your horn and flash your headlights to warn other drivers.
Car stalls in a dangerous situation
If your car stalls in a dangerous situation (e.g. at a railway level crossing), switch on
your hazard lights. Try to restart the engine. If this fails, get help and try to push
your vehicle clear.
Shattered windscreen
If your windscreen shatters and you cannot see:
 slow down and look out the driver’s window
 brake slowly and, if safe, pull off to the side of the road
 fill the demister vents with paper or cloth (this stops pieces of glass getting into
the vents)
 wrap a piece of cloth around your hand or use the wheel brace to punch out
the whole windscreen from the inside
 wind up the other windows
 drive at a slower speed.
If the windscreen is only cracked and there is no obvious danger, leave it in place
and drive at a reduced speed with all windows wound up. Replace your windscreen
as soon as possible.
141
Driver fatigue
Fatigue is a hidden killer—it creeps up on drivers who ignore their body’s warning
signs. Driving while tired is a factor in one in six crashes that result in serious injury
or death. Driving without sleep for 17 hours is the same as driving with a blood
alcohol concentration of 0.05. Driving without sleep for 24 hours is the same as
driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.10.
Peak times for fatigue crashes are 2.00 pm - 4.00 pm and 10.00 pm - 6.00 am,
when the body is in its natural sleep period.
Whether you travel long or short distances, stay alert at all times.
How to avoid driving tired on long trips
 Take regular breaks—at least 15 minutes every two hours and an additional
30 minutes every five hours is recommended.
 Pull into rest areas, tourist spots and Driver Reviver sites when you can
—see page 143.
 Avoid drinking alcohol before and during the trip.
 Check with your doctor if any medications you’re taking affect your
driving ability.
 Eat properly—not too little, not too much. Big meals can make you drowsy.
 Get plenty of sleep before your trip—not getting enough quality sleep before
your trip is dangerous.
 Don’t drive for more than 8-10 hours in a day. If driving a heavy vehicle,
demerit points and fines apply if you commit a fatigue offence—see Fatigue
offence demerit points and penalties, page 110.
 Get fresh air in the car and during breaks.
 Share the driving.
 Plan ahead—arrange stops and rest overnight.
 Check for warning signs of tiredness—see below.
 As soon as you feel tired, stop and rest.
How to avoid driving tired on short trips
 If you feel tired before you start, consider not driving.
 Ask someone to drive you home or pick you up.
 Collect your car later when you are not tired.
Warning signs
Be honest with yourself. Do not keep driving if you show these signs of tiredness:
142
 your car wanders across
the road
 fumbling gear changes
 day dreaming
 unintentional increases or decreases in speed
 dim or fuzzy vision
 sore or heavy eyes.
Driver Reviver sites
Driver Reviver sites operate along major Queensland
highways during busy holiday periods. You can rest while
enjoying free Bushells tea, coffee and refreshments.
For operating times, visit the Driver Reviver section at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
Correct seatbelt and child restraint use
A seatbelt is your defence against serious injury or death in a crash. Without a
seatbelt, you are 5.5 times more likely to die if involved in a crash. You never know
when a crash will happen, so why take the risk?
Wearing seatbelts
Always wear your seatbelt correctly. An incorrectly worn seatbelt could cause neck,
chest or abdominal injuries in a crash.
 Wear your belt with the buckle low on the hip, the sash running from the
shoulder across the chest and above the stomach, and the lap part sitting
across the pelvis and hips.
 Pregnant women must wear the seatbelt with the lap part sitting over the
thighs, across the pelvis and below the unborn child, and the sash above the
stomach and between the breasts.
 Check the seatbelt is not twisted, frayed or loose.
 Everyone in the car must have their own seatbelt—do not share a seatbelt.
 Replace the entire seatbelt assembly if the vehicle is involved in a severe crash.
Child restraints
It is a driver’s responsibility to ensure that a child is restrained in an appropriate
approved child restraint. A child could easily be killed or injured in a crash if they
are not in a correctly fitted, Australian Standards approved child restraint.
You must ensure that a child is secured in an approved child restraint until the
child turns seven years of age. Once a child turns seven, you must ensure that the
child uses a properly fitted adult seatbelt. The type of approved child restraint that
you must use will depend on the age and size of the child. The table on page 144
specifies the type of approved child restraint required for each age group.
143
The rules recognise that some children may be too small or too large for a specific
type of restraint. If your child is too small to move into the next level of restraint,
you should keep your child in the lower level of child restraint for as long as
necessary. If your child is too large to fit into a restraint specified, you may move
your child into the next level of restraint. A child is too tall for a booster seat when
the level of the child’s eyes is above the level of the back of the booster seat.
Use this guide to choose the appropriate restraint for a child.
Age Weight Child restraint
0 to 6 months Less than 8 kg Rearward facing baby capsule or infant
restraint
6 months to 1 year 8 to 12 kg Rearward or forward facing infant restraint
6 months to 4 years 8 to 18 kg Forward facing child restraint with built-in
harness
4 to 7 years 14 to 26 kg Booster seat with H-harness or a booster seat
with a secured adult seatbelt
7 years or older 27 kg or more Adult lap/sash belt
No restraint will work properly or prevent injury unless it is fitted in accordance
with the manufacturer’s directions.
A child under four years of age must not sit in the front row of a vehicle that has
more than one row of seats, even if the child is three years of age and large enough
to be seated in a booster seat.
A child between four and seven years of age must not sit in the front row of a
vehicle that has more than one row of seats unless all the other seats are occupied
by children under seven years of age.
A child of any age can sit in the front seat if the vehicle has only one row of seats,
for example a utility, and the child is properly restrained. If the vehicle has a
passenger airbag fitted, a rearward facing child restraint should not be used.
4WD driving
Driving a four-wheel drive (4WD) vehicle, on- or off-road, takes different skills than
the skills you need to drive a two-wheel drive vehicle. Drive off-road without
learning the skills and you could cause damage to your vehicle and put yourself and
your passengers in danger.
Engaging 4WD does not give your vehicle super grip, it just creates more traction.
You might still slip or skid.
144
Before you drive off-road, check your vehicle and equipment. Help may not be
nearby when you need it. Check your tyres, engine and transmission fluid levels and
recovery equipment. Secure all loose equipment.
Driving on slopes
Drive straight up or down a slope to reduce the chance of the vehicle rolling over.
4WD vehicles are often top heavy compared with conventional cars.
In slippery conditions, reduce speed by using the foot brake a little – if at all – to
keep your grip on the road. Accelerate lightly if your vehicle slips sideways driving
down a slope.
Driving on sand
Your vehicle can lose traction on sand. Keep up your momentum and avoid spinning
your wheels. In loose sand, improve traction by slightly deflating your tyres to
increase the amount of tyre you drive on (tyre imprint).
 Do not lower the air pressure too much—check tyre manufacturer’s
recommendations.
 Avoid sharp turns.
 Drive slowly.
 Re-inflate the tyres before you drive again on a hard surface, such as wet sand
or bitumen.
Towing a trailer or caravan
Towing a trailer or caravan requires extra concentration and skill. You should gain
experience before trying to tow at high speed or in confined spaces.
Before you start
Ensure your vehicle and trailer or caravan are safe to drive or tow. Check:
 tyres and tyre pressure
 wheel bearings and suspension
 brakes—an efficient braking system is needed for all trailers with a loaded
weight of more than 750 kg
 trailer coupling, including lights and safety chain—couplings must be strong
enough to take the weight of a fully loaded trailer and must be marked with the
manufacturer’s name or trademark and the rated capacity
 safety chains should be short enough to stop the front of the trailer hitting the
ground if the couplings break
 loading—distribute the bulk of it over the axles.
145
Check the manufacturer’s towing rating for your vehicle to ensure it can legally tow
the weight of the trailer or caravan.
How to tow safely
 When turning, allow additional space for the extra length and width
of the trailer.
 Steer smoothly to avoid swaying, especially in wet or slippery conditions.
 Allow for a greater stopping distance and look ahead for any changes in road or
traffic conditions.
 Avoid braking unnecessarily even if the trailer begins to sway or snake.
Continue at a steady speed or accelerate slightly until the swaying stops.
 Keep left—don’t hold up traffic unnecessarily.
See Long vehicles, page 102, Parking restrictions for heavy and long vehicles, page
104, Following other long vehicles, page 114, and Towlines, page 114 for road rules
specific to towing trailers and caravans.
More information about towing is available on the Department of Transport and
Main Roads website, www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
Restraining your load
As a driver, you have a legal responsibility to your passengers, other road users and
yourself to ensure that all loads carried by your vehicle are securely restrained.
This is how you carry loads safely.
1. Choose a suitable vehicle to carry the load.
2. Position the load correctly, ensuring the load does not affect the vehicle’s
stability, steering or braking performance.
3. If your load is light material, e.g. bark chips or leaves, secure it properly. This
may mean covering your load with a tarpaulin.
4. Use suitable restraints that are strong enough and in good condition.
5. Provide adequate load restraint to prevent movement of the load
6. Drive carefully—be prepared for changes in the vehicle’s stability, steering and
braking capacity.
7. If your load overhangs at the front, back or sides, check the overhang is legal.
Further information about carrying loads is available in the Load Restraint Guide.
The guide can be downloaded from the National Transport Commission website at
www.ntc.gov.au. To order a copy of the Load Restraint Guide, visit the Queensland
Government Bookshop website at www.bookshop.qld.gov.au.
146
What to do at a crash
What to do
You must stop if you are involved in a crash.
You must report a crash to the police immediately if:
 a vehicle involved needs to be towed away
 any driver involved in the crash does not give his or her particulars to any other
drivers involved in the crash
 any person involved is killed or injured
 the crash causes $2,500 or more damage to property.
If the crash cannot be reported immediately, it must be reported within 24 hours of
the crash occurring.
Minor crash
Even if the crash doesn’t require police to attend, you must still exchange
details with people involved in the crash or anyone with a good reason for
wanting your details.
Give your name and address, the vehicle owner’s name and address (if you are not
the owner) and the vehicle’s details (e.g. registration number, description of
vehicle). Leave a note (securely attached to the vehicle) with these details if a
vehicle without a driver is damaged.
A crash resulting in injury
If you are involved in a crash or are the first at the scene of a crash, stop your
vehicle in a safe area near the crash scene without causing more of a hazard.
For safety, follow these three steps.
1. Make the crash scene safe
- Switch on vehicle hazard warning lights
- Turn off the ignition in all the vehicles involved
- Carefully and with common sense, get people to warn other drivers. If
available, use safety vests
- If available, safely place portable warning triangles—see Portable warning
signs, page 107
- Light up the crash site with vehicle headlights on low beam—do not dazzle
oncoming traffic
- Keep clear of fallen power lines
- Do not smoke—there might be spilt petrol.
147
2. See who is injured
- Look in the vehicle/s, count the number of injured and check their injuries
- Look around the scene for victims who may have left their vehicles
- Do not move the injured unless necessary.
3. Send for help
- Call 000 for emergency services, or 112 on mobile phones (if 000 is
unsuccessful). If you are in an isolated area, send someone to get help or
stop a passer-by. Do not leave the injured alone unless there is no alternative.
Tell emergency services:
- the exact location of the crash site (use landmarks if necessary)
- whether ambulance, police, fire or tow trucks are needed
- the number of injured and types of injuries
- whether anyone is trapped in their vehicle
- whether power lines are down.
Tow trucks
There are laws governing tow truck licence holders, and it is important you know
your rights when having your vehicle towed.
However, Queensland’s tow truck regulations only apply to towing at crashes and
seizures in regulated areas. So if your car has broken down, it is up to you to discuss
the price with the tow truck licence holder and where your vehicle is being towed.
Most major populated areas of Queensland are regulated areas. For a full list, see
the Tow Truck Regulation 2009.
Tow truck licence holders must be licensed by the Department of Transport and
Main Roads to tow any vehicle from a crash or police seizure. The tow truck licence
holder’s name, business address and telephone number must be clearly marked on
their vehicle.
Organising your vehicle to be towed
 The accredited tow truck driver (or assistant) is the only person who is allowed
to approach you or your agent (if you are injured and unable to make your own
decisions, another person who is with you may act on your behalf) about
towing your vehicle from the crash.
 The driver (or assistant) must show you their certificate, even if you do not ask
to see it.
 You or your agent must sign a towing authority form before your vehicle can be
towed from the crash.
148
 Make sure the towing authority form is fully completed before you sign it. The
form should include full details of the cost of the tow, the cost of any storage
and the address of where you want the vehicle to be towed.
 A police officer or Department of Transport and Main Roads authorised officer
may sign the towing authority form if you or your agent cannot sign the form.
In this case, the tow truck licence holder must inform the Department of
Transport and Main Roads where your vehicle was towed within seven days.
 A tow truck licence holder must not charge more than the regulated towing fee
for a standard tow. A standard tow includes:
- loading and moving the vehicle to a place of storage (includes the first
50 km from the incident scene—a fee per km may be charged for each
1 km over 50 km)
- up to 60 minutes working time (after the towing authority form has
been signed)
- cleaning the scene of the incident
- storing the vehicle for up to 72 hours.
The services provided by the tow truck licence holder are detailed on the towing
authority form under the heading Fee details. You may negotiate the price at
the crash site.
 If your vehicle is covered by comprehensive insurance, your insurance company
may pay for the towing of the vehicle from the crash, but confirm this with
your insurance company.
 Once your vehicle is in storage, it cannot be moved again without
your permission.
 The tow truck licence holder must not charge you to view your vehicle during
business hours when it is held at the storage yard, or to move your vehicle near
the entrance of the yard for collection.
 The tow truck licence holder must do an inventory of all property in your
vehicle and keep the property in storage for you.
For more information about tow truck legislation, see the Tow Truck Act 1973 and
the Tow Truck Regulation 2009 by visiting the Office of the Queensland
Parliamentary Counsel website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au.
For more information on regulated towing fees, call the Department of
Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80 or visit the department’s website at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
149
Offences and penalties
 Enforcement
 Licence suspensions
 Unlicensed and disqualified driving
151
Enforcement
Speed cameras
Speed-related crashes cost the community
around $1.1 billion a year through
increased hospital and health care costs,
lost workplace productivity and the use of
emergency services. The greatest cost,
however, is the trauma suffered by victims
and their families.
To reduce the incidence of speed-
related crashes and to deter motorists from speeding, speed cameras are used on
Queensland roads. Independent evaluations reveal they have been successful in
these tasks.
Fixed speed cameras are installed at locations that have a history of road crashes
and are difficult or unsafe to monitor by other enforcement methods.
Mobile speed cameras operate at sites that have been approved following a strict
selection procedure, which considers:
 the site’s history of crashes
 validated complaints about high-risk speeding behaviour
 workplace health and safety issues for road workers and police officers
operating speed cameras
 that the speed limit for the road has been set in compliance with the state’s
speed control guidelines.
Using a radar device or in-road loops, a speed camera measures the speeds of all
vehicles and automatically photographs any vehicle exceeding the speed limit. The
photograph, which includes the recorded time, date, location and vehicle speed, is
examined by a trained adjudicator before an Infringement Notice (Photographic
Detection Device Offence) is sent to the registered vehicle owner. The registered
vehicle owner may then examine the notice and pay the fine or complete a
statutory declaration nominating the person who was driving the vehicle at the
time the offence occurred.
Payment of speed camera offences can be made by credit card online at
www.tmr.qld.gov.au or by phoning 13 23 90. Alternatively, payment can be made
using BPAY through a participating financial institution, or in person at any
Australia Post office or a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer
service centre (cash or cheque only).
152
Under the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995, all money
collected for speed camera detected offences in excess of the administrative costs
of collection must be used to fund road safety education and awareness programs,
road accident injury rehabilitation programs and safety improvement to state-
controlled roads.
For more information about speed limits, see Speed Limits, page 68.
Red light cameras
Crashes caused by red light running are usually serious, and result in high costs to
the community. The aim of the red light camera program is to reduce the number
of these crashes.
Red light cameras are installed at intersections that have a history of crashes
caused by red light running. The cameras operate 24 hours a day, seven days
a week.
A red light camera is activated when the traffic light turns red. Any vehicle that
crosses the stop line and enters the intersection after the lights have turned red
will be photographed. After a vehicle is photographed, a second photograph is
taken one second later. The second photograph is used to check whether the
vehicle continued through the intersection or stopped just past the stop line.
After the photograph is examined by trained adjudicators, the registered vehicle
operator will receive an Infringement Notice (Photographic Detection Device
Offence). The registered operator may then examine the notice and either pay the
fine or complete a statutory declaration nominating the driver of the vehicle at the
time of the offence.
Payment of red light camera offences can be made by credit card at Services online
at www.tmr.qld.gov.au or by phoning 13 23 90. Alternatively, use BPAY or pay by
cash or cheque at Australia Post or the Department of Transport and Main Roads
customer service centres.
Under the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995, all money
collected for red light camera detected offences in excess of the administrative
costs of collection must be used to fund road safety education and awareness
programs, road accident injury rehabilitation programs and safety improvement to
state-controlled roads. For more information, see Traffic lights, page 65.
153
Random breath testing
Random breath testing helps reduce the number of drink driving crashes by
deterring motorists from driving when over their alcohol limit, and detecting
drivers who do. Police regularly conduct random breath testing, and as a driver,
you should expect to be intercepted for a random breath test at any time.
If you are to be breath tested, a police officer will ask you to provide a preliminary
breath test by blowing into a roadside breath testing device.
If you are over your alcohol limit for your age, the type of licence you hold or the
type of vehicle that you are driving, you will be detained and taken for further
breath or blood testing at the officer’s discretion. If it is confirmed that you are
over your alcohol limit, you will be charged with the offence of drink driving.
Refusing to take the roadside breath test is an offence, and you will be detained
and taken for a further breath or blood test. If you again refuse to take this breath
or blood test, you will be charged with a second offence of refusing to supply the
specimen. The court may deal with your refusal to take the breath test (other than
the roadside breath test) or a blood test in the same manner as if you were found
to be over the high alcohol limit.
Random roadside drug testing
Drug driving, like drink driving, is a serious offence. Roadside drug testing allows
police to conduct saliva testing in conjunction with random breath testing (RBT)
or as a stand-alone check. The roadside drug testing process operates in a similar
way to RBTs.
Saliva tests will be able to detect the active ingredients in cannabis (THC), speed
and ice (methylamphetamine) and ecstasy (MDMA). There is no legal limit of
these drugs.
The preliminary saliva test is simple and painless and takes between three and five
minutes. If a negative result is returned, you are free to go. If the test is positive
(drug detected), you will be taken to a police vehicle for a second saliva test.
If the second saliva test is positive for drugs, your driver licence will be
suspended for 24 hours and the remainder of the saliva sample will be sent
for laboratory analysis.
If this test also comes back positive, you will be charged and required to appear in
court. If convicted, you will face a fine or imprisonment and you will be disqualified
from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a stated period.
If you are found drug driving a second time while an outstanding drug driving
offence is still to be heard by a court, you will have your licence suspended until
the matter is heard or finalised by a court.
See Drugs and driving, page 96, for more information
154
Vehicle impoundment
Police have the power to impound vehicles. Your vehicle can be impounded if you
are caught more than once for the following offences:
 driving a vehicle that is both unregistered and uninsured
 driving while unlicensed or disqualified
 driving with an alcohol content level of 0.15 or higher
 failing to supply a specimen of breath or blood, or driving while under
a 24-hour suspension
 driving an illegally modified or non-compliant vehicle.
Vehicle impoundment laws apply to the driver and the vehicle that is used while
committing the offence. Even if you don’t own the car you are driving, it will still
be impounded and you will be responsible of the cost of the impoundment.
As an owner of a vehicle it is your responsibility to ensure that your vehicle is
roadworthy and drivers of your vehicle are licensed and drive safely. Even if you are
not the driver that committed the offence, your vehicle can still be impounded.
The only exception is where the vehicle was stolen, in which case it will be returned
to you as soon as possible.
The following table outlines the Queensland vehicle impoundment laws
and penalties.
Offence Penalty
First offence Notice to appear in court may be issued.
No impoundment.
Two offences of the
same kind in a three
year period
Notice to appear in court may be issued.
Immediate impoundment of vehicle for a minimum 48 hours
(initial impoundment period).
Three offences of the
same kind in a three
year period
Notice to appear in court may be issued.
Immediate impoundment of vehicle for up to three months, or
may be forfeited altogether.
Magistrate may also impose a fine, community service and/or
jail time.
For further information about impoundment laws, refer to the Police Powers and
Responsibilities Act 2000. Visit the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel
website, www.legislation.qld.gov.au/legislation.
155
Transport inspectors
Transport inspectors play a major role in ensuring the safety of drivers and
protecting our road infrastructure and environment.
Transport inspectors:
 educate heavy vehicle drivers and transport operators about regulations
 audit and monitor the operations of approved inspection stations and approved
people
 check vehicles are registered, insured and meet safety requirements, and issue
defect notices and on-the-spot fines where appropriate
 test vehicles’ pollution levels
 monitor and enforce the regulations relating to driving practices and operating
procedures of heavy vehicles, including tow trucks and buses
 check loads are correctly secured and that vehicles are not overloaded
 help investigate heavy vehicle crashes.
Transport inspectors’ authority
Transport inspectors have broad powers relating to intercepting and examining
vehicles, and you must assist them.
You must pull over when a transport inspector indicates for you to stop. An inspector
in a patrol vehicle can also stop you by activating the patrol vehicle’s magenta lights
or electronic horn.
Transport inspectors will identify themselves and tell you why they have stopped
you. They may ask you for identification or your work diary or any other documents
that assist them. You must allow them to examine your vehicle.
Transport inspectors can issue substantial on-the-spot fines for a range of offences.
They can also report other matters for court action.
156
Licence suspensions
Immediate suspension
Your driver licence will be immediately suspended if you are charged with:
 driving when you are over 0.15 BAC
 failing to provide a specimen of blood or breath when required
 driving when you are over the limit and an earlier similar drink driving charge
has not been dealt with by a court, or withdrawn or otherwise discontinued
 operating a motor vehicle dangerously when adversely affected by an
intoxicating substance.
Your licence will remain suspended until the charge is dealt with by a court,
or withdrawn or otherwise discontinued.
However, you may be eligible to apply for a court order allowing you to continue
to drive until the charge is dealt with by a court, or withdrawn or otherwise
discontinued. You will need to complete a Section 79E Order Application (F4395)
and lodge it with the Magistrates Court within 21 days after the date of the
immediate suspension.
There are restrictions on who is eligible for a section 79E order. To be eligible,
you will need to be the holder of a Queensland open licence that was suspended,
and not have been convicted for drink driving or dangerous driving in the past
five years.
You will need to satisfy a court that:
 you are a fit and proper person to continue to drive
 you will not impose a risk on other road users
 your inability to drive will cause extreme financial or severe and unusual
hardship to either yourself or your family.
If you are successful, you must take the court order to a Department of Transport
and Main Roads customer service centre. An X4 condition code will be placed on
your licence, which will indicate that you are restricted to driving during particular
times and for particular purposes. A fee will be charged for this licence.
If you are charged with a further drink driving offence while driving under a
section 79E order, your licence will again be immediately suspended.
For more information, see Alcohol and drugs, page 96.
157
24 hour suspension
If you are found driving a motor vehicle when the concentration of alcohol in your
blood or breath is more than zero but less than 0.15, your driver licence may be
suspended for 24 hours. When this suspension period has ended, you may resume
driving until your case is decided by a court.
If convicted of drink driving, or failing to provide a specimen of breath (other than
a roadside test) or blood, you will be fined and disqualified from holding or
obtaining a driver licence for a stated period.
For more information about drink driving laws and how to avoid drink driving, see
Drink driving, page 96.
Speed suspension
If you are found driving at a speed more than 40 km/h over the speed limit, you
will generally be given an infringement notice for the offence. As soon as you pay
the fine or have been dealt with by a court, you will be sent a Notice of Driver
Licence Suspension for speeding offence, stating that your licence has been
suspended for six months from a stated date.
In addition, 8 demerit points will be recorded against your traffic history for this
offence. If these points cause you to gain too many demerit points, you will also be
dealt with under the demerit points scheme.
Accumulation of demerit points—Queensland licence holders
If you commit a demerit points offence, you will generally be given an infringement
notice for the offence. As soon as you pay the fine or have been dealt with by a
court, the number of demerit points that are set for the offence are then recorded
against your traffic history. These points are taken to have been allocated on the
day the offence was committed. Demerit points offences committed anywhere in
Australia may be recorded on your traffic history.
If you gain too many demerit points, you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit
Points—Notice to Choose, requiring you to choose between having your driver
licence suspended for a specified period or agreeing to continue driving under a
period of good behaviour for one year.
The number of demerit points varies according to the type of offence. For more
information, see Demerit points offences, page 163.
158
Learner licences
If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a one-year period while you hold
your learner licence, you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—Notice to
Choose. You will have the choice between:
 a three-month licence suspension
 a good driving behaviour period for one year.
Provisional licences
If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a one-year period while you hold
your provisional licence, you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—
Notice to Choose. You will have the choice between:
 a three-month licence suspension
 a good driving behaviour period for one year.
If you were disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a
time when you were the holder of a P1 or P2 licence, after serving the
disqualification period, you will get a P1 or P2 probationary licence and will be
required to complete any remaining period of your P1 or P2 licence, or a minimum
of one year, on this probationary licence.
If you were disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a
time when you were the holder of a provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007,
after serving the disqualification period, you will get a probationary licence and will
be required to complete any remaining period of your P1 or P2 provisional licence,
or a minimum of one year, on this probationary licence.
You may also have a one-year late night driving restriction imposed on you—see
Late night driving restrictions, page 160.
If your licence is suspended or you are disqualified from holding or obtaining a
driver licence during the provisional licence period, this time will not contribute to
the minimum period you must hold that licence.
Open licence
You may receive a warning letter when you gain at least 7 demerit points in a
three-year period.
If 12 or more demerit points are recorded against your traffic history in a three-
year period, you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—Notice to Choose.
The notice will require you to choose between having your open licence suspended
for a specific period or agreeing to continue driving under a period of good
behaviour for one year.
159
Open licence suspension periods
Demerit points 12 to 15 16 to 19 20 or more
Suspension periods 3 months 4 months 5 months
If you are disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a
time when you were the holder of an open licence, after serving the disqualification
period, you will be issued with a probationary licence and be required to hold the
licence for at least one year. You may also have a one-year late night driving
restriction imposed on your licence—see Late night driving restrictions below.
Driving under a good behaviour period for one year
If you choose to continue driving under a period of good driving behaviour for one
year, you may keep your current licence provided that you do not gain more than 1
demerit point during the one-year period. If you gain 2 or more demerit points
during this period, your licence will be suspended for double the suspension period
that would have applied had you taken the licence suspension in the first place.
Late night driving restrictions
If you are a provisional licence holder under 25 who accrues excessive demerit
points or commits a high speed offence that results in:
 a licence suspension period
 a good driving behaviour period
you will be prohibited from driving between the hours of 11.00 p.m. and 5.00 a.m.
for at least one year.
This restriction will begin the day after your suspension period has been
successfully completed, or on the day you nominate to begin your good driving
behaviour period.
If you are a provisional or open licence holder under 25 who commits an offence
that results in a court ordered disqualification, you will also be prohibited from
driving between the hours of 11.00 pm and 5.00 am for at least one year.
This restriction will begin the day you reapply for your licence after you have
successfully completed the disqualification period, or the day after your restricted
licence order has been served.
If your licence is suspended or you are disqualified from holding or obtaining a
driver licence during this period, this time will not contribute to the minimum
one-year period.
160
Double demerit points
Recidivist drivers and riders
If you are a driver or rider who is caught driving more than 20 km/h above the
speed limit more than once within a 12-month period, you will accumulate
double the amount of demerit points (based on the second offence) in relation
to the following speeding offence brackets:
 21-30 km/h above the speed limit—4 demerit points will be doubled to
8 demerit points
 31-40 km/h above the speed limit—6 demerit points will be doubled to
12 demerit points
 41 km/h or more above the speed limit—8 demerit points will be doubled to
16 demerit points.
The 12-month period starts from the date when the first offence was
committed, and will not end until a clear 12 months has passed from the date
of the last speeding offence.
Seatbelts, child restraints and helmets
Double demerit points are recorded on your traffic history for every additional
driver-related seatbelt, child restraint or motorbike rider helmet offence
committed within one year of a previous offence, in relation to the following
offences:
 driver of a vehicle failing to wear a seatbelt when driving a vehicle
fitted with a seatbelt for the driver—3 demerit points will be doubled
to 6 demerit points
 driver of a vehicle failing to ensure that a passenger wears a seatbelt or
child restraint—3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points
 rider of a motorbike failing to wear a motorbike helmet—3 demerit points
will be doubled to 6 demerit points
 rider of a motorbike failing to ensure a passenger wears a motorbike helmet
—3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points.
The 12-month period starts from the date when the first offence was
committed, and will not end until a clear 12 months has passed from the date
of the last offence.
The double demerit points scheme operates across the whole of the year
and will not involve doubling of fines. For more information, see Demerit
points offences on page 163.
161
Applying for a special hardship order
If the suspension of your Queensland driver licence will cause extreme hardship to
you and your family (for example, depriving you of the means of earning a living)
you may apply for a special hardship order if:
 you gained 2 or more demerit points while driving under a period of good
behaviour for one year
 your licence has been suspended for six months for driving more than 40 km/h
over the speed limit.
You must lodge your application for a special hardship order within 21 clear days
from when your provisional or open licence was suspended, and your application
must be lodged in the Magistrates Court district in which you reside.
You are not eligible to apply for a special hardship order if, within the past five
years before making the application:
 your Queensland driver licence was suspended or cancelled
 you have previously made a special hardship order application
 you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a Queensland
driver licence
 your authority to drive on Queensland roads under a non-Queensland driver
licence previously held by you has been suspended
 you were made ineligible to hold a Queensland driver licence because:
- you exceeded your demerit point threshold
- you were convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit,
at a time when you were unlicensed
 you have been convicted of operating a motor vehicle dangerously.
Accumulation of demerit points—interstate and foreign
licence holders
If you commit any demerit points offence, you will be given an infringement notice
for the offence. As soon as you pay the fine or have been dealt with by a court, the
number of demerit points that are set for the offence are then recorded against
your traffic history. If you gain too many demerit points, you will be sent a notice
from the Department of Transport and Main Roads advising that your authority to
drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign driver licence is suspended for the
stated period.
The length of the suspension period will depend on the type of licence you were
holding when the demerit points offence was committed and the number of
demerit points you gained during the period.
You cannot appeal against the suspension of your authority to drive in Queensland.
162
Demerit points offences
Offence Points
Speeding—more than 40 km/h over the speed limit 8*°
Speeding—more than 30 km/h but not more than 40 km/h over the speed limit 6°
Speeding—more than 20 km/h but not more than 30 km/h over the speed limit 4°
Speeding—at least 13 km/h but not more than 20 km/h over the speed limit 3
Driver using hand-held mobile phone while driving 3
Careless driving 3
Disobeying certain red traffic light signals 3
Disobeying emergency traffic signs 3
Disobeying stop or give way signs and certain other traffic control devices 3
Failing to give way, other than by disobeying a traffic sign 3
Failing to keep left of two continuous dividing lines 3
Failing to wear helmet, seatbelt or restraint 3
Driving with passenger who fails to wear seatbelt or restraint 3
Passenger 16 years or older who fails to wear seatbelt 3
Driving vehicle with person in or on parts of a motor vehicle not designed
for passengers or goods, or in open part of a motor vehicle designed for the
carriage of goods
3
Driving with person in a trailer being towed 3
Exceed carrying capacity of vehicle (for example, by number of people in
vehicle)
3
Improper turn (U-turn, left or right turn) 3
Using vehicle not in safe condition 3
Disobeying traffic lane arrows in roundabout 3
Operating television receivers and visual display units other than in a parked
vehicle
3
Failing to keep left in any other case 2
Failing to give proper change of direction signal 2
Improper overtaking, passing or driving to right of centre of road 2
Improper turn (other than U-turn, left or right turn) 2
Increasing speed when being overtaken 2
Placing or dropping injurious matter on roads 2
Unnecessary noise or smoke from vehicle 2
Speeding—less than 13 km/h over the speed limit 1
163
Demerit points offences cont.
Offence Points
Following too closely 1
Failing to dip headlights 1
Failing to have lights lit 1
Improper vehicle equipment, construction or loading 1
Dazzling road users with any light fitted to or in vehicle 1
Learner driving while unaccompanied by licensed driver or while not under
direction of licensed driver
1
*You will also be suspended from driving for six months—see Speed suspension,
page 158.
ºDouble demerit points apply when you drive more than 20 km/h above the speed
limit more than once within a 12-month period—see Recidivist drivers and riders,
page 161.
Young drivers demerit points offences
Offence Points
Disobeying high-powered vehicle restriction 3
Disobeying late night driving restriction 3
Disobeying peer passenger restriction 3
Using a mobile phone while driving 3
Failing to display or fit L or P plates 2
Failing to produce certificate of exemption for driving high-powered vehicle 1
Failing to produce certificate of exemption for late night driving 1
Note: The list of offences in these tables is not exhaustive—it shows only the most
common offences. For further information about new and existing offences, demerit
points, suspensions, cancellations or appeals, visit www.transport.qld.gov.au/licensing
or your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre, or
contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80.
164
Unlicensed and disqualified driving
Driving while disqualified by a court
You will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence for
a stated period by an order of an Australian court if you have been
convicted of committing:
 a drink or drug driving offence
 a dangerous driving offence
 a criminal offence involving the driving of a motor vehicle.
If you are found driving a motor vehicle while you are still disqualified from
holding or obtaining a driver licence because of this order, you will be charged
with disqualified driving.
If the court finds you guilty of disqualified driving, the court must further
disqualify you from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a period of at least
two years up to a maximum period of five years. You may also be given a fine of
up to $6,000, and you could be jailed for up to 18 months.
Driving while your Queensland driver licence or your authority to
drive is suspended
Your Queensland driver licence or your authority to drive in Queensland under
your non-Queensland driver licence will be suspended for a stated period if
you have:
 not paid any fines imposed on you by a court
 gained too many demerit points on your traffic history—see Licence
suspensions, page 157
 been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit—see Speed
suspension, page 158
 been charged with an offence that is subject to an immediate licence
suspension—see Immediate suspension, page 157.
If you are found driving a motor vehicle while your driver licence or your
authority to drive in Queensland under your non-Queensland driver licence is
suspended because of any of the above reasons, you will be charged with
unlicensed driving.
If the court finds you guilty of the unlicensed driving offence, the court must
disqualify you from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a period of at least
one month to a maximum period of six months. You may also be given a fine of
up to $4,000, and you could be jailed for up to one year.
165
Driving after your authority to drive is withdrawn
Your authority to drive in Queensland on your non-Queensland driver licence is
withdrawn if:
 it is proven that you have a mental or physical incapacity that adversely affects
your ability to drive safely
 the three months residency rule applies to you—see When the three months
residency rule applies, page 54.
If you are found driving a motor vehicle when your authority to drive has been
withdrawn because of any of the above reasons, you may be given an infringement
notice, or be dealt with by a court, for unlicensed driving.
The penalty is currently $200 for the offence of driving when your authority to
drive has been withdrawn because of the three months residency rule. If your
authority to drive has been withdrawn because of a medical reason, the penalty is
currently $400.
If the matter is dealt with by a court, and you are found guilty of the unlicensed
driving offence, you may be fined up to $4,000, and you could be jailed for up to
one year.
Driving when you do not hold a driver licence
You are taken to not hold a driver licence if:
 your driver licence has expired
 you have not renewed your licence
 you have voluntarily surrendered your driver licence
 your Queensland driver licence has been suspended or cancelled because
you have a mental or physical incapacity that adversely affects your ability
to drive safely
 you do not hold the class of licence for the vehicle you are found driving
 you have never held a driver licence
 after completing a period of disqualification, you do not obtain a further
driver licence before starting to drive again.
If you are found driving a motor vehicle and you do not hold a driver licence
because of any of the above reasons, you may be given an infringement notice
for the offence, or be dealt with by a court, for unlicensed driving.
The penalties for driving when you do not hold a driver licence presently range
from $153 to $446, depending on the reason why you did not hold a driver licence
when the offence was committed.
166
If the matter is dealt with by a court, and you are found guilty of the unlicensed
driving offence, you may be fined up to $4,000, and you could be jailed for up
to one year.
For more information about court imposed fines, contact the State Penalties
Enforcement Registry on 1300 365 635 or view their website, www.sper.qld.gov.au.
Cumulative disqualifications
A cumulative disqualification period applies when you have been convicted and
disqualified for two or more drink or drug driving related offences committed on
or after 18 May 2008.
You will start the first disqualification period on the date of the first court
conviction. The second disqualification period will not start until your first
disqualification period has been served.
The aim of cumulative disqualifications is to reduce repeated alcohol and or drug
driving behaviours and improve road safety by strengthening the deterrent effect
(making repeat offenders lose their licence for longer).
Cumulative disqualifications apply to a range of drink and drug driving and some
unlicensed driving offences. A full list of offences can be found at the Department
of Transport and Main Roads website www.tmr.qld.gov.au.
If you receive a cumulative disqualification, you will not be able to apply for a
restricted or work licence.
After serving your cumulative disqualifications, you will need to contact your
nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre, licence
issuing centre or agency to get your licence back.
167
Share what matters most at hereforlife.qld.gov.au
Drive safely Be here
Here for Life
q
t
l
h
h

0
0
4
6
Your vehicle
 Buying a used vehicle
 Registering your vehicle
 Insuring your vehicle
 Looking after your vehicle
169
Buying a used vehicle
Safety certificate
A registered vehicle that is offered for sale must have a current safety certificate
displayed in a conspicuous place. You do not need a certificate for a trailer with an
aggregate trailer mass that doesn’t exceed 750 kg.
A safety certificate offers consumers protection—buyers can be sure the vehicle is safe
to drive because it has undergone a basic safety inspection before being offered for sale.
A safety certificate covers basic safety functions such as:
 tyres
 brakes
 steering
 suspension
 body rust or damage
 windscreen
 lights.
However, a safety certificate does not mean the vehicle is in top condition. Before you
buy a used vehicle, it’s always wise to have a qualified independent mechanic check out
the vehicle’s engine, gearbox, differential and other equipment.
A safety certificate can only be issued by inspection stations—service stations, garages
or workshops—which have been approved to conduct vehicle inspections.
As a safety certificate must be displayed on a registered vehicle from the time it is
offered for sale, if the certificate is not displayed, it is likely the vehicle has not been
checked and you should not purchase it.
A safety certificate used by dealers must not have been issued more than three months
or 1,000 km prior to sale. For private sellers, the safety certificate must not have been
issued more than two months or 2,000 km prior to sale.
To help choose the best ‘green car’ for you, the Commonwealth Government’s Green
Vehicle Guide (www.greenvehicleguide.gov.au) provides information on vehicle fuel
consumption for both new and used vehicles and greenhouse and air pollution ratings
for new vehicles. It also includes a fuel consumption database for vehicles manufactured
between 1986 and 2003, plus more ‘greener motoring’ information about how to drive
and maintain any vehicle efficiently.
Vehicle history check
Consider purchasing a vehicle information certificate (VCheck) to:
 ensure you are paying for the right vehicle
 obtain details of the vehicle’s history, including whether the vehicle has been stolen
or involved in an accident and that there is no money owing on the vehicle.
Visit Services online at www.tmr.qld.gov.au or ask your car dealership for a VCheck.
170
Buyer’s checklist
 The vehicle has a Queensland safety certificate.
 The safety certificate is displayed on the vehicle.
 The issuing approved inspection station’s name is on it.
 The safety certificate is still valid.
 An independent mechanic has inspected the vehicle.
 The seller has a registration certificate in their name—although this is not proof
of legal ownership.
 Consider purchasing a vehicle information certificate (VCheck) to establish the
vehicle’s history and if it is recorded as a stolen or written-off vehicle (may
include a Register of encumbered vehicles [REVS] check).
 Obtain a REVS certificate to ensure there is no money owing on the vehicle. For
enquiries, contact SmartService Queensland on 131 304, or 1300 658 030 if you
are outside Brisbane.
 If the vehicle runs on gas or has gas fittings or systems it may require a gas
certificate.
 Ensure a transfer application is complete and signed by yourself and the seller
and lodge it with the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
Registering your vehicle
A vehicle must be registered before you can use it on the road, including driving
and parking. Registration fees help fund the development and maintenance of the
road network. Registration includes the cost of compulsory third party (CTP)
insurance, which covers the owner and driver of a motor vehicle for legal liability
arising from the use of the vehicle causing injury to another person.
CTP insurance does not cover damage to property, including vehicles.
The person in whose name a vehicle is registered is the ‘registered operator’. This
person is responsible for its operation on the road. The registered operator must be
a person or other legal entity. If the vehicle is a heavy vehicle, the person must be
18 years or older. The Department of Transport and Main Roads will currently allow
two individual registered operators to be recorded. However, further transactions
for this vehicle may be authorised by either operator. Registration is not proof of
legal ownership.
You can only register a vehicle in Queensland if its garage address (where it is based
or from where it regularly operates) is in Queensland. You must provide evidence of
a Queensland garage address when registering a vehicle. You must notify any
change of address within 14 days.
171
If you have a vehicle registered in another state and you are living in Queensland,
you must register the vehicle in Queensland within 14 days of Queensland
becoming the vehicle’s garage address.
How to register a motor vehicle
 Complete a Vehicle registration application form, available at a Department of
Transport and Main Roads customer service centre, any of the agencies listed on
page 170, or from www.transport.qld.gov.au/registration.
 Choose an authorised insurer and obtain a CTP insurance certificate—you do
not need the certificate for trailers or caravans if they are being towed by a
vehicle registered in Queensland, as they are covered by the registered towing
vehicle. If the vehicle is currently registered interstate, you do not need to
arrange insurance. Instead, you can nominate an insurance company when you
lodge your application for Queensland registration and pay the insurance
premium to the Department of Transport and Main Roads, who will forward it
on to your nominated insurer.
 The completed form and CTP insurance certificate cover you to take the vehicle
on the road for the purpose of registering the vehicle without the need for an
unregistered vehicle permit—see opposite
 Check the application form to see if you need a safety certificate or certificate
of inspection. To obtain the safety certificate, take your vehicle to an approved
inspection station for an inspection. You must carry your completed Vehicle
registration application form and the CTP insurance certificate. You must
present the original of the safety certificate or certificate of inspection (if
required) to the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
 If your vehicle is fuelled by gas or has gas appliances, you must present the
relevant gas certificate from an authorised gas installer, unless exempt. For used
vehicles, the issue date of the certificate must not be more than three months
before the lodgement date of registration.
 Go to a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or
any of the agencies listed on page 174 to register the vehicle. You will need the
following to register your vehicle:
- a completed Vehicle registration application form
- a CTP insurance certificate
- a safety certificate or a certificate of inspection (if applicable)
- a gas certificate (if applicable)
- personal identification—see Evidence of identity, page 11
- evidence of the vehicle’s origin (i.e. previous registration certificate)
- evidence of the Queensland garage address
172
- payment for the registration—call 13 23 80 or visit www.tmr.qld.gov.au for
the exact cost. You will need to pay duty unless you qualify for one of the
exemption categories listed on the application form.
 If registering a company or business vehicle, you will need to provide a
certificate of company or business registration. If registering a business vehicle,
identification of either a principal or the company behind the business is
required. If someone is representing you, they must show personal identification
and written authority to act on behalf of you or the company.
 If driving or towing your unregistered vehicle on the road, you will need an
unregistered vehicle permit. Permits can be issued for up to seven days. You
must first obtain the appropriate CTP insurance certificate from your CTP
insurer for the required number of days. Present this certificate at a
Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or any of the
agencies listed on page 174, with your application for an unregistered vehicle
permit. If your vehicle has number plates, you must return them before you get
the permit. An unregistered vehicle permit will only be issued if the vehicle is in
safe condition. Please note, you must not carry a load or use the vehicle for
other purposes while your vehicle is under a permit.
If you have bought a new vehicle, the motor vehicle dealer will register it before
you take delivery. You will need to show personal identification, verify and sign the
completed registration application form and pay the fees to the dealer.
How to register a motorised wheelchair
To be eligible to register a motorised wheelchair with free CTP insurance, you must
provide a current doctor’s certificate stating that, due to severe movement
impairment, you need to use a motorised wheelchair for assisted travel. You must
also provide a Motorised Wheelchair Statement Individual form (F4414), declaring
that the wheelchair will be solely used by the registered operator. For more
information about these rules for motorised wheelchairs, see Motorised
wheelchairs, page 126.
Motorised wheelchairs can be registered or transferred to an eligible individual
or organisation.
Transferring registration
If you have acquired a registered, second-hand vehicle you will need to transfer the
registration to your name within 14 days.
 Lodge a completed Vehicle registration transfer form at a Department of
Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or any of the agencies listed
on page 174. The acquirer (buyer) and disposer (seller) must sign both parts of
the completed application form. The disposer must keep the completed Part B
173
Notice of disposal section of the transfer form until the registration is
transferred out of their name.
 Supply the original copy of the Queensland safety certificate or certificate of
inspection. You do not need a certificate for a trailer with an aggregate trailer
mass that doesn’t exceed 750 kg.
 Provide a gas certificate (if applicable).
 Show personal identification—see Evidence of identity, page 14.
 Pay a transfer fee and duty if applicable.
 If the disposer reasonably believes the acquirer has not lodged part A of the
Vehicle registration transfer application within 14 days, they may lodge part B
(Notice of disposal) of the transfer application. It is important for the disposer
to retain part B until the vehicle has been transferred.
Renewing registration
You will need to renew your registration. A renewal notice will be sent to you about
five weeks before your registration expiry date. Notify the Department of Transport
and Main Roads when you change your address so the renewal notice reaches you.
If you do not receive a renewal notice, you are still responsible for
paying the registration fee and CTP insurance by the expiry date. If
you do not renew your registration by the expiry date, your registration
lapses and a reinstatement fee will be payable.
You can pay your registration using any one of these convenient
options:
 On the internet—go to Services online at www.tmr.qld.gov.au
 BPAY—an efficient and easy way to pay your renewal notice over the phone.
All you need is a BPAY access PIN. Call your bank for details
 By mail—send your cheque or money order to GPO Box 2211, Brisbane QLD 4001
 Australia Post—pay in person by cash, cheque or EFTPOS
 Other agencies (Queensland government agencies, Magistrates Court offices or
police remitting stations in areas where there is no Department of Transport and
Main Roads office)
 The Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centres—pay in
person by cash, cheque or money order or by EFTPOS (all major credit cards
accepted).
For more information about registration, including transfers of personalised plates,
concessional registrations and taxis and limousines, visit www.tmr.qld.gov.au, contact
your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or
call 13 23 80.
174
Insuring your vehicle
There are different kinds of insurance for your vehicle.
 Compulsory Third Party insurance (CTP) is paid with your registration. It is
illegal to drive an unregistered vehicle with no CTP coverage. CTP insurance
covers vehicle owners and drivers who are legally and financially liable for
personal injury to another person in the event of a motor vehicle accident.
For further information please visit the Motor Accident Commission website:
www.maic.qld.gov.au.
 Third party property damage insurance covers you if you cause damage to
other people’s property, but does not cover loss of, or repairs to, your own
vehicle or property.
 Fire, theft and third party property insurance protects you against damage to
other people’s property, as well as covering your own vehicle for damage caused
by fire or theft.
 Comprehensive insurance gives full cover to your vehicle for property damage,
but does not cover injuries to people. Comprehensive insurance protects you
against damage to other people’s property, as well as covering your vehicle for
property damage.
Your vehicle must be safe and registered at all times while using the road. If you
make any structural changes to your vehicle, they’ll need to be approved by the
Department of Transport and Main Roads officers or an agent. Your insurance
policy may not cover you if you modify your vehicle without approval and it is
involved in a crash.
If you cause a crash with the level of alcohol in your blood or breath over your
alcohol limit, the insurer will pay all CTP insurance claims, however the insurer
has the right to recover the cost from you.
For more information, contact your insurance company.
Looking after your vehicle
If you look after your vehicle, you’ll cut fuel costs, improve your safety by
minimising engine wear and tear, and help reduce your vehicle’s pollution levels.
Maintaining your car will also improve its re-sale value.
Try these tips:
 Service your vehicle as specified in the manufacturer’s handbook.
 Only fill your petrol tank to the first click as petrol pumped in after this point is
ejected into the overflow unit and wasted when the petrol heats and expands
as the car is in use.
175
 Drive smoothly without heavy acceleration.
 Remove unnecessary weight from the boot and roof racks.
In between services, a weekly inspection of your car is recommended. You should
check:
 engine oil and transmission fluid (if your car is fitted with automatic
transmission)
 that brake and clutch fluid reservoirs are between the minimum and maximum
levels
 fan belt
 water and radiator hoses
 battery
 windscreen washers, wipers and wiper blades
 that you have a car jack
 pressures of the tyres including the spare wheel
 wheels for damage, and the wheel nuts
 external lights
 external damage to the vehicle
 horn
 steering
 handbrake
 footbrake and clutch pedal
 internal lights and instruments
 seatbelts.
A Department of Transport and Main Roads inspector may pull over your vehicle
anywhere, anytime in south-east Queensland to test your vehicle’s pollution levels.
Your vehicle will be given a GOOD, FAIR or POOR pollution rating.
If your vehicle produces visible smoke for more than 10 seconds, anyone may report
it to the Smoky Vehicle Hotline (13 20 19), resulting in a requirement to fix the
problem. To report vehicles to the hotline you need the location, time and date of
the sighting, the vehicle type, colour and make, registration number, and the name
and address of the person reporting (to be kept confidential).
For more information about Aircare, the Department of Transport
and Main Roads’ program for promoting clean air practices, visit
www.transport.qld.gov.au/environment.
176
Organ donation
177
Organ donation
Being a donor
Your decision about organ and tissue donation is no longer recorded on driver
licences in Queensland. Instead, Australia now has the single national Australian
Organ Donor Register.
This register is now the only place for you to record your legal decision to donate
organs and tissue for transplantation. The register allows you to specify what you
would like to donate.
How to record your consent on
the register
You can record your donor consent on the
national register by completing and
returning an Australian Organ Donor
Register form. Use the reply paid envelope
attached to the form to send your consent
to the national register.
Call the Australian Organ Donor Register on
1800 777 203 for a brochure and form, or
pick one up from the Department of
Transport and Main Roads customer service
centres, Medicare offices, QGAP offices or
your local police station if located in a rural
area. Visit the Medicare Australia website www.medicareaustralia.gov.au for more
organ donor information.
Once you have registered, it is important to tell your family and friends about
your decision.
Remember:
 anyone can be an organ and tissue donor, regardless of age
 donated organs and tissues include kidneys, heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, eye
tissue, bone tissue, skin and heart valves
 you can change your mind at any time and remove your name from the register
 discuss your decision with family and friends.
178
179
Index
Accidents, see Crashes
Accredited driver training, 24
Alcohol, 96–101
- limits, 97
- see also Blood alcohol concentration
- see also Random breath testing
Animals at night, 141
Appeals against licence suspension, 162
Applying for a licence, 14–20
Aquaplaning, 139–140
Authority to learn, 7
Bad weather, 140
Bicycles, lanes, 87, 122
- overtaking, 87
- see also Cyclists
Blood alcohol concentration, 37, 96, 157–158
- heavy vehicles, 97
- learner licence, 21–22
- open licence, 37
- probationary licence, 38
- provisional licence, 33–34
Braking, 137–138
Breath testing, random, 97, 154
Built-up areas, speed limits in, 68
Buses, 66
- giving way to, 80, 131
- lanes, 86–87
- see also School buses
Buying a used vehicle, 170–171
- buyer’s checklist, 171
Caravans, 131
- see also Towing a caravan or trailer
Child restraints, 120, 143-144
Compulsory log book, learner drivers, 8, 14, 21, 23
- see also Supervised on-road driving experience
Crashes, 7, 147–149
- towing after, 148–149
- while under the influence, 96
Crossings, pedestrian, 81–82, 133–134
- school, 134
CTP insurance, 98, 171–175
Cumulative disqualifications, 167
Cyclists, 122–124, 132–133
- helmets, 122
- optional hook turns by, 123–124
- sharing the road with, 132–133
Dangerous goods, transport of, 105–107
Dangerous situations, car stall in, 141
- see also Hazards
Demerit points, 8–9, 22–23, 35–37, 53, 55, 158–165
Disqualified driving, 165–167
Drink driving, 37–38, 96–98
- see also Alcohol
- see also Blood alcohol concentration
- see also Random breath testing
- see also Standard drinks
180
Drink walking, 99
Driver fatigue, 108–111, 142–143
- see also Heavy vehicles
Driver licence, 6–13
- applying for a, 14–20
- changing your name or address, 52
- demerit points, 8–9, 22–23, 35–37, 53, 55, 158–165
- documents required for application for, 14–17
- driving in Queensland (interstate/foreign), 53–55
- foreign, 53–55
- heavy vehicles, 48–51
- interstate, 52–55
- learner, 21–26
- minimum periods, 13, 45–46
- motorbike, 9–11, 39–48
- open, 37
- probationary, 37–38
- provisional, 32–36
- Q–SAFE practical driving test for, 6–8, 21–24, 26–32
- renewing your, 52
- restricted, 6, 37–39
- suspension of, 8–9, 22–23, 33, 36–37, 157–166
- upgrading of, 12–13
- written road rules test, 7, 12–13, 20
Driver reviver, 143
- see also Driver fatigue
Driving hours, heavy vehicles, 108–111
Driving schools, driver trainers, see Accredited driver
training
Drugs and driving, 99–101, 154, 157–158
Emergency vehicles, 80, 130
Evidence of identity, 12, 14–17
Evidence of residential address, 12, 14, 16–17
Eyesight test, 12, 14, 17–18
Fatigue, driver, 142–143
- heavy vehicles, 109–111
Fog, driving in, 140
Following distance, 113–114
- see also Safe following distance
Footbrake failure, 141
Foreign licences, 53–55, 166
4WD driving, 144–145
Give way signs, 58–59, 77–79
Giving way, 77–84
- at give way signs, 77–79
- at pedestrian crossings, 82
- at railway level crossings, 83, 95–96
- at stop signs, 78–79
- at T–intersections, 81
- entering or leaving a road, 83
- from parked position, 83
- from a slip lane, 80
- multiple vehicles at intersections, 83
- reversing, 81
- to buses, 80
- to emergency vehicles, 80
- to horses, 83
- to pedestrians, 81–82, 133–134
- to the right, 79
- turning right, 82
- U–turns, 79
- when merging, 79
Good driving behaviour period, 23, 36, 37, 160, 162
Graduated licensing system, 7–9, 32
Hazardous localities, 92–95
- see also Roadwork sites
- see also Railway level crossings
Hazardous situations, 139–141
Hazard perception test, 7, 8, 3-34
Hazards, 138–141
- system of vehicle control, 138–139
- see also Hazardous localities
Headlights, see Lights
Heavy vehicles, 48–51, 69, 102–112, 130–132
- dangerous goods on, 105–107
- dimensions of, 102
- driver licence application, 48–51
- driving hours, 108–111
- fatigue, 108–111
- loading of, 103–104
- national work diary, 108–111
- parking restrictions for, 104
- passenger transport, 111–112
- pilot vehicles for, 131–132
- Q–SAFE practical driving test for, 49–51
- school buses, 112, 135
- sharing road with, 130–132
- speed limiters on, 104–105
- warning signs for, 104, 107
Helmets, bicycles, 122, 127
- double demerit points, 161
- motorbikes, 43
181
High-powered vehicles, 8, 27, 33, 35
Immediate suspension, 157
Indicating and signalling, 75–76
- hand signals, 75
Insurance of vehicle, 98, 175
Interstate licences, 52–53, 162
Keeping left, 87
Lanes, 85–87
- arrows, 86
- dividing lines or centre lines, 85
- edge lines, 86
- lane lines, 85
- markings, 85
- special purpose (bus, transit, bicycle), 86–87
- exemptions for driving in, 87
Late night restrictions, 8–9, 21, 160
Lawful directions, obeying, 66
Learner driver, 21–25, 159
Learner licence, 6, 7–9, 14, 21–26, 159
Leaving your vehicle, 117
Licence, see Driver licence
Licence classes, codes and conditions, 10–13
- classes, 10–13
- codes/conditions, 12–13
Lights, 113
Lines, see Lanes and markings
Load restraining, 103–104, 145–146
Log book, see Compulsory log book, learner drivers
see national work diary, heavy vehicles
Long vehicles, 86, 102, 114
Looking after your vehicle, 175–176
L plates, 7, 21–24, 41, 46
Medical conditions affecting driving, 18–20, 53, 54
Merging, giving way when, 79
Minimum periods, 13, 46
Mobile phones, use of, 7, 8, 21, 24–25, 32, 35, 120
Mopeds, 41
Motorbikes, 8, 9, 10–11, 39–48, 132
- additional road rules for, 46
- Australia Post using footpaths, 47–48
- classes, 9, 10–11, 39–40
- clothing requirements, 42
- helmets, 43
- learner licence application/conditions, 9, 39–40
- moped rules, 41
- parking, 47
- passengers, rules for carrying, 46
- Q–Ride, 40–43, 45–46
- Q–SAFE practical driving test for, 49
- sharing the road with, 132
- written road rules test, 20
Motorised bicycles, 125
Motorised wheelchairs, 126, 173
Motorway/highway driving, 90
Name or address, change, 52
National work diary, heavy vehicles, 108
Night, driving at, 8–9, 21
- see also Late night driving restrictions
Non–Queensland (interstate/foreign) licence, 14,
52–53, 162
Open licence, 6, 7, 9, 37, 159–160
Organ donation, 178
Oversize vehicles, see Heavy vehicles
Overtaking, 88–89
- bicycles, 89, 132–133
- heavy vehicles, 130–131
- long vehicles, 89
- on the left, 88
- on the right, 88
- signs (no overtaking or passing), 59, 89
P1 licence, see Provisional licence
P2 licence, see Provisional licence
Parking, 114–119
- angle or centre, 116
- disability, 117
- heavy and long vehicles, 104
- leaving vehicle when, 117
- prohibited places for, 117–119
- regulated, 115
- signs for, 114–116
- zones, 115–116
Passenger transport, 111–112
182
Pedestrians, 125–127, 133–134
- crossings, 82, 133
- sharing the road with, 133–134
Peer passenger restrictions, 32, 35
Pilot vehicles, heavy vehicles, 131
Police officer, obeying directions by, 66
P plates, 8, 27–28, 32, 33, 34, 38, 39, 40
Practical driving test, see Q-SAFE
Practice test questions, 20
- see also Sample questions
Probationary licence, 6, 10, 13, 37–38
Provisional licence, 6, 7, 8–9, 10–13, 32–36, 159
Q–Ride training and competency-based
assessment, 40, 42, 45-46
Q–SAFE practical driving test, 6, 7–8, 21, 23, 26–32,
37, 40-43
- failing, 32
- heavy vehicles, 20, 48-51
- learner driver, 21, 26–32
- motorbikes, 20, 39–48
Railway level crossing, 61, 95–96
Rain, driving in, 139–140
Random breath testing, 97, 154
Random roadside drug testing, 154
Recidivist drivers and riders, 160–161
Red light cameras, 153
Registering a vehicle, 171–174
Registration, renewing, 174
- transferring, 173–174
Renewing a licence, 52
Restraining loads, 146
Restricted licence, 6, 37–39, 97
Reversing, 81
REVS (Register of encumbered vehicles), 171
Road positioning, see Lanes
- see also Keeping left
- see also Overtaking
- see also Motorway/highway driving
Road rules, 57–127
Road rules, written test, 7, 12–13, 20
Road signs, 58–67, 114–117
Roadwork sites, 92–95
- signs for, 92–95
Roadworthy certificate, see Safety certificate
Rollerblades, 126
- see also Pedestrians
Roundabouts, 61, 73–74
Safe following distance, 113–114, 136–138
Safety certificate, 170
Sample questions
- giving way, 84
- hazardous localities, alcohol and drugs, 101
- heavy vehicles, 112
- learner licences, 25–26
- motorbikes, 48
- other rules and responsibilities, 121
- provisional licences, 36
- road positioning, 91
- sharing with other road users, 135–136
- signs and signals, 67
- speed limits, 70
- turns, roundabouts and signalling, 76
School buses, 111–112, 134–135
School crossings, 134
School zones, 69, 134
Seatbelts, 120, 143
- double demerit points, 161
- see also Child restraints
Servicing of vehicle, 175–176
Signs, 58–67, 73, 78, 86, 87, 89, 90, 92–96, 102,
104, 106–107, 114–117, 131, 134
- clearway, 116
- dangerous goods, 106–107
- give way, 58, 78
- guide and information, 63–64
- hazard markers, 63
- no overtaking or passing, 59, 89
- no parking, 114–116
- no stopping, 116
- parking, 114–115
- railway level crossings, 61, 95–96
- regulated parking, 115
184
Notes
185
186
Notes
187
183
- regulatory, 58–59
- roadwork site, 92–95
- roundabout, 61, 73–74
- speed limit, 60, 68–69
- stop, 58, 78
- warning, 61–62, 69, 104, 106–107
Skateboards, 126
- see also Pedestrians
Skidding, 139–140
Smoke, vehicle, 176
Special purpose lanes, 86–87
Speed cameras, 152–153
Speed limits, 68–70, 93, 95
- double demerit points, 160–161
- roadworks, 93, 95
- speed zones, 69
Speed suspension, 158
Standard drinks, 98
Stopping, 136–138
Stop signs, 58, 78
Storing of car, 149
Supervised on-road driving experience, 10, 21–26
Suspension of licence, 8, 9, 21, 22, 36, 37, 39,
157–158
System of vehicle control, 138–139
Test eyesight, 17–18
- failure in, 28, 32
- heavy vehicle, 20, 48–51
- loss of fee in, 28
- motorbike, 20, 39–48
- vehicle for, 27-29, 42, 48-49
- written road rules, 7, 12–13, 20
- see also Q-SAFE
Third party insurance, 171, 174–175
Three month residency rule, 53–54, 166
Time-lapse method, 136–137
Towlines, 114
Tow trucks, 148–149
Towing a trailer or caravan, 131, 145–146
- following other long vehicles, 114
Traffic lights, 65–66
- cyclists obeying, 122
- pedestrians obeying, 127
Trailers, 145–146
Transport inspectors, 156
Travelling interstate or overseas, 52
Turns, 71–72, 82
- across painted traffic islands, 72
- at unmarked intersections, 72
- left,71
- right, 71
- U–turns, 72, 82
Tyre blowouts, 140
Unlicensed driving, 165–167
Upgrading a licence, 12–13, 37
Used car, buying, 170–171
U-turns, 72, 82
Vehicle history check, 170
Vehicle impoundment, 155
Vehicle maintenance, 175–176
Weather, driving in bad, 140
Wheeled recreational devices, 126
Windscreen shattering, 141
Zone signs, 60, 69, 115–116

Your keys to driving in Queensland
Published by The Department of Transport and Main Roads PO Box 673 Fortitude Valley 4006 © The State of Queensland (Department of Transport and Main Roads) 2000-2010 Copyright protects this material. Except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 (Cwlth), reproduction by any means (photocopying, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise), making available online, electronic transmission or other publication of this material is prohibited without the prior written permission of the Department of Transport and Main Roads. Enquiries should be addressed to copyright@transport.qld.gov.au or to the Department of Transport and Main Roads at the postal address shown above. Information in this guide is current as at January 2010. For the latest road rules please refer to the Department of Transport and Main Roads website www.tmr.qld.gov.au. Please note: The notes and information contained in this guide are an interpretation of current traffic law and should not be used for a legal interpretation. ISSN 1443-4172

Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................3 Queensland licensing..................................................................................5
Licence types .................................................................................................................................................6 Graduated licensing system .....................................................................................................................7 Licence classes, codes and conditions .................................................................................................10 Upgrading your licence .......................................................................................................................... 12 Applying for a licence ............................................................................................................................. 14 Eyesight test ............................................................................................................................................... 17 Medical conditions affecting driving ................................................................................................. 18 Road rules test........................................................................................................................................... 20 Learning to drive .......................................................................................................................................21 L plates ......................................................................................................................................................... 23 The compulsory Queensland learner logbook ................................................................................. 23 Sample questions - learner licences ................................................................................................... 25 Q-SAFE practical driving test................................................................................................................ 26 Provisional licences .................................................................................................................................. 32 Sample questions —provisional licences ........................................................................................... 36 Open licences ............................................................................................................................................. 37 Probationary and restricted licences .................................................................................................. 37 Motorbikes.................................................................................................................................................. 39 Sample questions—motorbikes............................................................................................................. 48 Heavy vehicles ........................................................................................................................................... 48 General provisions .................................................................................................................................... 52 Non-Queensland driver licences .......................................................................................................... 52

Road rules ................................................................................................. 57
Signs and signals ...................................................................................................................................... 58 Sample questions—signs and signals.................................................................................................. 67 Speed limits ................................................................................................................................................ 68 Sample questions—speed limits ............................................................................................................70 Making turns...............................................................................................................................................71 Roundabouts .............................................................................................................................................. 73 Indicating and signalling ....................................................................................................................... 75 Sample questions—turns, roundabouts and signalling................................................................. 76 Giving way .................................................................................................................................................. 77 Sample questions—giving way ............................................................................................................. 84

.............................. 151 Enforcement.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Road positioning...................................... 112 Other rules and responsibilities .... 102 Sample questions—heavy vehicles ......................................... 121 Rules for other road users .............................................................................................................91 Hazardous localities ..................................130 Sample questions—sharing with other road users ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................179 ......................................................................................................................................135 Stopping ...........................................................177 Index ........................................................................................................................................................ alcohol and drugs ..................................................................................................................................................................138 Driver fatigue...................................................................................................................................................................................152 Licence suspensions .................................... 96 Sample questions—hazardous localities.........................157 Unlicensed and disqualified driving .............. 85 Sample questions—road positioning ............165 Your vehicle .................................................................................................................................................................................................144 Towing a trailer or caravan ...............129 Sharing with other road users ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 170 Registering your vehicle ................................................143 4WD driving ........................................................................................................... 101 Heavy vehicles ......................................................................175 Looking after your vehicle................................................................................................................................................................................................ 171 Insuring your vehicle.........................................................................................................136 Hazards ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................169 Buying a used vehicle ..............................142 Correct seatbelt and child restraint use ..122 Safe road use ......................................... 113 Sample questions—other rules and responsibilities............................................................................................................................................................................................175 Organ Donation ............................................................................................................................... 92 Alcohol and drugs ..................147 Offences and penalties ....................................................................................................................................................145 What to do at a crash .................................................................................................................................................................................

qld.qld. to read the book to update their knowledge of the road rules and road safety.au.au. You will be able to find information easily—there’s an index at the back and each section is colour coded for quick reference.gov.gov.legislation. Your keys to driving in Queensland is not just for learner drivers—it is important for everyone who uses the road. STD rates will apply.Introduction Your keys to driving in Queensland is a publication for Queensland drivers that combines important information about the Queensland driver licensing system and the Queensland road rules.tmr. 3 . For the complete picture of the Queensland road rules. This book is essential reading for anyone wanting to learn to drive.gov.bookshop. Questions you may find in your road rules test are featured at the end of some sections. contact your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80. The information in this guide is an interpretation of the rules applying to road use in Queensland.au. regardless of their level of experience. If calling from outside Queensland. Please note: Higher rates apply when calling 13 or 1800 phone numbers from mobile phones. To purchase a copy of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Road Rules) Regulation 1999 contact The Government Bookshop at www. visit the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www.qld. For further information visit www.

4 .

Queensland licensing  Licence types  Graduated licensing system  Licence classes. codes and conditions  Applying for a licence  Learning to drive  Q-SAFE practical driving test  Provisional licences  Open licences  Probationary and restricted licences  Motorbikes  Heavy vehicles  General provisions  Non-Queensland driver licences 5 .

you may go for your Q-SAFE practical driving test. you must hold a current driver licence allowing you to drive. After you have held your learner licence for at least one year. Applying for a licence on page 14 provides information about getting your learner licence. 6 . which you must hold for a minimum period before you can progress to the next stage—see Provisional licences on page 32. codes and conditions on page 10 provides information about learning to drive another class of vehicle under your provisional. or learn to drive. Depending on how old you are when you pass your test. you will get either a P1 or P2 provisional licence. probationary or open licence. Learner licence Before learning to drive any class of motor vehicle you must hold either a learner. you may ask the court that convicts you to grant you a restricted licence.Licence types Before you drive. Provisional licence Queensland has a two-stage provisional licence—P1 and P2—as part of a graduated licensing system. commonly known as ‘work’ licence—see Restricted licences on page 38. Probationary licence You will only be eligible for a probationary licence if you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by a court and you have now served the period of disqualification—see Probationary licences on page 37. any class of motor vehicle on a road in Queensland. Restricted licence If you are convicted of drink driving but need a licence to earn a living. The types of Queensland driver licences are:  learner licence  provisional licence  probationary licence  restricted licence  open licence. that class of vehicle. or learn to drive. Licence classes. probationary or open licence that allows you to learn to drive that vehicle. provisional. Learning to drive on page 21 outlines the conditions for driving with a learner licence and helps you get ready for your Q-SAFE practical driving test or Q-Ride assessment.

For learner drivers aged 23 and under. the Queensland graduated licensing system has been designed to give novice drivers more supervised on-road driving experience.  You must carry your learner licence with you at all times while learning to drive. to improve their driving skills with minimal distraction. including identifying and dealing with hazards.  Restrictions on mobile phone use apply to you.Open licence You may be eligible for an open licence if you have held your provisional licence for the required period—see Open licences on page 37. Graduated licensing system Statistics show that drivers aged 17 to 24 have the highest risk of being involved in crashes resulting in death or injury.  You will need to pass a road rules test.  Your learner licence will be issued for three years.  You must hold your learner licence for at least one year before you can take your Q-SAFE practical driving test. page 35. your supervisor and passengers—see Mobile phones. As a result. Written road rules test Learner licence Q-SAFE practical driving test P1 provisional licence Hazard perception test P2 provisional licence Open licence Under the graduated licensing system. For a learner licence  You may only get a car learner licence at 16. there are six steps before you get your open licence. and if you meet all the requirements for each stage. page 23. you may get your open licence by the time you are 20. 7 . you can get your learner licence at 16.  L plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of the car you are learning to drive—see L plates.

or those with turbo. or those with turbo. page 33. page 23 . page 34  Mobile phone restrictions apply to you and your passengers during your P1 period—see Mobile phones. page 35  If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a continuous one year period. you will be required to pass a hazard perception test before you can progress to a P2 provisional or open licence—see Hazard perception test. a three month licence suspension and late night driving restrictions apply —see Demerit points. page 35  If you are under 25 when you get your P1 provisional licence. For a P2 provisional licence  You may get your P2 licence after you have held your P1 licence for at least one year and have passed your hazard perception test—see Hazard perception test. A three-month licence suspension applies if you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a continuous one year period while holding a learner licence. page 33  You are required to hold your P2 licence for at least two years  Green P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of your car —see P plates. super-charged or modified engines) apply —see High-powered vehicles. page 35  Restrictions on driving high-powered vehicles (such as those with eight or more cylinders. page 26. For a P1 provisional licence  You may only get a provisional licence at 17  Your first provisional licence will be issued as a P1 licence  You are required to hold your P1 licence for at least one year  Red P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and rear of your car (rear only for motorbikes)—see P plates. page 34  Restrictions on driving high-powered vehicles (such as those with eight or more cylinders.pass the Q-SAFE practical driving test to progress to your P1 provisional licence—see Q-SAFE practical driving test. page 36  Peer passenger restrictions apply to you during your P1 period.complete 100 hours of supervised on-road driving (including at least 10 hours of night driving) recorded in your Queensland learner logbook— see The compulsory learner logbook. page 35 8 . you must: . super-charged or modified engines) apply —see High-powered vehicles.  If you are a learner driver under 25.

your P1 licence for at least one year if you got your P1 licence when you were at least 24 years but under 25 years . Minimum period for licence types If you are required to hold your licence for a stated period. page 40. A three month licence suspension and late night driving restrictions apply if you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a continuous one year period—see Demerit points. For an open licence  You may get your open licence after you have held: . page 23  You may only learn to ride a learner approved motorbike —see Learner approved motorbike (LAM). page 39  When you are learning to ride a motorbike.your P2 licence for at least one year if you got your P2 licence when you were at least 24 years. page 158. page 36  You are required to hold your P2 licence for at least two years if you got your P1 licence when you were under 23 years and your P2 licence when you were under 25 years. one year. an L plate must be displayed at the rear of your motorbike or on the back of a vest worn while riding —see L plates. and your licence expires or is suspended (including SPER suspensions) or you are disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by order of an Australian court. the stated period will be extended. In any other case.  Licence suspensions apply if you accumulate 12 or more demerit points in a continuous three year period—see Accumulation of demerit points —Queensland licence holders. page 39  Restrictions on passengers apply—see Pillion passenger restiction for learner riders.your P2 licence for at least two years if you got your P1 licence when you were under 23 years and your P2 licence when you were under 25 years . 9 . Learner licence for motorbike  You may apply for a class RE motorbike learner licence after you have held your car licence for at least one year—see Motorbikes.

with or without a trailer. For example. probationary or open licence. You may learn to ride a class R motorbike once you have held your class RE provisional. Your licence will show only the highest class of vehicle you are authorised to drive. probationary or open licence for at least one year. Note: L plates must be displayed while learning to drive the higher class of vehicle. motorbike classes RE or R and the specially constructed vehicle class UD will appear separately on the licence. other than a moped. If you are authorised to learn to drive a class of vehicle under your provisional. Driver licence classes This table shows what class of licence you need to drive a particular vehicle. codes and conditions You need a particular class of licence to drive certain vehicles. Your licence will show the licence class and. you must be accompanied by a person who holds an open licence for the class of vehicle you are learning to drive and has held that licence for at least one year. R (motorbike) 10 . if required. the code for any conditions that you are required to comply with. Authority to learn If you hold a provisional. if you hold a provisional. However. This means you are allowed to drive each class of vehicle under that class of licence. You may ride:  a class RE motorbike  a motorbike with unlimited engine size.Licence classes. you are authorised to learn to drive the higher class of vehicle—see the table below. If you hold an automatic car licence. probationary or open licence for a particular class of vehicle. You must have held a class C car provisional licence for at least one year to be eligible for a motorbike (class RE) learner licence. or with a person not appropriately licensed. page 39. you are authorised to learn to drive a car with a manual gearbox. probationary or open licence for a particular class of vehicle. Also. Licence class RE (motorbike) Class of vehicle You may ride:  a learner approved motorbike that is a moped  a learner approved motorbike. You risk a fine if you drive unaccompanied. you are authorised to learn to drive that class of vehicle with either an automatic or manual transmission or with a synchromesh gearbox. with or without a trailer—see Learner approved motorbike (LAM).

with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  a truck (including a prime mover) of not more than 8 tonne GVM. with or without a trailer  a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM. HR or UD vehicle. HC or UD vehicle.C (car) You may drive:  a moped  a car. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  a specially constructed vehicle of not more than 8 tonne GVM. HC (heavy combination) 11 . e. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM.  You may learn to drive a class LR. MR.g. You may learn to drive a class HR. You may drive:  a class HR vehicle  a truck (including a prime mover). HR or UD vehicle. MC or UD vehicle.5 tonne gross vehicle mass (GVM). You may learn to drive a class HC. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  an articulated bus  a truck (including a prime mover). with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM with not more than two axles. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM. You may learn to drive a class MR. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  a truck (including a prime mover) with not more than two axles. with or without a trailer  a specially constructed vehicle of not more than 4. with or without a trailer  a vehicle. You may drive:  a class C vehicle  a bus of not more than 8 tonne GVM. not more than 4. You may learn to drive a class MC vehicle. HR (heavy rigid) You may drive:  a class MR vehicle  a bus. LR (light rigid) MR (medium rigid) You may drive:  a class LR vehicle  a bus of more than 8 tonne GVM with not more than two axles. with or without a trailer of not more than 9 tonne GVM  a specially constructed vehicle of more than 8 tonne GVM. including the driver.5 tonne GVM. a minivan. with or without a trailer. built or fitted to carry no more than 12 adults.

your order under section 87 or 88 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995. and in accordance with. Upgrading your licence To upgrade your licence to the next higher class. an order under the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992. you must:  complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal form (F3000) and produce your driver licence. You may only drive while carrying. and in accordance with. and in accordance with. and in accordance with. and in accordance with. You will be required to declare any traffic offences for which you have been convicted  provide evidence of identity and residence if required —see Evidence of identity. You may only drive while carrying. your vehicle modification notice. part 5. your medical certificate. and in accordance with. UD Licence codes and conditions Code A B I M S V XI X3 X4 Licence condition You may only drive the class of vehicle with automatic transmission. You may only drive while carrying. page 14 12 . You may only drive the class of vehicle with synchromesh gearbox. You may only drive while wearing corrective lenses. Licence class MC (multicombination) Class of vehicle You may drive:  a class HC vehicle  a B-double  a road train. a section 79E order and any section 79E variation order. division 1.Driver licence classes cont. You may only drive while carrying. You may only drive while carrying. You may drive a specially constructed vehicle. You may only drive while carrying. a special hardship order and any special hardship order variation order.

probationary or open licence for at least one year. probationary or open licence for at least two years  a class LR or MR provisional. To pass the heavy vehicle test. you will need to answer eight out of ten questions correctly. Minimum periods for licence classes You must have held a provisional. page 17  pass a road rules test if required. You must have held a class RE provisional. you must answer four out of five questions correctly  pay the Q-SAFE practical driving test fee and pass the test if required  pass a hazard perception test if required. You must have held a class C provisional. probationary or open licence for a minimum period before you can upgrade to another licence class. probationary or open licence for at least one year. You must have held a class HR or HC provisional. probationary or open licence for at least one year. R (motorbike) LR (light rigid) MR (medium rigid) You must have held a class C provisional. HR (heavy rigid) You must have held:  a class C provisional. Licence class RE (motorbike) Minimum period You must have held a class C provisional. You must have held a class MR or HR provisional. probationary or open licence for at least one year. probationary or open licence for at least one year. HC (heavy or open combination) MC (multicombination) 13 . pass an eyesight test if required—see Eyesight test. For the motorbike test. probationary or open licence for at least one year. probationary or open licence for at least one year.

Evidence of identity You will need to comply with the evidence of identity requirements when you are applying for a Queensland driver licence for the first time. Learner licence  To apply for a learner licence. you will also need to pay the road rules test fee and pass the test if required. stolen. You will also need to comply with these requirements when you are applying for a replacement of your licence if it has been lost. page 18  pass an eyesight test (if required)—see Eyesight test page 17  pay the licence fee. If you hold an interstate or foreign licence and need to get a Queensland licence. If you have changed your name and you want your new name shown on your driver licence. see Obtaining a Queensland driver licence. you must show an official change of name document—see Change of name documents. or when you are renewing your licence and are unable to show your Queensland driver licence (current or expired less than two years). Provisional licence To apply for a provisional licence you will also need to:  complete 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience recorded in a Department of Transport and Main Roads learner logbook (if required)—see The compulsory Queensland learner licence logbook. In some rural or remote areas. page 16.Applying for a licence To apply for a licence you must:  visit a Department of Transport and Main Roads licence issuing centre or Queensland Government Agent Program (QGAP) licence issuing office (not all QGAP offices can issue licences). Queensland police stations may issue the licence  complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal form (F3000)  provide evidence of identity and evidence of Queensland residency  provide a medical certificate (if required)—see Medical conditions affecting driving. destroyed or defaced. page 33. page 54. page 23  pay the hazard perception test fee and pass the test (if required)—see Hazard perception test. 14 .

for example. For more information. contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80. All documents must be current unless otherwise stated. They include:  Australian Births. e. These documents must include at least either of the following:  one category A document and two category B documents  two category A documents and one category B document. extracts. for example. acknowledgment of birth.g. for bus. driver or rider trainers. taxi and limousine drivers (current or expired less than two years)  The Department of Transport and Main Roads Accreditation. At least one of these documents must include your signature. 15 . pilot vehicle drivers (current or expired less than two years). Each document must be an original. Deaths and Marriages birth certificate—full. Evidence of identity documents may be verified with the issuing authority. you should discuss this with staff at a Department of Transport and Main Roads licence issuing centre. Category A documents These documents establish the legal existence of your name and date of birth. photocopies or certified copies of original documents are not acceptable)  Australian or foreign passport (current or expired less than two years)  Australian citizenship certificate or naturalisation certificate  Department of Immigration and Citizenship travel document.Evidence of identity documents You will need to show three evidence of identity documents. including a Bicentennial birth certificate issued for births in 1988 (other commemorative certificates. If you cannot show any of the evidence of identity documents. resident visa (valid up to five years after issue)  Department of Immigration and Citizenship Certificate of evidence of resident status  Australian photo driver licence (current or expired less than two years)  Australian Defence Force photo identity card (excluding civilians)  Queensland or federal police officer photo identity card  Queensland Card 18+ (issued after 1 January 1992)  The Department of Transport and Main Roads Driver Authorisation.

naati.Category B documents These documents establish the use of your name in the community. Evidence of Queensland residential address If your current Queensland residential address is not shown on either category A or category B documents. They include:  Australian Medicare card  financial institution debit/credit card with signature and embossed name  education institution student identity document (must be issued in Australia and include photo or signature)  Department of Veterans Affairs/Centrelink pensioner concession card (including Health care cards)  Australian security guard or crowd controller licence (with photo)  Australian firearm licence (with photo). contact the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) at website www. Change of name documents If you have changed your name. you will need to show another document that does provide evidence of your Queensland residential address. you must also show an official change of name document such as:  Australian marriage certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births. They include:  contract of purchase. or the details of your name are different on the documents to be shown.com. For a list of approved recognised translators.au and access the Practitioners directory. you must include a recognised English translation. An official overseas marriage certificate may only be accepted if it has a registration number and official crest and is accompanied by one category A document in your married name or two category B documents in your married name. Note: If you have any documents in a foreign language. lease or rental document. Deaths and Marriages (excluding ceremonial certificate)  Australian change of name certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births. mortgage or land ownership certificate 16  Queensland vehicle registration certificate . Deaths and Marriages  Australian birth certificate (amended or with notations)  divorce papers decree nisi or absolute (must show the name being reverted to)  deed poll (issued before 1 February 2004).

 Queensland driver licence or vehicle registration renewal notice (for the coming period)  Queensland local government rates notice  Queensland land tax valuation notice  Australian Taxation Office assessment (last or current financial year)  Australian Taxation Office tax file number confirmation advice (valid up to two years)  electricity. HR. If you are required to take the test. taxi. If providing documentation from the Australian Taxation Office. If you are genuinely unable to show one of these documents. limousine or a driver trainer vehicle) 17 . you must be able to read the eyesight chart from a distance of six metres and not make more than two errors. To pass the test. R.qld. you must meet these standards: Driver licence class Private vehicle driver—RE.g. MC—includes any class of vehicle used for commercial purposes (e. LR Eyesight standard You must be able to read line 12 or smaller with both eyes. show a statement from the institution’s administrator  show a bank statement (issued from the same financial institution as debit/ credit card supplied). HC. gas or telephone account. C.transport. Visit www. please black out all personal information other than your name and residential address (for example. Eyesight test You may be required to undertake an eyesight test before you get your licence. Commercial vehicle driver MR. you may do any of the following:  complete the Queensland Residency Declaration form (F4208)  show a statement from your employer  if you are a student of an education institution.gov. Eyesight standard You must be able to read line 9 or smaller with one eye and line 18 or smaller with the other eye. black out information such as your tax file number).au/licensing or contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80 for more information or to get a copy of the Queensland Residency Declaration form (F4208).

You will need a medical certificate confirming your fitness to drive. You must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads as soon as a condition develops or if there is a long-term increase or aggravation to an existing condition. The code S will be shown on your licence. You must promptly inform the Department of Transport and Main Roads of any long-term or permanent medical condition that is likely to adversely affect your ability to drive safely. requiring you to wear corrective lenses while driving. Common medical conditions that may affect driving include. but are not limited to:  Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias  arthritis and other joint problems  diabetes (early and late onset)  eye problems (for example. Medical conditions affecting driving You should talk to your doctor if you believe you have a medical condition that is likely to adversely affect your ability to drive safely. cataracts)  epilepsy  hearing problems  heart disease  injuries and disabilities  loss or partial loss of a limb  lung disease 18 . regardless of whether you are a private or commercial vehicle driver. you will not be granted the licence. optometrist or ophthalmologist certifying your sight meets the approved standard for the class of licence you want. If you have any eyesight problems. You cannot wait until you renew your licence. you will be required to obtain a certificate from an optometrist or ophthalmologist confirming the extent of the loss of your visual acuity and visual fields. Your doctor may also recommend that your licence be subject to conditions.If you need to wear corrective lenses when driving. When you apply for a Queensland driver licence for the first time. bring them with you and wear them during the test. If you only have vision in one eye (monocular vision). you must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads about any medical condition that may adversely affect your ability to drive safely. you may be required to obtain a medical certificate from a doctor. If you do not meet the eyesight standards.

you must carry a current medical certificate when you drive. you risk a fine of up to $2. contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 07 3253 4851. For more information about driving specially modified vehicles. talk to your doctor.000. only driving during daylight or in a vehicle with automatic transmission)  not fit to drive. you must carry a medical certificate. you also need to provide evidence you are medically fit to drive. psychiatric disorders  sleep disorders  stroke. You must promptly give your medical certificate to the Department of Transport and Main Roads if your doctor completes a Medical Certificate for Motor Vehicle Driver form (F3712). If you have a medical condition and are only able to drive a specially modified vehicle. If you are 75 years of age or older. you risk a fine of up to $6. 19 . If you don’t. You must comply with any conditions imposed on your licence. having a medical condition will not stop you from driving. You will need to hold. stating in their opinion:  you meet the medical standards for a driver licence but with stated condition(s)  your driver licence should be subject to condition(s) that differ to the condition(s) already shown on your licence  you are medically unfit to drive. Your doctor must determine whether you are:  fit to drive with no conditions  fit to drive under stated conditions (for example. If your licence shows the code M. You may also be required to carry a vehicle modification notice when driving. and carry while driving. you can notify the Department of Transport and Main Roads by completing the Medical Condition Notification form (F4355). You must also show it to a police officer if asked to do so. In most cases. If you have a medical condition that is likely to adversely affect your ability to drive safely and you already hold a driver licence. If you are unsure about your medical condition. a Medical Certificate for Motor Vehicle Driver form (F3712) completed and signed by your doctor stating that you are medically fit to drive a motor vehicle safely. or you are 75 years of age or older. If you fail to notify the Department of Transport and Main Roads of a medical condition that adversely affects you ability to drive safely.000 and you may also be disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a period of time.

you must correctly answer at least 18 out of 20 questions. You pay a fee for each test. This will give you an indication of the areas you need to focus on before you try and pass the road rules test.transport. If you pass your test.tmr. HC or MC (heavy vehicle) road rules test If you hold a car or motorbike licence. For more information. LR. Practice test questions Before you sit the road rules test. you can test your knowledge for all licence classes by completing the practice road rules test online at www. Road rules test You can take the road rules test at a driver licence issuing centre when you apply for your learner licence. available from the Austroads website at www.au. Class C general road rules test There are 30 questions in the general road rules test.gov. contact your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or driver licence issuing centre. you must correctly answer at least nine out of 10 questions. the result is valid for five years. The test has two main sections. In the second section. Forms may also be available from your doctor. If you apply for an additional licence class.gov. If you fail your test.com. you cannot take it again until the next working day. or visit www. HR. Class UD.qld. Class RE or R (motorbike) road rules test You will have to correctly answer at least four out of the five additional questions specific to motorbikes to pass the test.5 tonne. buses or taxis) or vehicles carrying dangerous goods. In the first section.austroads. you will have to correctly answer at least eight of the 10 additional questions specific to heavy vehicles to pass the test. MR.au.qld. or to obtain forms relating to medical conditions. The questions have multiple choice answers—this means each question has a number of possible answers and you must mark the correct answer. Allow at least 30 minutes to complete your road rules test. you will get a learner licence.au/medicalconditions. public passenger vehicles (for example. you must meet the commercial driver standards in the Assessing Fitness to Drive publication. Once you pass your road rules test. you may need to pass a specific road rules test for that class. 20 .If you drive vehicles with a GVM of at least 4. or call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80.

page 23  drive with a blood alcohol concentration below 0. there are a number of requirements and restrictions that you must be aware of. before applying to do your Q-SAFE practical driving test to progress to a P1 provisional licence. page 24  drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration see Drink driving. page 96  ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger seating capacity  hold your learner licence for at least one year. page 96  always carry your learner licence when you are driving  be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held their open licence for at least one year. including hands-free function or Bluetooth accessories while learning to drive. page 23  gain 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience recorded and certified in your learner logbook by your supervisor. prior to taking your practical driving test—see The compulsory Queensland learner logbook. disqualification or cancellation. If you are 25 or older. excluding periods of suspension. If you are under 25. you must:  obey the conditions shown on your learner licence  ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving —see L plates. your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic car licence  ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and drugs. including 10 hours of night driving. However. page 23  not use a mobile phone. you must:  obey the conditions shown on your learner licence  ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving —see L plates. Your supervisor and any passengers are also banned from using mobile phones on the loudspeaker function—see Mobile phones. If you are learning to drive a manual car.05.Learning to drive Learner licence conditions Now you have your car learner licence. your supervisor must hold a manual car licence. the Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends you only drive with a zero blood 21 . but if you are learning to drive an automatic.

your supervisor must hold a manual car licence.05 if you are 25 or older—see Alcohol and drugs. you will be required to choose between: . but if you are learning to drive an automatic. before applying to do your Q-SAFE practical driving test to progress to a P2 provisional licence. excluding periods of suspension. For learner drivers aged 25 and over. your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic car licence  ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and drugs.alcohol concentration for optimum safety during the learning period—see Alcohol and drugs. page 96  ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger seating capacity. your supervisor must hold a manual car licence. your supervisor may hold either a manual or an automatic car licence  ensure your supervisor does not exceed the legal blood alcohol concentration for the type of vehicle in which they are supervising you—see Alcohol and drugs. page 96  always carry your learner licence when you are driving  be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held their open licence for at least one year. If you are learning to drive a manual car. page 96  ensure your supervisor sits next to you if the vehicle has passenger seating capacity  hold your learner licence for at least one year. If you obtained your learner licence before 1 July 2007. the requirement to gain the 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience is voluntary. but you are encouraged to complete this for improved road safety. you must:  obey the conditions shown on your learner licence  ensure L plates are fitted to the front and rear of the car you are driving —see L plates. 22 If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points over a continuous one year period on your learner licence. page 96  always carry your learner licence when you are driving  be supervised by a person who holds an open licence for a car and has held their open licence for at least one year. page 23  drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration if you are under 25. disqualification or cancellation. If you are learning to drive a manual car. or a blood alcohol concentration below 0. but if you are learning to drive an automatic.

Learner drivers and supervisors can also use an online electronic logbook system that has been developed by RACQ to record the 100 hours driving experience. If you require a new learner logbook please contact a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre.au for more information. or in the case of a motorbike. a three-month driving suspension  a good driving behaviour option for one year—see Accumulation of demerit points—Queensland licence holders. at the rear of the motorbike. You risk a fine if the L plates are not easily seen by anyone looking at the front and rear of the car. L plates An L plate is a sign that measures 146 mm x 146 mm and shows a black uppercase letter ‘L’ on a yellow background.qld. must not display L plates on the vehicle.tmr. All learner drivers under the age of 25 must gain 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience (including at least 10 hours night driving) and record it in an approved Department of Transport and Main Roads learner logbook. the Department of Transport and Main Roads must verify your logbook entries. (Visit www.) Before you book your Q-SAFE practical driving test.qld. When you are learning to drive a car. There are a number of ways in which you can gain your 100 hours of supervised 23 . page 158. You can also download and print a colour template from www. you will receive a learner logbook.tmr. Replacement learner logbooks will be available for a fee.gov. you must clearly display L plates at the front and rear of the car. an L plate must be clearly displayed at the rear of the motorbike. major retailers and automotive outlets. You can buy L plates from service stations.gov. A person driving or riding a motor vehicle. Check with your local supplier for cost. other than as a learner driver or rider. When you are learning to ride a motorbike.au. The compulsory Queensland learner logbook International research shows there is a significant link between the amount of supervised on-road driving experience that new drivers gain and improvements in road safety. When you are issued with your learner licence.

and record these hours in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook. If you are unable to gain your 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience. and record these hours in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook  undertake driving experience with an accredited driver trainer. up to a maximum of 10 actual hours (30 logbook hours)  undertake a combination of driving experience with a supervisor and an accredited driver trainer. including the required 10 hours of night driving). you may be eligible for an exemption. Your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook contains all the information and instructions you will need. Your supervising driver must sign every entry in your logbook. Your initial logbook will be issued to you when you get your learner licence.au or a customer service centre.gov. and record these hours in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook  if you have undertaken driving experience elsewhere under an Australian or New Zealand learner licence—a combination of that experience recorded on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration form (F4450) and driving experience recorded in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook  if you have undertaken driving experience other than in Australia or New Zealand on a foreign learner licence—a combination of that experience recorded on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration form (F4450) (no more than 50 hours) and driving experience gained on Australian roads recorded in your Department of Transport and Main Roads logbook (at least 50 hours. Replacement or additional logbooks may be purchased through the Services online section at www. This is why learner licence and P1 licence holders under 25 are banned from using mobile phones at . you will need to sign a declaration that the logbook entries are true and correct. you must hold your learner licence for two years before undertaking your driving test.transport. This can reduce the 100 hour requirement. When you have completed 100 hours. If you are submitting a Prior Driving Experience Declaration. Penalties apply to you and your supervisor if you record false or misleading information in your logbook. your supervising driver(s) must also sign this form. If an exemption is granted. A one-hour lesson will count as three hours in your logbook. qld.on-road driving experience:  undertake driving experience with a supervisor other than an accredited trainer. Mobile phones 24 Mobile phones can be a major distraction to young drivers. and the cost will be included in your learner licence fee.

It’s a bit like sport and other interests. You will also be provided with information to help you get your provisional licence. Use your time as a learner to make yourself the best possible driver.00 0. C.any time while driving. 25 . This information will give you helpful tips and explain the step-by-step process of upgrading from a learner licence to a provisional licence. Don’t fall into the trap of taking risks and becoming a statistic by doing something stupid. D. must ensure one L plate is fitted to your car so that it can be clearly seen from the front of the car. If you are under 25. you may use it only when you are legally and safely parked. You don’t want to just pass. B. D. Bluetooth accessories and loudspeaker functions Your supervisor and any passengers are also banned from using mobile phones on loudspeaker function. B.learner licences 1. You want to be the best driver you can be. a learner licence holder and need to use your mobile phone.08 2. If you are driving a car on a learner licence. This includes using hands-free kits. Sample questions . Remember that taking risks and driver inexperience are key factors in many fatal crashes involving young drivers. C. While learner drivers are not generally prone to having crashes.02 0. which includes the logbook for you to record your 100 hours of supervised on-road driving experience (including at least 10 hours night driving). once you get your provisional licence. Ready to drive—for the learner When you receive your learner licence you will be given a learner driver kit. 0. What is the maximum blood alcohol concentration for a learner driver under 25? (See page 21) A. you are then a solo driver and are much more likely to have a serious crash than other motorists. must ensure two L plates are fitted to your car so that they can be clearly seen from the front and the rear of the car. must ensure one L plate is fitted to your car so that it can be clearly seen from the rear of the car. are not required to display L plates when you are accompanied by a supervising driver.05 0. you: (See page 23) A.

You can drive without a supervisor. How long must you hold your learner licence for before you take your Q-SAFE practical driving test? (See page 7) A. provided you do not become distracted. You must never use a mobile phone in your car. For more information about booking a Q-SAFE practical driving test. Six months if you are 25 or over. you’ll need to do this yourself. The Department of Transport and Main Roads will carefully check and record your logbook. 12 months C. 4. You must only drive during daylight hours. You may only use a mobile phone in the car you are driving if you are legally and safely parked. Your logbook must be approved before you can take your Q-SAFE practical driving test.au. visit Services online at www. You can make a booking by contacting 13 23 90 or visiting the website. You must have only one passenger in the car. they may arrange an appointment time for your Q-SAFE practical driving test at a testing centre.gov. D. call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 90. and will then notify you of your result. D.tmr. 26 . Six months B. You will be required to pay the driving test fee. You may use a mobile phone while driving. B. If you are a learner licence holder under 25 years of age. C. Note: If you wish to obtain a motorbike licence or heavy vehicle licence. you must lodge your completed and certified logbook at Australia Post at least 14 days before your Q-SAFE practical driving test.3. 5. C. provided you use a hands-free or Bluetooth accessory. see pages 39 and 48 respectively. If not. Which one of the following statements is true for a learner driver? (See page 24) A. and 12 months if you are under 25. B. Q-SAFE practical driving test Booking your Q-SAFE practical driving test If you have an accredited driver trainer. You need to complete the required number of hours of supervised on-road driving experience before you can undertake your Q-SAFE practical driving test.qld. You may use a mobile phone while driving. Which one of the following statements is true for a learner driver? (See page 21) A. or check the information in your logbook. but it will not contribute to your logbook hours.

Before turning up for your test. Before the Q-SAFE practical driving test Bring your:  learner licence or current licence if you are being tested for another class of licence  L plates if you are using your own vehicle  Driving test appointment sheet (F3910)  Examiner’s authority to drive test vehicle section of the application form or appointment sheet. The vehicle must be registered and pass a basic safety check conducted by the driving examiner. horn and stop lights that are all working  brakes and tyres that are in good condition  mirrors and internal sun visors that are adjustable  windows that are clean and able to be opened and shut  windscreen and wipers in good condition  seatbelts and head restraints fitted to both front seats.5 tonne GVM. If you are under 25 and do your Q-SAFE practical driving test in a high-powered vehicle such as one with eight or more cylinders. page 35. you will not be able to drive it out of the testing centre after you pass the Q-SAFE practical driving test unless you have an exemption. or one with a turbo. authorising a Department of Transport and Main Roads driving examiner to drive the vehicle if necessary  vehicle  glasses or contact lenses. supercharged or modified engine. if needed (if you have to wear corrective lenses when driving you must wear them during your driving assessment)  P plates to attach to your vehicle after you pass the test and get your provisional licence—red P plates if you are under 25 years of age or 27 . signed by the registered owner. Convertible-style vehicles must have the roof closed. This is because P1 drivers (which you will then be) are restricted from driving high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles. All doors must be able to be opened from inside and outside the vehicle and be fitted with suitable door handles.Test vehicles The standard test vehicle for a class C licence is a vehicle (other than a motorbike) not more than 4. make sure the vehicle would pass the safety check by having:  signalling devices. built or fitted to carry no more than 12 adults including the driver.

Your Q-SAFE practical driving test fee will not be refunded if:  you fail your driving test  you don’t give two working days notice before altering or cancelling your appointment or cannot take your driving test at the set time.gov. Your signature on the form must be witnessed by a customer service officer. You should arrive at least ten minutes before your test with the Driving test appointment sheet and driver licence application fully completed by you and the registered operator of the test vehicle.green P plates if you are 25 years or over.qld. You will then be required to book and pay for another driving test.au/youngdrivers. Failure to be ready for the test at the scheduled time may result in the cancellation of your driving test and the forfeiture of your driving test fee. See P plates on page 34 for information on where to buy P plates or how to download them from www. 28 . possibly because you arrived late  you do not have the vehicle owner’s permission for the vehicle to be used for the test  your test vehicle failed the basic safety check  you are under 25 and your learner licence logbook has not been checked and passed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads. Your driving test may be cancelled for any of these reasons:  your vehicle is modified (unless the modifications have been approved by the Director-General of the Department of Transport and Main Roads)  anything (such as a tow bar) obscures the number plate  your number plate cannot be read from 20 m away  your vehicle does not meet the minimum standards for test vehicles  your vehicle does not pass a basic safety check  L plates are not displayed on the vehicle  the registered operator of the vehicle has not signed the Examiner’s authority to drive test vehicle section on the driver licence application or appointment sheet  you failed a driving test for the same class of licence earlier the same day  you did not sign the declaration attached to the application form (F3000)  you are under 25 and your learner licence logbook has not been checked and passed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.transport. Make sure that you give at least two working days notice if you need to alter or cancel your appointment.

the driving examiner cannot answer any questions that may influence your driving performance.During your Q-SAFE practical driving test The on-road test time for a class C licence will be not more than 35 minutes. It is the driving examiner’s job to assess your ability to drive safely. please follow the road and be directed by road signs. you will be informed on how the test will be conducted. but they are also there to help—so don’t feel intimidated or nervous. you must still look over your shoulder to make sure there are no vehicles in the blind spot. The driving examiner will carry out a basic safety check on your vehicle. 29 . which may include a variety of speed zones. Turn off your mobile phone as soon as you arrive at the testing centre. I will be asking you to perform a series of driving tasks throughout your assessment. If I don’t give you any specific directions. A message from your driving examiner When you meet your driving examiner they will make the following statements to you before you start your driving test: Q-SAFE is designed to evaluate your ability to drive safely and correctly in different driving situations. After the safety check.  Once your driving test has begun. which assesses your knowledge of the vehicle’s controls. Additional information  You will be expected to perform the driving tasks according to the road rules.  At no time during your test will you be asked to perform any driving tasks that are illegal or unsafe. You will be given clear directions in ample time. but you should allow at least one hour for your on-road test and administrative activities. and leave it off for the duration of the test. the driving examiner will go through a pre-drive check. don’t assume you have made a mistake.  As you drive. signals and road markings. When you arrive for your driving test.  If your vehicle is fitted with blind spot mirrors. Do you have any questions? Then you have a chance to ask questions before your on-road test starts. the driving examiner will make notes about how well you complete each task.

the driving examiner will check that you perform the following procedures correctly:  stopping—use of the vehicle’s parking or foot brake when stopped  giving way—give way. page 138 30  mirrors—check rear vision mirrors. The parking brake is used when the vehicle is stationary  speed—drive at a speed that suits the road and traffic conditions (even 10 km/h can sometimes be too fast)  observation and scanning—be on guard. Pre-drive check The pre-drive check asks you to locate and explain the operation of a range of vehicle controls including wipers. washers. frequently . ahead and behind when approaching a hazard. including any warning and guide signs  moving off. seat adjustment. hazard lights. mirrors and headlights. then use a driving ‘system’ to deal with it in time—see Hazards. check traffic. Look left. including both side mirrors. demister. always looking for traffic hazards and possible problems. check the vehicle’s blind spot by turning your head 4. no clutch coasting  gears—demonstrate the correct use of gears appropriate for speed. check for changed traffic conditions  clutch—control the clutch so that there is a smooth take-up of power to the drive wheels and smooth gear changing. your road position and speed 5. On-road driving test In your on-road driving test. air conditioner. slow down or stop and give way to vehicles or pedestrians so they do not have to slow down. This also applies to reversing your vehicle  signs. stop or take action to avoid your vehicle. look in mirrors 2.Q-SAFE practical driving test When you do a Q-SAFE practical driving test for a car you will be assessed on a number of tasks. indicate your intention 3. changing direction or lane changing—follow this sequence: 1. right. when beginning to move. vehicle and driving conditions  braking—drive to avoid harsh or abrupt movement by slowing the vehicle smoothly and progressively. signals and road markings. signals and road markings—obey all traffic signs.

U-turn—give way to all other vehicles and pedestrians and have a clear view of all approaching traffic .hold the wheel with your arms crossed or so that the movement of the wheel is restricted .hill start—position the car parallel to and within 50 cm of the kerb and move off without rolling backwards .gear changing in automatics—if you are driving an automatic car. travel at least two seconds behind the vehicle in front of you. You can have one attempt with a maximum of two reverse and one forward movements . Change lanes only after signalling and if it is safe to do so  road position—keep as far left as safe and practical when driving on a road without marked lanes  signalling and indicators—give other road users sufficient warning of what you intend to do—see Indicating and signalling.reverse—steer a steady course (in an approximate straight line). Double this gap in poor conditions—see Safe following distance.reverse parking—park the vehicle parallel to and within 45 cm of the kerb. The observation should be predominantly by turning your head and looking through the rear window .  manoeuvres (classes C or CA)—perform three of the listed manoeuvres (at least one with a reversing component): .remove your hands or let the wheel ‘go free’ . 31 .operate the wheel with the vehicle stationary (‘dry’ steering). page 136  marked lanes—keep within lane markings. turn the car around with a minimum number of forward and reverse movements. Do not turn the wheel when the vehicle is stopped . Never: . starting and finishing within 50 cm of the kerb.operate the wheel with one hand unnecessarily (for example. one arm resting on the door) .palm the wheel with one hand . following vehicles—in good conditions.put your hands inside the rim of the wheel . page 75  steering—always keep control of the steering wheel.turn around—within the width of a street. you may be asked to select a lower gear and re-select drive.

After the Q-SAFE practical driving test After you have completed all the driving tasks. the driving examiner directs you back to the testing office. You have many people to help you through one of the most important challenges you’ll ever take on. including hands-free functions or Bluetooth accessories. it will be re-issued with the new licence class stated on it. you will get a P2 provisional licence. If you failed. Under the graduated licensing system. but you must pay each time and can’t re-take the test on the same day. Provisional licences Once you have passed your practical driving test. If you have passed. make sure you know exactly what you did wrong and how you can improve. page 35  may only carry one peer passenger under 21 years (excluding immediate family members) between 11. you will get a P1 provisional licence. page 35 32 . So take your time. Your learner licence is current for three years and it is easily renewed. You can take the test as many times as you like. and a copy of your Driving assessment report. You risk a fine if you do not display the correctly coloured P plate on your vehicle before you start driving. you:  must display red P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving (rear only for motorbikes)  must not use your mobile phone when driving.00 pm and 5. you will get a provisional licence. the type of provisional licence you receive will depend on how old you are. and are upgrading your licence. You then get a P1 licence if you are under 25 years of age. Note: If you already hold a provisional or open licence.00 am—see Peer passengers. You also get feedback on any errors. Before you leave. you pay the licence fee and have your photo taken. P1 provisional licence requirements If you hold a P1 provisional licence and you are under 25. don’t panic Come back after more practice and try again. If you are 25 or older. or a P2 licence if you are 25 years of age or older. If you are under 25. Don’t push yourself if you are not ready. Your passengers are banned from using mobile phones on the loudspeaker function—see Mobile phones. The examiner will tell you at the end of your test whether you have passed or failed.

Note: You must remove the red P plates from your vehicle and replace them with green P plates before you start driving as a P2 licence holder. full P1 restrictions will apply to you until you turn 25. A traffic conflict is a situation where your vehicle is on course to hit another road user. the Department of Transport and Main Roads will send you a letter outlining eligibility requirements and instructions on how to take and prepare for the test. The hazard perception test is an online computer-based test that measures a driver’s ability to recognise and appropriately respond to potentially dangerous situations (traffic conflicts) while driving. page 96  must always carry your licence when you are driving. fewer restrictions will apply for the balance of the P1 period. Hazard perception test In order to graduate to a P2 or open licence. 33 . Getting your P2 licence If you hold a P1 licence and are under 24. If your vehicle needs to slow down or change course to prevent a crash. Queensland Government Agent Program office or licence issuing police station. The hazard perception test assesses whether your hazard perception skills are sufficiently advanced to allow you to upgrade from a P1 licence to a P2 or open licence. to get your P2 licence you will need to:  hold your P1 licence for at least one year (not including licence suspensions or cancellations)  obtain green P plates  pass a hazard perception test—see below  pay the hazard perception test fee  visit a driver licence issuing centre—Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre. When you turn 25. then there is a traffic conflict. When it is time for you to sit the hazard perception test. all P1 licence holders must pass a hazard perception test. If you are 24 years of age when you get your P1 licence. are not allowed to drive high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles. The test is only available through the Department of Transport and Main Roads website (it is not available at driver licence issuing centres). The hazard perception test is an additional test that complements the road rules test and the practical driving test. page 35  must drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration—see Alcohol and drugs.

au/youngdrivers.gov.au/hpt for more information. P2 provisional licence requirements If you hold a P2 provisional licence and you are under 25. you must:  display green P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving (rear only for motorbikes)  not drive high-powered vehicles—see High-powered vehicles below  drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration—see Alcohol and drugs. 34 .qld.Once you have passed the hazard perception test and held your P1 licence for 12 months. They also help other road users to exercise caution around P-plated drivers. If you are aged 25 or over. Visit www. P plates have been reintroduced to remind young or inexperienced drivers that they are novices and still developing their on-road experience. major retailers and automotive outlets. you must not drive a car or ride a motorbike unless a P plate can clearly be seen from:  the front and rear of the car  the rear of the motorbike. If you pass the hazard perception test.gov. you will never be able to exit the P1 provisional licence until you have successfully passed the hazard perception test.transport. Check with your local supplier for cost. you are eligible to upgrade your licence at a driver licence issuing centre. P plates The first year of driving poses the greatest risk of crashes for young drivers.05 if you are 25 or older—see Alcohol and drugs.transport. you must:  display green P plates at the front and rear of your car when driving. page 96  always carry your licence when you are driving. you will not be required to sit this test again.qld. A P plate is a sign that measures at least 146 mm x 146 mm and features an uppercase red letter ‘P’ or an uppercase green letter ‘P’ on a white background. Importantly. you must:  drive with a zero blood alcohol concentration if you are under 25. page 96  always carry your licence when you are driving. You can buy P plates from service stations. Provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007 If you obtained your provisional licence before 1 July 2007. You can also download and print a colour template from www. If you are a P1 or P2 licence holder. or a blood alcohol concentration below 0.

carsguide.com. Peer passengers Research shows that the risk of having a crash is higher when a young driver is carrying more than one passenger of a similar age to them (their peers) in their vehicle. Additionally. Passengers of P1 licence holders are also banned from using mobile phones on the loudspeaker function. When you are driving on your P1 licence. That’s why provisional licence holders under the age of 25. You may request an exemption. You risk a fine and 3 demerit points if you do not comply with this restriction. such as those with:  an engine with a power output of more than 200 kW  eight or more cylinders  a turbo-charged or super-charged engine (except a diesel-powered engine)  a modified engine requiring approval under the Transport Operations (Road Use Management Vehicle Standards and Safety) Regulation 1999  a rotary engine that has a capacity of more than 1146 cc. If you’re under 25. a P1 licence holder and need to use your mobile phone. you may use it only when you are legally and safely parked—otherwise you risk a fine and 3 demerit points. You may request an exemption. whether holding P1 or P2 licences. but exemptions are considered on a case-by-case basis in accordance with strict guidelines. Check your vehicle’s power specifications on the vehicle manufacturer’s website. Mobile phones All drivers are banned from using a mobile phone that is held in the hand while driving (see page 120). are not allowed to drive high-powered vehicles.00 pm and 5. and this includes using hands-free kits.00 am. or a car guide website such as www.High-powered vehicles Research shows that drivers take more risks such as speeding deliberately and driving recklessly when they are behind the wheel of high-powered or ‘performance’ cars.redbook.com. If you breach the high-powered vehicle restriction. you may only carry one passenger aged under 21 (excluding immediate family members) between 11.au or www. but exemptions are considered on a case-by-case basis in accordance with strict guidelines. the restrictions that apply to learner licence holders under 25 and their passengers still apply during the P1 period. P1 licence holders under 25 are banned from using mobile phones at any time while driving. 35 . Bluetooth accessories and loudspeaker function. a fine and 3 demerit point penalty will apply.au.

Which two of the following statements are true for a driver with a P1 provisional licence? (See page 32) A. You may only use a mobile phone in the car when you are legally and safely parked. B.08 3. If you hold a provisional licence. how many passengers under 21 (other than family members) are you allowed to have in the car between 11.00 am? (See page 32) A. you will have the choice between:  a three-month driving suspension  a good driving behaviour option for one year. You may use a mobile phone while driving. C. Sample questions —provisional licences 1. C. this time will not contribute to the time for which you must hold that licence. your licence will be suspended or you will have to comply with a good driving behaviour option if you accumulate how many demerit points? (See page 36) A. or you are disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence during the provisional licence period. B. 12 or more over a three-year period. B. 4 or more over a three-year period. provided you do not become distracted. D.00 pm and 5. What is the maximum blood alcohol concentration for a provisional licence holder under 25? (See page 33) 2. page 157. If your licence has expired. 36 . B. provided they do not use the loudspeaker function.Demerit points If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points over a one-year period.02 0. Further restrictions will be imposed during the good driving behaviour period. or when you resume driving after the suspension. You may use a mobile phone while driving. 0.05 0. 12 or more over a one-year period. D. D. D. 4 or more over a one-year period. If you are under 25 and hold a P1 provisional licence. C. 4. C. None 1 2 4 A. but your passengers can. You may not use a mobile phone while driving.00 0. is suspended. provided you use a hands-free or Bluetooth accessory. if you are under 25—see Licence suspensions.

 If you were 24 when you got your P1 licence. To graduate to an open licence you will not be required to undertake the hazard perception test. Conditions for open licence holders  You must remove any P plates once you get your open licence. your licence will be re-issued to you showing the additional or higher licence class.  If you were 23 when you got your P1 licence. and show it to any police officer who asks you to do so. 37 . this will result in a minimum three-month suspension. page 96. or you will have to observe a good driving behaviour period for one year—see Accumulation of demerit points—Queensland licence holders.05—see Alcohol and drugs. you will be issued with a probationary licence. you must hold your P2 licence for at least one year (not including licence suspensions or cancellations) to progress to an open licence. you must hold your P2 licence for at least two years (not including licence suspensions or cancellations) to progress to an open licence. you would have been issued with a P2 licence with certain conditions.  You must drive with a blood alcohol concentration below 0. If you pass a Q-SAFE practical driving test for an additional or higher class of licence and you already hold a Queensland open driver licence.Open licences You may be eligible for an open licence if you have held your P1 or P2 licence for the required period:  If you were under 23 when you got your P1 licence.  If you accumulate 12 or more demerit points over a three-year period.  If you were 25 or over when you passed your practical driving test. you must hold your P2 licence for at least one year (not including licence suspensions or cancellations) to progress to an open licence. page 158.  Always keep your licence with you when driving. Probationary and restricted licences Probationary licences If you were disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by a court and you have now served the period of disqualification.

You must apply to the court for this licence before the Magistrate decides your period of disqualification. you must continue to display the respective coloured P plates on your vehicle if you are driving under a P1 or P2 probationary licence. You are not eligible to apply for this licence if any of the following apply to you:  You have had another drink driving offence in the past five years.  You were driving a motor vehicle that you were not authorised to drive under your Queensland provisional or open driver licence.  When tested. Restricted licences If you are convicted of a low range drink driving offence but need a licence to earn your living. If you held a P provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007 before you were disqualified. codes and conditions. 38 . you may ask the court that convicts you to grant you a restricted licence.If you held a P1 or P2 licence before you were disqualified. page 10. If you are over the age of 25 and held an open licence before you were disqualified. the drink driving offence. your blood alcohol concentration was 0. Conditions for probationary licence holders You must:  carry your licence at all times when driving  if you are under 25 years of age. have a zero blood alcohol concentration when driving—see Alcohol and drugs. you are not required to display P plates on your vehicle while driving under a probationary licence. you are not required to display P plates if you are driving under a P probationary licence. page 96.  You did not hold a Queensland provisional or open driver licence at the time you committed. You may:  drive any class of vehicle shown on your licence learn to drive a higher class vehicle as long as you are with someone who holds an open licence for that class vehicle and has held that licence for at least one year— see Licence classes.  You are under 25 years of age and hold a learner or provisional driver licence. commonly known as a ‘work’ licence.15 or greater—see Alcohol and drugs. or were convicted of. page 96.

qld. To help identify motorbikes that can be legally ridden under a class RE licence. P type and open licence holders) are only able to ride a motorbike that is a learner approved motorbike (LAM).au. you must be able to prove to the court that you need a driver licence to earn your living.gov. A full list of approved motorbikes and more information about the LAM scheme is available on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website at www. or you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence. Conditions for restricted licence holders  You must hold the restricted licence for the same period as the disqualification period imposed by the court. Motorbikes Class RE To be eligible for a motorbike (class RE) learner licence.tmr. you must have held a provisional or open licence for another class of vehicle for at least one year during the past five years. you have had your licence suspended or cancelled.  You may only drive the class of vehicle shown on the licence and drive the vehicle while carrying and in accordance with conditions stated on the court order. a LAM indicator will be included on the registration label of approved motorbikes. 39 .tmr.  You may also be required to hold a probationary licence for a required period of time before being eligible for an open licence. P1. and:  has a power to weight ratio of not more than 150 kW per tonne  has not been modified other than for an allowable modification  is stated to be a learner approved motorbike in a list kept by the chief executive and published on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website at www.gov. Class RE licence holders (learners.au. A LAM is a production motorbike that is fitted with an electric motor. In all cases. or has an internal combustion engine with an engine capacity of not more than 660mL.qld. P2. In the past five years. Note: This five-year period is calculated backwards from the day your application is made to the court.

If the motorbike has a sidecar. You must pass a practical riding test before you are issued with your class RE licence. A class R provisional or open licence allows you to ride a motorbike of any engine capacity including a learner approved motorbike and a moped. You may also choose to obtain your class R motorbike licence (provisional or open) through Q-Ride or by passing the Q-SAFE practical driving test on a class R motorbike. While learning to ride you are assessed in four competency based units. If the motorbike does not have a sidecar. Q-SAFE Q-Ride You must hold your class RE learner licence You do not need to hold your class RE for six months before you are eligible to apply learner licence for six months before you for your class RE licence. The main differences are outlined in the table below. Class R You must have held your class RE provisional or open licence for at least one year before learning to ride a class R motorbike. you will not need to display a P plate when riding. Pillion passenger restriction for learner riders Class RE and R learner licence holders are prohibited from carrying pillion passengers (including their supervisor) when learning to ride a motorbike on a road. are eligible to apply for your class RE licence. P plates on motorbikes If you hold a P1 or P2 type licence. A learner is still required to be supervised by an appropriately licensed person when riding a motorbike. 40 . the supervisor may accompany the learner by being safely seated in the sidecar. you will need to clearly display a red or green P plate on the rear of your motorbike (including a moped) when riding. the supervisor may follow at a safe distance on another motorbike or in another vehicle. and you may get your class RE licence once you receive your Q-Ride certificate (competency declaration) from your Q-Ride provider.You may choose to get your class RE motorbike provisional or open licence through Q-Ride or by passing the Department of Transport and Main Roads Q-SAFE practical driving test. If you already hold an open licence when you get your class RE or R licence.

Note: A learner is still required to be supervised by an appropriately licensed person when riding a motorbike. After you have held your class RE provisional or open licence for at least one year. you must:  always carry your learner licence when you are learning to ride  be accompanied by. you may learn to ride a class R motorbike with any engine capacity under this licence. Special rules about mopeds If you have a class C learner licence and you want to learn to ride a moped. RE or R licence and has held this licence for at least one year.The Q-SAFE method Conditions for learning to ride You must:  obey the conditions shown on your learner licence  always carry your learner licence when you are learning to ride  only be taught by a person who holds an open class RE or class R licence and has held this licence for at least one year  only learn to ride a learner approved motorbike  always display an L plate on the rear of the motorbike you are riding or on the back of a vest worn while riding—see L plates. but you may only be taught by a person who holds an open class R licence and has held this licence for at least one year. 41 . If the motorbike has a sidecar. you are already authorised to ride a moped without supervision. If the motorbike does not have a sidecar. page 23. Note: if you hold a C. RE or R provisional or open licence. You cannot take the practical driving test on a moped because it is not representative of the class of vehicle that may be driven under a class C or RE licence. the supervisor may follow at a safe distance on another motorbike or in another vehicle. the supervisor may accompany the learner by being safely seated in the sidecar. or ride under the direction of. a person who holds an open class C. which will allow you to ride a learner approved motorbike. Your first motorbike licence will be for a class RE.

If you hold a P1 or P2 provisional licence. Clothing requirements The Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that you wear the following clothing when you take your motorbike test:  pants made from heavy material that cover leg length  long-sleeved shirt or jacket made from heavy material  gloves providing appropriate protection  fully enclosed shoes or boots  eye protection. Note: You cannot take a test on a moped. Test vehicles For your test.Q-SAFE practical riding test You must pass a Q-SAFE practical riding test or a Q-Ride competency assessment before your provisional or open licence will be upgraded to include a motorbike class. you must ride a motorbike that is a standard test vehicle for the licence you want. a motorbike with a sidecar attached or a motortrike. a motorbike with a sidecar attached or a motortrike. Before turning up for your test. conditionally registered motorbike. page 40. which is published on the department’s website. See P plates on motorbikes. 42 . You will need a red P plate if you hold a P1 type licence or a green P plate if you hold a P2 type licence. For information on booking your practical test. make sure the vehicle would pass the safety check by having:  signalling devices. horn and stop lights that are all working  brakes and tyres that are in good condition  mirrors that are adjustable. conditionally registered motorbike. Note: You cannot take a test on a moped. bring your P plate to attach to your motorbike after you pass the test. The vehicle must be registered and pass a basic safety check conducted by the riding examiner. see page 26. A motorbike not stated on the learner approved motorbike list. Licence class RE (restricted motorbike) R (motorbike) Vehicle requirement A learner approved motorbike.

At no time during the assessment will I ask you to perform any riding tasks that are illegal.If radio reception of directions given become unclear. .Once the assessment has commenced. which may include a variety of speed zones.You must wear an Australian Standard AS1698 (1988) motorbike helmet when riding a motorbike. .You will be given clear instructions in ample time.I will follow you during the riding assessment.I will be asking you to undertake a series of riding tasks throughout the assessment. A message from your riding examiner The riding examiner will make the following statements to you before starting your riding test: . . . . Please keep me in your vision and.Q-SAFE is designed to evaluate your ability to ride safely and correctly in different situations. Directions will be given by radio.Do you have any questions? 43 .Please make any lane changes that are necessary to follow my direction. . . .You will be expected to perform the riding tasks when conditions are safe and in accordance with the road rules. pull over somewhere safe and legal and I will give you further instruction. please stop somewhere safe and legal and wait for me. I am unable to answer any questions that may influence your riding performance. including when taking the test. You will be given clear directions in ample time. should we get separated during the assessment. .

especially near intersections. horn and headlight/ dip switch. The on-road riding test will include general riding exercises and low speed manoeuvres. side stand.Pre-ride check The test will start with the pre-ride check followed by the on-road riding test. The positioning of your motorbike on the road must be suitable for the road conditions. On a two-way road where there are no line markings. kill switch.keeping your feet out and slightly down.U-turns—giving way to all other vehicles and pedestrians and having a clear view of all approaching traffic in all directions of travel—see U-turns. keep within the lane.keeping your feet on the footrests except when stopping or moving off . The pre-ride check will involve the riding examiner asking you to locate and explain the operation of the fuel reserve.slow ride—riding in a straight line at the speed of a slow walk using the clutch if necessary to adjust the speed of the motorbike—see Posture when riding above . A touch to the accelerator on down changes is recommended  balance and control—maintaining full balance and control of the motorbike in all speed and riding conditions  road position—keeping clear of painted surfaces and metal inspection covers on the road surface.  gear changing—avoiding wheel lock-up by smooth gear changes. choke.keeping your knees into the tank . the riding examiner will check that you do the following procedures correctly:  changing road position—giving other road users sufficient warning of what you intend to do and always checking your mirrors and your vehicle’s blind spot before changing your position on the road—see Indicating and signalling. maintain a road position that enhances your safety  required manoeuvres: . On-road riding test The individual on-road test time will be 35 minutes or less for both the class RE and R licence. page 72 44 .keeping your head up so you are looking well ahead through the corners . page 75  posture when riding: . On your on-road riding test. When in a marked lane.keeping your foot instep on the footrest . Beware of oily or loose surfaces.

2. fees and charges.hill start—moving off smoothly from a stationary position and travelling up a moderate incline without the motorbike rolling backwards. You must always carry and show your class RE learner. Eligibility You can sign up for Q-Ride to get your class RE motorbike licence as soon as you get your class RE learner licence. 4. You must only receive instruction from another rider who holds an open licence for the class of motorbike you are riding and who has held that licence for at least one year. Learn—develop your motorbike riding skills through progressive training. or a class RE provisional or open licence for at least one year to learn to ride a class R motorbike. the Q-Ride registered service provider may issue you with a competency declaration (Q-Ride certificate) for the class of motorbike you have successfully learnt to ride. 5. The registered service provider will ask you to provide some information about your licence history to determine which class of motorbike you are eligible to learn to ride. 3. Enrol—in Q-Ride training with a Q-Ride registered service provider. The Q-Ride method Q-Ride is a competency-based training and assessment program aimed at improving the quality of learner rider instruction.. Applying for Q-Ride training and assessment To get your motorbike licence (class RE or R) with Q-Ride. Your choice may depend on location.emergency stop—stopping the motorbike safely with full control from a speed of no more than 40 km/h. follow these steps: 1. Choose—a Q-Ride registered service provider. Don’t lock the wheels. Q-Ride ensures that participants continue their training until they can demonstrate they are competent against set standards. Certificate—when you have been assessed as attaining the required competencies by an accredited rider trainer. You are not required to change back through the gears in this exercise . 45 . Q-Ride Registered Service Providers are accredited by the Department of Transport and Main Roads. Get started—you need to hold a class RE learner licence to learn to ride a class RE motorbike. provisional or open licence to any police officer who asks you to do so. Use all your fingers on the front brake at all times.

 Your passenger must not interfere with your effective control of the motorbike. However.transport.au/QRIDE. the following road rules also apply.gov. visit www.  You must sit astride the rider’s seat.5 m apart.  You must not carry more passengers in the motorbike’s sidecar than the sidecar was designed to carry. you are subject to the same road rules that apply to you when you drive other vehicles.  Your pillion passenger must not ride on the motorbike unless the motorbike has a suitable pillion seat and suitable passenger footrests. face forward and keep your feet on the rider’s footrests. you must have held your provisional or open motorbike licence for that class of motorbike for at least one year. Licence—take your Q-Ride certificate together with your driver licence into a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre to apply for either your class RE or R provisional or open licence.  You may ride side-by-side with another motorbike rider in one marked lane.  Before carrying a passenger on the class of motorbike you are riding. except to use a foot-operated device on the motorbike or to remain stable when travelling at low speeds. Additional road rules for motorbike riders As a motorbike rider. Rules for carrying passengers on any motorbike  Each of your passengers must wear an approved helmet securely fastened at all times other than when the motorbike is parked. 46 .  Your pillion passenger on a moving motorbike must sit astride the pillion seat and face forward with their feet on the passenger footrests.  Your passenger must be seated safely on the pillion seat or in a sidecar attached to the motorbike. For further information about your local Q-Ride registered service provider.  You must not carry passengers under eight years of age (except in a sidecar). because of the different nature of a motorbike.6. provided you are not more than 1.qld.  You must wear an approved helmet securely fastened at all times other than when the motorbike is parked. page 23.  You must always display an L plate on the rear of the motorbike you are learning to ride or on the back of a vest worn by you while learning to ride—see L plates.

you may ride a motorbike on a footpath or road reserve if: 47 . position at least one wheel as close as possible to the kerb. the Department of Transport and Main Roads also recommends you ride your motorbike with the headlight on at all times. unless the motorbike or moped is parked. the Department of Transport and Main Roads recommends that both you and your passengers should wear eye protection. or a contractor or a sub-contractor with Australia Post. boots and hardwearing. covering legs and arms. It should fit properly (e. an appropriate chain guard must  be fitted  chain—if the motorbike is chain driven. Preparing to get on the road You and your passengers (both pillion and sidecar) must wear an Australian Standard AS1698 (1988) motorbike helmet at all times when riding. check the following safety equipment on your motorbike is working:  headlight  rear and brake light that shows a red light  rear number plate light (clear)  rear red reflector  front and rear brakes  footrests for you and for the pillion passenger.5 mm deep)  indicators (if manufactured after 1962). Note: If you are an employee of. high-visibility clothing. see Parking. gloves. Park a motorbike with the sidecar parallel to the kerb. if the motorbike is registered to carry a pillion  muffler  horn  chain guard—if the motorbike is chain driven.Parking When parking a motorbike or moped. an adult’s helmet on a child will offer no protection) and be kept in good condition. page 114. To increase your visibility and safety.g. You must obey the parking rules. Before riding on the road. ensure that the chain is correctly adjusted and lightly lubricated  right and left rear-vision mirrors—a left rear-vision mirror is optional if the motorbike was manufactured before June 1975  a current registration label on the left side or rear that can be seen clearly from 6 m away  safe tyres (with a tread at least 1. For more information. For safety.

A motorbike with an engine capacity of more than 660 mL. C. no more than four riders side-by-side in one marked lane. single file in one marked lane B. Test vehicles For your driving test. must display one L plate so that it can be seen clearly from the rear of the motorbike B. A motorbike with a power to weight ratio of more than 150 kW per tonne. As a learner motorbike rider. Only if the motorbike has an engine capacity more than 250 mL. only the person controlling the motorbike is required to wear a helmet. What type of motorbike can be ridden under a class RE licence? (See page 39) A. 2. must only display L plates when riding on highways D. No. Yes. are not required to display L plates C. Is a pillion passenger required to wear a motorbike helmet? (See page 46) A. 3. B. Heavy vehicles To obtain a heavy vehicle licence. A learner approved motorbike. 4. you are delivering postal articles  the motorbike engine is not more than 125 mL  the speed of the motorbike is not more than 10 km/h  you ride safely. C. no more than two riders side-by-side in one marked lane C. For information on booking your practical test. you: (See page 41) A. you must undergo a practical driving test. you must drive a vehicle that is representative of the class of vehicle authorised to be driven under the particular class of licence. are only required to display L plates at night. taking care to avoid danger or a crash. Motorbike riders must ride: (See page 46) A. The standard test vehicles for each class of licence are: 48 . Sample questions—motorbikes 1. see page 26. B.

with at least three axles. mirrors. A bus or a truck more than 15 tonne GVM. A truck more than 15 tonne GVM with at least three axles and trailer more than 9 tonne GVM with at least two axles. HC (heavy combination) A vehicle of more than 12 tonne gross vehicle mass (GVM) must be equipped with at least three portable warning triangles for the test.Licence class LR (light rigid) MR (medium rigid) HR (heavy rigid) Vehicle requirement A bus or truck more than 4. On-road diving test times The on-road driving test times for the different heavy vehicle licence classes are:  LR—25 to 35 minutes  MR and HR—60 to 70 minutes  HC—70 to 80 minutes. Pre-drive check The pre-drive check asks you to locate and explain a range of vehicle controls including wipers. air conditioner. Uncontrolled and unpredictable events such as road works and traffic crashes may affect the duration of the test. seat adjustment. demister. washers. Note: the test cannot be taken in a bobtail prime mover. A bus or truck more than 8 tonne GVM. the minimum drive time will be 25 minutes for a class LR test. Unless the test is terminated for any reason. On-road driving test In your on-road driving test. Q-SAFE practical driving test When you do a practical driving test for a heavy vehicle. hazard lights. you will also be assessed on the following tasks. 60 minutes for MR or HR test and 70 minutes for an HC test. horn and headlights. A prime mover more than 15 tonne GVM with at least three axles and semi-trailer with at least two axles.5 tonne GVM but not more than 8 tonne GVM. with not more than two axles. the driving examiner will check that you perform the following procedures correctly: 49 .

two-speed differential. Lower trailer/drawbar support legs.electric cable . Alight from the cab facing the vehicle. 8. use the clutch. You can do the manoeuvre in a left. reversing exercise—reverse the vehicle around a corner. operate the air dump valve (where applicable) to prevent any damage to the vehicle. if they are fitted  hill start—move off smoothly from a parked position and travel up a moderate incline without the vehicle rolling backwards  uncouple/recouple requirements—for the class HC licence test.hydraulic lines . If you drive a truck with a dog trailer in the test. 7. Where the vehicle has airbag suspension. Drive prime mover or truck forward for a distance of approximately 10 m. and so on. flying saucer type coupling. 50 . uncouple the trailer. 4. Secure the wheel chocks (necessary for vehicles that do not have a spring brake system). Uncouple and recouple the trailer. you may reverse with or without the trailer steerable axle locked  gear changing—change down to a lower gear.or right-hand direction. Two reverse movements and one forward movement are allowed for each attempt. when the vehicle is in motion.g. although you can glance over your shoulder occasionally. drive forward approximately 10 m and reverse back onto the trailer to recouple.brake hoses . in the correct sequence within 12 minutes. The driving examiner may allow you two attempts to successfully reverse the vehicle around the corner. Extra time may be given for some configurations. You should check what you are doing by looking in your mirrors. The forward movement for left and right reversing can be as far as the furthest edge or kerb you are turning from.chains. range selector. You must be able to operate exhaust brakes. Disconnect. 6. retract and secure: . following all safe practices. Apply the park brake to the vehicle. On a manual vehicle. 5. e. Start and finish reversing parallel to and within 2 m of the edge of the road. 2. where applicable. excluding crawler gears. Correct sequence and procedure—uncouple 1. Release the turntable jaws/pin coupling. 3.

Synchromesh restriction code If the driving test is conducted in a vehicle with a synchromesh transmission and non-synchromesh skills haven’t been displayed in a previous licence test. For additional road rules for heavy vehicles. 6.electric cables . 5.chains. 8. walk around the vehicle listening for air leaks and checking the condition of all tyres. following distance and giving way to other vehicles. check that all the mechanisms are locked by: . Check trailer and footbrake stop lights. Ensure pin coupling/jaws are in the correct position for recoupling. Connect and check the condition of: . 10. see Heavy vehicles. activate valve to refill airbag suspension.hydraulic lines . Turn the engine off. 3. tug test) . This is done to ensure correct functioning of the electrical system. Start engine and build up air pressure to operating level.brake hoses . a licence condition code B (synchromesh restricted) will be stated on the licence. Remove wheel chocks. 4. Reverse prime mover/truck back towards the trailer. if appropriate. page 102. 7.visually checking the coupling to ensure locking pin/jaws have engaged after first applying the park brake. if applicable (ensure they are crossed). Wind up trailer support legs and lock in position or secure drawbar leg. 2. An additional tug test should be conducted on the trailer brake at low speed after recouple when asked to do so by the driving examiner.Correct sequence and procedure—recouple 1. Where applicable.attempting to carefully ease forward against the trailer brakes (i. you should know the length and height of the vehicle and your obligations regarding turning.e. You can stop and check the position of the prime mover/truck in relation to the trailer coupling. After you have coupled the prime mover/truck and trailer. Long vehicle While driving a long vehicle. 9. turn indicators and sound the horn. 51 .

you must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads or its agent within 14 days. if you are found driving after your licence expires and before you renew it.gov. and renewing early will not reduce your licence period. The licence may be granted to you for a period up to five years. Non-Queensland driver licences Interstate licence An interstate licence is a driver licence granted to you in another Australian state or territory. P type or open licence within five years of the expiry date of the licence.tmr.qld. you will not be required to take another practical driving test before being granted a further licence of the same class.au. You will need to pay a fee when renewing your licence. Changing your name or address If you change your name or address. you may have to show extra identification when you apply to renew it. 52 . your Queensland driver licence. contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads. and you still need to drive after it expires and before returning to Queensland. If you renew your P1. Travelling interstate or overseas If your licence will expire while you are travelling interstate or overseas. or renew. page 165. you may renew your licence online through Services online at www. visit a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or a driver licence issuing centre.gov. you can change your address online by visiting Services online at www. If your licence has expired. you may be charged with unlicensed driving—see Unlicensed driving. Alternatively. Call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80 for information about what you will need to show to change your name or address on your Queensland licence.au.tmr. However. This also includes any external territory of Australia. You may renew your licence up to six weeks before it expires. If you hold an open licence. P2.qld.General provisions Renewing your licence To apply for.

When you must not drive in Queensland You must not drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence if:  your licence is no longer valid because: . you must have the licence with you and show it straight away to a police officer when asked to do so. This includes a New Zealand driver licence.com. 53 . page 18 .naati. For a list of approved recognised translators.  you have been disqualified by an Australian court from holding or obtaining a driver licence  your authority to drive in Queensland on your licence has been suspended because: . page 162.  your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because: .you have gained too many demerit points—see Accumulation of demerit points—interstate and foreign licence holders.it has expired . you are allowed to drive any class of motor vehicle in Queensland that you are authorised to drive on that licence. Driving in Queensland When you may drive in Queensland If you hold a valid interstate or foreign licence.the three months residency rule applies to you—see page 54.you have not paid any fines imposed by a court .Foreign licence A foreign driver licence is a licence to drive a motor vehicle issued to you under a law of another country. as long as you comply with the conditions (if any) stated on it.you have been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit . If your licence is in a language other than English. contact the National Accreditation Authority of Translators and Interpreting Ltd (NAATI) at website www. This translation should be shown to the police officer at the same time you are required to show your licence.you have a medical condition that adversely affects your ability to drive safely—see Medical conditions affecting driving.it has been suspended by the issuing authority.au. you should carry a recognised English translation of it when driving. When you are driving.

 you are not an Australian citizen. you can no longer drive on your interstate or foreign licence.you have now been residing in Queensland for three months. you will need to:  show your interstate licence and supporting evidence of identity  show evidence of your Queensland residence  surrender your interstate licence. A visa.after you took up residence in Queensland you were given a permanent visa or special category visa under the Migration Act 1958 (Cwlth) . and: .before you took up residence in Queensland you were given a permanent visa or special category visa under the Migration Act 1958 (Cwlth) . or until a certain event happens or while you have a special status. and must obtain a Queensland driver licence to continue driving in Queensland. page 14.you have now been residing in Queensland for three months since getting the visa. You may also be required to:  show evidence that you are medically fit to drive safely  pass an eyesight test 54 . Permanent visa and special category visa A permanent visa and a special category visa allow you to stay indefinitely in Australia. if:  you are an Australian citizen and you have been residing in Queensland for three months  you are not an Australian citizen. you may be eligible to be granted a Queensland driver licence—see Applying for a licence. If you need to drive in Queensland If your licence has expired or your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because of the three months residency rule and you still need to drive. Obtaining a Queensland driver licence If you hold an interstate licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same class as your interstate licence.When the three months residency rule applies Under the three months residency rule. such as a student visa. that allows you to stay in Australia for a limited time. is not a permanent visa or special category visa. and: .

sper. you may be assisted by an approved interpreter while you take your road rules test.been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit .gov. For more information about unpaid court imposed fines. If your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because you have a medical condition that affects your ability to drive safely. The Department of Transport and Main Roads may organise an interpreter for you. you will need to:  show your foreign licence and a recognised translation of the licence if it is not in English  show supporting evidence of identity  show evidence of your Queensland residence. contact the State Penalties Enforcement Registry on 1300 365 635 or view their website at www. If any of the following happens. page 18. pay the licence fee. You must not continue to drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence once you have been granted a Queensland driver licence.not paid any court fines. If you hold a foreign licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same class as your foreign licence. if you wish to purchase an additional period. you will not be eligible to be granted a Queensland driver licence until the period of suspension or disqualification has ended:  your licence has been suspended by the issuing authority  you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence by an Australian court  your authority to drive in Queensland has been suspended because you have: . You may also be required to:  show evidence that you are medically fit to drive safely  pass an eyesight test  pay the road rules test fee and pass the test  pay the practical driving test fee and pass the test  pay the licence fee.qld. If you have genuine difficulty in understanding or speaking English.gained too many demerit points .au. you will not be eligible for a Queensland driver licence until your doctor gives you a medical certificate stating that you are medically fit to drive again—see Medical conditions affecting driving. 55 .

please share yours. qtlhh 0047 . I’ve already shared my story. now you can tell your story at a very special website. It could change or save someone’s life.My name’s Tegan Crick and a crash on Mothers Day 2007 left me a C5 paraplegic. If you’ve been injured in a car crash or lost a friend or family member.

Road rules  Signs and signals  Speed limits  Making turns  Roundabouts  Indicating and signalling  Giving way  Road positioning  Hazardous localities  Alcohol and drugs  Heavy vehicles  Other rules and responsibilities  Rules for other road users 57 .

Paying attention to traffic signs helps you move around safely and efficiently. you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering. No U-turn Do not make a U-turn on a length of road where this sign applies. Stop Stop and give way to all other vehicles approaching. you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering. Roundabout Slow down or stop and give way to all vehicles on the roundabout. Regulatory signs You must obey the instructions on these signs. No turns Do not turn right or left or make a U-turn at the intersection—you must only drive in the direction indicated by the arrow. If you turn at the intersection. 58 . Give way Slow down or stop and give way to all other vehicles approaching. Wrong way— go back This sign warns you that you are driving in the wrong direction along an exit ramp of a motorway. entering or already on the intersection. If you turn at the intersection.Signs and signals Signs Traffic signs and signals are an essential part of the road traffic system. There are three common types of traffic signs:  regulatory signs  warning signs  guide signs. entering or already on the intersection.

see Hazardous localities. Keep left unless overtaking When you drive past this sign on a multi-lane road. Used on steep routes. 59 . if the sign applies to a narrow length of road  an END NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign.No left turn Do not turn left at the intersection. making a U-turn. For more regulatory signs. One way You must drive only in the direction indicated by the arrow. you must not drive in the right lane unless overtaking. if the sign applies to a bridge  the end of a narrow length of road. Trucks and buses use low gear Trucks and buses must drive in a gear low enough to limit their speed without relying on the primary brake. No right turn Do not turn right or do a U-turn at the intersection. Keep left You must drive to the left of this sign. Two way Vehicles travel in both directions on this road. turning right. No entry Do not drive onto the road beyond this sign. page 92. No overtaking or passing Overtaking or passing another vehicle is not allowed from the NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign to:  a distance past the sign indicated on the sign  the end of the bridge. avoiding an obstacle or driving in congested traffic.

End shared zone You have reached the end of a shared zone and the previous speed limit applies.Speed limit signs You must not drive faster than the km/h speed shown in the circle. The (speed limit) AREA sign indicates the speed limit within the area you are about to enter. 60 . Other variable speed limit signs have a changeable electronic display to show the current speed limit. page 140. The END (speed limit) sign indicates that the previous speed limit has ended and the general default speed limit outside a built up area applies. around sports venues.g. In poor conditions it is safer to drive slower than the speed limit —see Bad weather. Some speed limit signs show times or days that the limit applies. in school zones. e. e. The END (speed limit) AREA sign indicates you are leaving the area covered by the area speed limit and re-entering a general speed limit area. Standard rules for giving way to pedestrians apply.g. These variable speed limit signs may have different colours to the normal speed restriction sign. Shared zone Give way to pedestrians and do not drive faster than the km/h speed shown in the circle between this sign and the next END SHARED ZONE sign.

downgrade Flashing signal ahead Roundabout ahead GIVE WAY sign ahead STOP sign ahead Traffic lights ahead Side road intersection Crossroad intersection T-intersection Divided road End divided road Road narrows Merging traffic Added lane One-lane bridge Arrows indicate Traffic travels direction in each of traffic direction Turn Reverse turns Curve Reverse curves Winding road 61 . Steep descent Railway level Railway level or steep crossing ahead crossing.Warning signs These signs warn you of hazards.

Be prepared to take action Slippery road 62 .Sharp depression in road Water flows across road Raised area on road Road hump Advisory speed limit School Pedestrian crossing ahead Pedestrian crossing Children could be on the road Maximum safe speed in good conditions Children getting on and off buses School bus turning People on bicycles may be using the road Pedestrians may be using the road Trucks crossing or entering Beware of kangaroos Low clearance ahead Low-flying aircraft ahead Hazard ahead.

Bidirectional hazard markers Drive either side of the hazard. destinations and points of interest. Drive to the right of the sign.Hazard markers You will see these signs on hazards on the road. routes. Drive to the right of the hazard. Guide and information signs These signs give you information about safe road use. The points of the V-shaped bars are the direction you must drive. They show the width of a bridge. directions. stock grid crossing or a narrow section of road. They show you the direction to take when driving past the hazard. 63 . Width markers These signs are normally used in pairs. You must obey these signs. Unidirectional hazard markers Drive to the left of the hazard. Drive to the left of the sign.

Slow vehicles use left lane You may see this sign at the beginning of a long or steep climb where a slow-moving vehicle may delay other vehicles. Reduce speed now The motorway you are on is ending. use the left lane and leave the other lane clear for passing vehicles. Form a single lane with other drivers. Give way to all vehicles on the road you are entering. which connects a number of tourist attractions. tourist information. Tourist drive information A scenic drive or route. The sign may be at the entrance to a local area or at detours where local traffic is allowed to enter the work area. 64 . caravan parks or meals.Form one lane The number of marked lanes for vehicles travelling in the same direction has been reduced to one. The sign may also show your distance from these services. If you are driving a slow-moving vehicle. Services The services shown on this sign are available on the road ahead or on a side road. The route may be identified by a particular number. and include first aid. Slow down from the motorway speed limit to the much slower speed limit on the next section of road. Turn left at any time with care Give way to all bicycles and pedestrians on the slip lane. No through road The road you are about to enter is a dead end. goes this way. Local traffic only The road past the sign is not intended for through traffic.

Traffic lights
Traffic lights control the flow of traffic and pedestrians to improve safety and access to roads. You should drive at a speed that gives you time to react if the traffic lights change. If you disobey a red or yellow traffic light, you may receive an infringement notice from police. If you disobey a red traffic light, you may be sent a Photographic detection device offence notice in the mail—see Red light cameras, page 153. For information about how cyclists and pedestrians should respond to traffic lights, see Rules for other road users, page 122. Obeying traffic lights Stop You must not drive past the STOP line at the red traffic light or, if there is no STOP line, the traffic light.

You must not drive in the direction of the red traffic arrow past the STOP line at the traffic light or, if there is no stop line, the traffic light.

Stop if it is safe to do so You must not drive past the STOP line at the yellow traffic light or, if there is no STOP line, the traffic light.

If it is unsafe to stop, for example if you are very close to the light when it changes from green to yellow, you may proceed through the yellow light.

65

Drive with caution If you face a flashing yellow traffic light or arrow, you may drive past it applying give way rules and caution to avoid a collision with other vehicles and pedestrians. Drive past the light Drive past the green traffic light or arrow, as long as the intersection is clear. Traffic lights showing a white B light If you are driving a bus, taxi, limousine, emergency vehicle or a bicycle, you may drive past the white B light.

Obeying lawful directions
Police officers and Department of Transport and Main Roads inspectors
Police officers and Department of Transport and Main Roads inspectors may direct road users with hand signals. A direction given by a police officer overrules a give way or stop sign, or a traffic light. You must obey these signals and any directions given.

Stop where indicated and wait

Go as directed

Stop Traffic controllers A traffic controller may direct traffic at or through a worksite. You must obey a lawful direction or signal given by a traffic controller within a designated worksite.

66

Stop

Slow

Slow

Sample questions—signs and signals
1. What does this sign mean? (See page 59) A. B. C. D. Danger—road bends sharply to the right. You must not turn right. Speed zone ends. No sharp right hand bends ahead.

2. When a traffic light turns from green to yellow, you should: (See page 65) A. speed up and go through the lights before they turn red B. stop, even if you must stop on the intersection and then reverse back to the stop line C. stop, even if you are in the intersection D. stop if you can do so safely before reaching the stop line. 3. What does this sign mean? (See page 58) A. B. C. D. U-turns allowed. No right turn. Give way to vehicles on the roundabout. Turning area for heavy vehicles ahead—give way.

4. What does this sign mean? (See page 59)

A. B. C. D.

Vehicles travel in both directions on this road. No right or left turn. No parking. No U-turns allowed.

5. What does this sign mean? (See page 61)

A. B. C. D.

Crossroad intersection ahead. Helicopter landing pad ahead. Ambulance station ahead. Hospital emergency entrance ahead.

67

Speed limits
In Queensland, all speed limits are set in accordance with part 4 of the Manual of uniform traffic control devices. This approach is aimed at ensuring speed limits are consistent and credible, and a balance is provided between increased safety, urban amenity and traffic efficiency for all road users. The faster you drive, the longer it takes you to stop, and the harder you hit in the event of a crash. If you drive too fast around corners, you may lose control of your vehicle.

Speed limit sign
A speed limit sign has a number in a circle on it showing the maximum speed in km/h that you may drive your vehicle on the road in good conditions. In poor weather or hazardous conditions, you should drive at a lower speed to suit those conditions. You must not exceed the sign posted speed limit even when overtaking.

Learner and provisional licence holders
There are no specified reduced speed limits in Queensland for learner or provisional licence holders. You may drive according to the speed limit for the area in which you are driving.

In a built-up area
The default speed limit on a road in a built-up area is 50 km/h. This means you may only drive at a maximum speed of 50 km/h in a built-up area, unless you see a speed limit sign on the road showing a different speed limit. Not all roads in a built-up area will have a speed limit sign on them. In that case, you should only drive at a maximum speed of 50 km/h until you pass a speed limit sign showing a different speed limit. A built-up area includes any area where there are buildings on land next to a road, or street lighting, at intervals of not more than 100 m, for a distance of 500 m. If the road is less than 500 m long, it includes the whole road. This includes roads in residential, commercial and industrial areas.

Outside a built-up area
The default speed limit on a road outside a built-up area is 100 km/h unless otherwise signed. On a small number of higher standard roads, you may be allowed to drive at a maximum speed limit of 110 km/h, but only if a speed limit sign on the road shows that speed limit.

68

A speed zone is always defined by a speed limit sign at the start of the zone and another speed limit sign showing a different speed limit at the end of the zone.Heavy vehicles over 12 tonne GVM or buses over 5 tonne GVM are restricted to travelling at a maximum speed of 100 km/h. you should not drive any faster than the default speed limit on the other road until you see a speed sign showing a different speed limit. See also Warning signs. page 104. These different speed limits may be shown by special speed limit signs that may be electronically controlled. page 61. An example of a variable speed zone is a school zone. should be through the curves ahead. and is usually 40 km/h or 60 km/h. the speed limit shown on the last speed limit sign before you enter the school zone still applies. in good driving conditions. This speed limit only applies on school days between the hours shown on the sign. These signs have different colours to the normal speed limit signs. Specific speed zones A length of road that has a specific speed limit applying to it is known as a speed zone. Warning sign with advisory speed limit This sign tells you what the recommended speed. read the time and read your speed. The maximum speed limit in a school zone may be shown either by normal school zone signs or by special electronic signs. School zone hours and speed limits may differ between schools. regardless of any higher speed limit that may be shown—see Speed limiters. If you turn off this road into another road before you see another speed limit sign. 69 . page 60. so read the sign. Variable speed zones A variable speed zone has different speed limits applying in the zone at different times of the day or days of the week. It is placed where extra caution is needed and where the speed of your vehicle should be reduced temporarily. At any other time. See also Speed limit signs.

D. D. the more time and space you need to stop increasing speed also increases the severity of crashes driving too fast around a corner can cause you to lose control of your vehicle all of the above. 70 km/h 80 km/h 50 km/h 60 km/h 5. C. 4. You can only turn right for the next 40 km. 2. D. 3. Children’s crossing—slow down. You must travel more than 60 km/h. when you have a good excuse. B. when you are overtaking a slower moving vehicle. as long as you do not go over the speed limit by 10 km/h. B. What does this sign mean? (See page 69) A. Yes. C. C.Sample questions—speed limits 1. What does this sign mean? (See page 68) A. Winding road for next 40 km. Yes. B. D. You are on Highway 60. What is the maximum speed limit (unless otherwise sign-posted) in a built-up area? (See page 68) A. You must not travel more than 60 km/h. No. the faster you drive. 40 km/h is the legal maximum speed limit for the curve ahead when the road is wet. C. B. 40 km/h is the advised maximum speed to travel around the curve ahead under good conditions. Yes. Can you legally drive over the speed limit? (See page 68) A. Speeding is dangerous because: (See page 68) A. 70 . C. B. D.

drive up to the intersection. Left turns  If turning left at an intersection. position your vehicle so you are close to the far left side of the road. Right turns When turning right into a two-way road. follow the turn lines When turning right from a one-way street. you must make the turn as indicated by the arrows 71 .Making turns Turning Before you turn you must indicate for long enough to tell other road users.  If there is a slip lane. If the road is marked with turn lines to show the path to take when turning. you must approach and enter the intersection from within the left lane unless:  there is a slip lane for left turns  there is an obstruction in the left lane  road markings allow the turn to be made from another lane Turning left on a multi-lane road with traffic arrows  your vehicle is showing a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign. keeping your vehicle close to the right and parallel to the side of the road When turning right from a one-way street. the left turn must be made from the slip lane. When you turn left at an intersection from a multi-lane road. keep left of the centre of the road you enter.

Give way rules apply. unless there is a sign that states you can. Tips—Turning When turning:  check your road position  check the position of approaching traffic  check the road markings  check traffic signs  check the direction of traffic  obey the give way rules  give way to pedestrians  make sure your entry position is correct. You can make a U-turn if:  you have a clear view of approaching traffic  you give way to all traffic and pedestrians  you can safely make a U-turn without obstructing the free movement of traffic  there are no signs or road markings prohibiting a U-turn.Turning right at unmarked intersections When you turn right from a two-way road at an unmarked intersection. 72 . Do not make a U-turn at traffic lights. U-turns You must only make a U-turn when necessary. pass to the right of the centre of the intersection unless turn lines indicate differently. You must not drive on or over a painted island surrounded by one continuous line if the island is at a merge point and separates vehicles travelling in the same direction or if the island separates parts of a road to create a slip lane. Turning across painted traffic islands You may drive on or over a painted island surrounded by one continuous line for up to 50 m to enter or leave the road or to enter a turning lane that begins immediately after the painted island.

give way to vehicles already on the roundabout 3. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout 4. you may drive in any of the directions 4. Driving on a roundabout with marked lanes To make a left turn at the roundabout: 1.  Follow the road arrows and direction signs. To drive straight ahead at the roundabout: 1. you may drive in any of the directions 5. enter the roundabout from the left marked lane or line of traffic 3. drive in the direction of the arrows.Roundabouts  Drive clockwise around the roundabout. If the arrows indicate two or more directions. continue to signal left as you exit the roundabout 6. 73 .  Drive within marked lanes. If the arrows indicate two or more directions. signal left as you enter the roundabout 2. This sign means that you are approaching a roundabout This sign means that you must give way to all vehicles on the roundabout  Indicate when you are going to change lanes. signal left as you exit the roundabout 5. turn off your indicator after you have left the roundabout. turn off your indicator after you have left the roundabout. drive in the direction of the arrows. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane. enter the roundabout from the left or right lane or line of traffic (do not use your indicator as you enter the roundabout when going straight ahead) 2.

Giving way at roundabouts At a roundabout you must give way to vehicles already on the roundabout. If the arrows indicate two or more directions. signal right as you enter the roundabout and continue to signal right while driving on the roundabout 2. signal left as you exit the roundabout 6. In this situation. if traffic lane arrows apply to the lane. turn off your indicator after you have left the roundabout. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout 4. the path taken by vehicle 1 is illegal. vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1. drive in the direction of the arrows. unless traffic lane arrows indicate otherwise. In this diagram. enter the roundabout from the right marked lane or line of traffic 3. . you may drive in any of the directions 5. Also watch out for large trucks as they may need more space to complete their manoeuvre. Cyclists may travel around the roundabout in either lane to exit more than halfway around but when in the left lane must give way to vehicles exiting the roundabout. Only use the left lane to leave the roundabout halfway around or earlier.To make a right or U-turn at the roundabout: 1. Tips—Roundabouts 74 Keep a special look out for motorbike riders and cyclists as they can be hard to see. Lane changes are permitted on roundabouts as long as they are conducted legally and safely. because vehicle 1 is already on the roundabout.

You must give the change of direction signal for long enough to give sufficient warning to other drivers and pedestrians. 75 . About to stop or slow down About to turn. If the continuing road at a T-intersection bends to the left or right. move right or make a U-turn—use indicators or hand signal  turn left or move left—use indicators only (there is no left hand signal). Do not use hand signals to tell drivers behind to overtake—this can be dangerous. Turn off your indicator after you have done the manoeuvre. Vehicle must indicate right if the continuing road curves to the left Vehicle must indicate left if the continuing road curves to the right Hand signals There are two official hand signals.Indicating and signalling You must signal your intention to:  stop or slow down—use brake lights or a hand signal  turn right. move right or make a U-turn Using hand signals is the only time when part of your body may protrude outside the vehicle. you must indicate left or right if you are turning off the continuing road and going straight ahead. You must signal for at least five seconds when moving off from a parked position.

B. You must enter and leave the roundabout in the left lane. D. 2. then car C. What lane must you take? (See page 73) A. B. then car C. 3. C. When are you allowed to sound your horn? (See page 76) A. Car B. then leave by the right lane. then car B. car B is turning right. 4. then car A. Cars A and C are travelling straight ahead. You can do a U-turn at an intersection with traffic lights: (See page 72) A. You may enter and leave the roundabout in either lane. then car A. B.00 pm and 6. roundabouts and signalling 1. You must move to the left lane before the roundabout. Car C.00 am if there is no oncoming traffic if the traffic lights are green only when there is a U-TURNS PERMITTED sign. D. In what order should they go through the roundabout? (See page 74) A. then car A.Using your horn You may only use the horn of your vehicle to warn other road users of your approach or the position of your vehicle. between 9. B. D. At anytime. C. To warn others of your approach. then car B. Only in a built-up area. D. Car B. You are driving your vehicle towards a multi-lane roundabout. Sample questions—turns. Car A. You must enter and leave the roundabout in the right lane. then car C. You want to travel straight through the roundabout to the road opposite. C. 76 . C. To say good-bye to friends.

stop. or where vehicles on the other road have priority. If you turn at the intersection. for a driver or pedestrian means:  if a driver or pedestrian is stopped—remain stationary until it is safe to proceed  in any other case—slow down and. you must slow down or. stolen or knocked down. e. you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering. STOP lines and GIVE WAY lines on the road have the same meaning as STOP signs and GIVE WAY signs.g. stop to avoid a collision. if necessary. in case a sign is missing. if necessary. You must then give way to vehicles approaching. Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1 Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1 77 .Giving way Give way. Learners will be tested in detail about giving way. Give way rules are designed to allow road users and pedestrians to move predictably without the danger of a crash. Drivers who don’t give way are dangerous to themselves and other road users. This also applies at railway level crossings. GIVE WAY signs When you face a GIVE WAY sign or GIVE WAY line at an intersection. so learn every rule before taking the written test. entering or on the intersection. GIVE WAY and STOP GIVE WAY and STOP signs are placed at intersections where extra care is needed because of limited visibility.

Vehicle 2 must stop and give way to vehicle 1 Giving way at GIVE WAY and STOP signs When two or more drivers face each other at STOP or GIVE WAY signs at an intersection. you must bring your vehicle to a complete stop just behind the STOP line. STOP signs When you face a STOP sign or STOP line. If you turn at the intersection. entering or on the intersection. they must first give way to all other vehicles and pedestrians. vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 because vehicle 1 is turning right across vehicle 2’s path After both vehicles have given way to all other vehicles and pedestrians. They then apply the give way rules—see also Giving way to the right on page 79. If there is no STOP line. After both vehicles have stopped and given way to all other vehicles.Do not drive past a GIVE WAY sign on a narrow section of road when a vehicle is approaching. you must give way to the traffic already in the lane you are moving to. you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering. you should stop where you have a clear view of the intersection before entering it. vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1 because it is turning right across vehicle 1’s path Giving way when changing lanes When you are changing lanes. You must give way to vehicles approaching. 78 .

page 72. Example 2 If your lane comes to an end. you must give way to all vehicles on your right if they are approaching. you must give way to traffic already in the lane you are moving to. Giving way when making a U-turn You must give way to all vehicles and pedestrians when you make a U-turn—see U-turns.Giving way to the right In all these situations. In example 2. Vehicle 1 must wait for vehicle 2 to pass before making the U-turn 79 . vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 When you come to a crossroad intersection. Vehicle B gives way to vehicle A. In example 1. entering or on the intersection. you must give way to any vehicle that is ahead of you. However. Vehicle A gives way to vehicle B. you do not have to give way to vehicles:  coming from the opposite direction and turning right at the intersection  making a U-turn  facing a STOP or GIVE WAY sign. Giving way when merging Example 1 When lines of traffic merge.

you must give way to all bicycles and pedestrians on the slip lane and all vehicles on the road you are entering.Giving way to emergency vehicles You must do everything practical to give way to an emergency vehicle sounding a siren. Vehicle 1 may continue without giving way 80 . page 130. if the bus is signalling to enter traffic from:  a bus stop bay Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus leaving a bus stop in a specially constructed bus bay  the shoulder of the road Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus moving away from the road shoulder or the left side of the road  the bus zone or bus stop Vehicle 1 gives way to a bus leaving a bus zone or a bus stop Giving way from a slip lane with or without a TURN LEFT AT ANY TIME WITH CARE sign at the intersection When you drive onto a road from a slip lane with or without a TURN LEFT AT ANYTIME WITH CARE sign on it. Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 3. when you are in a built-up area and in a 70 km/h or less zone. Giving way to buses You must give way to a bus ahead of you with this sign on its right-hand rear side. bell or flashing warning lights—see also Emergency vehicles.

Giving way at a T-intersection A T-intersection consists of two roads where one road continues through the intersection and the other road ends at the intersection. If you are driving on the road that ends at a T-intersection. Tips—Reversing You should take extra care when reversing near intersections. If you are on the road that ends at a T-intersection and a vehicle on the road continuing through the T-intersection faces a STOP or GIVE WAY sign. Reversing You may reverse only when it is safe to do so and only as far as is reasonable. entering or on the intersection. you do not have to give way to that vehicle. Vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1. In both situations. the vehicle must give way to the pedestrian and wait until the pedestrian has crossed before turning 81 . you must give way to all vehicles travelling on the road continuing through the intersection if they are approaching. Giving way to pedestrians When you turn at an intersection. you must give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering.

you don’t have to give way to a vehicle if it is:  oncoming. page 133. entering or already on the intersection and are:  not turning at the intersection  turning left at the intersection. 82 . you must not overtake the stopped vehicle. However. For more information about sharing the road with pedestrians. If a vehicle has stopped to give way at a pedestrian or children’s crossing. You must give way if you are turning across the path of a vehicle. you must give way to vehicles coming from the opposite direction if they are approaching. vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1 If you are turning right at an intersection. Giving way when turning right In both cases.Giving way at pedestrian crossings You must give way to pedestrians on a pedestrian crossing or pedestrians on or entering a children’s crossing. see Sharing with other road users—pedestrians. and it is also turning right  driving on to the road from a slip lane  making a U-turn  facing a STOP or GIVE WAY sign.

You must signal for at least five seconds—see Parking. Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 3 coming on the right Vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 on the right.Giving way when entering or leaving a road You must give way to vehicles. stop your vehicle and turn off the engine. In both cases. You should drive to the side of the road. Giving way at a railway level crossing When you face a GIVE WAY or STOP sign or line at a level crossing. Vehicles 1 and 3 are not required to give way to any other vehicle. by raising a hand and pointing to the horse. Keep the engine off and the car stopped until there is no reasonable chance that the noise of the engine or movement of your vehicle will further upset the horse. bicycles and pedestrians when leaving land to enter a road. you must give way. or entering land from a road. page 114. Vehicle 2 does not have to give way to any other vehicle. 83 . page 95. Vehicles 2 and 3 are not required to give way to one another as their paths will not cross Giving way from a parked position Give way to all other vehicles when you drive out of a parking area on the side of the road or in a median strip. Vehicle 3 must give way to vehicle 1 on the right. you must give way to a train approaching the level crossing—see Railway level crossings. you must combine the give way rules. vehicle B must give way to vehicle A and the pedestrian before turning Giving way when there are multiple vehicles When there are more than two vehicles at an intersection. Giving way to horses When a person in charge of a horse that appears to be hard to control gives a signal.

Car B has to give way to you as you are travelling ahead of it. Car 2 2.Sample questions—giving way 1. then car 2. pedestrians are about to enter the crossing. D. B. You are driving car A in a 100 km/h speed zone. 4. Which is correct? (See page 79) A. C. then car 3. then car 1 Car 3. pedestrians have left the crossing and there is no one about to enter the crossing C. In what order should the cars go through the intersection? (See page 78) A. Car 1 B. You are stopped at a children’s crossing displaying orange flags. You have to give way to car B as you are moving into its lane. pedestrians are not in your vehicle’s path B. C. then car 1 Car 3. then car 1. Car B has to give way to you as it is in the right lane. Car 1 B. Car 1. then car 2 3. B. You can drive on when: (See page 134) A. Which car goes first? (See page 77) A. then car 2. Which car must give way? (See page 79) A. Car 2 5. then car 3 Car 2. 84 . Your lane ends and you need to change lanes (there are line markings).

You are allowed to cross a dividing line that has a broken line to the left of a continuous line to overtake a vehicle. However. lane lines are continuous (B) close to a controlled situation.Road positioning Lanes Lane markings There are four types of lane markings that indicate where you must travel on the road:  lane lines  dividing lines or centre lines  edge lines  arrows. In each case. You are allowed to cross a dividing line that has a continuous line to the left of a broken line to enter or leave a road. You are allowed to cross a single continuous dividing line to enter or leave a road. such as traffic lights or a STOP sign. Dividing lines or centre lines You are allowed to cross a single broken dividing line to overtake a vehicle. to do a U-turn or to enter or leave a road. You must not cross a continuous line to the left of a broken line to overtake a vehicle or to do a U-turn. to do a U-turn or to enter or leave a road. You must not cross a single continuous dividing line to overtake a vehicle or to do a U-turn. entering or leaving a road includes turning from one road into another road and entering or leaving private property. You can cross broken lines to turn or overtake with caution. You must not cross a dividing line that has two continuous lines. You must not cross continuous lane lines. 85 . Lane lines Lane lines are usually broken (A).

Overhead lane control This sign is used above roads. you must drive only in the direction of the arrows. there are certain times when you can drive on or over a continuous white edge line for up to 100 metres only. These are:  turning at an intersection  entering or leaving the road  stopping at the side of the road. Arrows In a lane marked with arrows. taxi or limousine. You must not drive in a lane with the red X above it. In addition to the above. Bus lane You must not drive in a bus lane unless you are driving a bus. Special purpose lanes Some lanes are for use only by certain vehicles.Edge lines You must not drive on or over a continuous white edge line unless you are:  overtaking a vehicle that is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road  driving a slow moving vehicle  driving a vehicle that is too wide or long to fit within the marked lane to the left of the centre line. even to overtake another vehicle. Please note that a driver turning left from a multi-lane road must turn from within the marked lane (or lanes in the case of a long vehicle). the left turn must be made from the slip lane. or riding a bicycle. Transit lane You must not drive in a transit lane during the hours of operation (the hours will be marked on the transit lane sign) unless you are driving a vehicle with a minimum number of people specified by the sign 86 . If there is a slip lane however.

When you drive on a multi-lane road where the speed limit is more than 80 km/h. 87 . you must not travel in the far right lane unless you are:  overtaking  turning right  making a U-turn  avoiding an obstacle  entitled to drive in that lane because of an official traffic sign  driving in congested traffic.(including the driver). the basic rule is keep as close as practical to the left. Exemptions for driving in special purpose lanes You may drive in a bicycle lane for up to 50 m and all other special purpose lanes for up to 100 m to:  enter or leave a road  overtake a vehicle that is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road  enter a marked lane or line of traffic from the side of the road. You could be fined for driving in the right-hand lane. Bicycle lane Bicycle lanes are intended for use by cyclists.  Transit lane T2—at least 2 people  Transit lane T3—at least 3 people. or riding a bicycle or motorbike. You may stop or park in a marked bicycle lane unless there are signs or road markings prohibiting you from doing so. You must give way to bicycles when stopping or parking. or you are driving a bus. Keeping left When you drive on a two-way road. taxi or limousine.

Follow these steps for safer overtaking. 5. Check behind for other vehicles. 8. Check ahead for approaching traffic and other vehicles. 10. Turn off right indicator. Overtaking more than one vehicle at a time increases your risk of a crash. 6. do not speed up. 1. Signal left as you move ahead and clear of the vehicle you are overtaking. You may overtake a vehicle only if you have a clear view of any approaching traffic and you can do it safely. 2. 3. You can overtake a vehicle on the left if the vehicle is stationary and it is safe to do so 88 You can overtake a vehicle on the left on a multi-lane road if it is safe to do so You can overtake a vehicle on the left if the vehicle is turning right and it is safe to do so . 4.Overtaking Overtaking on the right The basic rule is that you overtake on the right. and the overtaking vehicle is crossing the centre of the road. 9. Accelerate and move right but do not exceed the speed limit. Signal right to give sufficient warning to other road users. 7. If you are being overtaken When you are being overtaken. Keep a safe following distance behind—see Safe following distance. Turn off left indicator. page 136. Move back to the left lane or line of traffic as soon as it is safe. Overtaking on the left You can overtake a vehicle on the left if:  you are driving on a multi-lane road and the vehicle can be safely overtaken in a marked lane to the left of the vehicle  the vehicle is turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road and is indicating right  the vehicle being overtaken is stationary and it is safe to do so.

page 132. Overtaking long vehicles You must not overtake a vehicle displaying a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign if the vehicle is signalling its intention to turn left or right.Overtake correctly or the results could be fatal. Overtaking cyclists You must leave a safe distance between your vehicle and a cyclist when you are overtaking or passing—see Sharing with other road users—Cyclists.  You must not overtake another vehicle going in the same direction when you have passed this sign. 89 . unless you can do it safely. NO OVERTAKING ON BRIDGE You must not overtake any vehicle on a bridge where a NO OVERTAKING ON BRIDGE sign appears. consider:  Is it necessary? Could I wait?  Is it safe? Can I see ahead? What is happening behind?  Is it legal? What are the road markings? What is my speed? Overtaking or passing NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING  You must not drive past this sign when a vehicle is approaching from the opposite direction. Before overtaking. page 130. A long vehicle on a multi-lane road may use the left-hand lane or the marked lane next to the left lane to turn left—see Sharing with other road users—Heavy vehicles.

as you enter a motorway. On a motorway you must:  be prepared to give way to vehicles already on the motorway as you enter along the on-ramp  not stop except in an emergency or if you break down. continue to the next exit. use the emergency lane or bay and switch on your hazard lights  not travel in the emergency lane  not make U-turns  not drive in the right lane unless overtaking. If you must stop. WRONG WAY—GO BACK. look for a gap between the vehicles in the closest lane and safely build up speed on the on-ramp so you enter at the motorway traffic’s speed.Motorway/highway driving Motorways and highways are divided roads designed for fast-moving vehicles. stop and reverse back when it is safe to do so—you are on an exit ramp.  Be ready and in the correct lane as your exit approaches.  Watch for other vehicles entering the motorway from an on-ramp and adjust your speed to allow them to enter safely.  If you miss your exit. 90 . avoiding an obstruction or travelling in congested traffic  check behind and signal before you overtake  signal for long enough to give sufficient warning to other road users before you change lanes  enter the exit lane and slow to the appropriate speed when you are about to leave the motorway. Tips—Motorway driving  Plan your route before you enter a motorway. For safety reasons.  When entering the motorway. Most motorway entrances list the vehicles not allowed to travel on the road. If you face the sign. slower vehicles and pedestrians are not allowed on these roads.

Turn right or go straight ahead. C. What must you do? (See page 89) A. Sound your horn and quickly pass the truck on the left before it turns. The truck is displaying a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign and is in the second lane from the left side of the road. You also want to turn left. D. 4. B.Sample questions—road positioning 1. B. To overtake a vehicle in front. To do a U-turn. Straight ahead only. D. B. Not at all 25 m 50 m 100 m 3. Indicate and quickly pass the truck on the right-hand side before it turns. You are driving behind a truck that is signalling and starting to turn left. vehicles on the freeway should give way to you C. You are driving car 1. In what direction must you travel? (See page 86) A. stop and wait for a gap. When entering a freeway using an on-ramp: (See page 90) A. What distance are you allowed to drive in a special purpose lane. D. 91 . D. C. Not at any time. 5. Where the road is marked with two continuous dividing lines. when may you cross the double lines? (See page 85) A. Use the far left lane to pass the truck and turn left. Turn right only. To turn into a driveway. B. Turn left only. C. allow the truck to complete its turn before you turn left. not being a bicycle lane when entering or leaving a road? (See page 86) A. C. 2. If it is unsafe to overtake. give way to vehicles on the freeway and adjust your speed accordingly B.

only your reaction to them.  Drive to suit the changed road conditions. ensuring a safe.  Keep to the reduced speed limit throughout the roadworks. Safety around roadworks Driving safely through roadwork sites requires road users to reduce speed and increase attention. Always follow road signs and traffic controller instructions. au or the website of the relevant local authority to see if any roadworks are identified along the route of your trip. Roadwork signs Roadwork signs are provided to ensure everyone’s safety.  Observe the roadworks signs. If you don’t see someone working there. Be prepared for changed road conditions and slow down if required.racq. Be patient. remember you can’t control the traffic conditions.  Stay calm.  Expect the unexpected.  Keep an eye out for roadworkers. The ROADWORK AHEAD sign gives advance warning of roadwork sites. more efficient and more convenient road network. they may be out of view. traffic barriers. construction equipment and roadworkers. and are enforceable and regulated by law.Hazardous localities Roadwork sites Roadworks improve the roads for everyone.  Be alert.  Plan your trip ahead to ease any delays—check the RACQ website at www. Disobeying roadworks signs means:  you are committing an offence. 92 .  Consider using an alternative route. When travelling through roadworks.com.  Ensure you are in the correct lane to avoid last minute lane changes.  Keep a safe distance between your vehicle and other vehicles. which may lead to fines and licence demerit points  you may be liable for damage caused to roadwork equipment and materials  your insurance claim may be void  vehicles may be damaged by loose stones and gravel.

The STOP/SLOW bat is used by a traffic controller. The PREPARE TO STOP and SIGNALS AHEAD signs give advance warning of temporary traffic signals. The SPEED LIMIT sign is used at roadworks to create a temporary speed zone. Drive with due care and attention for your own and roadworkers’ safety. 93 . This multi-message sign warns motorists that there are roadworkers ahead on or adjacent to the road. Do not overtake other vehicles when approaching the traffic controller. The TRAFFIC CONTROLLER AHEAD/PREPARE TO STOP sign gives advance warning that traffic may be required to stop in compliance with the directions of a traffic controller. and imposes a speed limit that applies until the next speed limit sign. You must stop at a safe distance from the traffic controller and wait when facing a STOP bat. You are required to reduce speed to. This multi-message sign gives advance warning of roadwork sites. and indicates the speed limit that applies until the next speed limit sign. or below the speed limit indicated. This sign is only used while workers are in the area. and imposes a speed limit that applies until the next speed limit sign. or below the speed limit indicated. You MUST obey all speed limit signs. You may proceed with caution when faced with a SLOW bat.The WORKERS sign is a temporary sign that warns motorists that there are roadworkers ahead on or adjacent to the travelled path. It is only used when a traffic controller is on duty. You are required to reduce speed to. This multi-message sign gives advance warning that traffic may be required to stop in compliance with the directions of a traffic controller.

The ROAD PLANT AHEAD sign is used at work sites where machinery is working on the roadway. The LINE MARKERS ON ROAD and SURVEYORS AHEAD signs warn motorists that there are line markers or surveyors working ahead on or adjacent to the road. This sign is only used while workers are in the area. The ‘bars’ indicate the closed lanes. Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions. The ROAD WORK supplementary plate may be used with a SPEED RESTRICTION sign at roadworks. Take care and be prepared for plant being operated on the road without any form of delineation or traffic control. The LANE STATUS signs give motorists advance warning that one or more lanes of a multi-lane roadway are closed ahead. The LOOSE STONES sign warns motorists of hazardous road surface conditions ahead. The TRAFFIC HAZARD AHEAD sign is only used for emergency purposes to warn motorists of an unexpected hazard ahead. Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions. while the arrows indicate lanes available to traffic. Take care and drive to the prevailing conditions. Drive with due care and attention for your own and roadworkers’ safety.You should be prepared to obey the traffic signals ahead. 94 . The SLIPPERY ROAD sign warns motorists of hazardous road surface conditions ahead. The STOP HERE ON RED SIGNAL sign is used to indicate where traffic must stop when faced with a red light and there is no stop line marked on the road.

 Often hidden from view are kilometres of utilities such as drainage pipes.The END ROADWORK sign may be used to define the end of a worksite.  Loose gravel on the road surface may cause damage to vehicles. the road surface may not be safe to drive on at the normal speed. such as line markings. When roads are widened. You should be aware that roadwork speed limits continue to apply until the next speed restriction sign.  The road condition may have changed. but you may not be aware of this.  Roadworkers may not always be visible when working in the road area. Relocation takes time. electrical and telecommunication lines. many of these have to be relocated. The roadworker may be moving through the zone and needs a reduced speed limit for safety reasons. While under construction or repair. Crashes at railway level crossings are generally more severe than other types of crash because trains are heavy and fast. This multi-message sign defines the end of a worksite and reinstates the speed limit. 95 . Reduced speed limits through roadworks Reduced speed limits in and around roadworks are in place to protect the road user and roadworker.  The road surface may be uneven. You may now travel in a safe manner up to the speed limit indicated.  The road lanes may have narrowed. road patching and mowing.  Speeding vehicles are a very real threat to the safety of other drivers and roadworkers.  Some roadwork activities are mobile. Railway level crossings Disobeying the road rules near railway level crossings can be fatal. This sign does not cancel out any previous speed restriction.

warning bells or boom gates are operating  you can see or hear a train approaching the crossing  the road beyond the crossing is blocked or your whole vehicle cannot immediately clear the crossing. You must get off the crossing as soon as you can do so safely. fog. It also increases your risk of having a crash. Alcohol and drugs Alcohol Drink driving Drinking alcohol impairs your ability to drive safely. At a level crossing where boom gates or flashing lights are not installed. If you have consumed alcohol. and look both ways and listen for trains. extra care should be taken. vision. Entering or leaving a level crossing You must not enter a level crossing if:  warning lights. you must not drive a motor vehicle if the level of alcohol in your blood or breath is over the alcohol limit for your age and for the type of licence you hold or the type of vehicle that you want to drive. coordination and reflexes.  If you have stopped for a train. or stop if facing a STOP sign. 96 . Alcohol affects your judgment. You must give way at a GIVE WAY sign or GIVE WAY line to any train approaching or entering the crossing. don’t move off until warning lights (if installed) have stopped flashing.Stopping and giving way at a level crossing You must stop at a STOP sign or STOP line and give way to any trains approaching or entering the crossing.  Take extra care if the sun. vegetation or buildings obscure your view of the train tracks.  Slow down. and you have checked that another train is not following or coming the other way.

What your alcohol limit is If you are under 25 years of age and hold a learner. If you are convicted. For more information. pilot or escort vehicle escorting an oversize vehicle. or in charge of.00 (zero) Below 0.00 (zero) 0. road train. vehicle carrying a placard load of dangerous goods. you face serious penalties and consequences:  your Queensland driver licence will be cancelled  you will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a further Queensland driver licence for a stated period  you will be fined and may be jailed as well. B-double. limousine. a truck.05  high alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol in your blood or breath is equal to or more than 0. see Random breath testing. or in charge of.15. Refusing to take a roadside breath test is an offence. 97 .05 Below 0. If you crash the vehicle when driving with the level of alcohol in your blood or breath over your alcohol limit.05 Police regularly carry out random breath tests to detect and deter drink drivers. taxi. your comprehensive insurance cover will not apply. any motor vehicle If you hold a restricted licence (see Restricted licences.00 (zero) 0. If you drive when over your alcohol limit If you drive when over your alcohol limit. or a vehicle being used by you as a driver trainer to give driver training If you hold an open licence and you are driving. articulated motor vehicle.When you are over the alcohol limit There are three alcohol limits:  no alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol in your blood or breath is more than zero  general alcohol limit—you will be over this limit if the concentration of alcohol in your blood or breath is equal to or more than 0. or in charge of.00 (zero) 0. page 38) If you are driving. tow truck. you may be charged. any other motor vehicle 0. bus. or in charge of. any other motor vehicle If you are 25 or over and hold a provisional licence and you are driving. page 154. probationary or provisional licence If you do not hold a driver licence and you are driving.

See the Motor Accident Insurance Act 1994 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www. plan alternative travel—catch a taxi or public transport. Common myth: I can reduce my alcohol level by sleeping. Your compulsory third party insurance (CTP) may also be affected.au. This way they can count how many drinks they have consumed. drinking coffee. It is possible for you to have an alcohol level over the legal limit the day after you’ve been drinking.  Do not mix drugs and alcohol.You will have to pay for any damage caused.legislation.  Discourage friends or family from driving when they have been drinking.qld. Truth: The only thing that reduces your alcohol level is time.  Serve non-alcohol and low alcohol drinks at parties. This is a guide only—some people can drink less and still be over the limit. Men can generally have two drinks in the first hour and one drink every hour after that. Let people ask for a refill rather than continually topping up their drinks. Tip—How to avoid drink driving  If you’re planning to drink. chewing gum. 98 . get a lift with a non-drinking driver or plan to stay overnight. Women can generally have one drink in the first hour and one every hour after that. Standard drinks rule One standard drink of full strength beer (285ml) = One standard drink of wine (100ml) = One standard drink of spirits (30ml nip) in a mixer = One standard drink of spirits (30ml nip) Use the standard drinks rule as a guide to stay under the limit. It takes about one hour to break down the alcohol content of a single standard drink. having a shower or exercising. The majority of alcohol you drink is broken down in your liver.gov.  Nominate one person in your group as the non-drinking driver.

 Plan travel arrangements to avoid walking or driving home. around 17 intoxicated pedestrians are killed on Queensland roads. crossings or crosswalks. the risk is even greater. wear reflective clothing or reflective bands to increase visibility. mood. crosswalks or signals.  Always walk on the footpath rather than the road. if possible. a taxi or get a lift home with a nondrinking driver. Cross under a streetlight if there are no marked crossings. A group or a pair is more visible than one person. 99 . Drugs and driving Many drugs can impair your ability to drive. see Rules for other road users—pedestrians.Drink walking Many people assume walking is a safe alternative to drink driving. as close to the edge as possible.  Cross at traffic lights. Carry or wear something light in colour. If you combine drugs with alcohol. take care to ensure you make it home safely. If you are walking while drunk. alcohol also impairs your ability to walk safely and judge traffic situations correctly. They can affect your vision. walk on the left. a courtesy bus. For more information about road rules for pedestrians. However. page 125. muscle control.  Walk with a sober friend or in a group. If possible. reflexes. coordination and level of alertness.  Catch public transport. If there isn’t one. This can increase your risk of having a crash. Common myth: Walking when intoxicated is safe.or right-hand side of the road. judgment. Truth: Each year.  Don’t expect drivers to see you at night. facing oncoming traffic. It is important to be aware of the effects drugs can have on your driving ability.

or drugs and alcohol.  Never drive when you’ve consumed recreational or illegal drugs. see Random roadside drug testing. page 154. You will have to pay for any damage. then it must be okay to drive after taking it.  Avoid driving if you are taking prescription or over-the-counter medications that could affect your driving ability. can seriously affect your ability to drive safely. speed. This can occur even if you take the recommended dosage. or if you have been prescribed a medicine. speed. If you crash while driving under the influence of drugs. If you fail to provide a specimen as required or a drug is detected.  Always ask your doctor or pharmacist if the medication could impair your driving. Illegal drugs  Many other drugs (including illegal drugs such as cannabis. ice and ecstasy.  Always ask for advice from your doctor or pharmacist if you’re taking more than one medication or want to change the amount you are taking. Mix at your own risk  Mixing drugs. If you are caught drug driving Drug driving is treated as a serious offence. ecstasy and heroin) can affect your driving. Truth: Many over-the-counter and prescription drugs can reduce your ability to drive safely. you will be charged and you could face serious penalites and consequences:  your Queensland driver licence will be cancelled  you will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a further Queensland driver licence for a stated period  you will be fined and may be jailed as well. For more information. your comprehensive insurance does not apply. 100 . Police also conduct random roadside saliva tests for illegal drugs such as marijuana. Any trace of illegal drugs in your system and you will be penalised. If a police officer reasonably suspects that your driving ability has been impaired by any drug (prescription or illegal) you may be required to provide a specimen of blood for analysis.Over-the-counter and prescribed medications Common myth: If you can buy a medication without a prescription. There is no legal limit for driving with any of these drugs in your system.

What does this sign mean? (See page 93) A. B. alcohol and drugs 1. wait until the red lights stop flashing before driving on.05% 0.qld.legislation. Left lane closed.au/safety. drive on once the boom gates begin to rise B. D. You can travel at any speed if you are driving to or from work.00% 2. B. D. drive around the boom gates if you can see that the train is not close D. See the Motor Accident Insurance Act 1994 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www. 4. 101 .gov. Can a police officer stop you and require you to undergo a random breath test for alcohol when you are driving? (See page 97) A. For more information. Road workers on the road. right lane closed. No. C. Trucks must use right lane. What is the maximum blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) for a learner driver under 25 years of age? (See page 97) A. C. Yes. 0. C. 5.Your CTP insurance may also be affected. At a railway crossing. You can travel at any speed—it only applies to road construction vehicles.gov. Sample questions—hazardous localities. B. You can travel at the speed that normally applies to the road—it is only a warning sign suggesting that you slow down. when the boom gates are down and the red lights are flashing.transport. D.02% 0. right lane open.08% 0. C. visit www. T-intersection ahead. drive around the boom gates once the train has passed C. you should: (See page 96) A. D. You must not travel any more than 60 km/h. Left lane opened. What does this sign mean? (See page 94) A. 3. Only if you cannot walk in a straight line. B.qld.au. Only after a crash.

pigs or horses) 4. Note : Only vehicles 7. If driving a long vehicle (7. lights. mirrors.Heavy vehicles Maximum vehicle dimensions Height 4. reflectors. signalling devices and tyre pressure gauges). if in a road train area.6 m (loaded height of a multi-deck car carrier only when loaded with vehicles on the upper deck). the lane next to the left lane. Long vehicles Vehicles 7. unless you are driving on a multi-lane road. or on a length of road in a built-up area.5 m or longer):  you must drive at least 60 m behind another long vehicle in front of you. Vehicles exceeding these dimensions are required to operate under specific guidelines or permits. Length 12. central tyre inflation systems. sheep.3 m (except as specified below) 4. Width 2. 102 . or overtaking  you must drive at least 200 m behind another long vehicle travelling in front of you.5 m or more in length (which would include a car towing a normal caravan) showing the sign DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE may turn left from.5 m (the maximum width of a vehicle does not include any anti-skid device mounted on wheels. or partly from.5 m or more in length are allowed to show a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign. From a one-way street. the lane next to the right lane. or partly from. Does not include B-doubles and road trains. the vehicles can turn right from.6 m (vehicles built to carry cattle. which are covered by a Queensland Transport guideline).5 m (rigid vehicles) 18 m (rigid bus) 19 m (combination vehicles such as a rigid vehicle and trailer.4 m (double-decker bus) 4.

you must enter a weighbridge checking station if the station is open. timber. it should be fastened so it will not flap or sway. as well as running up a large damages bill. Incorrect positioning Correct positioning Incorrect positioning Correct positioning These diagrams show examples of the incorrect and correct way of loading a heavy vehicle. The load of a heavy vehicle must not be more than the regulated mass for an axle or axle group or the vehicle’s GVM/GCM (whichever is the least). it must be loaded or covered so that no part of the load can fall or dislodge from the vehicle during transport. or the registered seating capacity. 103 .5 tonne. It should be parallel with the sides of the vehicle as far as practical.Loading your vehicle Drivers who fail to secure loads safely on a heavy vehicle risk injuring themselves and other road users. If your vehicle has a GVM of more than 4. All loading must be fastened safely and correctly. If you are carrying a loose load such as gravel or quarry products. piping or similar material. If you are carrying iron. or if directed by an authorised officer.

Load your vehicle so you have a good view of other vehicles to the front and on both sides and. If for any reason a load or equipment falls from your vehicle. you should be aware of the difference in the height of some containers. For more information about vehicle dimensions and mass limits.ntc. with engines up to 300 hp (224 kw).gov. Parking restrictions for heavy and long vehicles If you drive a heavy vehicle (GVM of 4.5 m or more in length).au. you must not stop for more than one hour in a built-up area unless otherwise permitted to do so by signs. and all heavy vehicle drivers should have a copy. regardless of any higher speed limit that may be shown on road signs. The safest way to secure containers is by using twist locks.5 tonne or more) or a long vehicle (7. The guide outlines the safety principles that should be followed to ensure the safe carriage of loads. The guide can be downloaded from the National Transport Commission website at www. you must remove or cover any sign that is no longer required. 104 .qld.gov. OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD or SLOW VEHICLE because of a condition of a guideline. Dimensions and Loading) Regulation 2005 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www. you must remove this from the road as soon as possible. Queensland law requires all loads to be restrained to the performance standards of the Load Restraint Guide. All freight containers transported by road must be accompanied by a container weight declaration. behind. Your local government may make provision for you to stop longer than this under a local law. LONG VEHICLE. OVERSIZE.If you carry freight containers. Speed limiters are compulsory for trucks over 12 tonne GVM.legislation. please refer to the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Mass. Warning signs If you are driving a vehicle that is required to display a sign with the words ROAD TRAIN. built after 1 July 1991. using mirrors. permit or authorisation. Speed limiters Heavy vehicles over 12 tonne GVM or buses over 5 tonne GVM are restricted to travelling at a maximum speed of 100 km/h. or you are actively dropping off or picking up goods. and for higher horsepower engines built after 1 January 1991.au.

procedures and guidelines govern the transport of dangerous goods. if handled incorrectly:  explode  burn  poison  pollute the environment  asphyxiate  make explosive mixtures  severely damage skin or corrode metal  become unstable if mixed with other products. including:  consignors  prime contractors  vehicle owners  packers and loaders  drivers.Buses over 14. which may. For more information on the ADG Code refer to the National Transport Commission website. Not complying with these rules is an offence and penalties apply. Transporting dangerous goods Rules.5 tonne GVM have speed limiters fitted from 1 July 1991. The laws and rules for the transport of dangerous goods by road are found in the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Dangerous Goods) Regulation 2008 (the dangerous goods regulation) and the Australian Dangerous Goods Code—7th edition (ADG Code). 105 . Buses over 5 tonne GVM and up to 14. Any heavy vehicle driven in excess of 115 km/h will be issued a defect notice requiring it to comply with Australian Design Rule ADR 65/00. They affect everyone involved in this transport. The vehicle will not be allowed to operate on the road until all repairs/modifications have been completed and cleared by the Department of Transport and Main Roads. What are dangerous goods? Dangerous goods are substances or articles with hazardous properties.5 tonne GVM or prime movers are to be fitted with speed limiters if they were manufactured after 1987.

and the diamond label for each class. non-toxic gases Toxic gases Flammable liquids Flammable solids Spontaneously combustible Dangerous when wet Oxidising substances Organic peroxides Toxic substances Infectious substances 106 .Dangerous goods are allocated a class. Explosives Flammable gases Non-flammable. The pictures and captions below show the different classes of dangerous goods.

as a minimum. in a position that gives sufficient warning to other road users of the position of the vehicle or fallen load. These signs must be displayed if the vehicle has broken down or has lost some or all of its load. A load of dangerous goods is a placard load if it contains:  dangerous goods in a receptacle with a capacity of more than 500 L or more than 500 kg (both the driver and the vehicle must be licensed to carry dangerous goods)  packaged dangerous goods of particular classes in certain quantities (defined in the ADG Code and the dangerous goods regulation). and the vehicle or load are not visible in all directions for 200 m. or fallen load. 107 . Portable warning signs A vehicle (including a combination of vehicle and trailer) either carrying a placard load of dangerous goods or weighing more than 12 tonne must carry three portable triangular. The signs must be displayed as follows:  one triangle should be placed at least 50 m but not more than 150 m in front of the vehicle  one triangle should be placed at least 50 m but not more than 150 m to the rear of the vehicle The correct way to display warning signs if your heavy vehicle has broken down outside a built-up area  one triangle should be placed to the side of the vehicle. the correct class diamonds (see above) at the front and rear of the vehicle. red. reflectorised warning signs.Radioactive substances Corrosives Miscellaneous dangerous goods Carrying dangerous goods Vehicles transporting a placard load of dangerous goods must display.

. please contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80 or visit www.gov. For further information.qld.The national work diary All drivers of commercial buses (with a seating capacity of more than 12 adults. and work diary if you have one  complete an application form provided in the front of the work diary in the presence of the issuing officer  pay the application fee. including the driver) and heavy vehicles (with a vehicle mass of more than 12 tonne) must record driving. Standard hours Time In any period of.. working and rest times in the national work diary during any trip that takes them further than 200 km from their driver base.au/heavyvehicles.transport. 15 continuous minutes rest time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*(A) 24 continuous hours stationary rest time 2 x night rest breaks*(B) and 2 x night rest breaks taken on consecutive days 108 . The national work diary is available from any Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre. or any of the agencies listed on page 174.. When applying for a national work diary:  present your current driver licence. The driver base is the place from which you normally work and receive instructions. 5 ½ hours 8 hours 11 hours 24 hours 7 days 14 days Work A driver must not work for more than a maximum of… 5 ¼ hours work time 7 1/2 hours work time 10 hours work time 12 hours work time 72 hours work time 144 hours work time Rest And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of..

.. Advanced fatigue management Parameter Normal operating limits Operator to propose Operator to propose Frequency for exceeding normal operating limits Operator to propose Operator to propose Outer limits Minimum break in a 24 hour period Minimum continuous 24 hour period free of work 6 continuous hours or 8 hours in 2 parts 4 periods in 28 days 109 .Basic fatigue management Time In any period of. 6 hours work time 8 ½ hours work time 11 hours work time 14 hours work time 36 hours long/night work time*(C) 144 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time taken after no more than 84 hours work time and 24 continuous hours stationary rest time and 2 x night rest breaks*(B) and 2 x night rest breaks taken on consecutive days Rest And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of.. Work A driver must not work for more than a maximum of. 15 continuous minutes rest time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*(A) 6 ¼ hours 9 hours 12 hours 24 hours 7 days 14 days *(A) Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a regulated heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary regulated heavy vehicle.00 am (or the equivalent hours in the time zone of the base of a driver). *(C) Long/night work time is any work time in excess of 12 hours in a 24 hour period or any work time between midnight and 6.00 pm on a day and 8.. *(B) Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10..00 am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break..

gov. Parameter Normal operating limits Operator to propose Frequency for exceeding normal operating limits Operator to propose Outer limits Minimum opportunity for night sleep (between 10pm and 8am) Maximum hours work in a 24 hour period Maximum work in 14 days Maximum work in 28 days 2 periods in 14 days Operator to propose Operator to propose 16 hours (except NSW and Victoria) 154 hours 288 hours Operator to propose Operator to propose Operator to propose Operator to propose Normal operating limits are used to guide operators when developing everyday schedules and driver rosters taking into account all foreseeable contingencies and reflecting the inherent fatigue risks (e.transport. demerits apply to offences that have a potential .g.000 110 Other fatigue offences also attract fines and demerit points. au/heavyvehicles.500 $6.qld.000 $4. Information on these offences can be found on the fatigue management page at www. The national outer limit of 16 hours cannot be exceeded.Advanced fatigue management cont. the amount of night driving balanced against longer rest breaks). This limit is based on robust advice from fatigue experts. Fatigue offence demerit points and penalties Fatigue management work and rest offence category Minor risk Substantial risk Severe risk Critical risk Demerit points Penalty Maximum court penalty Zero Zero 2 3 $150 $300 $450 $600 $1.500 $3. Generally. Outer limits represent the point at which further work poses an unacceptable fatigue risk. and experience from current transport industry practices.

you must have held a driver licence continuously for at least three years. and includes a courtesy or community transport service. you are required to hold the appropriate class of driver licence for driving that type of public passenger vehicle. This includes ensuring that drivers of public passenger vehicles:  are suitable people. transfer or charter bus services. Passenger transport Passenger transport (or a public passenger service) is a service provided for transporting members of the public for a fare or consideration.impact on a driver’s safety. you must have held an Australian driver licence for two years of the three-year period. There are no penalties for spelling mistakes or correcting your own incorrect entry in a work diary. including failing to record work and rest. For tourist. If you drive a vehicle that provides a passenger transport service to the public. For further information about Driver Authorisation. or providing false information in a work diary. Transport Operations (Passenger Transport) Regulation 1994 and Transport Operations (Passenger Transport) Standard 2000 regarding traffic and criminal history checks and medical fitness. contact your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or Passenger 111 . or in the course of a trade or business. having regard to their need to provide for the personal safety of passengers and their property. and a Queensland Driver Authorisation. or falsely claiming to be in an accreditation scheme. Examples of passenger transport services are:  school buses  taxis and limousines  tourist services  charter bus services  scheduled bus services. drivers of vehicles that provide a passenger transport service must meet the requirements contained in the Transport Operations (Passenger Transport) Act 1994. and the public  conduct themselves reasonably with passengers and the public  are responsible drivers and capable of safely operating a public passenger vehicle  are aware of their customer responsibilities  are accountable for complying with standards. In addition to the driver licence requirements. To apply for Driver Authorisation. The purpose of Driver Authorisation is to maximise public confidence in passenger transport and to ensure the protection of children and other vulnerable members of the community.

00 pm and before 8.legislation. 60 km/h B. Sample questions—heavy vehicles 1. You must also ensure the vehicle’s doors are closed while the bus is moving. Yes. 10 m for every 10 km/h you are travelling 4. What is the minimum rest period for a solo driver of a fatigue regulated heavy vehicle. Only when road conditions are bad. No. 2. it is after 5. What is the maximum speed allowed for a heavy vehicle over 12 tonne GVM? (See page 104) A. a sign permits it. or you are actively involved in loading or unloading. C. When travelling outside a built-up area on single-lane roads (but not in a road train area).au. 6 continuous hours 7 continuous hours 8 continuous hours 12 continuous hours 112 . If you drive a school bus. D. you must flash its warning lights when children are being picked up or set down. you must not park for more than one hour in a built-up area unless: (See page 104) A. If you are driving a heavy or long vehicle. no other vehicles are close by B. 5. B. Does a school bus have to operate flashing warning lights when picking up and setting down passengers? (See page 112) A. visit the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www. 100 km/h 3.00 am C. 60 m B.qld. B. C. 10 km/h under the signed speed limit C. who has completed 12 hours work operating under standard work and rest arrangements? (See page 109) A.Transport Office. School buses School buses have flashing yellow warning lights fitted to the front and rear of the bus. or call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80. 100 m C. For more information about the legislation.gov. what is the minimum distance to be maintained between long vehicles? (See page 102) A.

Other rules and responsibilities Use of lights When you drive at night (between sunset and sunrise) or in hazardous weather conditions. You should turn your headlights on when you cannot clearly see people or vehicles. If you are caught using fog lights where conditions are not hazardous. Wearing tinted glasses reduces your vision. you can be fined $40. Keep left and look to the side if oncoming lights dazzle you. rear lights and rear number plate light must be switched on and clearly visible. You may only drive with fog lights on if you are in fog or hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility. Following distance You must drive at a sufficient distance behind another vehicle so that you can. Only wear tinted glasses at night when an eye specialist has prescribed them for night driving. you must dip your headlights when:  an oncoming vehicle is within 200 m  you are within 200 m of the vehicle ahead. you may switch your headlights to high beam or drive more slowly so that you have time to react to traffic conditions. Tips—Headlights To see better at night. page 136. stop safely to avoid a collision with the vehicle—see Safe following distance. slow down and stop until the other vehicle has passed. 113 . or where visibility is not reduced. if necessary. your vehicle’s headlights. If you are unable to drive safely. While you may drive with your headlights on high beam in a built-up area.

Parking Parking is regulated and enforced by local governments. Parking signs Signs indicate where you can and cannot park. page 102. this sign indicates you can park on this section of road for no more than two hours between 7. Parking is also enforced by the Queensland Police Service. Vehicles towing caravans driving too close together make it hard for other motorists to overtake safely. If these signs show hours or days. You must not park closer than 1 m to any other vehicle in front of or behind your vehicle. but that there are no restrictions at other times. you must not take up more than a single space. If there is no sign or line marking. park the left side of your vehicle parallel to and as close to the left side of the road as you can safely. you may park parallel to and as close to the left or right side of the road as you can safely. it is considered to be a long vehicle—see Long vehicles. How to park You must obey an official sign or line marking telling you how to park. If you tow a caravan in road train areas.g. the towline must not be more than 4 m long. 114 . If you are in a one-way street (not a divided road). heavy vehicles may be restricted. unless your vehicle is longer than the length of space. These signs may also state the types of vehicles that must not be parked in an area.5 m or longer.00 am and noon Saturday.Following other long vehicles When towing a caravan or trailer. leave at least 200 m between your vehicle and another long vehicle.5 m or longer in front of you on single-lane roads outside built-up areas.30 pm Monday to Friday and between 7.00 am and 6. Towlines If you are towing a car with a towline. directions given by the signs apply during those hours and days. e. This is called parallel parking. if your towing vehicle combined with the length of the caravan or trailer is 7. Where parking spaces are marked on the road. You must leave at least 60 m between your vehicle and another vehicle 7. You must park facing the same direction as traffic in the adjacent lane or line of traffic. For example.

controlling up to four parking bays—located on the footpath central to all bays  pay and display. The time limit is shown by the number in front of the P. These exceptions will be shown on the sign. including:  single meters—located at the front of individual parking bays  multi-bays. controlling up to ten parking bays—coupons are dispensed from a machine located on the footpath near the bays. You must insert coins even if there are coins already in the meter. Always check the traffic signs before leaving your vehicle—see Clearway. page 116. Parking in this area is free. Regulated parking Regulated parking means there is a limit to how long you can park in this area. follow the instructions. You can park anytime for any length of time. it is shown by the number in front of the P. To operate a meter or coupon dispenser. 115 .Certain vehicles (e. those belonging to local residents) may be excluded from a sign’s parking restrictions. and must be displayed on your vehicle’s dashboard. The letter P alone means there is no time limit. The sign may also show the times and days when this time limit applies. Some metered parks become clearways during peak hours. If certain hours and days apply to the meters. For example. unless you are a:  bus that is dropping off or picking up passengers  truck that is dropping off or picking up passengers or goods  motor vehicle displaying a commercial vehicle identification label  vehicle that is dropping off or picking up goods (no longer than 20 minutes)  vehicle that is dropping off or picking up passengers (no longer than two minutes). If there is a time limit. except where there is a metered space. There are several different types of metered parking in Queensland. 2P means two-hour parking.g. you can park in this section for free outside these times. LOADING ZONES You must not stop in a loading zone.

This sign usually applies in peak-hour traffic—the sign will show the hours that it applies. Park at the angle shown by the road markings for the parking space. If you park or stop in a clearway. CLEARWAY Vehicles are not allowed to stop on this section of road.g. You may stop only to pick up or set down passengers or goods for a maximum of two minutes. e. Angle or centre parking You may only angle or centre park where there is an official traffic sign permitting it. though buses. you must enter and leave the parking area by driving forward unless a traffic sign indicates otherwise. a traffic light. 116 . NO STOPPING You must not stop your vehicle at any time where a NO STOPPING sign is placed. you may be fined and have your vehicle towed away. unless the sign allows a longer time. taxis and limousines may pick up or set down passengers. You must not leave the vehicle unattended. When moving out of a centre parking area. Park in the direction stated on the parking sign. except when obeying an official direction. or if you have to stand or stop for safety.NO PARKING You are not allowed to park in this area at any time.

Prohibited parking places Unless there is an official sign saying you can. such as a cyclist. Check with your local council for details of any available parking concessions. the doors do not need to be locked and the ignition key may be left with them.000. A red permit entitles a holder to access disability parking spaces in off-street carparks such as shopping centres. On-street parking privileges are not available to red permit holders unless authorised by the council. If you are caught misusing or parking illegally in a disability parking space. unattended in a vehicle. you must check that there is no one on the road. Disability parking If you hold a current blue parking permit for people with disabilities. you could be fined up to $2. You should check with the relevant authority for details of parking concessions. you are permitted to park in a regulated parking space free of charge if the time limit specified for the space is more than 30 minutes. Never leave children younger than 16 years. or animals. if somebody over 16 years of age is staying in the vehicle. you must not park or stop:  on a road with a yellow edge line  on a painted island  less than 10 m from an intersection without traffic lights  less than 20 m from an intersection with traffic lights 117 . which is issued by the Director-General of the Department of Transport and Main Roads. However. close enough to hit your door. Queensland disability parking permits are recognised in other Australian states and territories. Secure your vehicle before you leave it unattended and if you are going to be more than 3 m away.Leaving your vehicle When you open the car door. You must:  apply the parking brake  switch off the engines  remove the ignition key  close the windows if possible (a gap of 5 cm or less from the top of the window frame is permitted)  lock the doors if possible.

. or any continuous marked centre line or double lines  where you will be in the way of other vehicles  in a mail zone  in a special purpose lane other than a bicycle lane  between the centre of the road and another vehicle already parked (known as double parking). less than 20 m before and 10 m after a children’s crossing or pedestrian crossing  less than 20 m before and 10 m after a bus stop  less than 20 m from a level crossing  on the crest of a hill or curve outside a built-up area unless the rear of the vehicle is visible for at least 100 m  within 1 m of another parked car  where you would have less than 3 m of road between your car and the other side of the road. except when centre parking  if your vehicle has a GVM of 4. wharf or driveway 118  a tunnel or underpass. you must not park it in a built-up area for more than one hour unless otherwise signed.5 m or more in length. unless necessary for safety  in a loading zone. or if you are actively engaged in dropping off or picking up goods  within 1 m of a fire hydrant or fire plug indicator  in an emergency lane on a motorway. or is 7. or if you are driving a motor vehicle displaying an appropriate commercial vehicle identification label  in between signs that mark a bus zone. except if you are setting down or picking up goods or passengers. except for up to two minutes when you are dropping off or picking up passengers or goods  vehicles moving from one road to another road. ferry.5 tonne or more. Prohibited parking places Also. ensure your vehicle is not blocking or partly blocking:  an intersection  a footpath  a pedestrian crossing  a traffic light-controlled crosswalk  a railway level crossing  a bicycle path You must ensure your vehicle is not blocking or partly blocking a driveway  a driveway or property entrance. unless this is necessary for safety  on a safety ramp or arrester bed.

Prohibited parking places 119 .

you will be given a ticket for this offence. Tips—Mobile phones You may use a hands-free mobile phone. CB radio or any other two-way radio when driving. page 161. The only exceptions are if:  you are reversing the vehicle  you are driving a taxi. 120 . page 32 for special conditions relating to learner drivers and provisional licence holders. if you are the driver. and Provisional licences. If you are found using a hand-held mobile phone while driving. see Correct seatbelt and child restraint use. even when you are stopped at traffic lights. This includes making and receiving calls and text messaging. page 21. and there is a passenger/s in the taxi  you carry a medical certificate that states you cannot wear a seatbelt for medical reasons. However.Seatbelts and child restraints Everyone in a vehicle must wear a fastened seatbelt at all times. you must drive with extreme care and attention and not allow yourself to be distracted. while engaged in door-to-door pick up or delivery of goods. See Learning to drive. Under Queensland law. You must pull over and park in a safe place to make or receive a call. A person riding a motorbike must not carry an animal on the petrol tank of the motorbike. page 163. Mobile phones Using a mobile phone that is held in the hand is illegal when driving. Animals A driver must not have an animal in the driver’s lap while operating a vehicle. The medical certificate must have an end date no later than 12 months from the date it was given  you are required to get in and out of the vehicle frequently. and you drive at no more than 25 km/h. For further information. Passengers 16 years or older who fail to wear a seatbelt will also be fined (in addition to the driver) and accumulate 3 demerit points. Demerit points will be recorded against your traffic history— see Demerit points offences. page 143 and Double demerit points. you are responsible for ensuring that every passenger regardless of age wears a correctly fitted child restraint or seatbelt.

unless you are reversing when the vehicle is parked when convenient. You cannot stop during the times and days stated. C. C. but not within 200 m of another vehicle. 5. B. you must wear a seatbelt: (See page 120) A. D.It is recommended that pets do not ride unrestrained in either the front or back seats of any vehicle. B. Yes. No. Sample questions—other rules and responsibilities 1. C. Smaller pets can also be transported in pet carriers. You cannot stop for more than five minutes to pick up or drop off passengers. 121 . D. As a driver. 4m 6m 10 m 15 m 4. Dogs should not ride unrestrained in the back of trucks or trailers. B. What does this sign mean? (See page 116) A. Yes. when travelling over 60 km/h when the vehicle is moving or stationary in traffic. You must not stop at any time. You can only stop during the times and days stated. C. D. what is the maximum permissible length of the towline? (See page 114) A. special pet restrainers for dogs travelling in utes can restrain your dog safely. B. D. Are you permitted to drive with your lights on high beam in a built-up area? (See page 113) A. You can use a mobile phone that is held in your hand when sitting in the driver’s seat: (See page 120) A. When towing a car with a towline. C. A special pet harness can be attached to your vehicle’s seatbelt. but not within 100 m of another vehicle. Pets can be put in the back of a station wagon with a cargo barrier that complies with Australian standards. 3. 2. B. at any time when you are driving an automatic vehicle at any time when the phone call is less than five minutes long when you are stopped at traffic lights or stopped in traffic only when your vehicle is parked.

travel in the same direction (that is. don’t travel against the general traffic flow)  dismount and walk your bike across a pedestrian crossing. However.5 m apart. children’s crossing or marked foot crossing  give way to pedestrians on footpaths and shared use paths—keep to the left  never ride on that part of a separated footpath designed for pedestrians. unless it is impractical to do so  when riding in a bicycle lane that is next to traffic. you are legally required to:  wear an Australian Standard 2063. People can ride bicycles on roads and footpaths unless otherwise signed. If necessary. You must not ride closer than 2 m to the rear of a moving motor vehicle continuously for more than 200 m. Two cyclists may legally ride beside each other as long as they are not more than 1. especially when there are no marked lanes. 122 .Rules for other road users Cyclists A bicycle is a legal vehicle. you must ride as near as practical to the far left side of the road.2 bike helmet. correctly fitted and fastened—it will reduce your chances of suffering head injuries in a crash by 80%  fit your bike with a working bell. If riding at night. and cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as any other driver on the road. there are also some road rules just for cyclists. page 58  keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times  use hand signals when turning right  have a red reflector at the rear of your bike that can be seen for at least 50 m.1 and 2063. These footpaths must be identified by NO BICYCLE signs. have a flashing or steady front white light and rear red light fitted to your bike that can be seen for at least 200 m  fasten any luggage safely and securely  not double anyone unless the bicycle is designed to carry more than one person and each person wears a helmet  use a bicycle lane where provided. horn or similar warning device and at least one effective brake  obey all traffic signs and lights—see Signs and signals. Local governments may make local laws prohibiting the use of bicycles on specific footpaths within the local government area. another cyclist can overtake these cyclists. As a cyclist. When riding on roads.

Keep clear of any marked foot crossings. If you are under 17 years of age. 123 . Keep as near as possible to the far left side of the intersection. you cannot accumulate any demerit points because they don’t apply to bicycle offences. Approach and enter the intersection from as near as practical to the far left side of the road you are leaving. you may receive a number of cautions before being fined. Keep clear of any driver turning left from the intersection. To make the turn: 1. but must give way to vehicles exiting from the roundabout. 2. Special rules apply to you when using a bicycle storage area. Bicycle storage areas may be provided at an intersection with traffic lights. Optional hook turn by a bicycle rider You may turn right at an intersection on your bicycle using a hook turn unless prohibited by a NO HOOK TURN BY BICYCLES sign. You may be arrested for drink riding if the level of alcohol in your blood or breath is over the high alcohol limit—see Drink driving. including:  you must enter a bicycle storage area from a bicycle lane (unless it is impractical to ride in this bicycle lane)  you must give way to any vehicle that it in the bicycle storage area  where there is a green or yellow light in front of the bicycle storage area. you can:  ride in bus lanes. As a cyclist. A bicycle storage area opens from a bicycle lane and has one or more bicycle symbols painted on the road between two parallel stop lines. transit lanes and bicycle storage areas  overtake a vehicle on the left. to make a right turn). Penalties If you are 17 years of age or older and disobey any road rule while riding a bicycle. you must give way to any vehicle entering the area. page 96. you can occupy a lane and travel in the right-hand lane where necessary (for example. Move forward until you are as near as practical to the far side of the road you are entering. While you may be required to pay a fine for disobeying a road rule.On a multi-lane road or a road with two or more lines of traffic travelling in the same direction. unless the vehicle is turning left  travel in the left lane of a multi-lane roundabout if leaving more than halfway around a roundabout. you may be given an infringement notice by a police officer.

However. Light coloured clothing can make you more visible to motorists. Go Ride past the green traffic light if you can do it safely. If there are no traffic lights on the intersection. Stop if it is safe to do so Do not ride past the yellow traffic light unless you are so close to the yellow traffic light when it changes from green to yellow that you can’t stop safely. wait until you are facing a green light before moving forward. If you face a flashing yellow traffic light or arrow. you must dismount and walk across the pedestrian crossing—do not ride across the pedestrian crossing. You can cross the road if another traffic light you are facing shows a green WALK. If there are traffic lights. 4. Obeying traffic lights Stop Do not ride past the red traffic light. walking pedestrian or bicycle symbol. Tips—Cyclists To stay safe. use lights and reflectors on your bike and wear reflective clothing or reflective wrist and ankle bands to attract motorists’ attention. you should:  check your bike’s tyres and brakes regularly  be courteous to motorists and ride in a predictable manner so that road users know what you are doing  be seen. this is a warning to use caution near the traffic light when you enter the road. and to follow the general give way rules.3. 124 . At night. give way to approaching drivers on the road you have just left. then move forward.

LOOK for traffic. unless you are in or pushing a wheelchair. Motorised bicycles fall under the same road rules as bicycles and have the same rights and responsibilities as a bicycle. skateboards and other wheeled recreational devices. lights.  Allow yourself enough time to cross the road. Pedestrians include people:  walking  using wheelchairs (including registered motorised wheelchairs that cannot travel faster than 10 km/h)  on rollerblades. if possible. crosswalks or signals. refuge or where you can see drivers and they can see you. Pedestrians We are all pedestrians at some time.  Always walk on the footpath. Carry or wear something light in colour and cross under a streetlight if there are no marked crossings.  Obey traffic signals.  Cross the road by the most direct route. STOP. page 126.  You should always keep to the left when walking on a footpath. You do not require a licence to ride a motorised bicycle and they are exempt from registration and CTP insurance. you must walk as close to the edge of the road as possible. or you are using a wheeled recreational device—see Rollerblades. or on that part of a separated path designated for bicycles.Motorised bicycles A motorised bicycle is a bicycle with an auxiliary electric motor of 200 watts output or less.  When crossing a road. If there isn’t one. page 99.  Cross the road with a group. for more information—see Drink walking. skateboards. 125 . Staying safe  Always cross at the safest possible point—at a crossing. LISTEN for approaching cars and WAIT until there is a safe break in traffic before crossing. rollerskates and other wheeled recreational devices. Riding a bicycle powered by an internal combustion engine is illegal on Queensland roads. Tips—Pedestrians  Take care if walking after drinking alcohol. facing oncoming traffic.  Don’t expect drivers to see you at night.  Do not travel on a dedicated bicycle path. A group or a pair is more visible than one person.

qld. rollerskates. see the Road user code of behaviour at www. a skateboard or other wheeled recreational devices. bicycle path or separated path.au/pedestrian.  Give way to pedestrians on a footpath or shared path.  Pay attention to others’ safety.transport. Local council laws may affect wheeled recreational devices. Rollerblades.  Use footpaths at all times or. however. You do not require a licence to ride a motorised foot scooter. if there is no footpath. and it is exempt from registration and CTP insurance. travel on a footpath and cross a road by the most direct route at night).  Keep to the far left side when travelling on a road or footpath. The manufacturer of the scooter must certify that the power output does not exceed 200 watts. These rules also apply to children under 12 years of age using a wheeled toy such as a pedal car. For more information about the responsibilities of road users. For more information about registering. see How to register a motorised wheelchair.  Do not use wheeled recreational devices where a sign prohibits their use.  Do not travel on roads with a white centre line or median strip or where there are marked lanes. skateboards and other wheeled recreational devices If you are using rollerblades. Check the by-laws in the local area. (Note: Be aware that your smaller size and slower speeds often make you less visible in traffic. page 173. extra rules apply to you. Motorised wheelchairs can be registered to an individual or an organisation.gov. 126 .Motorised wheelchairs If you are using a motorised wheelchair. by either attaching a plate to the motor or engraving it. travel as close as possible to the left. scooter or tricycle.  Do not travel on a road at night (you may.)  Cross the road by the most direct route.  Do not travel on a road where the speed limit is 50 km/h or more. extra rules apply to you.  Give way to cyclists on a footpath.or right-hand side of the road. Motorised foot scooters A motorised foot scooter is a scooter that has an electric motor of 200 watts output or less attached.

 You cannot ride where there is a sign prohibiting the use of motorised foot scooters. In addition to the rules for wheeled recreational devices:  You must wear an approved bicycle helmet. start to cross the road with care. Walk If you face a green WALK or illuminated green pedestrian symbol. 127 . do not cross the road. complete the crossing if you have started—do not start to cross the road. Caution If you face a flashing red DON’T WALK or flashing red illuminated pedestrian signal. Pedestrians obeying traffic lights Stop If you face a red DON’T WALK or illuminated red pedestrian symbol.A motorised foot scooter is a wheeled recreational device.

.

Safe road use  Sharing with other road users  Stopping  Hazards  Driver fatigue  Correct seatbelt and child restraint use  4WD driving  Towing a trailer or caravan  What to do at a crash 129 .

You must give way to. indicate. fire and ambulance vehicles are emergency vehicles. You should:  slow down  move left to give the vehicle a clear run down the middle of the road. you must move out of the path of the emergency vehicle as soon as you can do so safely—see Giving way to emergency vehicles. Do not drive onto the wrong side of the road or drive through a red traffic light or arrow to get out of the way of the emergency vehicle. when preparing to overtake—see Safe following distance. page 136. without crossing the centre line.Sharing with other road users Emergency vehicles Police. and not drive into the path of. unless it is safe to do so. Heavy vehicles You can share the road with heavy vehicles more safely by following a few simple tips. without exceeding the speed limit. Overtaking a heavy vehicle  Allow sufficient time to overtake. maintain your speed because slowing down too soon will force the heavy vehicle to brake. Changing down a gear may give you enough engine power to get past. Watch out for emergency vehicles by looking ahead and in your rear vision mirrors regularly.  Stay back at the recommended minimum following distance.  Do not overtake a heavy vehicle at an intersection when it is turning. 130 . If you cannot move left safely. stay where you are and let the emergency vehicle overtake you  not move your vehicle suddenly or make an illegal turn  not drive into the path of the emergency vehicle.  After overtaking. page 80. an emergency vehicle that is sounding an alarm or showing flashing red or blue lights. Emergency vehicles at intersections Emergency vehicles often stop or slow down when they enter intersections to check if they can pass through safely.  When it is safe to overtake. accelerate and overtake quickly. even if you are facing a green traffic light or arrow and the emergency vehicle appears to have stopped or slowed down. If an emergency vehicle is coming towards you and is sounding an alarm or showing flashing red or blue lights.

you cannot see what is ahead of it and you won’t be able to react in time.  Maintain a consistent speed when a heavy vehicle overtakes you.tmr.  If you are towing a caravan or trailer and a heavy vehicle wants to pass you. wait until the rear pilot vehicle operator signals you can overtake. page 80. do not speed up. a pilot or escort vehicle will precede or follow it along the road. the driver cannot see you. 131 .Sharing the road safely with heavy vehicles  Do not cut in front of a heavy vehicle because you will reduce the driver’s braking distance. In general. page 88. Pilot vehicles If a heavy vehicle is wider than 3. Allow the heavy vehicle to maintain speed and pass safely.  Do not tailgate a heavy vehicle.gov. An escort vehicle has yellow flashing lights and yellow/white wig wag lights and an OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD sign on its roof. the more pilot or escort vehicles it will have. If you are following an oversize vehicle.5 m. the bigger the vehicle and its load.  When a heavy vehicle is turning.  If you are behind a heavy vehicle and you cannot see the driver in its side mirrors.  Remember that heavy vehicles accelerate slowly. Pass both pilot or escort vehicles and the oversize vehicle in one manoeuvre within the speed limit.qld. keep back from the intersection because the heavy vehicle needs more road space to turn than other vehicles. A pilot vehicle has yellow flashing lights and an OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD sign on its roof.au.  Give way to buses displaying this sign (left) when required to do so—see Giving way to buses. Performance guidelines for pilot and escort vehicles and drivers are available from www. When you see a pilot or escort vehicle approaching with its warning lights flashing:  slow down  move over if necessary  respond to gestures by the driver of an escort vehicle  give way to the oversize vehicle.  Heavy vehicles that show the sign DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE are allowed to take up more than one lane to turn—see Overtaking.

gov. such as giving way.  Use your lights in poor visibility—it helps motorbike riders see you. which means reduced traffic and pollution. For more information about maintaining a safe following distance—see Safe following distance. along with the Critical areas and roads in Queensland map. left.  Motorbike riders have a right to take up an entire lane.qld. You must overtake a motorbike as you would overtake any other vehicle.  The give way rules apply to cyclists. Apply the same road rules. sharing the same rights as larger vehicles and deserving the same respect and courtesy. just as you would give way to a car—see Giving way.  Check your blind spot for motorbikes—look in mirrors and over your shoulder.au. Motorbikes Motorbike riders have the same rights and responsibilities as other vehicle drivers.  Cyclists can legally ride on any part of the lane—leave them enough room and only overtake when you can do it safely. You must give way to cyclists at intersections.  Avoid dropping oil and debris on the road—it’s hazardous to all road users. Sharing the road safely with motorbikes  Always scan the traffic for motorbikes—front. rear. Remember. as long as they are not more than 1. page 78.  Give motorbikes plenty of room—in good driving conditions. every person riding a bicycle means one less car on the road. when you share the road with motorbikes. Truth Two motorbike riders may ride side-by-side in one marked lane. Cyclists Cyclists are road users. right—especially when changing lanes and at intersections. page 136. some motorists fail to obey the road rules or apply common sense when sharing the road with cyclists.You can also get these guidelines.  Be aware that motorbikes can accelerate quickly. Common myth Motorbike riders must ride single file. 132 . by contacting The Government Bookshop at www. keep a two second gap between you and the vehicle ahead. However.5 m apart.bookshop.

so look for cyclists when entering or leaving a driveway. Watch out for children running out onto the road.  Allow a person with a disability or senior pedestrians longer to cross the road. children’s crossings or marked foot crossings—see Giving way at pedestrian crossings. Sharing the road safely with pedestrians  When driving a vehicle or riding a bicycle.  Check for cyclists at intersections.  Signal your intentions by indicating when required so cyclists can react.  If you see another vehicle stop or slow down near a pedestrian or children’s school crossing or crosswalk. you must give way to pedestrians when they’re crossing at pedestrian crossings. as long as they are not more than 1.  You must give way to pedestrians in shared zones. you must give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are turning into.  Take care driving in areas where there are children.  Check for cyclists before opening your car door.  When you are turning at an intersection. especially around where alcohol may be served. Common myth Cyclists must ride single file. skateboards. Pedestrians include people:  walking  using wheelchairs (including registered motorised wheelchairs)  on rollerblades.  Lower your speed at night and be alert for people suddenly walking out on the road. page 82. prepare to stop because pedestrians may be crossing.  Anyone can legally cycle on the footpath. especially near schools and playgrounds. rollerskates and other wheeled recreational devices. Pedestrians Always be aware of pedestrians.  Do not sound your horn at cyclists—it may startle them and make them fall.5 m apart. Truth Two cyclists may legally ride beside each other on the road.  Check your blind spot for cyclists—look in mirrors and over your shoulder. Leave a safe distance between your vehicle and a cyclist when passing or overtaking. 133 .

Speeds and times depend on the area. Children’s crossings are temporary.Common myth At traffic lights. You should always refer to the sign for hours of operation. so you must always check the sign carefully. You can identify school zones by signs near the school. Where supervised. This is usually for an hour in the morning and half an hour in the afternoon. Crossings at schools There are two types of school crossings:  single or dual children’s school crossings with CHILDREN CROSSING flags  zebra or pedestrian-activated signal crossings. Some children’s crossings are supervised by the Department of Transport and Main Roads crossing supervisors. You must wait until the pedestrians have crossed the road and the crossing supervisor has returned to the footpath. page 69. public holidays or during school holidays. Truth School zones do not apply on weekends. even when the driver is facing a green traffic light or arrow. 134 . a crossing supervisor will step onto the road and display the STOP sign. see Variable speed zones. Lower speed limits reduce the risk of death or injury to pedestrians using the roads at these times. For more information about speed limits in school zones. and are only in operation at certain times of the day when the flags are displayed. generally in the morning and the afternoon. Schools School zones Common myth School zones apply every day. Speed limits are lower in school zones on school days. drivers who are turning on a green light do not have to give way to people crossing at a pedestrian crossing. Truth Drivers turning must give way to pedestrians crossing the road that they are entering.

you must stop before the stop line and wait while any pedestrian is on or entering the crossing. The speed limit in school zones applies on weekends only. Yes. If a vehicle has stopped to give way to pedestrians at a crossing. The speed limit in school zones does not apply if there are no children around. immediately turn on your vehicle’s hazard lights B. An emergency vehicle (eg ambulance or fire engine) is sounding its siren and quickly approaching your vehicle from behind. immediately accelerate D. Only if the pedestrians are under 16 years of age. Which one of the following statements is true? (See page 134) A. The speed limit in school zones only applies to children from within that school. C. especially when the yellow lights are flashing. Buses used only or primarily for taking children to or from school display either the words SCHOOL BUS or an image of two children. 135 .If you come to an unsupervised children’s crossing. B. School buses Transporting children safely in school buses is part of school life. The speed limit in school zones applies on school days during designated times. immediately sound your horn to warn other vehicles of the approaching emergency vehicle C. and pass with care. Sample questions—sharing with other road users 1. Watch for children who may run across the road from in front of or behind the bus. School buses have flashing yellow warning lights fitted to the front and rear of the bus. The driver of a school bus must flash its warning lights when children are being picked up or set down. B. must you give way to pedestrians that are crossing the road you are turning into? (See page 134) A. D. D. If you are turning at an intersection. 2. No. move out of the path of the emergency vehicle as soon as you can do so safely. 3. C. Only if the pedestrians are over 16 years of age. do not overtake the vehicle while it is stationary. You must: (See page 130) A. The signs have black letters or images on a yellow background. You must not begin to accelerate until all pedestrians are safely on the footpath on either side of the road. You should slow down when approaching a school bus.

Stopping Safe following distance If you drive too close to the vehicle in front of you. Which one of the following statements is true? (See page 132) A. B. 136 . one thousand two’ (this takes about two seconds). held by a school crossing supervisor. 2. road markings or traffic lights. as you approach a school crossing.4. What should you do? (See page 134) A. one thousand two. what will you do if they brake suddenly? You are likely to crash. D. plus one second for each 3 m of trailer. Stop and remain stopped until the supervisor has returned to the footpath. If you wave the cyclist on. C. you should wait for them to pass. count ‘one thousand one. Slow down until all pedestrians are clear of your vehicle. Pick a mark on the road or an object close to the left-hand side of the road.  A heavy vehicle should drive at least four seconds behind the vehicle in front. The cyclist must slow down so you can continue. such as a power or light pole. 5. If the conditions are bad.  Double this following distance in poor conditions. You may be faced with this sign.  A vehicle towing a trailer or caravan should allow two seconds. How far should you travel behind?  A car should drive at least two seconds behind the vehicle in front in ideal conditions. Stop and remain stopped for children only. C.  Use the time-lapse method to keep a safe distance behind the vehicle in front. The cyclist must give way to you. A cyclist is approaching from your right. You must give way to the cyclist. You are at an intersection without signs. When the rear of the vehicle ahead passes the object. Keep far enough back so that you can stop in time. count ‘one thousand one. one thousand three. B. Time-lapse method 1. one thousand four’ (this takes about four seconds). otherwise the cyclist must wait for you.

The following graph shows how much quicker you stop if you travel at lower speeds. a car braking from 60 km/h would still be travelling at about 40 km/h. you are too close.5 seconds)  your experience and age  average deceleration of your car  physical condition of your car  braking capacity of your car  condition of the tyres  nature of the road  weather conditions  your behaviour at the time of the incident. If you hit a pedestrian at this speed. 137 . so drop back. Braking How quickly could you stop your vehicle in an emergency? The time for you to see and react (reaction distance) plus the time for you to apply the brakes to stop your vehicle (braking distance) may not be enough to avoid a crash. the further you travel before you stop. 60km/h 70km/h Vehicle speed 80km/h 90km/h 100km/h 110km/h 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 56m 71m 88m 107m 127m 150m 160 Distance in metres Your vehicle’s stopping distance is also affected by:  your reaction time (average of 1.3. If the front of your vehicle passes the object before you finish counting. By the time a car travelling at 50 km/h has stopped. Reaction distance + braking distance = total stopping distance Total stopping distance The faster you go. they have an almost 60% chance of being killed.

Ask. 4. do it now. has a loose surface or if you are travelling downhill. you should refer to the owner’s handbook to familiarise yourself with how the system operates. roundabout. Young drivers also react more slowly to avoid a hazard. so always ensure you drive for the conditions. System of vehicle control Use this system when approaching any traffic situation: 1. see page 33. Approaching speed—check your speed is appropriate. However. muddy. For information about Hazard perception testing. if you follow the system of vehicle control. 5. slippery. Reduce or increase your speed as necessary.Your stopping distance will increase when the road is wet. Gears and mirrors—if you change speed. Identify the hazard (e. 138 . ‘Is my position on the road correct for the hazard ahead?’ 3. Hazards Approaching hazards A hazard can be a physical feature or a situation such as an intersection. 2.g. Young drivers do not detect hazards as well as experienced drivers. As a driver you should:  recognise the hazard (scan continuously)  know what action to take (system of vehicle control)  act in time (give other drivers behind you ample warning). or pedestrians or animals near a roadway. Note: If your vehicle is fitted with an anti-lock braking system (ABS). That is why the hazard perception test is being introduced for drivers under 25 years of age. pedestrian). If you need to indicate. you may need to change gears. Check the rear vision mirrors again to see what other vehicles are doing. Mirrors and signals—check the rear vision mirrors to see where other vehicles are. you will always be in the correct position on the road. travelling at the correct speed and in the correct gear so you can deal with any hazard safely. intersection.

causing them to lose contact with the road surface. Tyres with inadequate tread may also skid or aquaplane in wet conditions. Aquaplaning Aquaplaning is where there is a build-up of water between the road surface and the tyres. 139 . follow the ABC plan:  Accelerate smoothly  Brake smoothly  Corner smoothly. reduce your speed and allow the tyres to grip the road. After passing the hazard. resume the appropriate speed. 7. When you are driving in these conditions. Wet surfaces and gravel roads increase the risk of skidding.6. Skidding To prevent a skid. Ask.5 mm across the full width of the tyre. tyre blowouts. Hazardous situations A hazardous driving situation includes brake failure. animals or debris on the road. apply the system of vehicle control described above. slowing down or sounding the horn. skidding or aquaplaning. In a hazardous situation. Always ensure your tyres have a tread depth of at least 1. Skidding is caused by one or a combination of these factors:  driving too fast for the circumstances  too much acceleration  sudden or too much braking or faulty brakes  loose or wet road surface  turning the steering wheel too sharply or too much so that the wheels lose traction and the vehicle skids. ‘Do I have to take some action?’ This may mean stopping. check to see if it is still safe to drive in the way and direction you planned. Evasive action—just before you come to the hazard.

you may drive in fog or other hazardous weather conditions without your headlights on if you turn on your front fog lights (if fitted)  you may only drive with fog lights on if you are in fog or hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility  use your air conditioner or demister to keep the windscreen clear  slow down—remember the signed speed limit is the maximum safe speed for good conditions  double your following distance to allow for longer reaction time and subsequent greater stopping distance—see Safe following distance. dust) Only use your hazard lights if you are driving in hazardous weather conditions and you are driving slowly and likely to obstruct other vehicles. If this happens:  grip the steering wheel firmly  do not press on the footbrake and do not apply the handbrake  do not take your foot off the accelerator  provide some additional power through the accelerator to continue momentum  compensate for the pull by counter steering. Bad weather (e. When driving in bad weather:  keep your windscreen and all lights clean  turn your headlights on when you cannot clearly see people or vehicles  keep headlights on low beam—in fog you can see better on low beam than high beam  during the day. 140 . Once the vehicle is under control:  ease off the accelerator and let the vehicle slow down gradually  look for a safe place to pull over and stop. or your vehicle is stopped and is obstructing the path of other vehicles or pedestrians. Tyre blowouts If a tyre does blow out. drive slowly with your foot on the brake for a short distance.To reduce the danger of aquaplaning:  don’t use cruise control  reduce speed. page 136. After driving through deep water. your vehicle will pull to the side of the damage for a front tyre and sway to the sides for a rear tyre. fog. This helps the brakes dry out.g. rain.

you may need to:  ease the handbrake on and increase the pressure gradually—sudden pressure may lock the rear wheels and cause skidding  change to a lower gear  use your horn and flash your headlights to warn other drivers.Animals at night Animals can be hypnotised by the glare of your headlights. If the windscreen is only cracked and there is no obvious danger. Replace your windscreen as soon as possible. Shattered windscreen If your windscreen shatters and you cannot see:  slow down and look out the driver’s window  brake slowly and. if safe. at a railway level crossing). Car stalls in a dangerous situation If your car stalls in a dangerous situation (e. If an animal is on the road:  slow down. leave it in place and drive at a reduced speed with all windows wound up. If this fails. If either the front or rear braking system fails and you are having trouble stopping the car due to reduced braking efficiency. 141 .g. Also. get help and try to push your vehicle clear. Try to restart the engine. switch on your hazard lights. Footbrake failure The Australian Design Rules require modern cars to be fitted with a dual braking system. pull off to the side of the road  fill the demister vents with paper or cloth (this stops pieces of glass getting into the vents)  wrap a piece of cloth around your hand or use the wheel brace to punch out the whole windscreen from the inside  wind up the other windows  drive at a slower speed. watch for animals on the side of the road because they may cross the road without warning. apply the system of vehicle control  be prepared to brake  flash your headlights  sound your horn (if necessary)  keep control of the vehicle and do not swerve.

stay alert at all times.  Share the driving.  Get fresh air in the car and during breaks.10.  Plan ahead—arrange stops and rest overnight. tourist spots and Driver Reviver sites when you can —see page 143. Whether you travel long or short distances.6.00 pm . Do not keep driving if you show these signs of tiredness: 142 .4. when the body is in its natural sleep period. demerit points and fines apply if you commit a fatigue offence—see Fatigue offence demerit points and penalties.  Get plenty of sleep before your trip—not getting enough quality sleep before your trip is dangerous.  As soon as you feel tired.  Collect your car later when you are not tired. How to avoid driving tired on short trips  If you feel tired before you start. If driving a heavy vehicle. Driving without sleep for 24 hours is the same as driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.  Check with your doctor if any medications you’re taking affect your driving ability. Driving while tired is a factor in one in six crashes that result in serious injury or death.  Ask someone to drive you home or pick you up. stop and rest.  Don’t drive for more than 8-10 hours in a day. Peak times for fatigue crashes are 2. consider not driving.  Check for warning signs of tiredness—see below.  Avoid drinking alcohol before and during the trip.05. page 110. Driving without sleep for 17 hours is the same as driving with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.  Pull into rest areas. Big meals can make you drowsy. Warning signs Be honest with yourself. not too much.Driver fatigue Fatigue is a hidden killer—it creeps up on drivers who ignore their body’s warning signs.00 pm .00 pm and 10.  Eat properly—not too little.00 am. How to avoid driving tired on long trips  Take regular breaks—at least 15 minutes every two hours and an additional 30 minutes every five hours is recommended.

visit the Driver Reviver section at www.  Replace the entire seatbelt assembly if the vehicle is involved in a severe crash. A child could easily be killed or injured in a crash if they are not in a correctly fitted. Child restraints It is a driver’s responsibility to ensure that a child is restrained in an appropriate approved child restraint. you are 5. Correct seatbelt and child restraint use A seatbelt is your defence against serious injury or death in a crash. 143 . Australian Standards approved child restraint. Driver Reviver sites Driver Reviver sites operate along major Queensland highways during busy holiday periods. coffee and refreshments.  Check the seatbelt is not twisted.  Pregnant women must wear the seatbelt with the lap part sitting over the thighs.  Everyone in the car must have their own seatbelt—do not share a seatbelt.  Wear your belt with the buckle low on the hip.qld. so why take the risk? Wearing seatbelts Always wear your seatbelt correctly. you must ensure that the child uses a properly fitted adult seatbelt. chest or abdominal injuries in a crash. An incorrectly worn seatbelt could cause neck. across the pelvis and below the unborn child. the sash running from the shoulder across the chest and above the stomach.tmr. and the lap part sitting across the pelvis and hips.gov. The table on page 144 specifies the type of approved child restraint required for each age group. The type of approved child restraint that you must use will depend on the age and size of the child.au. your car wanders across the road  fumbling gear changes  day dreaming  unintentional increases or decreases in speed  dim or fuzzy vision  sore or heavy eyes. and the sash above the stomach and between the breasts. frayed or loose. Once a child turns seven. For operating times. You can rest while enjoying free Bushells tea. Without a seatbelt.5 times more likely to die if involved in a crash. You never know when a crash will happen. You must ensure that a child is secured in an approved child restraint until the child turns seven years of age.

it just creates more traction. 4WD driving Driving a four-wheel drive (4WD) vehicle. A child is too tall for a booster seat when the level of the child’s eyes is above the level of the back of the booster seat. 144 . you may move your child into the next level of restraint. a rearward facing child restraint should not be used. Age 0 to 6 months 6 months to 1 year 6 months to 4 years 4 to 7 years 7 years or older Weight Less than 8 kg 8 to 12 kg 8 to 18 kg 14 to 26 kg 27 kg or more Child restraint Rearward facing baby capsule or infant restraint Rearward or forward facing infant restraint Forward facing child restraint with built-in harness Booster seat with H-harness or a booster seat with a secured adult seatbelt Adult lap/sash belt No restraint will work properly or prevent injury unless it is fitted in accordance with the manufacturer’s directions. and the child is properly restrained. Engaging 4WD does not give your vehicle super grip. A child of any age can sit in the front seat if the vehicle has only one row of seats.The rules recognise that some children may be too small or too large for a specific type of restraint. Use this guide to choose the appropriate restraint for a child.or off-road. even if the child is three years of age and large enough to be seated in a booster seat. you should keep your child in the lower level of child restraint for as long as necessary. If your child is too large to fit into a restraint specified. Drive off-road without learning the skills and you could cause damage to your vehicle and put yourself and your passengers in danger. If your child is too small to move into the next level of restraint. If the vehicle has a passenger airbag fitted. for example a utility. A child under four years of age must not sit in the front row of a vehicle that has more than one row of seats. on. A child between four and seven years of age must not sit in the front row of a vehicle that has more than one row of seats unless all the other seats are occupied by children under seven years of age. You might still slip or skid. takes different skills than the skills you need to drive a two-wheel drive vehicle.

engine and transmission fluid levels and recovery equipment. reduce speed by using the foot brake a little – if at all – to keep your grip on the road. Secure all loose equipment. such as wet sand or bitumen.  Drive slowly. including lights and safety chain—couplings must be strong enough to take the weight of a fully loaded trailer and must be marked with the manufacturer’s name or trademark and the rated capacity  safety chains should be short enough to stop the front of the trailer hitting the ground if the couplings break  loading—distribute the bulk of it over the axles. You should gain experience before trying to tow at high speed or in confined spaces. Help may not be nearby when you need it.  Avoid sharp turns. In slippery conditions. Check your tyres. Check:  tyres and tyre pressure  wheel bearings and suspension  brakes—an efficient braking system is needed for all trailers with a loaded weight of more than 750 kg  trailer coupling.Before you drive off-road. Towing a trailer or caravan Towing a trailer or caravan requires extra concentration and skill. In loose sand. 4WD vehicles are often top heavy compared with conventional cars. check your vehicle and equipment. Driving on sand Your vehicle can lose traction on sand. 145 . Before you start Ensure your vehicle and trailer or caravan are safe to drive or tow.  Do not lower the air pressure too much—check tyre manufacturer’s recommendations.  Re-inflate the tyres before you drive again on a hard surface. improve traction by slightly deflating your tyres to increase the amount of tyre you drive on (tyre imprint). Driving on slopes Drive straight up or down a slope to reduce the chance of the vehicle rolling over. Keep up your momentum and avoid spinning your wheels. Accelerate lightly if your vehicle slips sideways driving down a slope.

visit the Queensland Government Bookshop website at www. The guide can be downloaded from the National Transport Commission website at www. 3. To order a copy of the Load Restraint Guide. bark chips or leaves.ntc.bookshop. e. More information about towing is available on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website. Following other long vehicles. 146 . Provide adequate load restraint to prevent movement of the load 6. page 104.gov. page 114. 2. 5. page 102. 1. back or sides.au.tmr.  Keep left—don’t hold up traffic unnecessarily.gov. secure it properly. Position the load correctly. Drive carefully—be prepared for changes in the vehicle’s stability. How to tow safely  When turning. Use suitable restraints that are strong enough and in good condition. This is how you carry loads safely.Check the manufacturer’s towing rating for your vehicle to ensure it can legally tow the weight of the trailer or caravan. Further information about carrying loads is available in the Load Restraint Guide. page 114 for road rules specific to towing trailers and caravans. and Towlines. check the overhang is legal. steering or braking performance. 4.qld.g.  Steer smoothly to avoid swaying.gov. Continue at a steady speed or accelerate slightly until the swaying stops. steering and braking capacity. This may mean covering your load with a tarpaulin. Choose a suitable vehicle to carry the load. other road users and yourself to ensure that all loads carried by your vehicle are securely restrained. See Long vehicles.qld. Parking restrictions for heavy and long vehicles. you have a legal responsibility to your passengers. If your load overhangs at the front. especially in wet or slippery conditions. 7. If your load is light material. ensuring the load does not affect the vehicle’s stability. www.au.  Allow for a greater stopping distance and look ahead for any changes in road or traffic conditions. Restraining your load As a driver. allow additional space for the extra length and width of the trailer.au.  Avoid braking unnecessarily even if the trailer begins to sway or snake.

Light up the crash site with vehicle headlights on low beam—do not dazzle oncoming traffic . follow these three steps.What to do at a crash What to do You must stop if you are involved in a crash. stop your vehicle in a safe area near the crash scene without causing more of a hazard. page 107 . A crash resulting in injury If you are involved in a crash or are the first at the scene of a crash. get people to warn other drivers. you must still exchange details with people involved in the crash or anyone with a good reason for wanting your details. Leave a note (securely attached to the vehicle) with these details if a vehicle without a driver is damaged.Keep clear of fallen power lines . For safety. it must be reported within 24 hours of the crash occurring.Turn off the ignition in all the vehicles involved .Do not smoke—there might be spilt petrol.Carefully and with common sense. description of vehicle). Minor crash Even if the crash doesn’t require police to attend.500 or more damage to property. If the crash cannot be reported immediately. If available. safely place portable warning triangles—see Portable warning signs. the vehicle owner’s name and address (if you are not the owner) and the vehicle’s details (e. Make the crash scene safe . You must report a crash to the police immediately if:  a vehicle involved needs to be towed away  any driver involved in the crash does not give his or her particulars to any other drivers involved in the crash  any person involved is killed or injured  the crash causes $2.If available.Switch on vehicle hazard warning lights . 1. Give your name and address.g. registration number. 147 . use safety vests .

If you are in an isolated area. Do not leave the injured alone unless there is no alternative. See who is injured .Look in the vehicle/s. So if your car has broken down. Tow truck licence holders must be licensed by the Department of Transport and Main Roads to tow any vehicle from a crash or police seizure. Tow trucks There are laws governing tow truck licence holders. and it is important you know your rights when having your vehicle towed. another person who is with you may act on your behalf) about towing your vehicle from the crash. Most major populated areas of Queensland are regulated areas.Look around the scene for victims who may have left their vehicles . count the number of injured and check their injuries . Organising your vehicle to be towed  The accredited tow truck driver (or assistant) is the only person who is allowed to approach you or your agent (if you are injured and unable to make your own decisions. police.whether anyone is trapped in their vehicle .  You or your agent must sign a towing authority form before your vehicle can be towed from the crash.Do not move the injured unless necessary.2. business address and telephone number must be clearly marked on their vehicle. 3. However. Queensland’s tow truck regulations only apply to towing at crashes and seizures in regulated areas. Send for help . fire or tow trucks are needed .Call 000 for emergency services.the exact location of the crash site (use landmarks if necessary) .whether ambulance. For a full list. send someone to get help or stop a passer-by. see the Tow Truck Regulation 2009.whether power lines are down.the number of injured and types of injuries . even if you do not ask to see it. The tow truck licence holder’s name. Tell emergency services: .  The driver (or assistant) must show you their certificate. 148 . or 112 on mobile phones (if 000 is unsuccessful). it is up to you to discuss the price with the tow truck licence holder and where your vehicle is being towed.

 Make sure the towing authority form is fully completed before you sign it. The form should include full details of the cost of the tow, the cost of any storage and the address of where you want the vehicle to be towed.  A police officer or Department of Transport and Main Roads authorised officer may sign the towing authority form if you or your agent cannot sign the form. In this case, the tow truck licence holder must inform the Department of Transport and Main Roads where your vehicle was towed within seven days.  A tow truck licence holder must not charge more than the regulated towing fee for a standard tow. A standard tow includes: - loading and moving the vehicle to a place of storage (includes the first 50 km from the incident scene—a fee per km may be charged for each 1 km over 50 km) - up to 60 minutes working time (after the towing authority form has been signed) - cleaning the scene of the incident - storing the vehicle for up to 72 hours. The services provided by the tow truck licence holder are detailed on the towing authority form under the heading Fee details. You may negotiate the price at the crash site.  If your vehicle is covered by comprehensive insurance, your insurance company may pay for the towing of the vehicle from the crash, but confirm this with your insurance company.  Once your vehicle is in storage, it cannot be moved again without your permission.  The tow truck licence holder must not charge you to view your vehicle during business hours when it is held at the storage yard, or to move your vehicle near the entrance of the yard for collection.  The tow truck licence holder must do an inventory of all property in your vehicle and keep the property in storage for you. For more information about tow truck legislation, see the Tow Truck Act 1973 and the Tow Truck Regulation 2009 by visiting the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au. For more information on regulated towing fees, call the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80 or visit the department’s website at www.tmr.qld.gov.au.

149

Offences and penalties
 Enforcement  Licence suspensions  Unlicensed and disqualified driving

151

The greatest cost.tmr. date.1 billion a year through increased hospital and health care costs. The photograph. is the trauma suffered by victims and their families. Mobile speed cameras operate at sites that have been approved following a strict selection procedure. payment can be made using BPAY through a participating financial institution. which includes the recorded time. Using a radar device or in-road loops. To reduce the incidence of speedrelated crashes and to deter motorists from speeding. Fixed speed cameras are installed at locations that have a history of road crashes and are difficult or unsafe to monitor by other enforcement methods. however. Independent evaluations reveal they have been successful in these tasks. 152 . speed cameras are used on Queensland roads. Payment of speed camera offences can be made by credit card online at www. lost workplace productivity and the use of emergency services. The registered vehicle owner may then examine the notice and pay the fine or complete a statutory declaration nominating the person who was driving the vehicle at the time the offence occurred. or in person at any Australia Post office or a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre (cash or cheque only). is examined by a trained adjudicator before an Infringement Notice (Photographic Detection Device Offence) is sent to the registered vehicle owner.Enforcement Speed cameras Speed-related crashes cost the community around $1.gov.qld. location and vehicle speed. which considers:  the site’s history of crashes  validated complaints about high-risk speeding behaviour  workplace health and safety issues for road workers and police officers operating speed cameras  that the speed limit for the road has been set in compliance with the state’s speed control guidelines. Alternatively. a speed camera measures the speeds of all vehicles and automatically photographs any vehicle exceeding the speed limit.au or by phoning 13 23 90.

qld. After a vehicle is photographed. see Traffic lights. page 65. and result in high costs to the community. For more information about speed limits. the registered vehicle operator will receive an Infringement Notice (Photographic Detection Device Offence).gov. The aim of the red light camera program is to reduce the number of these crashes. seven days a week. The registered operator may then examine the notice and either pay the fine or complete a statutory declaration nominating the driver of the vehicle at the time of the offence. use BPAY or pay by cash or cheque at Australia Post or the Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centres. see Speed Limits. road accident injury rehabilitation programs and safety improvement to state-controlled roads. A red light camera is activated when the traffic light turns red. Red light cameras Crashes caused by red light running are usually serious. The second photograph is used to check whether the vehicle continued through the intersection or stopped just past the stop line. page 68. Any vehicle that crosses the stop line and enters the intersection after the lights have turned red will be photographed. For more information. 153 . Payment of red light camera offences can be made by credit card at Services online at www. a second photograph is taken one second later. Red light cameras are installed at intersections that have a history of crashes caused by red light running. Alternatively.au or by phoning 13 23 90. The cameras operate 24 hours a day.tmr. all money collected for speed camera detected offences in excess of the administrative costs of collection must be used to fund road safety education and awareness programs. After the photograph is examined by trained adjudicators. road accident injury rehabilitation programs and safety improvement to statecontrolled roads. Under the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995. all money collected for red light camera detected offences in excess of the administrative costs of collection must be used to fund road safety education and awareness programs.Under the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995.

for more information . page 96. The court may deal with your refusal to take the breath test (other than the roadside breath test) or a blood test in the same manner as if you were found to be over the high alcohol limit. Roadside drug testing allows police to conduct saliva testing in conjunction with random breath testing (RBT) or as a stand-alone check. a police officer will ask you to provide a preliminary breath test by blowing into a roadside breath testing device. 154 See Drugs and driving. the type of licence you hold or the type of vehicle that you are driving. you will have your licence suspended until the matter is heard or finalised by a court. Saliva tests will be able to detect the active ingredients in cannabis (THC). you will be charged with a second offence of refusing to supply the specimen. you will be charged and required to appear in court. The roadside drug testing process operates in a similar way to RBTs. Police regularly conduct random breath testing.Random breath testing Random breath testing helps reduce the number of drink driving crashes by deterring motorists from driving when over their alcohol limit. you will be detained and taken for further breath or blood testing at the officer’s discretion. and you will be detained and taken for a further breath or blood test. and as a driver. If convicted. and detecting drivers who do. If you are found drug driving a second time while an outstanding drug driving offence is still to be heard by a court. you will be taken to a police vehicle for a second saliva test. Random roadside drug testing Drug driving. your driver licence will be suspended for 24 hours and the remainder of the saliva sample will be sent for laboratory analysis. If the second saliva test is positive for drugs. you should expect to be intercepted for a random breath test at any time. is a serious offence. The preliminary saliva test is simple and painless and takes between three and five minutes. There is no legal limit of these drugs. If you again refuse to take this breath or blood test. If it is confirmed that you are over your alcohol limit. you will face a fine or imprisonment and you will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a stated period. you are free to go. If this test also comes back positive. speed and ice (methylamphetamine) and ecstasy (MDMA). If you are to be breath tested. If the test is positive (drug detected). If you are over your alcohol limit for your age. If a negative result is returned. Refusing to take the roadside breath test is an offence. like drink driving. you will be charged with the offence of drink driving.

Visit the Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel website. Immediate impoundment of vehicle for up to three months. The following table outlines the Queensland vehicle impoundment laws and penalties.legislation. it will still be impounded and you will be responsible of the cost of the impoundment. Even if you don’t own the car you are driving. As an owner of a vehicle it is your responsibility to ensure that your vehicle is roadworthy and drivers of your vehicle are licensed and drive safely. The only exception is where the vehicle was stolen. Immediate impoundment of vehicle for a minimum 48 hours (initial impoundment period). in which case it will be returned to you as soon as possible. or driving while under a 24-hour suspension  driving an illegally modified or non-compliant vehicle. Your vehicle can be impounded if you are caught more than once for the following offences:  driving a vehicle that is both unregistered and uninsured  driving while unlicensed or disqualified  driving with an alcohol content level of 0. Magistrate may also impose a fine. your vehicle can still be impounded.Vehicle impoundment Police have the power to impound vehicles. Offence First offence Two offences of the same kind in a three year period Three offences of the same kind in a three year period Penalty Notice to appear in court may be issued. Notice to appear in court may be issued.qld.15 or higher  failing to supply a specimen of breath or blood.au/legislation. 155 . Notice to appear in court may be issued. community service and/or jail time.gov. No impoundment. www. or may be forfeited altogether. Even if you are not the driver that committed the offence. For further information about impoundment laws. Vehicle impoundment laws apply to the driver and the vehicle that is used while committing the offence. refer to the Police Powers and Responsibilities Act 2000.

They may ask you for identification or your work diary or any other documents that assist them.Transport inspectors Transport inspectors play a major role in ensuring the safety of drivers and protecting our road infrastructure and environment. insured and meet safety requirements. and issue defect notices and on-the-spot fines where appropriate  test vehicles’ pollution levels  monitor and enforce the regulations relating to driving practices and operating procedures of heavy vehicles. An inspector in a patrol vehicle can also stop you by activating the patrol vehicle’s magenta lights or electronic horn. including tow trucks and buses  check loads are correctly secured and that vehicles are not overloaded  help investigate heavy vehicle crashes. Transport inspectors’ authority Transport inspectors have broad powers relating to intercepting and examining vehicles. Transport inspectors will identify themselves and tell you why they have stopped you. 156 . and you must assist them. Transport inspectors:  educate heavy vehicle drivers and transport operators about regulations  audit and monitor the operations of approved inspection stations and approved people  check vehicles are registered. You must allow them to examine your vehicle. You must pull over when a transport inspector indicates for you to stop. Transport inspectors can issue substantial on-the-spot fines for a range of offences. They can also report other matters for court action.

If you are successful.15 BAC  failing to provide a specimen of blood or breath when required  driving when you are over the limit and an earlier similar drink driving charge has not been dealt with by a court. or withdrawn or otherwise discontinued  operating a motor vehicle dangerously when adversely affected by an intoxicating substance. You will need to satisfy a court that:  you are a fit and proper person to continue to drive  you will not impose a risk on other road users  your inability to drive will cause extreme financial or severe and unusual hardship to either yourself or your family. Your licence will remain suspended until the charge is dealt with by a court. There are restrictions on who is eligible for a section 79E order. or withdrawn or otherwise discontinued. If you are charged with a further drink driving offence while driving under a section 79E order. and not have been convicted for drink driving or dangerous driving in the past five years. your licence will again be immediately suspended. 157 . which will indicate that you are restricted to driving during particular times and for particular purposes. you may be eligible to apply for a court order allowing you to continue to drive until the charge is dealt with by a court. A fee will be charged for this licence. However. To be eligible.Licence suspensions Immediate suspension Your driver licence will be immediately suspended if you are charged with:  driving when you are over 0. page 96. or withdrawn or otherwise discontinued. For more information. see Alcohol and drugs. you will need to be the holder of a Queensland open licence that was suspended. An X4 condition code will be placed on your licence. you must take the court order to a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre. You will need to complete a Section 79E Order Application (F4395) and lodge it with the Magistrates Court within 21 days after the date of the immediate suspension.

If you gain too many demerit points.24 hour suspension If you are found driving a motor vehicle when the concentration of alcohol in your blood or breath is more than zero but less than 0. These points are taken to have been allocated on the day the offence was committed. requiring you to choose between having your driver licence suspended for a specified period or agreeing to continue driving under a period of good behaviour for one year. For more information about drink driving laws and how to avoid drink driving. or failing to provide a specimen of breath (other than a roadside test) or blood. your driver licence may be suspended for 24 hours. 8 demerit points will be recorded against your traffic history for this offence. you will be fined and disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a stated period. Demerit points offences committed anywhere in Australia may be recorded on your traffic history. the number of demerit points that are set for the offence are then recorded against your traffic history. In addition. 158 . you will generally be given an infringement notice for the offence. If these points cause you to gain too many demerit points.15. For more information. see Drink driving. When this suspension period has ended. As soon as you pay the fine or have been dealt with by a court. page 163. you will generally be given an infringement notice for the offence. The number of demerit points varies according to the type of offence. you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—Notice to Choose. you may resume driving until your case is decided by a court. you will also be dealt with under the demerit points scheme. stating that your licence has been suspended for six months from a stated date. you will be sent a Notice of Driver Licence Suspension for speeding offence. As soon as you pay the fine or have been dealt with by a court. If convicted of drink driving. Speed suspension If you are found driving at a speed more than 40 km/h over the speed limit. see Demerit points offences. page 96. Accumulation of demerit points—Queensland licence holders If you commit a demerit points offence.

you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points— Notice to Choose. The notice will require you to choose between having your open licence suspended for a specific period or agreeing to continue driving under a period of good behaviour for one year.Learner licences If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a one-year period while you hold your learner licence. this time will not contribute to the minimum period you must hold that licence. after serving the disqualification period. You may also have a one-year late night driving restriction imposed on you—see Late night driving restrictions. or a minimum of one year. you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—Notice to Choose. You will have the choice between:  a three-month licence suspension  a good driving behaviour period for one year. If 12 or more demerit points are recorded against your traffic history in a threeyear period. after serving the disqualification period. you will get a probationary licence and will be required to complete any remaining period of your P1 or P2 provisional licence. page 160. Provisional licences If you accumulate 4 or more demerit points in a one-year period while you hold your provisional licence. you will be sent an Accumulation of Demerit Points—Notice to Choose. on this probationary licence. If your licence is suspended or you are disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence during the provisional licence period. 159 . or a minimum of one year. on this probationary licence. You will have the choice between:  a three-month licence suspension  a good driving behaviour period for one year. If you were disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a time when you were the holder of a P1 or P2 licence. If you were disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a time when you were the holder of a provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007. Open licence You may receive a warning letter when you gain at least 7 demerit points in a three-year period. you will get a P1 or P2 probationary licence and will be required to complete any remaining period of your P1 or P2 licence.

you may keep your current licence provided that you do not gain more than 1 demerit point during the one-year period. This restriction will begin the day you reapply for your licence after you have successfully completed the disqualification period.00 a. Late night driving restrictions If you are a provisional licence holder under 25 who accrues excessive demerit points or commits a high speed offence that results in:  a licence suspension period  a good driving behaviour period you will be prohibited from driving between the hours of 11.m. this time will not contribute to the minimum one-year period. or the day after your restricted licence order has been served.00 am for at least one year.m. If your licence is suspended or you are disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence during this period. If you are a provisional or open licence holder under 25 who commits an offence that results in a court ordered disqualification. your licence will be suspended for double the suspension period that would have applied had you taken the licence suspension in the first place. This restriction will begin the day after your suspension period has been successfully completed. and 5. you will be issued with a probationary licence and be required to hold the licence for at least one year. or on the day you nominate to begin your good driving behaviour period.00 p. 160 .00 pm and 5. after serving the disqualification period. Driving under a good behaviour period for one year If you choose to continue driving under a period of good driving behaviour for one year. If you gain 2 or more demerit points during this period.Open licence suspension periods Demerit points Suspension periods 12 to 15 3 months 16 to 19 4 months 20 or more 5 months If you are disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver licence at a time when you were the holder of an open licence. you will also be prohibited from driving between the hours of 11. You may also have a one-year late night driving restriction imposed on your licence—see Late night driving restrictions below. for at least one year.

in relation to the following offences:  driver of a vehicle failing to wear a seatbelt when driving a vehicle fitted with a seatbelt for the driver—3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points  driver of a vehicle failing to ensure that a passenger wears a seatbelt or child restraint—3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points  rider of a motorbike failing to wear a motorbike helmet—3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points  rider of a motorbike failing to ensure a passenger wears a motorbike helmet —3 demerit points will be doubled to 6 demerit points. child restraints and helmets Double demerit points are recorded on your traffic history for every additional driver-related seatbelt. The double demerit points scheme operates across the whole of the year and will not involve doubling of fines. 161 . see Demerit points offences on page 163. The 12-month period starts from the date when the first offence was committed.Double demerit points Recidivist drivers and riders If you are a driver or rider who is caught driving more than 20 km/h above the speed limit more than once within a 12-month period. child restraint or motorbike rider helmet offence committed within one year of a previous offence. For more information. you will accumulate double the amount of demerit points (based on the second offence) in relation to the following speeding offence brackets:  21-30 km/h above the speed limit—4 demerit points will be doubled to 8 demerit points  31-40 km/h above the speed limit—6 demerit points will be doubled to 12 demerit points  41 km/h or more above the speed limit—8 demerit points will be doubled to 16 demerit points. and will not end until a clear 12 months has passed from the date of the last speeding offence. The 12-month period starts from the date when the first offence was committed. Seatbelts. and will not end until a clear 12 months has passed from the date of the last offence.

As soon as you pay the fine or have been dealt with by a court. Accumulation of demerit points—interstate and foreign licence holders If you commit any demerit points offence. You are not eligible to apply for a special hardship order if. If you gain too many demerit points. the number of demerit points that are set for the offence are then recorded against your traffic history. and your application must be lodged in the Magistrates Court district in which you reside. at a time when you were unlicensed  you have been convicted of operating a motor vehicle dangerously. . you will be sent a notice from the Department of Transport and Main Roads advising that your authority to drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign driver licence is suspended for the stated period. You must lodge your application for a special hardship order within 21 clear days from when your provisional or open licence was suspended. depriving you of the means of earning a living) you may apply for a special hardship order if:  you gained 2 or more demerit points while driving under a period of good behaviour for one year  your licence has been suspended for six months for driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit.you were convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit.you exceeded your demerit point threshold . within the past five years before making the application:  your Queensland driver licence was suspended or cancelled  you have previously made a special hardship order application  you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a Queensland driver licence  your authority to drive on Queensland roads under a non-Queensland driver licence previously held by you has been suspended  you were made ineligible to hold a Queensland driver licence because: .Applying for a special hardship order If the suspension of your Queensland driver licence will cause extreme hardship to you and your family (for example. 162 You cannot appeal against the suspension of your authority to drive in Queensland. you will be given an infringement notice for the offence. The length of the suspension period will depend on the type of licence you were holding when the demerit points offence was committed and the number of demerit points you gained during the period.

passing or driving to right of centre of road Improper turn (other than U-turn. left or right turn) Increasing speed when being overtaken Placing or dropping injurious matter on roads Unnecessary noise or smoke from vehicle Speeding—less than 13 km/h over the speed limit Points 8*° 6° 4° 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 163 . by number of people in vehicle) Improper turn (U-turn. left or right turn) Using vehicle not in safe condition Disobeying traffic lane arrows in roundabout Operating television receivers and visual display units other than in a parked vehicle Failing to keep left in any other case Failing to give proper change of direction signal Improper overtaking.Demerit points offences Offence Speeding—more than 40 km/h over the speed limit Speeding—more than 30 km/h but not more than 40 km/h over the speed limit Speeding—more than 20 km/h but not more than 30 km/h over the speed limit Speeding—at least 13 km/h but not more than 20 km/h over the speed limit Driver using hand-held mobile phone while driving Careless driving Disobeying certain red traffic light signals Disobeying emergency traffic signs Disobeying stop or give way signs and certain other traffic control devices Failing to give way. seatbelt or restraint Driving with passenger who fails to wear seatbelt or restraint Passenger 16 years or older who fails to wear seatbelt Driving vehicle with person in or on parts of a motor vehicle not designed for passengers or goods. or in open part of a motor vehicle designed for the carriage of goods Driving with person in a trailer being towed Exceed carrying capacity of vehicle (for example. other than by disobeying a traffic sign Failing to keep left of two continuous dividing lines Failing to wear helmet.

page 161. For further information about new and existing offences. or contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads on 13 23 80. page 158. Young drivers demerit points offences Offence Disobeying high-powered vehicle restriction Disobeying late night driving restriction Disobeying peer passenger restriction Using a mobile phone while driving Failing to display or fit L or P plates Failing to produce certificate of exemption for driving high-powered vehicle Failing to produce certificate of exemption for late night driving Points 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 Note: The list of offences in these tables is not exhaustive—it shows only the most common offences. visit www.au/licensing or your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre. demerit points.Demerit points offences cont. ºDouble demerit points apply when you drive more than 20 km/h above the speed limit more than once within a 12-month period—see Recidivist drivers and riders. construction or loading Dazzling road users with any light fitted to or in vehicle Learner driving while unaccompanied by licensed driver or while not under direction of licensed driver Points 1 1 1 1 1 1 *You will also be suspended from driving for six months—see Speed suspension. 164 .transport. Offence Following too closely Failing to dip headlights Failing to have lights lit Improper vehicle equipment.qld. suspensions.gov. cancellations or appeals.

You may also be given a fine of up to $6. and you could be jailed for up to 18 months. 165 . If you are found driving a motor vehicle while your driver licence or your authority to drive in Queensland under your non-Queensland driver licence is suspended because of any of the above reasons. If you are found driving a motor vehicle while you are still disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence because of this order.Unlicensed and disqualified driving Driving while disqualified by a court You will be disqualified from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a stated period by an order of an Australian court if you have been convicted of committing:  a drink or drug driving offence  a dangerous driving offence  a criminal offence involving the driving of a motor vehicle. If the court finds you guilty of disqualified driving. page 157  been convicted of driving more than 40 km/h over the speed limit—see Speed suspension.000. the court must further disqualify you from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a period of at least two years up to a maximum period of five years. and you could be jailed for up to one year.000. Driving while your Queensland driver licence or your authority to drive is suspended Your Queensland driver licence or your authority to drive in Queensland under your non-Queensland driver licence will be suspended for a stated period if you have:  not paid any fines imposed on you by a court  gained too many demerit points on your traffic history—see Licence suspensions. you will be charged with unlicensed driving. the court must disqualify you from holding or obtaining a driver licence for a period of at least one month to a maximum period of six months. If the court finds you guilty of the unlicensed driving offence. page 158  been charged with an offence that is subject to an immediate licence suspension—see Immediate suspension. you will be charged with disqualified driving. You may also be given a fine of up to $4. page 157.

and you could be jailed for up to one year. If you are found driving a motor vehicle and you do not hold a driver licence because of any of the above reasons. you may be fined up to $4. page 54. or be dealt with by a court. If you are found driving a motor vehicle when your authority to drive has been withdrawn because of any of the above reasons. depending on the reason why you did not hold a driver licence when the offence was committed. for unlicensed driving. the penalty is currently $400. If your authority to drive has been withdrawn because of a medical reason. The penalties for driving when you do not hold a driver licence presently range from $153 to $446.Driving after your authority to drive is withdrawn Your authority to drive in Queensland on your non-Queensland driver licence is withdrawn if:  it is proven that you have a mental or physical incapacity that adversely affects your ability to drive safely  the three months residency rule applies to you—see When the three months residency rule applies. If the matter is dealt with by a court. Driving when you do not hold a driver licence You are taken to not hold a driver licence if:  your driver licence has expired  you have not renewed your licence  you have voluntarily surrendered your driver licence  your Queensland driver licence has been suspended or cancelled because you have a mental or physical incapacity that adversely affects your ability to drive safely  you do not hold the class of licence for the vehicle you are found driving  you have never held a driver licence  after completing a period of disqualification. for unlicensed driving. you do not obtain a further driver licence before starting to drive again. you may be given an infringement notice for the offence. 166 . and you are found guilty of the unlicensed driving offence. The penalty is currently $200 for the offence of driving when your authority to drive has been withdrawn because of the three months residency rule.000. you may be given an infringement notice. or be dealt with by a court.

gov.sper. A full list of offences can be found at the Department of Transport and Main Roads website www.qld. contact the State Penalties Enforcement Registry on 1300 365 635 or view their website. For more information about court imposed fines. and you are found guilty of the unlicensed driving offence. The second disqualification period will not start until your first disqualification period has been served. www. you may be fined up to $4. The aim of cumulative disqualifications is to reduce repeated alcohol and or drug driving behaviours and improve road safety by strengthening the deterrent effect (making repeat offenders lose their licence for longer). You will start the first disqualification period on the date of the first court conviction.tmr.au.000.qld. Cumulative disqualifications A cumulative disqualification period applies when you have been convicted and disqualified for two or more drink or drug driving related offences committed on or after 18 May 2008. you will need to contact your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre.au.gov. licence issuing centre or agency to get your licence back. 167 . you will not be able to apply for a restricted or work licence. Cumulative disqualifications apply to a range of drink and drug driving and some unlicensed driving offences. After serving your cumulative disqualifications. If you receive a cumulative disqualification.If the matter is dealt with by a court. and you could be jailed for up to one year.

gov.Here for Life Share what matters most at hereforlife.qld.au Drive safely Be here qtlhh 0046 .

Your vehicle  Buying a used vehicle  Registering your vehicle  Insuring your vehicle  Looking after your vehicle 169 .

garages or workshops—which have been approved to conduct vehicle inspections. You do not need a certificate for a trailer with an aggregate trailer mass that doesn’t exceed 750 kg. A safety certificate can only be issued by inspection stations—service stations. it is likely the vehicle has not been checked and you should not purchase it. As a safety certificate must be displayed on a registered vehicle from the time it is offered for sale. Vehicle history check Consider purchasing a vehicle information certificate (VCheck) to:  ensure you are paying for the right vehicle  obtain details of the vehicle’s history.gov.gov.au) provides information on vehicle fuel consumption for both new and used vehicles and greenhouse and air pollution ratings for new vehicles.  body rust or damage  windscreen  lights. It also includes a fuel consumption database for vehicles manufactured between 1986 and 2003.Buying a used vehicle Safety certificate A registered vehicle that is offered for sale must have a current safety certificate displayed in a conspicuous place. .000 km prior to sale.greenvehicleguide. the Commonwealth Government’s Green Vehicle Guide (www. gearbox. plus more ‘greener motoring’ information about how to drive and maintain any vehicle efficiently. Before you buy a used vehicle. if the certificate is not displayed. a safety certificate does not mean the vehicle is in top condition.qld. To help choose the best ‘green car’ for you. 170 Visit Services online at www. For private sellers. differential and other equipment.tmr. A safety certificate offers consumers protection—buyers can be sure the vehicle is safe to drive because it has undergone a basic safety inspection before being offered for sale. it’s always wise to have a qualified independent mechanic check out the vehicle’s engine. A safety certificate used by dealers must not have been issued more than three months or 1.au or ask your car dealership for a VCheck. A safety certificate covers basic safety functions such as:  tyres  brakes  steering  suspension However. the safety certificate must not have been issued more than two months or 2.000 km prior to sale. including whether the vehicle has been stolen or involved in an accident and that there is no money owing on the vehicle.

 If the vehicle runs on gas or has gas fittings or systems it may require a gas certificate. Registration is not proof of legal ownership. The Department of Transport and Main Roads will currently allow two individual registered operators to be recorded. further transactions for this vehicle may be authorised by either operator. Registration fees help fund the development and maintenance of the road network. the person must be 18 years or older. The person in whose name a vehicle is registered is the ‘registered operator’.  The safety certificate is still valid.  The issuing approved inspection station’s name is on it. You must notify any change of address within 14 days. If the vehicle is a heavy vehicle. For enquiries. You can only register a vehicle in Queensland if its garage address (where it is based or from where it regularly operates) is in Queensland. The registered operator must be a person or other legal entity. including driving and parking. This person is responsible for its operation on the road.  An independent mechanic has inspected the vehicle.  Ensure a transfer application is complete and signed by yourself and the seller and lodge it with the Department of Transport and Main Roads. or 1300 658 030 if you are outside Brisbane. contact SmartService Queensland on 131 304. including vehicles.  Consider purchasing a vehicle information certificate (VCheck) to establish the vehicle’s history and if it is recorded as a stolen or written-off vehicle (may include a Register of encumbered vehicles [REVS] check). 171 . which covers the owner and driver of a motor vehicle for legal liability arising from the use of the vehicle causing injury to another person.  The seller has a registration certificate in their name—although this is not proof of legal ownership. Registering your vehicle A vehicle must be registered before you can use it on the road.Buyer’s checklist  The vehicle has a Queensland safety certificate. Registration includes the cost of compulsory third party (CTP) insurance.  The safety certificate is displayed on the vehicle. You must provide evidence of a Queensland garage address when registering a vehicle.  Obtain a REVS certificate to ensure there is no money owing on the vehicle. CTP insurance does not cover damage to property. However.

transport. You will need the following to register your vehicle: . Instead.personal identification—see Evidence of identity. who will forward it on to your nominated insurer.If you have a vehicle registered in another state and you are living in Queensland.au/registration.  The completed form and CTP insurance certificate cover you to take the vehicle on the road for the purpose of registering the vehicle without the need for an unregistered vehicle permit—see opposite  Check the application form to see if you need a safety certificate or certificate of inspection. or from www. take your vehicle to an approved inspection station for an inspection. For used vehicles. You must carry your completed Vehicle registration application form and the CTP insurance certificate. available at a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre.a completed Vehicle registration application form . How to register a motor vehicle  Complete a Vehicle registration application form. If the vehicle is currently registered interstate.a CTP insurance certificate . the issue date of the certificate must not be more than three months before the lodgement date of registration. you must register the vehicle in Queensland within 14 days of Queensland becoming the vehicle’s garage address. any of the agencies listed on page 170.  If your vehicle is fuelled by gas or has gas appliances.gov.a safety certificate or a certificate of inspection (if applicable) .evidence of the Queensland garage address 172 .qld.a gas certificate (if applicable) . previous registration certificate) .e. To obtain the safety certificate.  Choose an authorised insurer and obtain a CTP insurance certificate—you do not need the certificate for trailers or caravans if they are being towed by a vehicle registered in Queensland. page 11 . you can nominate an insurance company when you lodge your application for Queensland registration and pay the insurance premium to the Department of Transport and Main Roads. you do not need to arrange insurance. as they are covered by the registered towing vehicle.  Go to a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or any of the agencies listed on page 174 to register the vehicle. you must present the relevant gas certificate from an authorised gas installer. unless exempt.evidence of the vehicle’s origin (i. You must present the original of the safety certificate or certificate of inspection (if required) to the Department of Transport and Main Roads.

The disposer must keep the completed Part B 173 .tmr. How to register a motorised wheelchair To be eligible to register a motorised wheelchair with free CTP insurance. with your application for an unregistered vehicle permit.qld. you must not carry a load or use the vehicle for other purposes while your vehicle is under a permit. You must first obtain the appropriate CTP insurance certificate from your CTP insurer for the required number of days. you need to use a motorised wheelchair for assisted travel. For more information about these rules for motorised wheelchairs. second-hand vehicle you will need to transfer the registration to your name within 14 days. The acquirer (buyer) and disposer (seller) must sign both parts of the completed application form. due to severe movement impairment.gov. you will need an unregistered vehicle permit. If you have bought a new vehicle. An unregistered vehicle permit will only be issued if the vehicle is in safe condition.payment for the registration—call 13 23 80 or visit www. the motor vehicle dealer will register it before you take delivery. Transferring registration If you have acquired a registered. see Motorised wheelchairs.au for the exact cost. Permits can be issued for up to seven days. If your vehicle has number plates. declaring that the wheelchair will be solely used by the registered operator. page 126. If registering a business vehicle. You will need to pay duty unless you qualify for one of the exemption categories listed on the application form. identification of either a principal or the company behind the business is required. you will need to provide a certificate of company or business registration. Please note. you must provide a current doctor’s certificate stating that.. Present this certificate at a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or any of the agencies listed on page 174. You must also provide a Motorised Wheelchair Statement Individual form (F4414).  If registering a company or business vehicle. If someone is representing you.  If driving or towing your unregistered vehicle on the road. verify and sign the completed registration application form and pay the fees to the dealer. they must show personal identification and written authority to act on behalf of you or the company.  Lodge a completed Vehicle registration transfer form at a Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or any of the agencies listed on page 174. you must return them before you get the permit. You will need to show personal identification. Motorised wheelchairs can be registered or transferred to an eligible individual or organisation.

gov.qld. Notify the Department of Transport and Main Roads when you change your address so the renewal notice reaches you. including transfers of personalised plates. For more information about registration. 174 .qld.au  BPAY—an efficient and easy way to pay your renewal notice over the phone.  Pay a transfer fee and duty if applicable. your registration lapses and a reinstatement fee will be payable.Notice of disposal section of the transfer form until the registration is transferred out of their name.tmr. Magistrates Court offices or police remitting stations in areas where there is no Department of Transport and Main Roads office)  The Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centres—pay in person by cash. Brisbane QLD 4001  Australia Post—pay in person by cash.au. concessional registrations and taxis and limousines. You can pay your registration using any one of these convenient options:  On the internet—go to Services online at www. A renewal notice will be sent to you about five weeks before your registration expiry date. you are still responsible for paying the registration fee and CTP insurance by the expiry date. It is important for the disposer to retain part B until the vehicle has been transferred.  Show personal identification—see Evidence of identity. page 14. All you need is a BPAY access PIN.gov. You do not need a certificate for a trailer with an aggregate trailer mass that doesn’t exceed 750 kg.tmr. contact your nearest Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centre or call 13 23 80.  Supply the original copy of the Queensland safety certificate or certificate of inspection. cheque or money order or by EFTPOS (all major credit cards accepted). cheque or EFTPOS  Other agencies (Queensland government agencies. Renewing registration You will need to renew your registration. If you do not receive a renewal notice.  If the disposer reasonably believes the acquirer has not lodged part A of the Vehicle registration transfer application within 14 days. Call your bank for details  By mail—send your cheque or money order to GPO Box 2211.  Provide a gas certificate (if applicable). they may lodge part B (Notice of disposal) of the transfer application. If you do not renew your registration by the expiry date. visit www.

but does not cover loss of. Your vehicle must be safe and registered at all times while using the road. contact your insurance company. For further information please visit the Motor Accident Commission website: www. Maintaining your car will also improve its re-sale value. CTP insurance covers vehicle owners and drivers who are legally and financially liable for personal injury to another person in the event of a motor vehicle accident. improve your safety by minimising engine wear and tear.  Only fill your petrol tank to the first click as petrol pumped in after this point is ejected into the overflow unit and wasted when the petrol heats and expands as the car is in use. your own vehicle or property. they’ll need to be approved by the Department of Transport and Main Roads officers or an agent.  Compulsory Third Party insurance (CTP) is paid with your registration. If you make any structural changes to your vehicle.maic.Insuring your vehicle There are different kinds of insurance for your vehicle. as well as covering your own vehicle for damage caused by fire or theft. or repairs to. however the insurer has the right to recover the cost from you. the insurer will pay all CTP insurance claims. Try these tips:  Service your vehicle as specified in the manufacturer’s handbook. For more information. If you cause a crash with the level of alcohol in your blood or breath over your alcohol limit.  Comprehensive insurance gives full cover to your vehicle for property damage. Comprehensive insurance protects you against damage to other people’s property. 175 .au. Looking after your vehicle If you look after your vehicle.gov.qld. Your insurance policy may not cover you if you modify your vehicle without approval and it is involved in a crash.  Third party property damage insurance covers you if you cause damage to other people’s property. but does not cover injuries to people.  Fire. and help reduce your vehicle’s pollution levels. theft and third party property insurance protects you against damage to other people’s property. It is illegal to drive an unregistered vehicle with no CTP coverage. as well as covering your vehicle for property damage. you’ll cut fuel costs.

In between services. For more information about Aircare. anyone may report it to the Smoky Vehicle Hotline (13 20 19). 176 .au/environment. time and date of the sighting.gov. the Department of Transport and Main Roads’ program for promoting clean air practices. resulting in a requirement to fix the problem. FAIR or POOR pollution rating. a weekly inspection of your car is recommended. Drive smoothly without heavy acceleration. anytime in south-east Queensland to test your vehicle’s pollution levels. A Department of Transport and Main Roads inspector may pull over your vehicle anywhere.transport. If your vehicle produces visible smoke for more than 10 seconds. and the wheel nuts  external lights  external damage to the vehicle  horn  steering  handbrake  footbrake and clutch pedal  internal lights and instruments  seatbelts. and the name and address of the person reporting (to be kept confidential).  Remove unnecessary weight from the boot and roof racks. Your vehicle will be given a GOOD. registration number. To report vehicles to the hotline you need the location. colour and make. wipers and wiper blades  that you have a car jack  pressures of the tyres including the spare wheel  wheels for damage. You should check:  engine oil and transmission fluid (if your car is fitted with automatic transmission)  that brake and clutch fluid reservoirs are between the minimum and maximum levels  fan belt  water and radiator hoses  battery  windscreen washers.qld. visit www. the vehicle type.

Organ donation 177 .

Visit the Medicare Australia website www. eye tissue.gov. Australia now has the single national Australian Organ Donor Register. pancreas.medicareaustralia. it is important to tell your family and friends about your decision.au for more organ donor information. heart. Once you have registered. 178 . This register is now the only place for you to record your legal decision to donate organs and tissue for transplantation. regardless of age  donated organs and tissues include kidneys. QGAP offices or your local police station if located in a rural area. bone tissue. Use the reply paid envelope attached to the form to send your consent to the national register. Medicare offices. skin and heart valves  you can change your mind at any time and remove your name from the register  discuss your decision with family and friends. or pick one up from the Department of Transport and Main Roads customer service centres. lungs. How to record your consent on the register You can record your donor consent on the national register by completing and returning an Australian Organ Donor Register form. Call the Australian Organ Donor Register on 1800 777 203 for a brochure and form. liver. Instead.Organ donation Being a donor Your decision about organ and tissue donation is no longer recorded on driver licences in Queensland. Remember:  anyone can be an organ and tissue donor. The register allows you to specify what you would like to donate.

limits. 122 . learner drivers. 96–101 . see Crashes Accredited driver training.see also Hazards Demerit points. 162 Applying for a licence. 131 . 24 Alcohol.see also School buses 179 . 132–133 .helmets. random. 97 . 98. 37. 120. 141 . 143-144 Compulsory log book. lanes. transport of. 37–38. 167 Cyclists.see also Towing a caravan or trailer Child restraints.while under the influence. pedestrian. 170–171 . 66 . 122–124. 137–138 Breath testing. 147–149 . 35–37.optional hook turns by. 140 Bicycles. 131 . 86–87 .sharing the road with. 38 provisional licence. 87. 97.see also Cyclists Crossings. 68 Buses. 122 . 33–34 Dangerous goods. 96.see also Supervised on-road driving experience Crashes. 165–167 Drink driving.see also Blood alcohol concentration . 96–98 see also Alcohol see also Blood alcohol concentration see also Random breath testing see also Standard drinks Braking. 141 Appeals against licence suspension. 21. car stall in. 14–20 Aquaplaning. 157–158 heavy vehicles. 154 Built-up areas. 158–165 Disqualified driving. 148–149 .Index Accidents. 96 Animals at night. 8–9. 22–23. 53. 80.overtaking. 55. 105–107 Dangerous situations.buyer’s checklist. 81–82. 23 . 21–22 open licence. 134 CTP insurance. 7.lanes. 97 learner licence. speed limits in.towing after. 139–140 Authority to learn. 123–124 . 171–175 Cumulative disqualifications. 87 . 14. 37 probationary licence.see also Random breath testing Buying a used vehicle. 8.giving way to. 132–133 Blood alcohol concentration. 171 Caravans.school. 7 Bad weather. 133–134 .

108–111 Driving schools. 58–59. 81–82. 113–114 . 81 entering or leaving a road. 20 Giving way. 52 restricted. 36. 135 sharing road with. driving in. 130–132 speed limiters on. 14–20 changing your name or address. 55. 104–105 warning signs for. 53–55 heavy vehicles.system of vehicle control. 32 Hazardous localities. 133–134 to the right.see also Hazardous localities Headlights. 48–51 interstate. 53–55 foreign. 108–111 fatigue. 127 . 139–141 Hazard perception test. 108–111 loading of. 35–37. 49–51 school buses. 109–111 dangerous goods on. 143 . 81 to buses. 104 passenger transport. 14–17 Evidence of residential address. 131–132 Q–SAFE practical driving test for. 43 180 Give way signs. 3-34 Hazards. 14–17 driving in Queensland (interstate/foreign). heavy vehicles. 82 U–turns. 69. 157–166 upgrading of. see Lights Driver reviver. 48–51 driving hours. 13. 108–111. 6. 102 driver licence application. 77–79 at pedestrian crossings. 158–165 documents required for application for. 95–96 at stop signs. 16–17 Eyesight test.heavy vehicles. 154. 83 reversing. 17–18 Fatigue.Drink walking. 130 Heavy vehicles.see also Driver fatigue Driving hours. 78–79 at T–intersections. 157–158 Emergency vehicles. 12–13 written road rules test. 108–111 parking restrictions for.see also Safe following distance Footbrake failure. 8–9. 37 probationary. 80 to horses. 33. 83 to pedestrians. 138–141 . 7. 161 . 9–11. 77–79 . 122. 160. 99–101. 83. 166 4WD driving. 83 from a slip lane. 45–46 motorbike. 37. 12. 144–145 Helmets. 21–24. 103–104 national work diary. 39–48 open. 7–9. bicycles. 102–112. 83 from parked position. 138–139 . 48–51. 99 Driver fatigue.see also Heavy vehicles Driver licence. 80 to emergency vehicles.see also Roadwork sites .double demerit points. 12–13. 12. 26–32 renewing your. 92–95 . 140 Following distance. 162 Graduated licensing system. 77–84 at give way signs. 22–23. 111–112 pilot vehicles for. 36–37. 79 turning right. see Accredited driver training Drugs and driving. 141 Foreign licences. 52–55 learner. driver trainers. 7. 37–39 suspension of. 6–13 applying for a. 53–55. 142–143 . 80. 32–36 Q–SAFE practical driving test for. 82 at railway level crossings. 6–8. 142–143 . 8–9.motorbikes. 23. 14. 37–38 provisional. 21–26 minimum periods. 53. 80 multiple vehicles at intersections. 14. 79 when merging. 104. 79 Good driving behaviour period. 105–107 dimensions of. driver. 52 demerit points. 107 Fog.see also Railway level crossings Hazardous situations. 22–23. 12. 112. 8. 130–132 Evidence of identity.

52–53. 24–25. 35 Immediate suspension. 47 passengers. 88 on the right. 9. 54 Merging. 87 Motorised bicycles. 103–104. 175–176 L plates.High-powered vehicles. 157 Indicating and signalling.see also Late night driving restrictions Non–Queensland (interstate/foreign) licence. 39–48. 8–9. 79 Minimum periods. 21. 160 Lawful directions. 87 Lanes. 175 Interstate licences. 21 . 89 on the left. 114–116 zones. transit. 12–13 Lights. 75–76 . change. 114 Looking after your vehicle. heavy vehicles Long vehicles. 120 Mopeds. heavy vehicles.hand signals. 6. 8. 49 sharing the road with. 14. 39–40 moped rules. 132–133 heavy vehicles. rules for carrying. 178 Oversize vehicles. 10–13 . 21–25. 85 special purpose (bus. 59. 108 Night. 159 Leaving your vehicle. 46 Australia Post using footpaths. 86 dividing lines or centre lines. 85 edge lines. 145–146 Log book. 115–116 Passenger transport.codes/conditions. 18–20. 125 Motorised wheelchairs. 35. 113 Lines. codes and conditions. 86 lane lines. 6. 9. use of. 8. 162 Keeping left. 13. 132 additional road rules for. see Heavy vehicles Overtaking. see Provisional licence P2 licence. 9. 75 Motorbikes. 116 disability. 7–9. 7. 88 signs (no overtaking or passing). 66 Learner driver. 47–48 classes. 52 National work diary. 85–87 arrows. obeying. 10–11. 89 Late night restrictions. 33. 86–87 exemptions for driving in. driving at. 98. 102. see Provisional licence Parking. 159–160 Organ donation. 32. 42 helmets. 7. 117–119 regulated. 41 P1 licence. giving way when. 37. 39–40 clothing requirements. 89. 21–24. 53. 20 Insurance of vehicle. 173 Motorway/highway driving. learner drivers see national work diary. see Lanes and markings Load restraining. 14. 85 markings. 104 leaving vehicle when.classes. 8–9. 126. 52–53. 130–131 long vehicles. 41 parking. 8. 162 Open licence. 111–112 181 . 132 written road rules test. 117 prohibited places for. 41. 21. 10–11. 159 Learner licence. see Compulsory log book. 27. 43 learner licence application/conditions. 7. 45–46 Q–SAFE practical driving test for. see Driver licence Licence classes. 117 heavy and long vehicles. 46 Mobile phones. 46 Medical conditions affecting driving. 86. 40–43. bicycle). 90 Name or address. 9. 114–119 angle or centre. 21–26. 46 Q–Ride. 115 signs for. 10–13 . 117 Licence. 88–89 bicycles.

45-46 Q–SAFE practical driving test. 90. 154 Recidivist drivers and riders. 76 Probationary licence. 67 speed limits. 81 REVS (Register of encumbered vehicles). 111–112. 20. 61. 159 Q–Ride training and competency-based assessment. 6. 34. 160–161 Red light cameras.see also Motorway/highway driving 182 . 40 Practical driving test. 95–96 regulated parking. 136–138 Safety certificate. heavy vehicles. 61. 134 School zones. 13. 92–95 Peer passenger restrictions. 114–115 railway level crossings. 120. 106–107. 116 dangerous goods.see also Keeping left . 134–135 School crossings. 104. 7. 134 Seatbelts. 58–67. 115 Renewing a licence.see also Overtaking . 82. 69. 48 other rules and responsibilities.signs for. 146 Restricted licence. 89. 134 clearway. 114–116 no stopping. 40. 63–64 hazard markers. 97. 33. 10–13. 32 heavy vehicles.see also Pedestrians Roundabouts. see Q-SAFE Practice test questions. 58–67. 58. 21. 12–13. 23. 37–39. renewing. 92–95 . 8–9. roundabouts and signalling. 27–28. 139–140 Random breath testing. 175–176 Signs. 32. 26–32.crossings. 154 Random roadside drug testing. 73–74 Safe following distance. 39. 173–174 School buses. 32–36. 114–117 Roadwork sites. 37. 21. 37–38 Provisional licence. 52 Restraining loads. 131. 7. see Safety certificate Rollerblades. 171–174 Registration. 170 Sample questions giving way. 84 hazardous localities. 32. 153 Registering a vehicle. 57–127 Road rules. 125–127. 87. 59. 95–96 Rain. 6.double demerit points. 126 . alcohol and drugs. 70 turns. 106–107 give way. 161 . 36 road positioning.see also Sample questions Roadworthy certificate. 92–96. 86. 78 guide and information. 131 Police officer. 133–134 Road rules. 40-43 failing. 91 sharing with other road users. 97 Reversing. 20. 89 no parking.see also Child restraints Servicing of vehicle. 102. 10. 42. 112 learner licences. 20 Road signs.sharing the road with. 63 no overtaking or passing. 25–26 motorbikes. 38. 39–48 Railway level crossing. 133 .Pedestrians. 6. 133–134 . 48-51 learner driver. 121 provisional licences. 101 heavy vehicles.transferring. 113–114. obeying directions by. 135–136 signs and signals. 61. see Lanes . 73. 116 parking. 20 . 6. 174 . driving in. 8. 66 P plates. written test. 7–8. 26–32 motorbikes. 143 . 35 Pilot vehicles. 114–117. 171 Road positioning. 78.

Notes

184

185

Notes

186

187 .

48–51 loss of fee in. 73–74 speed limit. 174–175 Three month residency rule. 170 Vehicle impoundment. 22. 131. 69.speed zones. 82 Vehicle history check. 69 Tyre blowouts. 28 motorbike. 28. 127 Trailers. 93. 7. 61. 42. 156 Travelling interstate or overseas. 95 . 145–146 Transport inspectors. 86–87 Speed cameras. 20. 138–139 Zone signs.see also Pedestrians Skidding.following other long vehicles. 72 at unmarked intersections.double demerit points. 71–72. 114 Tow trucks. 58.pedestrians obeying. 98 Stopping. 95 . 12–13. driving in bad. 65–66 . 171. 78 Storing of car. 17–18 failure in. 170–171 U-turns. 82 Skateboards. 72. 60. 145–146 .roadworks. 82 across painted traffic islands. 136–137 Towlines. 10. 20. 21. 136–138 Stop signs. 148–149 Towing a trailer or caravan. 58. 8. 27-29. 139–140 Smoke. 36. 122 . vehicle. 52 Turns. 72 left. 115–116 Test eyesight.- regulatory. 114 183 . 166 Time-lapse method. 175–176 Weather. 155 Vehicle maintenance. 32 heavy vehicle. 37 Used car. 48-49 written road rules. 12–13. 140 Wheeled recreational devices. 58–59 roadwork site. 71 U–turns. 126 . 152–153 Speed limits. 60. 69. 78 warning. 157–158 System of vehicle control. 37. 149 Supervised on-road driving experience. 9. 140 Unlicensed driving.cyclists obeying. 141 Speed suspension. 176 Special purpose lanes. 21–26 Suspension of licence. 53–54. 160–161 . 104. 20 see also Q-SAFE Third party insurance. 158 Standard drinks. 39.71 right. 126 Windscreen shattering. 68–70. buying. 39–48 vehicle for. 72. 68–69 stop. 61–62. 92–95 roundabout. 93. 165–167 Upgrading a licence. 106–107 Traffic lights.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful