20/11/2010 ' , (0544443239 ) : Freud, S. (1899). Screen memories. Standard Edition, 3, 301-322. London: The Hogarth Press. ," . : ± , ) . . . . , ". . , . " " .

" ,1899 .(1)". , , . 43 1899, . ' . , , ' . .' . ,( , . " ", ". 38 "

.(2) 302 ) : . ." . . "
y y y

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(p. ) . And since the elements of the experience which aroused objection were precisely the important ones.3-4 . y y y ) "What is recorded as a mnemic image is not the relevant experience itself²in this respect the resistance gets its way. . .303) 2 1897 . . The result of the conflict is therefore that.307) . . the substituted memory will necessarily lack those important elements and will in consequence most probably strike us as trivia. .( : . another is produced which has been to some degree associatively displaced from the former one. ( ) .(. 306) . what is recorded is another psychical element closely associated with the objectionable one²and in this respect the first principle shows its strength. the principle which endeavours to fix important impressions by establishing reproducible mnemic images. . ."(p. instead of the mnemic image which would have been justified by the original event.. . . P. . (substitution) (repression) . ( . .

.2 . . . . ( ) . . . . .3 3 . I should like to know?¶ For the sake of its innocence.1 . .2-3 . . . . 316). . . . µBut why precisely.38 . . . : . . . . It is precisely the coarsely sensual element in the phantasy which explains why it " does not develop into a conscious phantasy but must be content to find its way allusively and under a flowery disguise into a childhood scene. . Can you imagine a greater contrast to these designs for gross sexual aggression than childish pranks? "(p. into a childhood scene. . . perhaps. . .

Thus the µchildhood memories¶ of individuals come in general to acquire the significance of µscreen memories¶ and in doing so offer a remarkable analogy with the childhood memories that a nation preserves in its store of legends and myths. . . a revision which may have been subjected to the influences of a variety of later psychical forces. And a number of motives.' . 321) ." " . ." (p. " (3) (2."(p. " . ." .1900- . It may indeed be questioned whether we have any memories at all from our childhood: memories relating to our childhood may be all that we possess. In these periods of arousal. emerge. " . : The recognition of this fact must diminish the distinction we have drawn between " screen memories and other memories derived from our childhood. 46-47). . with no concern for historical accuracy. Our childhood memories show us our earliest years not as they were but as they appeared at the later periods when the memories were aroused. had a part in forming them. as well as in the selection of the memories themselves.3) One is thus forced by various considerations to suspect that in the so-called earliest " childhood memories we possess not the genuine memory-trace but a later revision of it.4. they were formed at that time. the childhood memories did not. " . . as people are accustomed to say.

304) .. . . (8) y .(2. . ( p. Not only some but all of what is essential from childhood has been retained in these memories." . and with a thorough analysis everything that has been forgotten can be extracted from them" (pp. They represent the forgotten years of childhood as adequately as the manifest content of a dream represents the dream-thoughts. as identity. . It is simply a question of knowing how to extract it out of them by analysis.147) "I have called these childhood memories µscreen memories¶. as difference.4) : "In some cases I have had an impression that the familiar childhood amnesia."(p.(6) (7) : " The theory of deferred action or screen memory suggests."(p.60) " . . We return to it as if it were genuine. by the problematic nature of the sign it requires. that childhood is a name given to the intersection of the objective and the subjective in the project of representing ourselves to ourselves. is completely counterbalanced by screen memories.(5) . . but at the same time it returns to us as the expression of another. which is theoretically so important to us.199-200) .

1887-1904. St. (1916). Slips of the Tongue. S. Letter from Freud to Fliess. Mahon. . Contemp. 1-240. 145-156. Repeating and Working-Through (Further Recommendations on the Technique of Psycho-Analysis II). Volume XII (1911-1913): The Case of Schreber. Battin-Mahon. The Fate of Screen Memories in Psychoanalysis. 351-352. The Return of Childhood in Autobiography: Freud's ³Screen Memories´. S. (2004 ) . (1901). Bungled Actions. (1983). S. The Complete Letters of Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. 5:293-305. May 25. Freud. . D. Remembering. 4. 38:459-479 7. The Psychopathology of Everyday Life: Forgetting. Superstitions and Errors (1901). (1982). Laguardia. Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis. Papers on Technique and Other Works. Freud.. E. Psychoanal. Freud. Freud. Thought. Volume XV (19151916): Introductory Lectures on Psycho-analysis (Parts I and II).y . S. 1899. vii-296. 2. . Psychoanal. E. (1899). Volume VI (1901): The Psychopathology of Everyday Life. y ( ) y : ? ? ? References 1. (1914). 3.5 ± 6. Child.

(2000). . F. Bjorklund. False-memory creation in children and adults: theory.8. Routledge. research. and implications. D.

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