SCIENCE GUIDEBOOK

Name:______________

Hello and welcome to another exciting school year. This guidebook will be helpful to you as it outlines my expectations, grading, homework policies and the lab report format. It is important that you and your parents read this over together so we are all on the same page. It is also necessary for you to keep this reference in your notebook at all times. Again, welcome to an exciting new year! I am excited to be teaching you.

What does it mean to come to class prepared? • You will need to arrive on time, every minute is important. • Materials to have everyday are the following: 1. Science Journal (I will be giving you one although you can buy a nice one if you like because we will be using them many years to come. 2. Assignment book (For recording homework and hall passes) 3. Pen or pencil Extras that may help you – Small tool kit with colored pencils, ruler, scissors, calculator, protractor, straight edge, and compass.
Science Journal A science journal is a written record that you will be keeping of what you are learning in class. We very rarely use a textbook in science. Instead, you will be writing in your journals everyday such as taking classroom notes, answering journal questions, drawing graphs, and making observations. Journals are 25% of your total science grade and will be checked for periodically throughout the trimester for neatness, completion, and quality. You will be filling in the entire journal with writing and drawings by the end of the year. Homework, and Unit Assessment / Bundled Homework Package Most of the homework and tests this year are grouped together in something called an end of the unit assessment. They are similar to a test but differ in some ways. They range somewhere between 8-16 pages covering the various topics throughout the trimesters. Each year students will complete 4-10 of these bundled homework packages. They are passed out near the beginning of a unit and should be completed as part of nightly homework. They are due shortly after the end of the unit. The due dates should be copied into the student agenda book.

Students should use their notes from their science journal as a reference to assist them. Students can also use the internet, books, family members, relatives, and past students for help. Students can also assist other students as long as it is not direct copying. Direct copying from another student’s assessment is considered cheating. My expectations for a well done assessment are very high because students are given several weeks to complete, access to class notes in their science journal, access to the internet, and the ability to discuss questions with peers and myself. Do not wait to the last minute, as a well done assessment takes a considerable amount of time and chronologically follows the notes from the science journal. Always complete your bundled homework / assessment up to the most recent notes in your science journal, I call this “Staying Current”. Students should be working on assessments about 15-20 minutes a night or an hour a week. Homework from now till the end of the year is to stay current on your assessment that is due. Absence Please see me after an absence to discuss what you have missed. You can obtain missed class notes by going through the class slideshow on the student computer located in the corner of my room. You can also use a friends science journal to record the missing the notes or see me for a copy. In all cases, taking a proactive approach to your missed days is recommended. Grading: I use an electronic grading system that uses category weights. It is very important to be successful in all of the different categories to obtain a strong grade. A printed copy of your student’s individual grades can be obtained by request periodically throughout a trimester.
35% • Unit Assessment / Bundled Howmework 25% • Science Journals 20% • Major investigations 10% • Classroom investigations 7% • On-task 3% • Quiz Grades (Like a test, helps review material) (Everyday entries, class notes, and observations) (Lab Reports One or two a trimester / science fair) (Daily labs, worksheets, movie sheets) (Participation, Behavior, Motivation) (Miscellaneous, quizzes, permission slips)

Additional Help If you need help with an assignment then please come and see me. I am here to help you in whatever way I can. I am usually available during most study halls. I am also available to assist you after school if needed. Please let me know in advance if you would like to stay after school so I don’t make any other appointments. Please read this guidebook with your parents and keep it for the rest of the year. You can use this guidebook to assist you with the guidebook quiz. If you or your parents have any questions, please feel free to contact me at _____________________Thanks again, and I look forward to another exciting year.

Sincerely,

Science Curriculum (4 Years)
Science Units that will be covered in 5th grade
Ecology and the Environment: Trophic Feeding Levels Unit -Creation and monitoring of students bio-domes. -Areas of Focus: Areas of Focus within The Feeding Levels Unit:What is Ecology, Concepts in Ecology, Concept-There is no such thing as a free lunch, Energy Comes From the Sun, Food Chains, Trophic Feeding Levels, Producers, Consumers, Decomposers, Aquatic Food Chains, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton, Animal Dentition, Carnivores, Herbivores, Pyramid of Biomass, Pyramid of Numbers. Ecology and the Environment: Interactions Unit -Includes Friday field studies and section of nature trail brochure. -Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit:Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species. Ecology and the Environment: Abiotic Factors Unit -Includes Isopod formal lab report. - Areas of Focus within The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit:Abiotic Factors, Biotic Factors, The Big 7 Abiotic Factors, Organisms Range of Tolerance, Light, How light affects Organisms, Photosynthesis, Factors in the Environment that Affect the Amount of Light, How Organisms Movements are affected by light, Bioluminescence, How temperature affects organisms, Thermoregulation, Physiological Regulation, Behavioral Regulation, Adaptation, Hypothermia, Hyperthermia, Warm-Bloodedness (endothermy), Cold-Bloodedness, Hibernation / Torpor, Advantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Advantages of ColdBloodedness, Disadvantages of Cold-Bloodedness, Water, Water Requirements and Plants, Adaptations of Plants and Water, Adaptations of Animals and Water, Wind, Positives and Negatives of Wind to Organisms, How animals use Wind, How Plants use Wind, Wind Dispersal, Water Dispersal, Animal Seed Dispersal, Fire Ecology, Fire Dependence, Biogeochemical Cycles, Hydrologic Cycle, Carbon Cycle, Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Balance, Nitrogen Cycle, Phosphorus Cycle, Importance of Phosphorus, Nutrients and Aquatic Systems, Eutrophification. -Break between units to create student exhibition of Ecology concepts for Science Fair

Life Science Evolution Unit -Areas of Focus: Concept “Everything is Changing” The Diversity of Life Photo Tour, Evolution History, Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwins Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession.

Science Units 6th and 7th grade 2010-2011
Water Molecule Unit -Areas of Focus within the Water Molecule Unit:-Locations of Water on the Planet, Importance of Water, Groundwater, Groundwater Pollution, The Water Molecule, Properties of Water, Polarity, Cohesion, Adhesion, Capillary Action, High Specific Heat, Water has a Neutral pH, Lower Density of Ice. Water is the Universal Solvent, Mixtures. Rivers Unit and Water Quality Unit -Areas of Focus within The Rivers and Water Quality Unit:Watersheds, Rivers of the United States, Sections of a River, Parts of River (Vocabulary), Stream Order, Erosion and Deposition, Water Quality, Chemical Properties of Water, Bio-Indicators of Water Quality (EPT richness), Physical Properties of Water Quality, Rivers and Flooding, Factors that Control Flooding, Types of Flooding,Tsunami’s, Wetlands, Flood Prevention, Levees, Dams and Ecosystem, Importance of Dams, Impacts of Dams,Hydropower, Parts of Dam, Salmon (Life Cycle), Systems of Help Salmon, Fish (General), Layering in a Lake, Lake Turnover, Nutrients and Lakes. -Water Quality Assessment Lab Report on The Blackwater River. Astronomy and Earth System History Unit -Areas of Focus in the Astronomy unit:Earth System History and Time, Principle of Superposition, Timeline of Earth, History and Events, Astronomy, The Solar System and the Sun, Order of the Planets, Our Sun, Solar Eclipse, Lunar Eclipse, The Inner Planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Moon, Craters, Tides, Phases of the Moon, Mars and Moons, Rocketry, Asteroid Belt, NEO’s, The Outer Planets and Gas Giants, Jupiter / Moons, Saturn / Moons, Uranus / Moons, Neptune / Moons, The Kuiper Belt, Oort Cloud, Comets / Other, Beyond the Solar System, Blackholes, Exoplanets, The Big Bang, The Special Theory of Relativity, Hubble Space Telescope, Constellations. Geology Topics Unit -Areas of Focus within The Geology Topics Unit: Plate Tectonics, Evidence for Plate Tectonics, Pangea, Energy Waves, Layers of the Earth, Heat Transfer, Types of Crust, Plate Boundaries, Hot Spots, Volcanoes, Positives and Negatives of Volcanoes, Types of Volcanoes, Parts of a Volcano, Magma, Types of Lava, Viscosity, Earthquakes, Faults, Folds, Seismograph, Richter Scale, Seismograph, Tsunami’s, Rocks, Minerals, Crystals, Uses of Minerals, Types of Crystals,

Physical Properties of Minerals, Rock Cycle, Common Igneous Rocks, Common Sedimentary Rocks, Common Metamorphic Rocks. Weather and Climate Unit -Areas of Focus within The Weather and Climate Unit: What is weather?, Climate, Importance of the Atmosphere, Components of the Atmosphere, Layers of the Atmosphere, Air Quality and Pollution, Carbon Monoxide, Ozone Layer, Ways to Avoid Skin Cancer, Air Pressure, Barometer, Air Pressure and Wind, Fronts, Wind, Global Wind, Coriolis Force, Jet Stream, Sea Breeze / Land Breeze, Mountain Winds, Mountain Rain Shadow, Wind Chill, Flight, Dangerous Weather Systems, Light, Albedo, Temperature, Thermometers, Seasons, Humidity / Condensation / Evaporation, Dew Points, Clouds, Types of Clouds, Meteorology, Weather Tools, Isotherms, Ocean Currents, Enhanced Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, The Effects of Global Warming, Biomes, Types of Biomes.

Science Units 6th and 7th Grade 2011-2012
The Introduction to Science Unit -Areas of Focus within The Introduction to Science Unit:Lab Safety, Lab Safety Equipment, Magnification, Microscopes, Stereoscopes, Hand Lenses, Electron Microscopes, Compound Light Microscopes, Parts of a Compound Microscope, Metric System, International System of Units, Scientific Notation, Base Units, Mass, Volume, Density, Temperature, Time, Other SI Units, Observation, Inferences, Scientific Method, What is Science? What makes a good scientist? Types of Scientists, Branches of Science, Scientific Method, Hypothesis, Observations, Inferences. The Soil Science and Ice Ages Unit -Areas of Focus within The Soil Science and Ice-Ages Unit: Importance of Soil, Weathering, Mechanical Weathering, Chemical Weathering, Surface Area and Weathering, Mass Movement of Earthen Materials, Soil, Soil Color, Particle Size, Soil Porosity and Permeability, Soil Horizons, Soil Conservation, The Dust Bowl, Erosion, Deposition, Soil Conservation Measures, Glaciers, Types of Glaciers, Ice Ages, Paleoecology, Glacial Landforms. The Plant Unit -Areas of Focus in The Plant Unit: Cool Facts about Plants, Plant Evolution, Importance of Algae, Lichens, The Three Types of Lichens, Non-Vascular Plants, Bryophytes, Seedless Vascular Plants (Ferns), Seeds, Seed Dormancy, Factors that Break Seed Dormancy, Germination, Parts of a Young Plant, Monocots and Dicots, Roots and Water, Types of Roots, Water Uptake and Photosynthesis, Plant Hormones, Types of Plant Tissues, Xylem and Phloem, Woody Plants, Leaves, Light and Plants, Transpiration, Guard Cells, Leaf Identification, Plant Life Cycles, Seed Plant Life Cycles, Parts of a Flower, Matured Ovaries (Fruits), Types of Fruit.

Taxonomy and Classification Unit -Areas of Focus within The Taxonomy and Classification Unit:Taxonomy, Classification, Need for Taxonomy vs. Common Names, What is a Species?, Dichotomous Keys, What does Classification Use?, The Domains of Life, Kingdoms of Life,The 8 Taxonomic Ranks, Humans Taxonomic Classification, Kingdom Monera, Prokaryotic Cells, Types of Eubacteria, Bacteria Classification, Gram Staining,Bacterial Food Borne Illnesses, Penicillin and Antiseptic, Oral Hygiene and Plaque, Bacterial Reproduction (Binary Fission), Asexual Reproduction, Positives and Negatives of Bacteria, Protista, Plant-like Protists, Animal-like Protists, Fungi-like Protists, Animalia, Characteristics of Animalia, Animal Symmetry, Phylums of Animalia (Extensive), Classes of Chordata, Mammals, Subclasses of Mammals, Characteristics of Mammals, Fungi, Positives and Negatives of Fungi, Divisions of Fungi (Extensive), Parts of a Mushroom, 3 Roles of Fungi, Fungi Reproduction, Mold Prevention, Plant Divisions, Anatomy and Physiology -Currently under construction but will cover most topics associated with an Intro A & P course at a middle school level.

8th Grade Units
Laws of Motion and Machines Unit -Areas of Focus within The Motion and Machines Unit:-Newton’s First Law, Inertia, Friction, Four Types of Friction, Negatives and Positives of Friction, Newton’s Third Law, Newton’s Second Law, Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy, Mechanical Energy, Forms of Potential to Kinetic Energy, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration, Deceleration, Momentum, Work, Machines (Joules), Catapults, Trajectory, Force, Simple Machines, Pulley / (MA Mechanical Advantage), Lever / (MA), Wedge / (MA), Wheel and Axle (MA), Inclined Plane / (MA), Screw / (MA). Energy and the Environment Unit -Areas of Focus within the Energy and the Environment Unit.- Concept “There is no such thing as a free lunch”, Matter, Dark Matter, Dark Energt, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro’s Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal’s Law, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb’s Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday’s Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics,Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R’s, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy.

Atoms and the Periodic Table Unit -Areas of Focus within The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit:-Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford’s Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #’;s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Electron Negativity, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds,Ionization. Life Topics Unit in Biology and Basic Organic Chemistry -Areas of Focus within The Life Topics Unit: -What is SPONCH?, SPONCH / Biologically Important Molecules, % of SPONCH in Living Things, Organic Building Blocks, Carbohydrates, Simple to Complex Sugars, Proteins, Grrr (Growth, Repair, Reproduce, Regulate), Structural Proteins, Lipids, Types of Fats, Nucleic Acids, What is inside a Twinkie?, Dangers of Obesity, Why Fast Food Sells?, Dangers of Anorexia, Dangers of Bulimia nervosa, Dangers of Anabolic Steroid Use, Nucleic Acids. DNA, RNA, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls. Diseases and Cells Unit -Areas of Focus within The Cells and Infectious Diseases Unit:-Infectious Diseases through History, Viruses, Size of Viruses, Computer Viruses, Viral Reproduction, Are Viruses Living?, Types of Viruses, Lytic Viruses, Lysogenic Viruses, Immune System, Disease are Spread by.., Treatment for Viruses, Virus Prevention, HIV, HIV Prevention, AIDS, STD’s, Cellular Biology, History of Cellular Biology, Modern Cell Theory, Types of Cells, Prokaryotic Cells, Eukaryotic Cells, Cellular Organelles, Cell Wall, Plasma Membrane, Passive Transport, Diffusion, Osmosis, Active Transport, The Nucleus, Chromatin / Chromosomes, Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum, Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum, Ribosomes, Protein Synthesis, Golgi Apparatus, Lysosomes, Cytoskeleton / Mictrotubules / Microfilaments, Centrioles, Plastid, Mitochondria, Vacuoles, Organelles by real images. DNA and Genetics Unit -Areas of Focus within The DNA and Genetics Unit: DNA, DNA Extraction, Structure of DNA, Discovery of the Double Helix, Rosalind Franklin, Nucleotides, RNA, Cell Division, Mitosis, Phases of Mitosis, Chromosomes, Cancer, Ways to Avoid Cancer, What is Inside a Cigarette?, Facts about Smoking?, Anti-Smoking Ads, Meiosis, Phases in Meiosis, Mendelian Genetics, Gregor Mendel, Punnett Squares, Probability, Dihybrid Cross, Codominance, Bio-Ethics, Stem Cell Debate, Cloning Debate.

Lab and Outdoor Safety
The study of science is challenging and fun, but it can also be dangerous. Don’t take any chances! The guidelines below must be followed at all times. Outdoor Safety 1.) All general codes of school conduct are multiplied when learning outdoors. 2.) Plan ahead, please come prepared for outdoor learning. a. Warm gear when it is cold b. Water resistant gear when it is wet c. Appropriate footwear (no sandals or heels) d. Clothes you don’t mind getting dirty. e. Optional – Water bottle, backpack, insect repellent. 3.) Please stay together at all times. When we walk to a location there will be a designated leader and sweep (person in back). Everyone else should be in the middle. 4.) Please do not pick up and throw objects, or swing sticks. No hiking sticks please. 5.) Never shake or attempt to knock down a dead tree. Trees when shaken can break halfway up dropping a hundred pound log on unsuspecting students resulting in serious injury. 6.) Please do keep specimens, and do your best to minimize impact. 7.) Please carry out all waste and leave nothing behind. 8.) Be considerate of others in the community. Lab Safety 1.) Please wear safety goggles over your eyes when required. 2.) Handle living organisms only as your teacher directs. Always treat animals carefully and with respect. 3.) Examine all glassware before using. Be sure that it is clean and free of chips and cracks. Report damaged glassware to your teacher. 4.) Always cap chemicals after use to avoid harmful vapors. 5.) Before leaving, clean up your work area. Put away all equipment and supplies. Dispose of chemicals and other materials as directed by your teacher. 6.) Make sure all hot plates and electrical equipment are turned off and unplugged. 7.) Avoiding running or any other horseplay while in the laboratory. The major causes of outdoor learning and laboratory accidents are carelessness, lack of attention, and inappropriate behavior. These things reflect a person’s attitude. Adopt a positive attitude and you will greatly reduce your chances of harming yourself or others. Even minor accidents can cause major injuries, please be careful, and use good judgment.

Science Guidebook Quiz
(Quiz / Other Grade)

Name:
Due:

Please read the student guidebook and answer the questions below.

What are three things you should bring to class everyday? 1) 2) 3) Briefly discuss the importance of a science journal to your grade and general understanding in the field of science.

What is an OFE? Describe one strategy to complete them well?

What are the rules regarding an OFE? What can, and what can’t you do?

How do you, “Stay current” on your unit assessment / bundled homework?

What should you do if you were absent?

Correctly spell Deoxyribonucleic acid on the line to the right Please record the name of the four units you will be studying this year. 1)______________________________ 2)____________________________ 3)______________________________4)____________________________ What are the six grading categories that you should be aware of?

Add some articles to the student below who will be going outside to learn on some Friday’s. The weather forecast for the day is cold and cloudy with a chance of showers.

Great work finishing the quiz, now go back to proof read and check for errors. Science Off-Campus Trip Permission Slip

Over the course of the school year students will be completing work that will take them off of school grounds. During some science classes, we will be walking to different forested areas, streams, or other bodies of water to conduct science observations, water testing, area mapping, hiking, and nature walks. I will provide notice of when these outdoor visitations will occur through the student assignment books an online homework updates I give my son/daughter permission to go off-campus on any local walking field trip to conduct the necessary studies over the course of the 2010-2011 school year. Parent/Guardian Signature Date

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Lab and Outdoor Safety Guidelines (Please read with your student)
The study of science is challenging and fun, but it can also be dangerous. Don’t take any chances! The guidelines below must be followed at all times. Outdoor Safety -All general codes of school conduct are multiplied when learning outdoors. -Plan ahead, please come prepared for outdoor learning. (See the back page) -Please stay together at all times. When we hike in the woods, there will be a designated leader and sweep (person in back). Everyone else should be in the middle. -Please do not pick up and throw objects, or swing sticks. No hiking sticks please. -Never shake or attempt to knock down a dead tree. Trees when shaken can break halfway up dropping a hundred pound log on unsuspecting students resulting in serious injury. -Please do keep specimens, and do your best to minimize impact. -Please carry out all waste and leave nothing behind. -Be considerate of others in the community. Lab Safety -Please wear safety goggles over your eyes when required. -Handle living organisms only as your teacher directs. Always treat animals carefully and with respect. -Examine all glassware before using. Be sure that it is clean and free of chips and cracks. Report damaged glassware to your teacher. -Always cap chemicals after use to avoid harmful vapors. -Before leaving, clean up your work area. Put away all equipment and supplies. Dispose of chemicals and other materials as directed by your teacher. -Make sure all hot plates and electrical equipment are turned off and unplugged. - Avoiding running or any other horseplay while in the laboratory. The major causes of outdoor learning and laboratory accidents are carelessness, lack of attention, and inappropriate behavior. These things reflect a person’s attitude. Adopt a positive attitude and you will greatly reduce your chances of harming yourself or others. Even minor accidents can cause major injuries, please be careful, and use good judgment.

Preparedness: Outdoor Learning in Science Learning in the outdoors will provide us with many valuable and memorable learning experiences. Students will be using a science journal to make observations, conduct field studies, as well as quarterly reflection. It is very important that everyone arrive to class prepared, as one unprepared student can jeopardize the experience for everyone. Below is a list of equipment that will assist your student for outdoor learning in science. Early Fall and Late Spring ● ● ● ● ● ● ● A working backpack Appropriate footwear: old sneakers hiking boots (no sandals, heels, or flip-flops) Rain jacket (A trash bag poncho could do the trick) Water bottle Warm gear if needed Science journal with writing supplies Individual Epi-pen kit if your student requires.

Optional: Plastic trash bag to sit on, tool kit with writing, measuring, and drawing supplies, compass, snacks, nature guides etc. Thank you for your support. Sincerely,

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