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Inventor® Self-paced Learning Modules

Autodesk Inventor
Module 10
2D Sketching Planes

Learning Outcomes:
When you have completed this module, you will be able to:
1. Describe the three predefined 2D sketching planes and the view of the model that they are on.
2. Construct solid models by drawing the base sketch on either the front or right side instead of the
default top view.
3. Describe a consumed and an unconsumed sketch.

2D Sketching Planes
Up to this point in the modules, the base sketch has been drawn
on the XY plane. The XY plane is the top view of the model and
the default plane as configured in the templates that are being
used to complete the workalongs and lab exercises in the Inventor
Modules. The models that have been constructed up to this point
in the modules were all designed so that the base sketch was
drawn on the XY plane or the top view. In this module, learning
how to construct solid models by drawing the base sketch on either
the front or right side planes will be taught.
Inventor has three predefined planes that can be used to draw the
Figure 10-1
base sketch. They are the XY, XZ, and YZ planes. The XY plane
The 3D Model
is the top view, the XZ plane is the front view and the YZ is the
right side view.
Keep in mind the rule that was taught in Module 4.
"It is best to draw the base sketch on the plane that
has the most complex contour. Contours with arcs
and curves should be avoided".

The Three Predefined Planes


To help visualize the three predefined planes used
in Inventor, the 3D model shown in Figure 10-1 is
used in this module. The glass box principle that
was taught in Module 8 is used to help visualize the
three planes. See Figure 10-2.
Figure 10-2
The Glass Box

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 2 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Consumed and Unconsumed Sketches


A consumed sketch is a 2D sketch that has been extruded or revolved to create a 3D solid model.
An unconsumed sketch is a 2D sketch that is blank or one that has not been extruded or revolved.
The Browser Bar will display which sketches have been consumed and which ones are
unconsumed. See Figure 10-3. Sketch1 is unconsumed while Sketch2, Sketch3 and Sketch4
have been extruded and are consumed.

Figure 10-3
Consumed and Unconsumed
Sketches

A 2D sketch can be drawn in the orthographic view or the home/isometric view.


In fact, any orbited or rotated view can be used. When drawing on a orbited or
rotated view, it is always best to draw in the home or isometric view since this
helps the operator maintain a good
mental picture of the model.

Orthographic View Home or Isometric View

Inventor has three predefined planes that can be used to draw the base sketch on.
They are the XY, XZ and YZ planes. The XY plane is the top view, the XZ plane is
the front view and the YZ is the right side view.

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 3

Working with 2D Sketching Planes

Step 1 Start a new part file using the template English - Modules Part (in).ipt.

Step 2 In 2D sketch mode, press F6 to change to the


home/isometric view. The graphic window and the
Browser Bar will appear as shown in the figures. (Figure
Step 2A and 2B)

Author's Comments: This is the top view or the XY


plane since that is Inventor's default plane. Note that
Sketch1 is always on the default plane.

Figure Step 2A

Figure Step 2B

Step 3 In the Browser Bar, expand the Origin folder as shown in the figure. Place the cursor on
the XY Plane. Note the orientation of the plane on the sketch. (Figure Step 3A and 3B)

Figure Step 3B
Figure Step 3A

Author's Comments: The XY Plane is the top view.

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 4 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Step 4 Place the cursor on


the XZ Plane in the Browser
Bar. Note the orientation of
the plane on the sketch.
(Figure Step 4A and 4B)

Author's Comments: The


XZ Plane is the front view.

Figure Step 4A

Step 5 Place the cursor on the YZ Plane in the Browser Bar.


Note the orientation of the plane on the sketch. (Figure Step Figure Step 4B
5A and 5B)

Figure Step 5A

Figure Step 5B

Author's Comments: The YZ plane is the right side view.

Step 6 Place the cursor anywhere in the graphic window and right
click the mouse. In the right-click menu, click Finish Sketch. Save
the part with the name Inventor Workalong 10-1. (Figure Step 6)

Figure Step 6

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 5

Author's Comments: The object shown below is the model


that you will be constructing in this workalong.

Home or Isometric View

Dimensioned Multiview Drawing

Author's Comments: Before starting the base sketch you


must pick the best view to draw it on. It should, in most cases,
be the view with the most complex contour. For this object,
the best view to use is the front view or the XZ plane.

Step 7 While In model mode, expand the Origin folder in the


Browser Bar and right-click the XZ plane. In the right-click
menu, click New Sketch as shown in figure. (Figure Step 7)

Figure Step 7

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 6 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Step 8 The graphic window will change to sketch mode in the XZ


plane. Note that in the Browser Bar a new sketch will appear named
Sketch2. (Figure Step 8A and 8B)

Figure Step 8A

Figure Step 8B

Author's Comments: Since Sketch1 was not used, it is blank and is an unconsumed sketch.

Step 9 Project the Center Point onto


the sketch plane. Draw the base sketch
for the object applying all of the
necessary geometrical constraints to
maintain the shape of the sketch. Note
the location of X0Y0Z0. Insert the
necessary driving dimensions to fully
constrain the sketch. (Figure Step 9A
and 9B)

Author's Comments: All the lines in the


sketch should display purple If they do
not, start the workalong over again.

Figure Step 9A

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 7

Step 10 Right-click anywhere in the


graphic window. In the right-click menu,
click Finish Sketch to return to model
mode. (Figure Step 10)

Figure Step 10

Figure Step 9B

Step 11 Extrude the sketch to create the solid model as


shown in figure. (Figure Step 11)

Figure Step 11

Step 12 Using the 2D SKETCH command, or even better


the shortcut S, start a new sketch and select the right side as
the plane to draw it on. (Figure Step 12)

Figure Step 12

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 8 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Step 13 The grid will display on the right side. It will


be Sketch3 in the Browser Bar. (Figure Step 13)

Figure Step 13
St
ep 14 Draw three lines for the slot. Apply all of
the necessary geometrical and dimensional
constraints to fully constrain the sketch. (Figure
Step 14A and 14B)

Author's Comments: Ensure that you snap


onto the edge when you start the first line and
end the third line. By doing that, you only are
required to draw 3 lines to fully constrain the
sketch. See Module 7 if you have trouble doing
this.

Figure Step 14A

Author's Comments: All three lines in the sketch


should display purple to indicate the sketch is fully
constrained. Do not continue on with this
workalong until the sketch is fully constrained.

Figure Step 14B

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 9

Step 15 Press F8 to enable the display of the constraint icons. They should be similar to the
figure. (Figure Step 15)

Author's Comments:
Inventor 2008 will
display the icons
slightly different then
2009. 2009 is shown
here.

Figure Step 15

Step 16 Press F9 to disable the display of the


constraint icons. Extrude the sketch using the To
extents. (Figure Step 16)

Figure Step 16

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 10 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Step 17 Start a new sketch on the top plane as


shown in the figure. (Figure Step 17)

Step 18 Draw the 2D sketch on the new


sketching plane and insert the necessary
dimensions to fully constrain it. (Figure Step 18A
and 18B)

Figure Step 17

Author's Comments: Inventor


2008 will display the icons slightly
different then 2009. 2009 is
shown here.

Figure Step 18A

Author's Comments: Ensure


that you snap onto the edge. That
way, you will only be required to
draw three lines to fully constrain
the sketch.

Figure Step 18B

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 11

Step 19 Extrude the top sketch to complete the solid


model. (Figure Step 19)

Step 20 Change the view to the home or isometric


view and apply the color Black Chrome. Orbit or rotate
the view to check the bottom of the solid model. (Figure
Step 20)

Figure step 19

Figure Step 20

Step 21 Save and close the file.

The Key Principles in Module 10


1. Inventor has three predefined planes that can be used to draw the base sketch on. They are
the XY, XZ and YZ planes. The XY plane is the top view, the XZ plane is the front view and the
YZ is the right side view.

2. A consumed sketch is a 2D sketch that has been extruded or revolved. An unconsumed sketch
is a 2D sketch that is blank or one that has not been extruded or revolved.

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
10 - 12 Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30

Lab Exercise 10-1 Time Allowed: 45 Min.


Part Name: Inventor Lab 10-1 Template: English - Modules Part (in).ipt Units: Inches
Project: Inventor Course Color: Metal-Titanium (Polished) Material: N/A

Instructions:
1. Project the center point onto the base sketching plane.
2. Note the location of X0Y0Z0.
3. Draw the necessary sketches and extrude them to produced the
solid model shown below. Apply all of the necessary geometrical
and dimensional constraints to fully constrain all sketches.
4. Apply the color as shown above.
5. Save the file with the name Inventor Lab 10-1 as shown above.

3D Model - Home or Isometric View

Completed Solid Model -


Home or Isometric View

Suggested Base View -


Front XZ Plane

Dimensioned Multiview Drawing

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
Inventor Self-paced Learning Modules - Autodesk Inventor - Revised 2008-11-30 10 - 13

Lab Exercise 10-2 Time Allowed: 45 Min.


Part Name: Inventor Lab 10-2 Template: Metric - Modules Part (mm).ipt Units: Inches
Project: Inventor Course Color: Zinc Chromate Material: N/A

Instructions:
1. Project the Center Point onto the base sketching plane.
2. Note the location of X0Y0Z0.
3. Draw the necessary sketches and extrude them to produced the
solid model shown below. Apply all of the necessary geometrical
and dimensional constraints to fully constrain all sketches.
4. Apply the color shown above.
5. Save the file with the name Inventor Lab 10-2 as shown above.

3D Model - Home or Isometric View

Completed Solid Model -


Home or Isometric View

Suggested Base View -


Right Side - YZ Plane
Dimensioned Multiview Drawing

2D Sketching Planes The CAD Guys Ltd. Copyright © 1993 - 2008 Module 10
CHAPTER 2
Tutorial
Applying Colors to Parts
Learning Objectives
After Completing this chapter, you will be able to:
• Apply colors to entire parts, features and surfaces
• Override part colors with feature and face colors

Required Objectives
Before stating this tutorial you should have been able to:
• Select features in the object browser
Understand the concept of colors

Figure 1
1. Open the file Screwdriver1.ipt. Note that the screwdriver’s default color is gray
(As Material).
2. Find Loft1 in the browser and right click on it. Select Properties from the context
menu as shown in Figure 2.
3. In the Feature Properties dialogue, select BlackRubber in the Feature Color
Style pulldown and click OK. The body of the screwdriver will change to black .
4. Select Emboss1 in the browser and right click on it. Select Properties from the
context menu.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 1


5. In the Feature Properties dialogue, select Red in the pulldown and click OK.
Only the first ridge on the body of the screwdriver will change to red. The rest will
remain gray as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 2

Figure 3
6. Select CircularPattern1 in the browser and right click on it. Select Properties
from the context menu.
7. In the Feature Properties dialogue, select Red in the pulldown and click OK. The
remaining ridges on the body of the screwdriver will change to red.
8. Zoom in on the base of the screwdriver and select the four fillets and face that make
up the base. After all five faces have been selected, as shown in Figure 4, right click
and select Properties from the context menu to open the Face Properties
dialogue. In the Face Color Style, select Yellow and click OK.
Select multiple faces by holding down the Control key. To remove a face or line, hold Shift and
select the line.
9. Repeat the same process for the chamfers that make up the part of the screwdriver
that connects to the blade as shown in Figure 5.

2 Changing Colors in Parts


Figure 4

Figure 5

10. Change the default color of the part via the color pulldown on the standard toolbar
to any other color. Notice that only the color of the shaft and blade change. This is
because the blade extrusion and loft’s properties were not overridden and their color
styles were set to “as part”.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 3


© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

4 Changing Colors in Parts


CHAPTER 2
Tutorial
Defining Materials
Learning Objectives
After Completing this chapter, you will be able to:
• Define materials and their associated colors

Required Objectives
Before starting this tutorial you should have been able to:
• Apply colors to parts
Create new colors

Figure 1: Idler Bracket


1. Open the file IdlerBracket1.ipt.
2. Select Format>Materials and click New. Name the new material Aluminum-
6061.
3. Enter the properties of the material as shown in Figure 2. While Inventor only
utilizes values for density and render color, it is good practice to enter all values at
creation time for use in 3rd party applications.

Professional Tip
All values for physical properties have metric units. Be sure to convert your values if your
source is stated in English units.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 1


4. Assign the Rendering Style of Metal-AL-6061 (Flat) to the new material.
Note: This color was predefined in the part file. If you want to apply a custom color, you must
create it before creating the material.
5. Click Save.

Figure 2: Physical Properties of Aluminum 6061

6. Click New once again and create a new material Steel, Stainless 302, enter the
properties of the material as shown in Figure 3.
7. Assign the Rendering Style of Metal-Steel to the material.

Figure 3: Physical Properties of Stainless Steel 302


8. Click Save, then Close and return to the model.
9. In the model environment, select File>iProperties from the main menu. Click on
the Physical tab.

2 Defining Materials
10. Select Aluminum-6061 from the Material pulldown. Note the mass of the part.
Click Apply, note how the color of the part has changed.
11. Change the material to Steel, Stainless 302 and note the mass of the part. Click
OK and return to the model. Again, note that the color of the model has changed.

Figure 4

Figure 5

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 3


© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

4 Defining Materials
CHAPTER 3
TUTORIAL
Simple Extruding of a Sketch
Learning Objectives
After completing this tutorial, you will be able to:
• Sketch an object
• Extrude a sketch

Required Competencies
Before starting this tutorial, you should have been able to:
• Construct, constraint and dimension sketches
• Make work planes visible

Figure 1

1. Open a new Standard.ipt


2. Click on the plus sign next to origin in the Model panel bar as shown in Figure 2.
Click the right mouse button over the XY Plane and select visibility as shown in Figure
3.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 1


Figure 2 Figure 3

3. Select the Line Button in the 2D sketch panel and create the sketch shown in
Figure 4.

Figure 4

2 Title of the Project or Textbook


4. Once the sketch is completed and fully dimensioned click on Return in the
Inventor Standard menu at the top of the screen.

Figure 5

5. Move the cursor into the workspace and right click to open the options menu.
Select Isometric View as shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6

6. Select Extrude in the Part Features menu as shown in Figure 7. This opens
the Extrude dialog box as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 7 Figure 8

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 3


7. The Profile button should be selected as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9

8. Move the cursor over the sketch till it becomes highlighted and left click, making
sure that the circle is not included, as shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10

9. Set the distance as .5 in and select the middle button with the arrow pointing up
and away from the yellow plane as shown in Figure 11.

4 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 11

10. Click on the OK button and the finished part should look like Figure 12.

Figure 12

© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 5


Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

6 Title of the Project or Textbook


CHAPTER 3
TUTORIAL
Simple Extruding of a Sketch
Learning Objectives
After completing this tutorial, you will be able to:
• Sketch an object
• Extrude a sketch

Required Competencies
Before starting this tutorial, you should have been able to:
• Construct, constraint and dimension sketches
• Make work planes visible

Figure 1

1. Open a new Standard.ipt


2. Click on the plus sign next to origin in the Model panel bar as shown in Figure 2.
Click the right mouse button over the XY Plane and select visibility as shown in Figure
3.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 1


Figure 2 Figure 3

3. Select the Line Button in the 2D sketch panel and create the sketch shown in
Figure 4.

Figure 4

4. Once the sketch is completed and fully dimensioned click on Return in the
Inventor Standard menu at the top of the screen.

Figure 5

2 Title of the Project or Textbook


5. Select Extrude in the Part Features menu as shown in Figure 6. This opens the
Extrude dialog box as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 6 Figure 7

6. The profile should already be highlighted in your work space. In the area
highlighted under the Extents category type in a depth of 2 in as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 8

7. Select the button that has arrows pointing in both directions from the yellow plane
at the bottom of the dialog box; this is considered a midplane extrusion. Click the OK
button.
8. Move the cursor into the workspace and right click to open the options menu.
Select Isometric View as shown in Figure 9.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 3


Figure 9

9. The finished part should look as shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10

© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

4 Title of the Project or Textbook


Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 5


CHAPTER 6
Placed Features
Learning Objectives
After Completing this chapter, you will be able to:
• Understand and create the following features:
• Holes
• Fillets
• Chamfers
• Shell
• Patterns (Rectangular, Circular)

Placed features are predefined features that require specific values as well as the
desired positioning. In order to use placed features there must be a sketched base
feature already created. Editing of placed features is done in the Browser like sketched
features. The use of these placed features is usually more efficient than the use of
sketched features. Please refer to “Learning Inventor” Chapter 6.

HOLES

Creating Holes
There are three types of holes to choose from in Inventor: drilled, counterbore, and
countersink. Each of these hole types also have the option of being tapped. Holes can
have the diameter and depth or termination determined in the Hole menu box.

Steps to creating holes


1. Have a base feature created in which the hole will be placed on.
2. Choose the sketch plane (surface) that the hole will be placed.
3. In order to use the hole command you must place a Point, Hole Center
from the Sketch Panel Bar, Figure 1 .

Figure 1 Figure 2

4. Once the point has been placed in the desired position return to the
Features Panel Bar and select the Hole command shown in Figure 2.
5. The Hole dialog box will then open providing the different options for
hole creation. There are four tabs with various setting options available for each.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 1


Type Tab
This tab allows you to select the hole type, termination, centers, and hole diameter
as shown in Figure 3.
• Hole Types include: drilled, counterbore, and countersink.
• There are three types of Termination to choose from:
ƒ Distance: allows you to give a specific depth for the hole.
ƒ Through All: the hole will cut through the entire part.
ƒ To: allows you to choose a plane in which the hole will stop.
• Centers: this button will allow you to choose multiple hole centers that
will share the same hole type.
• Hole Diameter: allows you to change the diameter of the hole by selecting
the dimension in the dialog box and typing in the desired dimension. See
Figure 3.

Figure 3

Threads Tab
This tab allows you to choose whether you want the hole to be tapped and set the
various values that can be defined. Values that can be changed are the thread depth,
thread type, and thread direction (Right Hand, Left Hand). See Figure 4.

Size Tab
This tab allows you to set the thread’s nominal size, pitch, class, and diameter.

Options Tab
This tab allows you to set the drill point and countersink angles.

2 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 4

NOTE
Any attribute of a hole can be edited by accessing the edit feature command in the Model
Panel.

Example 1
‰ Open the file “Lever.ipt”

Figure 5

‰ Select Sketch from the Command Bar


‰ Click on the top surface of Extrusion 1

Figure 6

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 3


‰ Choose Point, Hole Center and click on the center points of
the two arcs of Extrusion 1 as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7

o Once you have placed the hole centers click Return.

‰ Select Hole from the Features Panel Bar


‰ A Dialog box will appear with the hole options.
‰ Edit the Hole termination and diameter as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 8

‰ Next choose the Threads tab

Figure 9

4 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Select Tapped and Full Depth
‰ Click the OK button

Figure 9

‰ Select the sloped circular surface as the new sketch plane.

Figure 10

‰ Place the Point, Hole Center at the center point of the circle.

Figure 11
‰ Click Return
‰ Select the Hole command.
‰ Select the Threads Tab and turn off Tapped.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 5


Figure 12

‰ Choose Counterbore for the hole type and set the dimensions as shown in Figure 13.

Figure 13
‰ Click the OK button

Figure 14

‰ Select the sloped rectangular surface as your new sketch plane.

Figure 15

‰ Put a Point, Hole Center some where on the sketch plane.

6 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 16

‰ Locate the Point by dimensioning it .75 in from the right edge, and .625 from the top
edge. Refer to Chapter 5

Figure 17
‰ Click Return
‰ Select the Hole feature.
‰ Choose Countersink for the hole type and set the dimensions as shown.

Figure 18
‰ Click the OK button.
‰ The finished part with all the placed holes.

Figure 19

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 7


FILLETS & CHAMFERS

Creating Fillets
Inventor has three different styles of Fillets that can be placed from the feature
menu on a given part. The first style, constant, creates fillets with the same radius from
start to finish of the edge selected. Constant fillets have the following three selection
options: Edge, Loop, Feature.

Edge
This allows you to select individual edges of an object that need to be filleted. If
there are tangent edges they will be selected as one.

Loop
Loop selects all edges of a surface that creates a closed loop.

Feature
The feature option will place fillets on all edges of a selected object.

Steps to creating a constant fillet


1. Have a base feature created in which the fillets will be placed on.
2. Choose the selection option and set the desired radius.
3. Select the edges on the object that will be filleted using whichever
selection option desired.
4. Once all edges that will have the fillet placed on them are selected click
the OK button and the fillets will be placed.

Example 2
‰ Open the file “holder.ipt”

Figure 20

8 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Select Fillet from the Features Bar which will bring up the Fillet Dialog
box.

Figure 21

‰ Set the fillet radius to 6mm and select the four corners as shown in Figure 21 and
click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.

Figure 22 Figure 23

‰ Once again select Fillet.


‰ Set the fillet radius to 3 and choose loop for the select mode.

Figure 24

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 9


‰ Choose all the inner surfaces of the part.

Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27

Figure 28 Figure 29

‰ Once all areas are selected click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.
‰ The finished part should look like Figure 29.

Figure 30

10 Title of the Project or Textbook


Example 3

‰ Open the file “variable fillet.ipt”

Figure 31

‰ Select Fillet from the Features Bar and click on the Variable tab

Figure 32

‰ Click on the top front edge of the part. Notice that the whole edge which includes
the curves is selected.

Figure 33

‰ Now that the edge has been selected, we can add points in which our fillets radius

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 11


can be varied. Notice that there are 5 work points along the selected edge.
Refer to Chapter 7 Work Features. Select each point in order from 1 – 5 as shown
in Figure 34.

Figure 34

‰ In the dialog box click on each point and set the radius to the required value as
shown in the following figures.

Figure 35

12 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Once all radii are set click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.
‰ The finished part should look like Figure 36.

Figure 36

Creating Chamfers
Chamfers are created much in the same way as fillets. When creating chamfers
the edge between two surfaces is selected and the chamfer will be placed. The three
different styles of chamfers to choose from are Distance, Distance and Angle, and Two
Distances.

Distance
This allows you to set the distance offset from the edge selected and places a 45°
chamfer on the edge.

Distance and Angle


Distance and angle allows you to change the angle of the chamfer as well as setting
the distance of offset. Once the two attributes are set, the edge to be chamfered must be
selected as well as the surface in which the distance will be measured.

Two Distances
This option allows the offset distances of each surface to be set. Once the edge to be
chamfered is selected, Distance 1, which will be offset on the surface highlighted, must
be set followed by Distance 2.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 13


Example 4
‰ Open the file “Cover box.ipt”

Figure 37

‰ Select Chamfer from the Features Bar.


‰ Choose distance and set the value for the distance to .75in.

Figure 38

‰ Click on the 2 vertical edges of the front left surface to place the chamfer.

Figure 39

‰ Click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.

14 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 40

‰ Select Chamfer from the Features Bar again.


‰ Choose Distance and Angle and set the value for the distance to .25in and the
angle to 60°.

Figure 41

‰ The select Face tab should already be selected, select the top suface of the part and
left click.

Figure 42

‰ This surface will be the direction of offset from each edge chosen that the distance
will be measured.
‰ Now select the edges that will be chamfered as shown in Figure 43.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 15


Figure 43

‰ Click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.

Figure 44

SHELL

Creating Shells
Shells are useful tools for creating parts that have thin walls in Inventor. The shell
feature has the ability to have a part be hollow or to remove a portion of a face. Some
parts may require different wall thicknesses in different sections of the part which can be
accomodated with the shell command.

16 Title of the Project or Textbook


Steps to creating basic shells
1. Have a base feature created that will have a portion hollowed out or
shelled.
2. Select Shell from the Features Panel Bar.

Figure 45
3. Set the wall thickness as desired and choose the faces that will be removed if
necessary.
4. Once all surfaces are selected click OK or press enter and the part will be shelled.

Example 5
‰ Open the file “Cover box.ipt”

Figure 46

‰ Select Shell from the Part Features panel


‰ Make sure that the Remove Faces button in the dialog box is depressed as shown in
Figure 47.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 17


Figure 47

‰ Move the cursor over the top surface of the part and click to select. This will
highlight that face in which material will be removed.

Figure 48 Figure 49

‰ Set the thickness of the walls to .25in as shown in Figure 49.

‰ Click OK or press Enter on the keyboard and the part will appear with walls rather
than a solid, with the top face being open as shown in Figure 50.

Figure 50

18 Title of the Project or Textbook


PATTERNS

Creating Patterns
The Pattern feature is useful when you have a feature of the part that has multiple
instances. By using the pattern command, the selected feature will be copied and placed
given the dimensions specified. There are two types of patterns to choose from in
Inventor: circular and rectangular. Circular patterns will place the features in a pattern
around a given axis, while rectangular patterns will place them in rows and or columns.

Steps to creating patterns


1. Have a base feature created in which the pattern will be placed on.
2. Choose the feature that will be patterned.

3. Set the direction/axis that the pattern will follow.

4. Set the count and spacing/angle the pattern will follow.

Example 6
‰ Open the file “circular pattern.ipt”

Figure 51

‰ Select Circular Pattern from the Part Features panel, this will open the pattern
dialog box.

Figure 52

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 19


Figure 53

‰ The Features selection button should be depressed, if not click on it. Now click on
the hole that is at the top of extrusion 1 or click on extrusion 2 in the Browser.

Figure 54 Figure 55

‰ Click on the rotation axis selection button to choose the axis that the pattern will be
revolved around.

Figure 56

‰ We will use the given axis of extrusion 1. Select and click on the base feature as
shown in Figure 57.

20 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 57 Figure 58

‰ Set the Count to 6 instances and the Angle to 360°.

Figure 59

‰ Click OK or press Enter on the keyboard.

Figure 60

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 21


NOTE
Try changing the Instances and Angle values by editing the feature in the Browser and see
what happens to the part.

Example 7
‰ Open the file “rectangular pattern.ipt”

Figure 61

‰ Select Rectangular Pattern from the Features Bar, this will open the pattern dialog
box.

Figure 62 Figure 63

22 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Click on the cylinder that is at the bottom left of extrusion 1 or click on extrusion 2 in
the Browser.

Figure 64 Figure 65

‰ Now that the feature to be patterned is selected, click on the Direction 1 selection
button and choose the bottom edge of the base feature.

Figure 66 Figure 67

‰ Notice the direction that the patern is going to be copied. To chage the direction
click on the Path button to switch the direction of pattern to the right as shown in
Figure 69.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 23


Figure 68 Figure 69

‰ Set the Count to 5 and the Spacing to 1.0in.

Figure 70

‰ Click on the Direction 2 selection button and choose the left vertical edge of the base
feature.

Figure 71 Figure 72

24 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Set the Count to 3 and the Spacing to 1.0in. Click OK or press Enter on the
keyboard.

Figure 73

‰ The finished part with both patterns added should look like Figure 74.

Figure 74

© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 25


Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

26 Title of the Project or Textbook


CHAPTER 7
TUTORIAL
Advanced Part Features
Learning Objectives
After Completing this chapter, you will be able to:
• Create the following features:
• Sweeps
• Lofts
• Coils
• Threads
• Ribs & Webs
• Face Draft
• Split Feature
• Slice Graphics

Advanced part features will allow the creation of more complex objects or parts that
could not be created by basic boolean operations. The use of these techniques will assist
in creating complex transitions and shapes.

SWEEPS

Creating Sweeps
Using the sweep feature is a more efficient way of creating piping, tubing and other
complex shapes that follow a path.

Steps to creating sweeps


1. Create a sketch of the path that the sketched feature will follow.
2. Create a sketched feature that is a cross section.
3. Use the sweep command to create the part.

NOTE
Make sure that the path forms a continuous line.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 1


TUTORIAL 1
‰ Open a new Standard. ipt
‰ Make the XZ and YZ planes visible.
‰ Create the sketch of the paperclip. (Figure 1)

Figure 1

‰ Once you have created the sketch click Return


‰ Change your view to Isometric
‰ Select the XZ plane as your new sketch plane as shown in Figure 2.

2 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 2

‰ Click on Project Geometry and select the left verticle line. (Figure 3a)
‰ Draw a diameter .125 circle at the projected point. (Figure 3b)

Figure 3a Figure 3b

‰ Once you have finished the sketch click Return


‰ Click on the Sweep button in the Part Features menu bar

Figure 4

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 3


‰ The profile should already be highlighted and the path button selected

Figure 5

‰ Click on the line that was created in Sketch1. (Figure 6)

Figure 6

‰ Click OK.

4 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 7

COIL

Creating Coils
Coils are a useful option for creating such things as springs, coils, and other helical
shapes. They can be used to create solids or with the cut option to create cuts in a part.
There are three different tabs available in the coil dialog box.

Coil Shape
This tab allows you to choose the profile to be coiled as well as the direction and
axis the coil will follow.

Coil Size
In the coil size tab there are options for adjusting the type of parameters for creating
the coil. Depending on what parameters are chosen for creation of the coil, there are
places for setting the pitch, height, revolution, and taper.

Coil Ends
This tab allows the designer to determine the conditions of the start and end of the
coil feature allow for a natural coil or one with flat ends.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 5


Steps to creating a coil
1. Create an unconsumed sketch, or profile, that is a cross section of the coil
feature that will be created.
2. Have an axis in which the coil will be rotated around.
3. Use the coil option to create the part.

TUTORIAL 2
‰ Open a Standard(mm).ipt
‰ Make the base planes visible.
‰ Create a 5mm circle below the XZ Plane.

Figure 8

‰ Use Project Geometry, and project the XZ plane to be used as the axis.
‰ Dimension the center of the circle to projected XZ plane. Give it a dimension of 15.

Figure 9

‰ Click Return.
‰ Select Coil from the Part Feature menu.

6 Title of the Project or Textbook


Figure 10
‰ The Coil dialog box will open and the circle should already be selected as the profile.
Notice that the Axis button is selected.

Figure 11

‰ Click on the XZ plane as the axis of revolution.

Figure 12

‰ Select the Coil Size tab in the dialog box and change the settings as shown in Figure
13.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 7


Figure 13

‰ Next select the Coil Ends tab and set the Start to Flat.

Figure 14

‰ Click OK and the result should look like Figure 15.

Figure 15

8 Title of the Project or Textbook


THREADS

Creating Threads
The thread feature in Inventor can be used to create a graphical representation of
both internal and external threads. It does not actually remove or add material, it
simply places a graphical representation to give the appearance of threads as well as
allows for thread notes in the drawing mode.

Steps to creating threads


1. Have a base cylindrical feature with the major diameter dimension
created that will have the threads placed on it.
2. Select Threads from the Features Panel Bar.

3. Select the surface/edge threads will be placed and set the data necessary
for creation.

TUTORIAL 3
‰ Open part “Thread.ipt”
‰ Click on Thread in the Feature menu.

Figure 16

‰ This will open Thread Feature dialog box.

Figure 17

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 9


‰ Click on the cylinder surface at the front right edge of the bolt. Make sure that Full
Length is not checked in the dialog box.

Figure 18

‰ Set the Length to 2.5 inches.

Figure 19

‰ Click on the Specifications tab to set the thread type.

Figure 20

10 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Set the Pitch to 1/2-13 UNC. Click OK and the threads should appear as Figure 21.

Figure 21

RIBS & WEBS

Creating Ribs & Webs


Ribs and webs use an unconsumed sketch to create features that are used as
reinforcement in molded parts. By using a single line and the rib feature, Inventor will
create a closed ribbed feature or an open webbed feature set to the specifications
determined in the Rib Dialog box.

Steps to creating ribs


1. Have a base feature created in which the rib will be placed on.
2. Sketch the profile of the rib or web.

3. Select the Rib feature button in the Feature menu bar.

Click on the profile.

4. Set the attributes in the dialog box as desired and click OK.

TUTORIAL 4
‰ Open the file “base.ipt”
‰ Select the top surface of the base part as the sketch plane.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 11


Figure 22

‰ Sketch a line from the mid point of the top left projected edge to the mid point of the
bottom right projected edge.

Figure 23 Figure 24

‰ Create another line from the mid point of the bottom left projected edge to the mid
point of the top right projected edge.

Figure 25 Figure 26

Figure 27

12 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Click Return.
‰ Click on the Rib button in the Part Feature menu bar.

Figure 28

‰ In the Rib dialog box the profile button should already be selected, if not then select
the profile button.

Figure 29

‰ Click on the two lines just created as the profile.

Figure 30

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 13


‰ Set the thickness to .25in. Then click on the Direction button.

Figure 31

‰ Set the direction to be facing towards the interior of the part.

Figure 32

‰ Click on OK. Nottice that the rib did not go through the hole portion of the part.

Figure 33

14 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Next right click on rib1 in the browser and edit feature.
‰ Change the Extents to finite.

Figure 34

‰ A new attribute box opens inside the Extents section of the dialog box. Change this
dimension to .25 inches.

Figure 35

‰ Click OK. Nottice the change from rib to web.

Figure 36

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 15


FACE DRAFT

Creating Face Drafts


Face draft adds an angled/sloped surface to any face of a part either internal or
external. This is commonly used for molded or cast parts.

Steps to creating a face draft


1. Have a base part created in which a face/surface will be sloped.
2. Choose the face draft command in the part feature menu.

3. Select the pull direction that the mold will be removed from the part.

4. Select the face/faces that will have the draft applied to and set the angle of
draft.

TUTORIAL 5
‰ Open the file “draft.ipt”

Figure 37 Figure 38

‰ Select Face Draft from the Features Bar.

‰ The Pull direction button should be selected. (Figure 39)

16 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Select the interior bottom surface.

Figure 39 Figure 40

‰ Next select the interior faces that will be drafted, since there are fillets on the corners
it will automatically choose all the faces. Select the top left edge where the interior
vertical faces meet the top face.

Figure 41

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 17


‰ Set the Draft Angle to 5° and press Enter or click OK.

Figure 42

‰ Change the part display to Hidden Edge Display. Notice the slope that has been
applied to the faces.

Figure 43

Figure 44

18 Title of the Project or Textbook


SPLIT FEATURE

Creating Split Features


Cutting and removing faces and parts can be performed using the split feature tool.
By using a sketched shape, surface, or workplane to use as a cutting edge, the entire part
can be split and have a portion removed.

Steps to creating split feature


1. Have a base part created.
2. Either select a created sketch geometry, a workplane, or use an existing
surface to be used as the cutting edge.

3. Select whether the part or the face will be split.

4. If the part is to be split select the direction that the material will be
removed from.

TUTORIAL 6
‰ Open a new “Standard.ipt”
‰ Create the following sketch.

Figure 45

‰ Extrude the profile 2 inches..


‰ View the part in isometric and select the top surface as the new sketch plane. (Figure
46)

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 19


Figure 46

‰ Sketch a three point arc from corner to corner, giving the arc a dimension of 6.5
inches.

Figure 47

‰ Select Split from the Part Features menu bar.

Figure 48
‰ In the Split dialog box click on Split Part.

Figure 49

20 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Select the Split Tool button and click on the arc.

Figure 50

‰ If the arrow is not pointing toward you, click on the reverse direction button that is
in the Remove section of the dialog box.

Figure 51

‰ Click OK or press Enter.

Figure 52

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 21


SLICE GRAPHICS

Using Slice Graphics


Some parts are rather complex and require sketching on planes or surfaces that are
dificult to see. For these problems the use of Slice Graphics can be handy. This will
temporarily remove part material so that you can view the sketch plane to work easier.

Steps for slicing graphics


1. Have a base part created in which the sketch plane goes through.
2. Using the View pull down menu or by right clicking the mouse in the
work area select Slice Graphics.

TUTORIAL 7
‰ Open the file “swing arm.ipt”
‰ Create a work axis through the counterbores in the front and the back of the part.

Figure 53 Figure 54

‰ Create a new workplane bisecting the part through the new workaxises.

Figure 55

22 Title of the Project or Textbook


‰ Choose the new workplane as the sketch.

Figure 56

‰ Click the right mouse button in the work area and select Slice Graphics.

Figure 57

‰ Notice that we can now view inside the object along the sketch plane we are using as
shown in figure 58.

Chapter XX Chapter Title Goes Here 23


Figure 58

‰ We can now project geometry onto our current sketch plane and work without using
wireframe.

© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

24 Title of the Project or Textbook


CHAPTER 7
TUTORIAL
Sweep and Multiple
Thickness Shell
Learning Objectives
After completing this tutorial, you will be able to:
• Create a multiple thickness shell
• Create a sweep

Required Competencies
Before starting this tutorial, you should have been able to:
• Construct, constraint and dimension sketches
• Use free rotate
• Create work planes
• Create holes

1. Open the part shellwithsweep.ipt

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 1


2. Select Shell from the Part Features panel bar as shown in Figure 1. This will
open the shell dialog box from which the specifications will be set as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 1 Figure 2

3. Rotate the part to view the bottom surface. This will be the face that will be
removed. The button next to Remove Faces should be selected already, if not click on
the button to select it. Move the cursor to the bottom face and click as shown in Figure
3.

Figure 3

5. Set the wall Thickness to .25 in. as shown in Figure 4. For this part the back
walls need to be a thickness of .375 due to structural requirements from the
addition of a handle to be placed on the back.

Figure 4

2 Title of the Project or Textbook


6. Click on the button with the two greater than symbols located at the bottom
right corner of the dialog box to open the unique face thickness options dialog as shown
in Figure 5.

Figure 5

7. Move the cursor in the white area of the dialog box and click where the words Click
to add are located as shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 3


8. The words 0 Selected should be highlighted in blue at this time. This option allows
the selection of the faces that will have a different thickness than the rest of the faces.
Click on the two back surfaces to have the different thickness as shown in Figures 7 and
8.

Figure 7 Figure 8

9. After selecting the two faces it will say 2 Selected. Next click on 0.25 under the
Thickness tab of the dialog box and type in .375 as the thickness as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9

10. Click on the OK button and the shelled part should look like Figure 10.

Figure 10

4 Title of the Project or Textbook


11. Set the part back to the Isometric view to begin placing the holes. Select Sketch
and click on the top surface of the part as shown in Figure 11.

Figure 11

12. Place a Point, Hole Center somewhere on the sketch plane and position it in the
center of the face using construction lines and Horizontal and Vertical constraints as
shown in Figures 12 and 13.

Figure 12 Figure 13

13. Click on the Return button to switch to the Part Features mode.. Select the Hole
feature to open the hole dialog box as shown in Figure 14. Set the hole depth and
diameter to 0.5 in. as shown in Figure15.

Figure 14 Figure 15

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 5


14. After the hole is created on the top of the part select the left surface, as shown in
Figure 16, as the sketch plane for creating the second hole. We don’t need to place a
Point,Hole Center because the center point of the bottom right arc will be used as the
center of the new hole.

Figure 16

15. Click on the Return button to switch to the Part Features mode. Select the Hole
feature to open the hole dialog box. Notice that the button next to Centers is selected.
Click on the center point of the bottom arc as shown in Figure 17. Set the Termination
to Through All and the diameter to 0.5 in. as shown in Figure18.

Figure 17

Figure 18

6 Title of the Project or Textbook


16. In order to begin the sweep a new work plane must be created. Create an offset
work plane parallel to the top surface down at a distance of -1.75 in. as shown in Figure
19.

Figure 19

17. Choose Sketch from the menu bar and select this new work plane to be the new
sketch plane. Once the sketch plane is selected choose the Look At command, Figure 20,
and click on the work plane to view the part from the top.

Figure 20

18. Select Project Geometry from the 2D Sketch Panel as shown in Figure 21. Select
the top and bottom horizontal edges of the part as shown in Figures 22 and 23.

Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 7


19. Create the sketch, as shown in figure 24, which will be used as the path for the
sweep. Make sure that the center points of the arcs are in line with the left edge and
equally spaced from the top and bottom edges of the part. Use the Coincident and
Equal constraints to perform this task.

Figure 24

20. Click Return to switch to the Part Feature mode. Switch to the Isometric view
and select the left surface as the new sketch plane as shown in Figure 25.

Figure 25

8 Title of the Project or Textbook


21. Use Project Geometry to project the short line of the previous sketch as a point on
the new sketch plane as shown in Figure 26.

Figure 26

22. Draw a circle using the projected point as the center point as shown in Figure 27.
Dimension the circle with a diameter of 0.25 in. as shown in Figure 28.

Figure 27 Figure 28

22. Click Return to and select Sweep from the Part Features panel to open the Sweep
Dialog box as shown in Figures 29 and 30.

Figure 29 Figure 30

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 9


23. Select the circle that was just sketched as the Profile as shown in Figure 31.
Next click on the button next to Path in the dialog box and click on the first
sketch as shown in Figure 32 as the sweep path.

Figure 31 Figure 32

24. Once the Path and Profile of the sweep are selected click OK, which should
create the finished part shown in Figure 33.

Figure 33

10 Title of the Project or Textbook


© By downloading this document you agree to the following:

Educators only may use this material for educational purposes only at an
accredited high school or college. As an educator, you may copy this
document as many times as you need for your classroom students. You may
not distribute, publish, modify, display, email/transmit to others, create other
similar works from this document, in any way. Any other use of this
document is strictly prohibited.

Disclaimer:
This tutorial is designed for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for
manufacture of parts, drawings or assemblies or merchandising of products. The author
or publisher shall not be liable for any damages, in whole or part, from the use of this
tutorial and its materials or any revisions of this tutorial or materials.

Tutorial # chapter title goes here 11


CHAPTER
TUTORIAL
Coil Features in Parts

Learning Objectives
After completing this tutorial, you will be able to:
• Construct and use coils

Required Competencies
Before starting this tutorial, you should have been able to:
• Construct, constraint and dimension Sketches
• Project Geometry on Sketch Planes
• Construct Work Features

Figure 1: Impeller

1.  Open file impeller_shaft.ipt 

Figure 2: Impeller_shaft

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 1


2.  Construct a new Work Plane parallel to the default XY plane at an offset distance of 
4.25”. 
 
a.  Click the work plane tool on the part feature toolbar.  

Figure 3

      b.  Expand the Origin in the Browser and click the default XY plane.  

Figure 4

c.  Drag the new work plane to an offset distance of 4.25”. 

2 Coil Features in Parts


Figure 5

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 3


3.  Project the default Y-Axis on the new work plane. 
 
a.  Enter Sketch Mode and select the newly constructed  work plane as a sketch 
plane.  
 
b.  Click the Project Geometry tool.   

Figure 6

c.  Click the Y-Axis in the Browser.  

Figure 7.a Figure 7.b

4 Coil Features in Parts


d.  Exit Sketch Mode. 
 
4.  Construct a new Work Plane 2 making a 24o angle with the previously constructed 
Work Plane 1 and passing through the Projected Y-Axis. 
 
a.  Click the work plane tool and select the projected Y‐Axis. 

Figure 8

b.  Click the previously constructed Work Plane 1 and change the angle to 24o to 
create Work Plane 2.. 

Figure 9.a Figure 9.b

5.  Construct a new Work Axis 1 coinciding with the Projected Y‐Axis.     


           

Figure 10.a Figure 10.b

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 5


6.  Turn the visibility of Work plane 1 and the previously constructed Sketch off. 

Figure 11

7.  Click the Look At button and click Work Plane 2. 

Figure 12
8.  Rotate the image 90o.  

Figure 13

9.  Enter Sketch Mode and select work plane 2 as a sketch plane.  

6 Coil Features in Parts


10. Right‐click on the work plane and Slice Graphics.

Figure 14.b

Figure 14.a

11.    Use  the  Project Geometry  tool  and  project  Work  Axis  1  and  the  Z‐Axis  on  the 
work plane. 

Figure 15.a

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 7


Figure 15.c

Figure 15.b

12.  Construct the following sketch.   

Note: The next three (3) pages outline suggested construction steps.  

Figure 16

8 Coil Features in Parts


Suggested Construction Steps
a.   

Figure 17.a
 
b.

Figure 17.b

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 9


c.  Trim   

Figure 17.c
d. 

Figure 17.d

10 Coil Features in Parts


e.  Trim and verify that the Tangency Constraints between adjacent arcs are        
maintained. 

Figure 17.e

f.  The following should be Driven Dimensions. 

Figure 17.f

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 11


13.  Exit Sketch Mode and Coil the drawn profile about the Z‐Axis, 1/3 of a revolution 
to a coil height of 2.923” 
 
a.  Click the Coil tool on the Feature toolbar.  

Figure 18

b.  Select the drawn profile. 

Figure 19

12 Coil Features in Parts


c.    Select  the  Z‐Axis  and  the  proper  Direction  and  Rotation  for  the  required  coil 
shape. 

Figure 20

d.  Click the Coil Size tab and adjust the parameters as shown below. 

Figure 21

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 13


e.  Click the Coil Ends tab and select Natural Start and End and click OK.     

Figure 22.a

Figure 22.b

14 Coil Features in Parts


14.  Enter Sketch Mode and select Surface A as the sketch plane.  Click the Look At 
button. 

Figure 23

15.  Construct the .410” diameter hole as shown below and exit Sketch Mode.

Figure 24

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 15


16.  Coil and Cut the drawn profile with the same parameters as in step 13.  

Figure 25.a

Figure 25.b

16 Coil Features in Parts


17.  Create a Circular Pattern of the two Coils about the Z‐Axis with three (3) 
occurrences in the pattern. 

a.  Click the Circular Pattern tool on the Feature toolbar and select the two Coils as 
Features. 

Figure 26

b.    Click  the  Rotation  Axis  button,  select  the  Z‐Axis  in  the  Browser  and  adjust  the 
required parameters as shown below. 
 

Figure 27

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 17


18.  Turn the visibility of the YZ plane on. 

Figure 28

19.  Enter Sketch Mode and select the YZ plane as a sketch plane. Use the Look At and 


Slice Graphics functions for easy construction. Rotate the image. 

Figure 29
20.  Use the Project Geometry tool and project Edge 1, the larger diameter portion of 
the shaft 2 and 3, and the Z‐Axis on the sketch plane. 

Figure 30

18 Coil Features in Parts


21.  Construct the following sketch. 

Figure 31

22.  Exit Sketch Mode, Revolve and Cut the constructed profile about the Z‐Axis. 

Figure 32

Tutorial # Coil Features in Parts 19


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20 Coil Features in Parts


Autodesk Inventor Tutorial 1
Introduction to Autodesk Inventor
Ron K C Cheng

AUTODESK INVENTOR FUNCTIONS


A product usually consists of a number of component parts. Using computer as a tool to design
and manufacture products, you construct computer models to represent each individual component
of the product and put the computer models together to form a virtual assembly to explore and
evaluate the integrity of the design. To illustrate how the components of an assembly are related
to each other, you explode them apart. Although it is very common to use electronic data of
computer models directly in downstream computerized manufacturing operations, there are times
when conventional 2D engineering drawings are required. To meet this requirement, you output
engineering drawings from the computer models of the individual parts, assemblies, and exploded
assemblies. Serving these design requirements, Autodesk Inventor has four basic functions:
constructing 3D parametric solid parts, assemblies of solid parts, exploded presentations of
assemblies, and engineering drawings.

Constructing Solid Parts and Sheet Metal Parts


The prime function of Autodesk Inventor is to construct computer models in the form of 3D
parametric solid parts and 3D sheet metal parts that represent a component part in the computer.
Figure 1–1 shows a solid part for the model of a component of a radio controlled toy car.

Figure 1–1
Solid part of the chassis of a scale model car

Sheet metal parts are a special kind of solid part. You make a sheet metal component by cutting
and folding a sheet of metal of uniform thickness. To meet the manufacturing requirement of
providing rounded bends at the joints of faces, relieves at the bends, hems at the edges, and seams
at the joints, you need a special kind of solid modeling tool. Figure 1–2 shows the model of a sheet
component.

1
2

Figure 1–2
Sheet metal component

Constructing Assemblies of Solid Parts


The next function of Autodesk Inventor is to construct a virtual assembly of 3D solid parts. An
assembly is a device consisting of a number of component parts. Figure 1–3 shows the assembly
of the axle of a toy car.

Figure 1–3
Assembly of the axle of a toy car

Constructing Exploded Presentation of Assemblies


The third function of Autodesk Inventor is to construct an exploded presentation of assemblies. To
illustrate how various parts of an assembly are put together, you construct a presentation of an
assembly. In the presentation, you explode or tweak the components apart. Figure 1–4 shows that
exploded presentation of the assembly shown in Figure 1–3.

Figure 1–4
Presentation of the assemble of the rear axle
Introduction to Autodesk Inventor 3

Constructing Engineering Drawings


The fourth function of Autodesk Inventor is to construct engineering drawings. Engineering
drawing is an engineering communication tool that depicts a 3D design in 2D engineering drawing
views. You specify a solid part or an assembly and the computer application can automatically
generate 2D orthographic views of 3D solid parts, sheet metal parts, and assemblies, flat patterns
of sheet metal, and exploded views of assemblies. Figure 1–5 shows the engineering drawing
derived from the solid part of a toy car body.

Figure 1–5
Toy car body and its engineering drawing

AUTODESK INVENTOR FILE T YPES


To cope with the four design functions, Autodesk Inventor uses four kinds of files:
Part files for constructing solid parts
Assembly files for assemblies of solid parts or sub-assemblies
Presentation files for exploded views of an assembly
Drawing files for engineering drawings

Part Files
You construct a 3D solid part or a sheet metal part in a part file; the file extension is .ipt. A part
file stores the definition of the parametric 3D solid part.

Assembly Files
To construct an assembly or a sub-assembly, you use an assembly file; the file extension is .iam.
An assembly file links to a set of parametric 3D solid parts and/or sub-assembly of parametric 3D
solid parts. It stores only the information on how the component parts are assembled together and
information regarding the details of the parametric 3D solid parts is stored in the corresponding
part files. Each time you open an assembly file, information from the part files is retrieved.
4

Presentation Files
To construct an exploded presentation of an assembly or animate the exploded presentation, you
use a presentation file; the file extension is .ipn. A presentation file links to an assembly file. It
stores the information on how the parts of the assembly are tweaked apart. Details regarding how
the component parts are assembled are stored in the respective assembly file.

Drawing Files
To construct a 2D engineering drawing of a parametric 3D solid part, an assembly of 3D solid
parts, and an exploded view of an assembly, you use a drawing file; the file extension is .idw. A
drawing file links to a part file, an assembly file, or a presentation file. It stores the information
about the 2D presentation of 3D objects.

File Icons
To depict the four kinds of files, different icons are used. See Figure 1–6.

Figure 1–6
Icons (from let to right) for part file, assembly file, presentation file, and drawing file

APPLICATION WINDOW
Now select the Cancel button of the Open dialog box. This brings you to the Inventor application
window. (See Figure 1–7.)

Figure 1–7
Application window
Introduction to Autodesk Inventor 5

In the application window, there are five major areas. At the top of the window, there is the
standard Windows title bar which displays the name of the application. Below the title bar, is a set
of pull-down menus, and below the menus is the Standard toolbar (Figure 1–8). Below the toolbar
is a graphics area, and at the bottom of the window, there is a status bar.

Figure 1–8
Standard toolbar

Starting A New File


Having decided what to do (construct a part, assembly, presentation, or drawing file), you start a
new file by selecting New from the File pull-down menu. In the Open dialog box, select New from
the What To Do panel. Then you will find three tabs: Default, English, and Metric. In each tab,
there are a number of template files. The English tab has English templates; the Metric tab has
metric templates (including BSI, DIN, GB, ISO, and JIS standards); and the Default tab has
templates configured for the default measurement system you selected when you installed
Inventor. Select the Default tab. You will find five template icons: Sheet Metal.ipt, Standard.iam,
Standard.idw, Standard.ipn, and Standard.ipt.

New Part File


There are two part file templates, Sheet Metal.ipt and Standard.ipt. Figure 1–9 shows the
application window for constructing a solid part or a sheet metal part.

Figure 1–9
Application window for a 3D solid part file
6

New Assembly File


Select the Standard.iam template to construct an assembly of parts. Figure 1–10 shows the
application window for constructing an assembly.

Figure 1–10
Application window for an assembly file

New Presentation File


Select the Standard.ipn template to construct a presentation of assemblies. Figure 1–11 shows the
application window for constructing a presentation of an assembly.

Figure 1–11
Application window for a presentation file
Introduction to Autodesk Inventor 7

New Engineering Drawing File


Select the Standard.idw template to construct an engineering drawing. Figure 1–12 shows the
application window for constructing an engineering drawing.

Figure 1–12
Application window for a drawing file

Panel Bar and Browser Bar


Common to the four application windows, there are three additional window areas: the panel bar
and the browser bar. The panel bar has a number of palettes that enable you to access various
design tools. The panel bar is context sensitive, so the tools available will vary according to current
design context. In each palette of the panel bar, there are two modes available: general mode and
expert mode. In general mode, there is text accompanying each icon to depict the command. In
expert mode, text is not displayed until you place the cursor on the icon. Figure 1–13 shows the
Sketch panel bar in general mode.

Figure 1–13
Sketch Panel bar

The browser bar shows a hierarchy of objects in the file. Figure 1–14 shows the browser bar for a
part file. To increase the graphics area, you can close the panel bar and the browser bar.
8

Figure 1–14
Browser bar

Right-Click Menus
Normally, your mouse has two buttons. You use the left button to select an object and use the
right mouse button to activate a shortcut menu. Depending on the location of the mouse cursor
and the kind of file you are working on, right-clicking the mouse will bring up different kinds of
shortcut menus—they are context sensitive. You select an appropriate command from it. You will
use the right-click button very often in the following chapters while you work through the tutorials.
Figure 1–15 shows a right-click menu when you place your mouse on the graphics area of a part
file.

Figure 1–15
Context sensitive right-click menu
Autodesk Inventor Tutorial 2
Introduction to Part Modeling
Ron K C Cheng

PARAMETRIC FEATURE -BASED SOLID MODELING


CONCEPTS
Autodesk Inventor is a parametric feature-based solid modeling application. Parameters of all
objects are modifiable. To construct a 3D solid model, you think about how to decompose it into
features, construct the features one by one, and combine them as you construct them. To
construct the solid features, you either make sketches or select a pre-constructed solid feature
from the menu.

Sketched Solid Features


Sketched solid features derive from sketches. There are four basic kinds of sketched solid
features: extruded, revolved, loft, and sweep. In addition, there are other kinds of sketched
features: coil, rib, and split.

Extruded Feature
To make an extruded solid feature, you make a sketch and extrude the sketch in a direction
perpendicular to the plane of the sketch. (See Figure 2–1.) You extrude the sketch in either
direction or from mid-plane.

Figure 2–1
Sketch extruded in either direction and from mid-plane

Revolved Feature
To make a revolved solid feature, you make a sketch and revolve it about an axis in either
direction or from mid-plane. (See Figure 2–2.)

1
2

Figure 2–2
Sketch revolved in either direction and from mid-plane

Loft Feature
A loft solid feature builds on multiple sketches. It has a variable cross section defined by two or
more sketches residing on different sketch planes. To construct a loft solid, you construct two or
more sketches on the different sketch planes, and loft from one sketch to another sketch. Figure
2–3 shows a set of sketches and a loft solid constructed from the sketches.

Figure 2–3
Sketches constructed on three sketch planes and loft solid feature constructed from the sketches

Sweep Feature
Construction of a sweep solid feature requires two sketches: a profile sketch and a path sketch.
The sweep solid’s volume is defined by sweeping the profile sketch along the path sketch. There
are two kinds of path sketch: 2D path sketch and 3D path sketch. Sweeping a profile sketch along
a 2D path sketch, you construct a 2D sweep solid feature. Sweeping a profile sketch along a 3D
path sketch, you get a 3D sweep solid feature.

2D Sweeping

In a 2D sweep feature, both the profile sketch and the path sketch are 2D. They lie on planar
sketch planes. Figure 2–4 shows a 2D profile and a 2D path (left) and a 2D sweep solid derived
from the sketches (right).
Part Modeling 3

Figure 2–4
Profile sketch and 2D path sketch (left) and 2D sweep solid (right)

3D Sweeping

Construction of 2D and 3D sweep solids is similar, both require a profile sketch to depict the cross
section of the sweep solid and a path sketch to specify the path of the sweep operation. The
difference between them lies on the shape of the sweep path. In a 2D sweep solid feature, the
path sketch is planar. In a 3D sweep solid feature, the path is three dimensional. Figure 2–5 shows
a profile sketch and 3D path sketch together with a 3D sweep solid.

Figure 2–5
Profile sketch and 3D path sketch (left) and 3D sweep solid (right)

Coil Feature

A coil solid is a special kind of 3D sweep solid in which the profile sketch is swept along a helical
path. To make a coil solid, you construct a 2D sketch to depict the cross section of the coil,
specify an axis, and specify the parameters of the helix. The axis can be a line, an edge, or a work
axis. (See Figure 2–6.)
4

Figure 2–6
Sketch and coil feature

Rib Feature
A rib is a triangular or rectangular reinforcing element you add to a component to strengthen it.
(See Figure 2–7.) In essence, a rib is a special kind of extruded solid feature. To construct a rib,
you construct an open-loop sketch profile and use the body of the solid to form a close loop in
extruding.

Figure 2–7
Two kinds of rib

Split Features
There are two kinds of split features: face split and part split. Using a split tool, a face split feature
splits the faces of a solid part into two pieces, and a part split feature splits a solid part into two
solids and removes one of them. You can use a work plane, a sketch, or a surface as split tool.
Figure 2–8 shows a face split feature and Figure 2–9 shows a part split feature. Both of them use
a sketch as a split tool.
Part Modeling 5

Figure 2–8
Work plane used as split tool (left) and faces split (right)

Figure 2–9
Work plane used as split tool (left) and part split (right)

Sketched Surface Features


Using the four basic sketched feature construction methods (extruding a sketch, revolving a
sketch, lofting two or more sketches, and sweeping a sketch along another sketch), you can
construct surfaces as well as solids. The surfaces that you construct are: extruded surface,
revolved surface, loft surface, and sweep surface. To construct surfaces, you select the Surface
button from the feature construction dialog box. You can use surfaces as split tool to split a part
and as termination objects when constructing an extruded or revolved solid feature.

Sketch Planes
To construct a sketched solid feature, you start with a sketch. To construct a sketch, you need a
sketch plane. There are three default planes where you specify a sketch plane: XY plane, XZ
plane, and YZ plane. In addition, you can use any existing planes of a solid feature or use artificial
planes established by using work features. Figure 2–10 shows a sketch constructed on a face of a
solid part.
6

Figure 2–10
Sketch plane establishd on the face of a solid

Boolean Operations
The first sketched solid feature you construct in a 3D solid part is called the base solid feature.
Using feature-based approach to construct a complex solid part, you construct additional features
and combine them, one by one, with the existing solid by using one of the three kinds of Boolean
operations: join, cut, or intersect.

Join
Using the join operation, you join the new sketched solid feature with the existing solid. The
resulting solid has the volume enclosed by the new solid feature and the existing solid. Figure 2–11
shows a revolved solid feature joined to an extruded solid.

Figure 2–11
New sketched solid feature joined to the existing solid

Cut
Using the cut operation, you cut the new sketched solid feature from the existing solid. The
resulting solid has the volume of the new sketched solid feature removed from the existing solid.
Figure 2–12 shows a revolved solid feature cut from an extruded solid.
Part Modeling 7

Figure 2–12
New sketched solid feature cut from the existing solid

Intersect
Using the intersect operation, you intersect the new sketched solid feature with the existing solid.
The resulting solid has a volume that contains the portion common to both the new sketched solid
feature and the existing solid. Figure 2–13 shows a revolved solid feature intersecting with an
extruded solid.

Figure 2–13
New sketched solid feature intersected with the existing solid

Placed Solid Features


Apart from constructing features from sketches, you can construct a feature by selecting a shape
from the menu and specify the parameters. We call these pre-constructed solid shapes the placed
solid features. Autodesk Inventor has nine kinds of placed solid features: hole, thread, shell, fillet,
chamfer, rectangular pattern, circular pattern, mirror, and face draft features.

Hole Feature
A hole is a circular feature cut on a solid. While cutting a hole, you can tap the hole to incorporate
an internal thread. To construct a hole, you place a hole feature by specifying type, size, and
location. Figure 2–14 shows three hole features placed on a solid.
8

Figure 2–14
An outside view and a cutaway view of a rectangular solid with three hole features

Thread Feature
To construct a thread feature, you select a circular feature and specify the pitch and length of the
thread. Figure 2–15 shows two thread features placed on the external and an internal circular
features of a solid.

Figure 2–15
Thread features placed on ciruclar faces of a solid part

Shell Feature
To make a solid hollow, you place a shell feature and state the thickness of the shell. Figure 2–16
shows a shell feature placed on a solid part, making the solid hollow.

Figure 2–16
Solid part made hollow

Fillet Feature
A fillet feature rounds off the edges of a solid; you select edges and specify fillet radii. Figure 2–
17 shows a fillet feature placed on a solid, rounding off three edges and a corner.
Part Modeling 9

Figure 2–17
Fillet feature placed on a solid

Chamfer Feature
A chamfer feature bevels the edges of a solid; you select edges and specify bevel distances or the
bevel distance and bevel angle. Figure 2–18 shows a chamfer feature placed on a solid.

Figure 2–18
Chamfer features placed on a solid

Rectangular Pattern
To repeat a solid feature in a rectangular array, you select the feature and specify the directions,
distances, and the number of repetitions. Figure 2–19 shows a rectangular slot repeated in a
rectangular array.

Figure 2–19
Rectangular pattern feature

Circular Pattern
To repeat a solid feature in a circular array, you select the feature and specify an axis, angular
distance, and number of repetitions. Figure 2–20 shows a gear tooth repeated in a circular array.
10

Figure 2–20
Circular pattern feature

Mirror Feature
To construct a mirror copy of a solid feature, you select a feature and specify a mirror plane.
Figure 2–21 shows a shaped slot mirrored about an artificial work plane.

Figure 2–21
Mirror feature placed

Face Draft Feature


To taper the faces of a solid, you place a face draft feature. You select an edge or a split line and
specify a draft angle. Figure 2–22 shows a face draft feature placed on the vertical faces of a
solid part.

Figure 2–22
Face draft feature placed along the edges of a solid
Part Modeling 11

By now, you should have a general picture of two kinds of sketched solid features (extruded and
revolved) and various kinds of placed solid features (hole, thread, shell, fillet, chamfer, rectangular
pattern, circular pattern, mirror, and face draft) that you use in making a solid model.

WORK FEATURES
To help establish sketch plane and references for solid modeling, you construct artificial planes,
axes, and points. They are work points, work axes, and work planes. Collectively, we call them
work features.

Features in a Solid Part


Together with sketched solid features and placed solid features, there can be three kinds of
features in a solid part. They are:
1. Sketched Solid Features
2. Placed Solid Features
3. Work Features
Autodesk Inventor Tutorial 3
Assembly Modeling
Ron K C Cheng

Assembly Modeling Concepts


With the exception of very simple objects, such as a ruler, most objects have more than one part
put together to form a useful whole. The set of parts put together is called an assembly. When you
design the parts for an assembly, the relative dimensions and positions of parts, and how they fit
together, are crucial. You need to know whether there is any interference among the mating
parts. If there is interference, you need to find out where it occurs; then you can eliminate it.
Apart from fitting the parts together, you also need to validate relative motions and check
clearances if there are moving parts in the assembly. Moreover, you should critically evaluate the
parts and the assembly as a whole to ensure the assembly functions correctly in accordance with
the design intent. To shorten the design lead time, you construct virtual assemblies in the computer
to validate the integrity of the parts and the assembly.

Components
For complex devices that have many parts, it is common practice to organize the parts into a
number of smaller sub-assemblies such that each sub-assembly has fewer parts. Therefore, an
assembly set consists of an assembly file and a number of part files or an assembly file together
with a number of sub-assembly files and part files. Collectively calling the individual parts or sub-
assemblies as components, you can define an assembly in the computer as a data set containing
information about a collection of components linked to the assembly and how the components are
assembled together. Figure 3–1 shows an assembly of a model car. It is a set of components.

Figure 3–1
An assembly of components

1
2

Part File and Assembly File


To construct an assembly in the computer, you start a new assembly file and connect a set of
relevant part files and/or assembly files (sub-assemblies) to the assembly file. In the computer, the
part files store the information about the 3D objects and the assembly files store the information
about how you assemble the 3D objects together. (See Table 6–1.) Because the part files hold the
definitions of the solid parts and link to the assembly file, any change you make to the part files
will be incorporated in the assembly automatically.

Table 6–1 Information


File Information
Part File Definition and information of individual 3D solid part

Assembly File Information on the locations of the linked components and how the linked
components are assembled together

Construction of an assembly
Construction of an assembly in the computer involves two major tasks: gathering a set of
components in an assembly file and assembling the components by applying appropriate assembly
constraints. How you gather a set of components in an assembly depends on which design
approach you take and how you apply assembly constraints depends on the shapes of the features
of the components in the assembly.

Design Approaches
There are three design approaches: bottom-up, top-down, (bottom being the parts, and top being
the assembly) and hybrid. In a bottom-up approach, you construct all the component parts and
then assemble them in an assembly file. In a top-down approach, you start an assembly file and
construct the individual component parts while you are doing the assembly. The hybrid approach is
a combination of the bottom-up and top-down approaches.

The Bottom-Up Approach


When you already have a good idea on the size and shape of the components of an assembly or
you are working as a team on an assembly, you use the bottom-up approach. Through parametric
solid modeling methods, you construct all the parts to appropriate sizes and shapes that best
describe the components of the assembly. Then you start an assembly file and place the parts in
the assembly. In the assembly, you align the components together by applying assembly
constraints. After putting all the parts together, you analyze and make necessary changes to the
parts.

The Top-Down Approach


Sometimes you have a concept in your mind, but you do not have any concrete ideas about the
component parts. You use the top-down approach—you start an assembly file and design some
component parts there. From the preliminary component parts, you improvise. The main
Assembly Modeling 3

advantages in using this approach are that you see other parts while working on an individual part
and you can continuously switch from designing one part to another.

The Hybrid Approach


In reality, you seldom use one approach alone. You use the bottom-up approach for standard
component parts and new parts that you already know about and you use the top-down approach
to figure out new component parts with reference to the other component parts. This combined
approach is the hybrid approach.

Part Modeling Mode and Assembly Modeling Mode


On matter which design approach you use to construct an assembly, you can switch from
assembly modeling mode to part modeling mode (or vice versa) any time you feel appropriate. In
assembly modeling mode, you use the assembly modeling tools to construct an assembly. (You will
learn more about assembly modeling in this and the next chapter.) In part modeling mode while
working in an assembly, the assembly model tools are replaced by the set of part modeling tool
and the other component parts in the assembly are grayed out.

Components in an Assembly
In an assembly file, the components are free to translate in three linear directions and three
rotational directions. You move and rotate them as if you were manipulating a real object. To
impose restriction to the movements and to align a component properly with another component in
the assembly, you apply assembly constraints.

Degrees of Freedom
Initially, the component parts (except the first component) that you place or create in an assembly
are free to translate in the 3D space, in three linear directions and three rotational directions.
These free translations are called the six degrees of freedom (DOF). The DOF of a component is
represented by a DOF symbol (see Figure 3–2). You discover the DOF of the objects in an
assembly by selecting Degrees of Freedom from the View menu.

Figure 3–2
Six degrees of freedom of a free object
4

Grounding
By default, the first component part that you place or create in the assembly is fixed in the 3D
space. We call a fixed object a grounded object, it has no degree of freedom—you cannot move
it. To free a grounded object, you select the object, right-click, and deselect Grounded. (See Figure
3–3.) On the other hand, if you want to fix an object in 3D space, you ground the object by right-
clicking and selecting Grounded.

Translation of Objects in 3D Space


Unless a component part is grounded, it is free to translate in the 3D space. To translate the
component parts in an assembly to their appropriate locations, you move or rotate them. Note that
moving or rotating a component does not affect a component’s DOF. You simply put it in a new
position and new orientation.

Figure 3–3
Grounded selected

Applying Assembly Constraints


To restrict the movement of a component in 3D and to align it with another component in the
assembly, you apply assembly constraints to selected faces, edges, and vertices of parts and the
origin (with three work axes along the X, Y, and Z directions) of the part file or the sub-assembly
file. There are four kinds of assembly constraints: mate, angle, tangent, and insert. The kind of
constraint to be applied to a pair of components depends on the design intend of the assembly and
the function and shape of the individual components.

Mate Constraint
A mate constraint causes two selected objects (face, edge, or vertex) to mate or flush at a
specified offset distance. You can mate a face to a face, an edge to an edge, a point to a point, an
Assembly Modeling 5

edge to a face, a vertex to a face, and a vertex to an edge. If you mate a face to a face, you have
to decide how the faces face each other, in the same direction or in the opposite directions.
By mating a face of a component with six DOFs to a face of another component, you remove
three DOFs (two degrees of rotation freedom and one degree of linear freedom).
By mating an edge of a component with six DOFs to an edge of another component, you
remove four DOFs (two degrees of rotation freedom and two degrees of linear freedom).
By mating a vertex of a component with six DOFs to a vertex of another component, you
remove three DOFs (three degrees of linear freedom).
By mating an edge of a component with six DOFs to a face of another component, you
remove two DOFs (one degree of rotation freedom and one degree of linear freedom).
By mating a vertex of a component with six DOFs to a face of another component, you
remove one DOF (one degree of linear freedom).
By mating a vertex of a component with six DOFs to an edge of another component, you
remove two DOFs (two degrees of linear freedom).
Figure 3–4 shows (from top to bottom) mating face A to face B, mating edge A to edge B, mating
vertex A to vertex B, mating edge A to face B, mating vertex A to face B, and mating vertex A
to edge B.
6

Figure 3–4
Mate constraints

Angle Constraint
Angle constraint causes two selected objects (face or edge) to align at a specified angle. You can
constrain a face at an angle with another face, an edge at an angle with another edge, and a face
at an angle with an edge. You can consider an angle constraint a special kind of mate constraint
because the angle constraint causes the constrained component to align at an angle.
Assembly Modeling 7

By constraining a face of a component with six DOFs to a face of another component at an


angle, you remove three DOFs (two degrees of rotation freedom and one degree of linear
freedom).
By constraining an edge of a component with six DOFs to an edge of another component at
an angle, you remove four DOFs (two degrees of rotation freedom and two degrees of linear
freedom).
By constraining an edge of a component with six DOFs to a face of another component at an
angle, you remove two DOFs (one degree of rotation freedom and one degree of linear
freedom).
Figure 3–5 shows (from top to bottom) face A constrained at an angle with face B, edge A
constrained at an angle with edge B, and edge A constrained at an angle with face B.

Figure 3–5
Angle constraints

Tangent Constraint
Tangent causes selected faces, planes, cylinders, spheres, and cones to contact at their tangential
point and at a specified offset distance; you select faces.
By applying tangent constraint to a cylindrical face of a component with six DOFs to a face of
another component, you remove two DOFs (one degree of rotation freedom and one degree
of linear freedom).
By applying tangent constraint to a spherical face of a component with six DOFs to a face of
another component, you remove one DOFs (one degree of linear freedom).
Figure 3–6 shows (from top to bottom) cylindrical face constrained to tangent with a planar face
and a spherical face constrained to tangent with another spherical face.
8

Figure 3–6
Tangent constraints

Insert Constraint
Insert causes selected circular edges to align face to face and concentrically at a specified
distance; you select circular edges. An insert constraint is a combination of two mate constraints:
mating an axis of a cylindrical object with the axis of another cylindrical object and mating the end
face of the cylindrical object with the end face of another cylindrical object.
Figure 3–7 shows (from top to bottom) a cylindrical object inserted to another cylindrical object in
an opposed direction and a cylindrical object inserted to another cylindrical object in an aligned
direction.

Figure 3–7
Insert constraints