Monday, deceMber 6, 2010

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

Lady Jays clip Roughriders, p6A
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-7A
Announcements 8A
Classifieds 3B
TV 4B
Index
Scattered snow
showers Tuesday
with high in
low 20s. See
page 2A.
Medicaid patients’ Rx
drugs go to dealers
By CAROLYN
THOMPSON
The Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. — Ethel
Johnson couldn’t get her pre-
scription for pain medica-
tion filled fast enough. The
60-year-old Buffalo woman
was hurting — but investiga-
tors say that wasn’t the rea-
son for the rush.
According to secretly
recorded telephone conver-
sations, the sooner Johnson
could pick up her pills, the
more quickly she could sell
them to her dealer. Her pain
pills were destined for the
street.
Johnson is among 33
people charged so far in a
large-scale investigation that
has opened a window into an
emerging class of suppliers in
the illicit drug trade: medical
patients, including many who
rely on the publicly-funded
Medicaid program to pay for
their appointments and pre-
scriptions. She has pleaded
not guilty.
For the first time, the
Buffalo investigators devoted
the kinds of resources nor-
mally aimed at street drugs
like heroin or crack — wire-
taps, buys, surveillance and
cross-agency cooperation to
trace the drugs from phar-
macy to street. Even they
were taken aback by the bur-
geoning market for the kinds
of pills found in medicine
cabinets in typical American
homes.
“I have to admit we were
sort of surprised at how
big this had become,” said
Charles Tomaszewski, for-
mer supervisor of the DEA
office. “The suburbs, the city,
there was no area that wasn’t
touched by this.”
Often at no charge, the
patients see a doctor, or sev-
eral doctors, and come away
with prescriptions for narcot-
ic OxyContin and other pills
they then sell to a dealer for
as much as $1,000. If they
are on Medicaid, the pro-
gram is billed about $1,060
for a typical 60-pill, 80-mg
prescription, along with the
$23-to-$39 cost of the doc-
tor’s visit.
“These patients, in essence,
become the source for the
drugs,” said Dale Kasprzyk,
acting head of the Drug
Enforcement Administration
in Buffalo.
“This is a lucrative under-
ground business for people.”
A report last year by the
Government Accountability
Office estimated that 65,000
Medicaid beneficiaries in
New York and four other
states had visited six or more
doctors in fiscal 2006 and
2007 to acquire duplicate
prescriptions for controlled
substances.
The cost to Medicaid was
$63 million for the drugs
alone, excluding doctors’
exams. The report examined
Medicaid abuse in New York,
California, Illinois, North
Carolina and Texas, high-
volume states in Medicaid
prescription drug payments.
OxyContin, a time-release
formulation of oxycodone,
packs 12 hours’ worth of
pain relief into one tablet.
It is especially prized by
drug abusers, authorities say,
because it can be crushed and
ingested, snorted or injected
for the full narcotic impact, a
heroin-like rush.
The criminal cases
brought in July by U.S.
Attorney William Hochul’s
office in Buffalo illustrate
how patients are coached
about which doctors to see
and what to say when they
get there. Prosecutors, in
November court filings, said
plea agreements are being
negotiated.
“Tell him, you know, you
know you’ve been in a lot of
pain, your throat is complain-
ing. And then, you know,
even throw a little of that
stress on about your baby,”
alleged Buffalo kingpin
Michael McCall instructs a
40-year-old patient-supplier
in a conversation recorded by
investigators.
“You need to tell doctor
you need to go up to 90 (pills)
’cause ... you’ve been taking
three a day and you ran out
earlier,” he says.
When another patient,
a 60-year-old woman, tells
McCall a doctor is insist-
ing on a urine test to be
sure she’s taking the pre-
scribed medication, McCall
responds: “You want some?”
and offers to bring the urine
to her home.
Dealers “don’t have to get
their money together, smug-
gle or reach out to connec-
tions in Mexico or anything,”
said Tomaszewski, who
helped oversee the Buffalo
crackdown before becoming
the city’s deputy police com-
missioner. “They were clever
enough to find the sources
of supply were in their own
neighborhood.”
“These patients,
in essence, become
the source for
the drugs. ... This
is a lucrative
underground
business for
people.”
— Dale Kasprzyk,
acting head of the
DEA in Buffalo
Tuition tips to be offered
at high school Tuesday
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delpho-
sherald.com
DELPHOS — Because
intellectual development
plays a vital role in person-
al growth, higher education
is significant for individu-
als, families and society.
The road to college is one
many think is unaffordable
but an area financial aid
officer says high school
seniors and their parents
have options.
“The obligation to pay
for college is a shared part-
nership between the family,
the colleges and the govern-
ment. An investment is made
in young people because
society really benefits from
an educated citizenry,” said
University of Northwestern
Ohio Financial Aid Director
Wendell Schick. “We want
to try to remove the eco-
nomic barriers people think
are there when their son or
daughter becomes a high
school senior and they
don’t know what to do. We
want to give them the peace
of mind that comes from
knowing their options.”
Schick will meet with
parents and students at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the
Jefferson High School caf-
eteria to advise families
of how to file the Free
Application for Federal
Student Aid.
“High school seniors
need to gear up for the
FAFSA process. This
involves looking for local
scholarships and getting
your PIN number for the
FAFSA application and I’ll
show them how to do that,”
he said. “There’s a web site
they can do that at; there
are a number of web sites
they will use throughout the
process. Parents and stu-
dents should start thinking
about the preliminary steps
now to prepare for the cycle
of events that includes fil-
ing the financial aid award
notice to get an award dis-
playing the money they
would get from the respec-
tive colleges they’re con-
sidering.”
Many families may also
need to go through the stu-
dent loan process, which
will also be covered in
the workshop. Schick said
the entire process takes
approximately 4-6 weeks
and involves several web
sites.
“This is something that
will occur throughout
their senior year in high
school until about mid-
April when they get their
financial aid award that
gives them their financial
options,” he said.
“One of the things I
always remind them of
is to go for local scholar-
ships. I will also give them
an update on governmen-
tal changes; they’re going
through the health care plan
that set aside money for
‘needy’ students. So, even
that had an impact on finan-
cial aid. You wouldn’t think
that would have anything to
do with it but the govern-
ment found a way to save
money and share the excess
funds with students.”
The workshop is spon-
sored by both local high
schools’ guidance depart-
ments.
Derek “Dozer” Klaus holds the Division VI state football trophy Sunday as fellow
seniors AJ Klausing, Joey Grubenhoff, Chris Pohlman, Joe Haggard and Alex Recker
lead the team past the high school trophy case and the mementoes of championships past.
The Blue Jays were feted for grabbing the sixth state football title in program history at
Robert Arnzen Gymnasium.
Delphos
welcomes
state champs
By AUSTIN CLARKSON
austinclarkson_24@
hotmail.com
DELPHOS — The Delphos
community “officially” wel-
comed back the St. John’s
Blue Jays football team
Sunday afternoon with warm
pleasure at Robert A. Arnzen
Gymnasium.
The Blue Jays routed
Shadyside 77-6 Friday after-
noon in Canton to claim their
sixth state gridiron title in
school history, along with
going 15-0 on the season.
This was also the fourth
state title and fourth outright
Midwest Athletic Conference
under 12th-year head coach
Todd Schulte.
Several members of the
Sponsors
brighten
Christmas
Paul Hesseling of
Delphos sits with Jacob
Hillery, the child he
sponsored for the
Spencerville VFW’s
annual Underprivileged
Children’s Christmas
party, as he opens his pres-
ents. Hesseling has spon-
sored children since the
1970s.
Stacy Taff photo
Tom Morris photo
Stacy Taff photos
Santa makes debut in Ottoville at Winterfest
Santa Claus arrives at the Ottoville Parish Center for the Winterfest Sunday.
Dozens of children lined up to sit on his lap and share their Christmas wishes. Below:
Kim Hilvers, left, helps her daughters Vanessa, 2, and Alivia, 4, and Jackson Ricker, 4,
decorate cookies at the Mother’s Club cookie-decorating table. Children also enjoyed
Banjo the Clown and his magical balloon animals and visits with Santa.
See JAYS, page 6A
2
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Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Adrienne
May.
Congratulations
Adrienne!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Derrick
Erman.
Congratulations
Derrick!
Scholars of the Day
2A – The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 148
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl, general manager/
Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Feb. 13, 1928 - Dec. 4, 2010
Elizabeth A. “Betty”
Schnipke, 82, of Cloverdale
passed away at 5:12 a.m.
Saturday at her residence
under the loving care of her
family.
She was born Feb. 13, 1928
in Fort Jennings, the second of
eight children to Sigmund and
Clara (Meier) Ricker Sr.
She met and married the
love of her life Urban H.
Schnipke on Sept. 27, 1950.
He passed away Oct. 4, 2005.
Survivors include her chil-
dren, Kathy (Herbert) Gardner
of Adrian, Mich., David
(Bea) Schnipke of Delphos,
Randy (Bev) Schnipke of
Ottoville, Connie Schnipke of
Cloverdale, Dennis (Melissa)
Schnipke of Ottoville and
Daylnn (Shawna) Schnipke
of Van Wert; 20 grandchil-
dren; 21 great-grandchildren;
son-in-law, Dan (Norma)
Rieman of Findlay; daugh-
ter-in-law, Wanda Schnipke
of Circleville; a sister, Mary
Knueve of Kalida; five broth-
ers, Richard (Noreen) Ricker
of Fort Jennings, Art (Diane)
Ricker of Cloverdale, Charles
(Geri) Ricker of Elida,
Arnold (Carolyn) Ricker
of Continental, Sig (Carol)
Ricker of Spencerville; and a
sister-in-law, Dorothy Ricker
of Spencerville.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Gary Schnipke; a
daughter, Karen Rieman; a
brother, Eugene Ricker; a
sister-in-law, Doris Ricker;
and a brother-in-law, Frank
Knueve.
Mass of Christian burial
and celebration of life will
begin at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at
St. Barbara Catholic Church,
Cloverdale, the Rev. John
Stites officiating. Burial will
follow in the church ceme-
tery.
Friends may call from
2 to 8 p.m. today at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township (on the
corner of St. Rts. 224 and
634), where a scripture ser-
vice will begin at 2 p.m. and a
rosary at 3 p.m. today.
Memorials can be made
in Betty’s honor to St.
Barbara Catholic Church,
the Community Health
Professionals of Delphos or
Area on Aging in Lima.
Condolences may be sent
to: www.lovefuneralhome.
com
Dec. 25, 1938-Dec. 4, 2010
Carole A. Widmer, 71,
of Lima, died at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday at her son’s resi-
dence.
She was born Dec. 25,
1938, in Toledo to Elmer and
Ruth Burchert Brown, who
preceded her in death.
She married Robert C.
Widmer on July 16, 1960 in
Toledo. He died on April 21,
2009.
Survivors include sons
Gary Widmer of Oregon,
Ohio, Bill Widmer and Jeff
Widmer of Delphos and Rob
(Sherry) Widmer of Lima;
daughters Karen (Marlin)
Pitchford of Massillon and
Laurie Sealscott, Mary
(Dennis) Brock and Kellie
(Dustin) Bush of Lima; grand-
children Michael Widmer,
Marcus Widmer, Kristin
Pitchford, Karrie (Josh)
Dobie, Marshal Pitchford,
Marlena Stechschulte, Dusty
Widmer, Tyler Widmer,
Kylee Sealscott, Steven
Sealscott, Brittany Brock,
Bradly Brock, Baylie Brock,
Brenton Brock, Joshua
Widmer, Emma Widmer,
Ava Widmer and Caiden
Bush; and great-grandchil-
dren Jonathan Stechschulte,
Chrissy Stechscuhlte,
Anna Stechschulte, Preston
Pitchford, Pryce Pitchford,
Piper Pitchford and Porter
Pitchford.
Mrs. Widmer was a mem-
ber of St. Gerard’s Catholic
Church. She worked in the
school cafeteria and helped
out in the library.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 11 a.m. Tuesday
at St. Gerard’s Catholic
Church. The Rev. Joy Poonoly
will officiate.
Friends may call from 2-4
p.m. and 6-8 p.m. today at
Chamberl ai n-Huckeri ede
Funeral Home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Jills House
at 751 E. Tamarrack Trail in
Bloomington, IN 47408; or to
St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital in Memphis, TN
38105.
Condolences may be
expressed at chamberlain-
huckeriede.com.
Elizabeth A.
“Betty” Schnipke
Carole A. Widmer
At 2:23 p.m. on Saturday,
a collision occurred when the
driver of a vehicle bottomed
out on a set of railroad tracks
while traveling at a high
speed.
Janice Brown, 48, of
Blacklick, was traveling south-
bound on South Canal Street
approaching a set of railroad
tracks at what appeared to be
a high rate of speed, according
to the police report. Brown
bottomed out her vehicle,
causing front-end damage.
There was no injury to
Brown and possible injury to
her passenger.
Brown’s vehicle sustained
disabling damage.
Driver bottoms
out on railroad
tracks
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 29 degrees,
low was 21. Snowfall was
recorded at .25 inch. High a
year ago today was 34, low
was 16. Record high for today
is 69, set in 1988. Record low
is -1, set in 1977.
Pearl L. Fritz, 96, formerly
of Spencerville, died Sunday at
Shawnee Manor. Friends may
call after 8 a.m. Wednesday
at Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral
Home, where the funeral will
begin at 9 a.m. Other arrange-
ments are incomplete.
April 25, 1986-Dec. 2, 2010
Travis M. “Stumpy”
Stump, 24, of Ohio City, died
Thursday in Celina.
He was born April 25,
1986, in Lima to Todd P. and
Yvonne G. Crisenbery Stump.
His father and stepmother,
Kandi Hopson, survive in
Lima. His mother, Yvonne G.
Felger, survives in Ohio City.
Services will begin at 10:30
a.m. Tuesday at Thomas E.
Bayliff Funeral Home in
Spencerville. His uncle, Pastor
Jim Makley, will officiate.
Burial will be in Woodlawn
Cemetery in Ohio City.
Friends may call from
2-8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the family.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Dec. 3 to
Patrick and Kelly Horstman of
Fort Jennings.
A girl was born Dec. 3
to Cassie Kemper and David
Johnson of Delphos.
Pearl L. Fritz
Travis Stump
Corn: $5.46
Wheat: $6.59
Beans: $12.73
Jimmie Herfurth
July 1, 1928-
Dec. 4, 2010
Jimmie Dickson “Jim”
Herfurth, 82, formerly of
Spencerville, died at 8:17 a.m.
Saturday at St. Marys Living
Center.
He was born July 1, 1928,
in St. Johns to John H. and
Mildred J. Dickson Herfurth.
He was raised by his moth-
er and stepfather, Earl D.
Neuman Sr.
On Nov. 19, 1949, he mar-
ried Donna J. Gander, who
died April 8, 2008.
Services will begin at 1
p.m. Wednesday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home
in Spencerville. Burial will
follow in Willow Grove
Cemetery, northeast of New
Bremen, with graveside mili-
tary rites by the Spencerville
Veterans.
Friends may call from 11
a.m. Wednesday until the time
of services.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the organiza-
tion of the donor’s choice.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Cloudy with
scattered snow showers. Lows
15 to 20. West winds around
15 mph. Chance of snow 50
percent.
TUESDAY: Cloudy with
scattered snow showers. Highs
in the lower 20s. West winds
around 15 mph with gusts up
to 25 mph. Chance of snow 40
percent.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy. Scattered
snow showers in the evening.
Lows 10 to 15. West winds 10
to 15 mph. Chance of snow 30
percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Mostly
cloudy. Highs in the mid 20s.
West winds around 10 mph.
Wind chill as low as zero in
the morning.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $74
million
Midday 3
2-6-6
Midday 4
3-4-5-9
Pick 3
8-6-4
Pick 4
1-8-2-2
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $20
million
Rolling Cash 5
11-12-15-34-35
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH
09-13-15-18-19-24-30-32-
41-43-48-53-56-57-61-67-68-
72-73-79
Ten OH Midday
02-04-06-07-08-12-18-19-
27-30-31-45-51-60-67-68-69-
75-78-80
Delphos weather
Clinic to cut
some charity care
CLEVELAND (AP) —
Tough economic times are forc-
ing the Cleveland Clinic to cut
charity care for some patients.
All Northeast Ohio Clinic
facilities will stop routinely
accepting uninsured patients who
can’t pay for treatments, aren’t
eligible for government assis-
tance and who live more than
150 miles away from Cleveland,
The Plain Dealer reported.
Clinic spokeswoman Eileen
Sheil said the changes will apply
to people who earn between 250
to 400 percent of the federal
poverty level. (A family of four
that makes $88,200 a year is
at 400 percent of the federal
poverty level.) Those who earn
less are eligible for other aid and
those who are more are expected
to pay.
The Clinic will treat some
cash-strapped patients who live
more than 150 miles away in rare
cases, but only after a referral,
Sheil told The Plain Dealer.
The changes will go into
effect Jan. 1.
The Clinic also plans to ask
insured patients how they will
pay for care not covered by their
insurance — before they undergo
a procedure.
Sheil said the percentage of
insured patients who don’t pay
their share of their bills has risen
from 43 percent to 50 percent in
the past few years. That’s due in
part to employees having to pay
for larger portions of their health
care costs.
“It’s a huge loss to the Clinic,”
Sheil said, “and the burden
should not fall on the hospital.”
The economy is to blame for
both changes, The Plain Dealer
reported.
“It’s increased the number
of people needing charity care,”
Sheil said. “And we have to start
protecting the resources we have
to better care for the people in
our community.”
The Clinic spent almost $120
million on free or discounted care
for poor patients in the last fiscal
year — a $20 million increase
from the year before.
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burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
Curves
works.
Our 30-minute circuit works every
major muscle group and you can
burn up to 500 calories.
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth Street
Delphos, Ohio curves.com
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 30 DAY DIET PLAN
CURVES
WORKS WITH
SilverSneakers!
coming to Curves soon!
419-692-2388
Delphos
2 Col x 8”
K
nueve
&
S
ons
inc.
“Your Komfort Is Our Koncern!”
102 Water Street | Kalida, OH 45853
800-676-3619
119.582.8699
www.knueve.com
(All offers in this ad are not valid with any other offer. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or specials.)
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6/10 of a mile north of Lincoln Hwy.
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
IS NOT THE SAME
AS HAVING MORE MONEY.
When it comes to the number of retirement accounts you
have, the saying “more is better” is not necessarily true. In
fact, if you hold multiple accounts with various brokers, it
can be difficult to keep track of your investments and to
see if you’re properly diversified.
*
At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could help solve
all that. Plus, one statement can make it easier to see if
you’re moving toward your goals.
*
Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts
to Edward Jones makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald –3A
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
Mom, Grandma
&
Great-Grandma!
We love you!
Anna Marie
Eickholt
celebrates
her 90th
Anna Marie Eickholt
will be celebrating her 90th
birthday on December 12.
Her family is hosting a card
shower in her honor. Please
help us celebrate by send-
ing her a card or paying her
a visit.
Anna Eickholt, Vancrest,
Room 37, 1425 East Fifth
Street, Delphos 45833.
State awards $250,000 for area business retention
BY KIRK DOUGAL
Times Bulletin Editor
VAN WERT — Van Wert
and the West Central Ohio
region received good news
on Thursday as the Ohio
Department of Development
announced a $250,000 award
for the area.
ODOD Director Lisa Patt-
McDaniel announced that 11
organizations across the state
will receive funds from the
state totaling $2.4 million.
A part of the state’s push
for economic development,
the money is to be used to
identify and help companies
who are at risk of experi-
encing layoffs or of shutting
their doors. Called the Early
Warning Network, these
organizations are a combina-
tion of local economic devel-
opment offices and state and
local workforce officials.
“The Early Warning
Network allows us to con-
tinue our proactive work with
companies that are in need of
assistance, rather than getting
involved after layoff notices
are given,” Patt-McDaniel
said. “This program will
ensure that companies around
the state have the resources
needed to keep their employ-
ees on the job and continue to
bolster their communities.”
Although the Early
Warning program can
also be used for Labor-
Management Cooperations
and an Employee Ownership
Center, the West Central Ohio
Network will be using the
$250,000 award for business
retention purposes accord-
ing to Van Wert County
Economic Development
Director Nancy Bowen.
“We plan on using the
money to bolster our business
retention efforts and as lay-
off aversion funds,” she told
The Times Bulletin. “This
will definitely help us with
our local efforts to hold onto
jobs and businesses.”
The award on Thursday
dovetails with the announce-
ment two weeks ago of the
eight-county partnership that
was formed to create a region-
al economic development
group. Including Van Wert,
Paulding, Mercer, Auglaize,
Allen, Hardin, Hancock and
Putnam counties, the separate
entities had worked together
informally for quite some
time before the recent move.
Bowen said the group was
actually involved with pre-
paring the paperwork for the
funds and that the receipt of
the money would not have
been possible without pulling
their resources together.
ODOT invests $15 million in Next
Generation Clean and Green buses
More than three dozen
new vehicles part of three-
year $150 million transit part-
nership pledge
COLUMBUS — Call it an
early Christmas present: as
part of the Ohio Department
of Transportation’s three-
year $150 million pledge to
assist Ohio’s transit agen-
cies, ODOT is directing $15
million to the purchase this
year of more than three dozen
“Clean and Green” buses and
transit vehicles across the
state.
“The demand for greener
transportation choices contin-
ues to rise, especially among
Ohio’s next generation,” said
ODOT Director Jolene M.
Molitoris. “In Ohio’s cities,
nearly two-thirds of all bus
trips are work-related, provid-
ing young people with access
to education, first-time jobs,
homes and a quality way of
life.”
In all, ODOT will help
transit agencies purchase
38 new vehicles, including
electric-diesel hybrid buses,
cleaner ultra-low sulfur diesel
vehicles, and buses that run
on biodiesel or compressed
natural gas.
In October, ODOT identi-
fied additional federal trans-
portation dollars made avail-
able through significant proj-
ect savings and supplemen-
tary federal resources. With
those flexible federal funds,
ODOT targeted $50 million
to make immediate invest-
ments in transit, and pledged
similar funding in each of the
next two fiscal years.
Under this 21st Century
Transit Partnerships for
Ohio’s Next Generation, the
new funding is helping to pre-
serve existing transit services
by providing $25 million in
operational support, $15 mil-
lion in clean and green new
vehicles, and $10 million for
innovative new services —
all to better connect Ohioans
to job centers and new oppor-
tunities.
For the current fiscal year,
ODOT’s Office of Transit
has already allocated the $25
million in operational assis-
tance and is currently accept-
ing applications to fund $10
million in innovative new
services.
As part of budget informa-
tion submitted this week to
the Ohio Legislature, ODOT
identified similar levels of
funding — $50 million in
each state fiscal year 2012
and 2013 — to continue
this important investment in
Ohio’s transit system.
“Under Governor
Strickland, ODOT has iden-
tified new ways to invest in
transportation choice,” added
Director Molitoris. “This
critical investment will not
only allow the state to help
preserve services — so buses
can continue to arrive on time
and help people get to work
and school — our investment
in new vehicles will improve
fuel efficiencies and reduce
maintenance costs, so our
transit agencies don’t have
to spend so much on gas and
repair costs.”
Clean and Green Vehicles for Ohio’s Transit System SFY 2011 Allocation:
Transit System Allocation Vehicles
Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (Cincinnati) $3,868,800 6
Metro Akron Regional Transit Authority $3,066,000 7
Central Ohio Transit Authority (Columbus) $2,460,200 7
Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority $2,800,000 7
Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority $1,200,000 2
Stark Area Regional Transit Authority $710,000 2
Western Reserve Regional Transit Authority (Youngstown) $600,000 3
Richland County Transit $225,000 3
Washington County/Community Action Bus Lines $70,000 1
GRAND TOTAL $15,000,000 38
AAA: Ohio gas
jumps 12 cents
COLUMBUS (AP) — Oil
prices at their highest levels
in more than two years have
helped send prices at Ohio gas
pumps zooming back toward $3
a gallon.
A survey from auto club
AAA, the Oil Price Information
Service and Wright Express
shows Ohio’s average price
for regular-grade gasoline has
jumped 12 cents from last
Monday to $2.93 a gallon.
One year ago, the state’s
motorists paid 35 cents less, or
an average $2.58 for regular.
Oil prices rallied to a
26-month high last week and
are closing in on $90 a barrel
amid unusually cold weather in
Europe that has fueled hopes of
rising demand for fuel.
On Saturday at 1:20 p.m.,
Delphos police were called to
the 500 block of East Third
Street in reference to a suspi-
cious mailing.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that they had
received a check stating they
had won money but needed to
send money to them to claim
the money.
Officers advised that the
letter and check were not valid
and a scam.
While on routine patrol in
the 200 block of West Fifth
Street at 9:05 p.m. on Saturday,
Delphos police observed two
subjects behind a business act-
ing suspicious.
As officers approached
the subjects and identified
themselves, one subject, later
identified as Ian Tester, 17,
of Delphos, took off running
from officers. After a short
foot chase, Tester was located
at a residence and was taken
into custody.
It was found that an item
was taken from a local busi-
ness.
Charges will be filed into
Van Wert Juvenile Court for
theft and obstructing official
business.
On Wednesday at 9:03
a.m., Delphos Police were
called to the 1500 block of
East Fifth Street in reference
to a theft complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone
had taken a log splitter that
was stored on a trailer at that
location.
On Thursday at 9:44 p.m.,
Delphos police were called to
the 400 block of North Clay
Street in reference to a crimi-
nal damaging complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival,
the victim reported someone
had broken a window in the
victim’s residence and also
caused damage to a vehicle
parked at the residence.
Resident receives
suspicious mailing
Teen runs from
police
Log splitter miss-
ing from trailer
Home and
vehicle damaged
On Wednesday at 4:27
p.m., Delphos Police were
called to the 500 block of
South Jefferson Street in ref-
erence to a theft complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone
had taken money from the
victim’s motor vehicle.
Money taken
from vehicle
POLICE
REPORTS
The number “four” is
considered unlucky in Japan
because it is pronounced the
same as “death.”
4A — The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
POLITICS
“Each and every one of us has one obligation, during the bewildered days of our pilgrimage
here: the saving of his own soul, and secondarily and incidentally thereby affecting for good
such other souls as come under our influence.” — Kathleen Norris, American author (1880-1960)
www.delphosherald.com
IT WAS NEWS THEN
By DAVID ESPO
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Senate
Republicans derailed legisla-
tion Saturday to extend expir-
ing tax cuts at all but the high-
est income levels in a political
showdown that paradoxically
clears a path for a compromise
with the White House on steps
to boost the economy.
“We need to get this
resolved and I’m confident
we can do it,” President
Barack Obama said shortly
after the near party-line votes.
The public must have “the
peace of mind that their taxes
will not go up” on Jan. 1, he
added.
Obama has signaled that
he will bow to Republican
demands for extending tax
cuts at all income levels, and
his remarks capped a day that
lurched between political con-
flict and talk of compromise
on an issue that played a lead-
ing role in last month’s elec-
tions.
Sen. Chuck Schumer,
D-N.Y., eyeing the 2012 cam-
paign, accused Republicans of
siding with “millionaires and
billionaires” with their rejec-
tion of proposals that would let
tax cuts passed during George
W. Bush’s presidency lapse
on seven-figure incomes.
Republicans noted that
unemployment rose to 9.8
percent last month and said it
made no sense to raise taxes
on anyone in a weak economy.
Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., jabbed
that Democrats were undergo-
ing a “political catharsis” in
public after losing control of
the House and surrendering
several seats in the Senate in
the Nov. 2 election.
But the rhetoric subsided
quickly after the votes, and
Senate leaders in both par-
ties said they hoped political
clashes would give way to
compromise in the next sev-
eral days.
Kentucky Sen. Mitch
McConnell, the GOP leader,
said he was relatively con-
fident there would be a deal
with the White House “not to
raise taxes in the middle of a
recession.” He said talks were
continuing on the length of an
extension to be enacted for the
cuts that were put in place in
2001 and 2003.
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he
hoped for an agreement by the
middle or end of next week
on legislation that would com-
bine an extension of tax cuts
with a renewal of expiring
jobless benefits for the long-
term unemployed.
Officials have said that
in addition to tax cuts and
unemployment benefits, the
White House wants to include
renewal of several other tax
provisions that are expir-
ing. They include a break for
lower- and middle- class wage
earners, even if they don’t
make enough to pay the gov-
ernment, as well as for college
students and for companies
that hire the unemployed.
Key lawmakers and admin-
istration officials have been
at work negotiating the terms
of a possible deal for several
days.
But many congressional
Democrats privately have
expressed anger at Obama for
his willingness to surrender
to Republican demands to let
the tax cuts remain in place at
upper incomes, and numerous
officials said no compromise
would be possible until they
had engineered votes in both
the House and Senate.
Any deal would mean a
reversal for Obama, who said
in the 2008 presidential race
and this year that he wanted to
let cuts expire above incomes
of $200,000 for individuals
and $250,000 for couples.
In the Senate, a bill to
enact Obama’s original posi-
tion was blocked on a vote
of 53-36, seven votes short
of the 60 needed to advance.
Republicans were unanimous
in their opposition, and were
joined by Democratic Sens.
Russell Feingold of Wisconsin,
Joe Manchin of West Virginia,
Ben Nelson of Nebraska, Jim
Webb of Virginia and inde-
pendent Joseph Lieberman of
Connecticut.
Senate showdown may
pave way for tax deal
WASHINGTON (AP)
— BP is mounting a new
challenge to the U.S. govern-
ment’s estimates of how much
oil flowed from the runaway
well deep below the Gulf of
Mexico, an argument that
could reduce by billions of
dollars the federal pollution
fines it faces for the largest
offshore oil spill in history.
BP’s lawyers are arguing
that the government overstated
the spill by 20 to 50 per-
cent, staffers working for the
presidential oil spill commis-
sion said Friday. In a 10-page
document obtained by The
Associated Press, BP says the
government’s spill estimate of
206 million gallons is “over-
stated by a significant amount”
and the company said any con-
sensus around that number is
premature and inaccurate.
The company submitted
the document to the commis-
sion, the Justice Department
and the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration.
“They rely on incomplete
or inaccurate information, rest
in large part on assumptions
that have not been validated,
and are subject to far greater
uncertainties than have been
acknowledged,” BP wrote.
“BP fully intends to present
its own estimate as soon as the
information is available to get
the science right.”
In a statement Friday,
the company said the gov-
ernment’s estimates failed to
account for equipment that
could obstruct the flow of oil
and gas, such as the blowout
preventer, making its numbers
“highly unreliable.”
BP’s request could save
it as much as $10.5 billion
or as little as $1.1 billion,
depending on factors such as
whether the government con-
cludes that BP acted negli-
gently. For context, the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency’s entire federal bud-
get for 2010 was $10.3 billion.
President Barack Obama has
said he wants Congress to set
aside some of the money BP
pays for fines for the Gulf’s
coastal restoration. Louisiana
lawmakers are pushing leg-
islation that would require at
least 80 percent of the civil
and criminal penalties charged
to BP, and possibly other
companies, to be returned to
the Gulf Coast.
William K. Reilly, co-chair-
man of the presidential com-
mission, expressed amazement
at BP’s case Friday. Reilly
headed the Environmental
Protection Agency under
President George H.W. Bush.
“They are going to argue
that it is 50 percent less” than
the government’s total? Reilly
asked. “Wow.”
Under the Clean Water Act,
the oil giant — which owned
and operated the well — faces
fines of up to $1,100 for each
barrel of oil spilled. If BP
were found to have commit-
ted gross negligence or willful
misconduct, the fine could be
up to $4,300 per barrel.
That means that based on
the government’s estimate
of 206 million gallons, BP
could face civil fines alone
of between $5.4 billion and
$21.1 billion.
“They are going to argue
it was less,” said Priya Aiyar,
the commission’s deputy chief
counsel. “BP has not offered
its own numbers yet, but BP
has told us that it thinks the
government’s numbers are
too high and thinks the actual
flow rate can be actually 20 to
50 percent lower.”
One Year Ago
• Runners took off for the “Run Your Ice Off” 5k Run in
front of Peak 24-hour Fitness. For the 5Ks first year, 50 run-
ners were hoped for. By the morning of the race, the registered
count reached 98 runners.
25 Years Ago — 1985
• The Green Thumb Garden Club entertained and pre-
sented Christmas table centerpieces and gifts to the patients at
Delphos Memorial and Sarah Jane Chambers Geriatric Center.
The entertainment and gift-giving is an annual event sponsored
by the club.
• Two Jaycee fund-raising projects are under way in
Delphos. The Jaycees have 120 trees left to sell on the A&W
parking lot. They will also be canvassing the city for their
Christmas booster raffle. Prizes for the raffle include gift cer-
tificates, courtesy of local merchants.
• Spencerville Lions Club will hold a porch light crusade
Dec. 10. Lion members will collect canned goods or pack-
age items to be distributed through Spencerville Ministerial
Association to needy families during the holiday season.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• Lending much to the holiday atmosphere in downtown
Delphos decorations were recently erected at the Commercial
Bank’s Auto and at the post office. On the roof of the Auto
Bank figures of robed choir boys are to be seen singing the
message of Christmas, and in the north yard of the post office a
manager scene with nearly life-sized figures has been erected.
These decorations, along with the city’s street decorations and
the many beautifully decorated store windows, give Delphos a
thoroughly festive appearance. Children are also reminded that
the Chamber of Commerce has made arrangements for Santa
Claus to be at his Econ-O-Wash headquarters on North Main
Street every Friday and Saturday night.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• Walterick-Hemme Post. No. 3035, VFW, met in regular
session Wednesday night at the Veterans Club with 12 active
members present. Roy Sheeter, Officer of the Day, and R. E.
McKinnon, Junior Vice Commander, were installed in proper
form by Commander Bonifas. B. M. Violet was reappointed as
Post Service Officer.
• Twenty-nine girls were recognized as members of the
Girl Reserve Club of Jefferson High School at the annual
Recognition Service, Wednesday evening in the Presbyterian
Church. Dorothy Griffin, president of the organization, had
charge of the impressive formal recognition service. Margaret
Gudakunst acted as herald of the light and membership chair-
man.
• Mrs. Herman Kloeppel received the members of the
Lutheran Aid Society and a group of guests into her home on
East Fifth Street Wednesday. The guests were Lena Gas of
Cleveland, Mrs. Lawrence Dunlap, Mrs. Clarence Heisterman,
Mrs. W. L. Carter, Mrs. Frank Kurth, Mrs. C. J. Leilich, Mrs.
Herman Rauschart and Lucile Werner.
By ANDREW TAYLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama’s
deficit commission failed
Friday to forge consensus on
what to do about an increas-
ingly urgent debt problem,
but the breakdown of its vote
lays out the road map for
how Congress might address
it next year.
The 11-7 vote in favor of
the panel co-chairmen’s rec-
ommendations for a painful
mix of spending cuts and tax
increases foretells a bitterly
partisan and possibly unpro-
ductive debate in the House.
If there’s a deal to be had, it
will likely be reached in the
Senate. Fourteen votes were
needed to officially send the
plan to Congress now for
quick action on it.
About $4 trillion would be
slashed from the budget over
the coming decade — three-
fourths of it through spend-
ing cuts and the other fourth
from higher taxes. Deficits
over the period are estimated
in the $10 trillion range and
are expected to require the
federal government to borrow
up to 33 cents of every dollar
it spends.
Five of six senators on
the panel — two Democratic
allies of Obama and three
conservative Republicans —
voted for the plan’s wrench-
ing measures, including rais-
ing the Social Security retire-
ment age, cutting future ben-
efit increases and rolling back
popular tax breaks like the
mortgage interest deduction.
But only one of the half
dozen House members on
the commission endorsed the
proposal — Democrat John
Spratt Jr. of South Carolina.
And he doesn’t have to face
voters in his district again;
they decided last month to
retire him from Congress.
No other House mem-
bers were willing to swing
behind the painstakingly
assembled proposal by
Democrat Erskine Bowles, a
White House chief of staff
in Bill Clinton’s presidency,
and former Republican Sen.
Alan Simpson of Wyoming.
Republicans Reps. Paul Ryan
of Wisconsin, Dave Camp of
Michigan and Jeb Hensarling
of Texas recoiled from tax
increases and said it didn’t do
enough to rein in skyrocket-
ing health care costs. Not one
of them even attended the
panel’s final meeting.
House Democrats Xavier
Becerra of California and
Jan Schakowsky of Illinois,
meanwhile, pressed for bigger
tax increases and less dra-
matic cuts to spending.
“The Bowles-Simpson
plan further erodes the mid-
dle class and threatens low-
income Americans,” said
Schakowsky.
The ink wasn’t even dry on
an earlier version of the pro-
posal before House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called
it “simply unacceptable,” a
move that Republicans said
undercut the panel’s work.
The plan would nearly
freeze the Pentagon’s bud-
get and cut spending outright
by most domestic agencies.
It would nearly double the
federal tax on gasoline with a
15 cents-per-gallon increase.
Income tax rates would fall,
but only by eliminating or
scaling back dozens of popu-
lar tax breaks, including the
child tax credit, mortgage
interest deduction and deduc-
tion claimed by employers
who provide health insur-
ance.
That recipe of shared polit-
ical pain is the type of sac-
rifice that budget hawks say
is needed in any bipartisan
deficit-cutting effort.
“People have to be willing
to embrace plans which actual-
ly lend themselves to compro-
mise ... the kinds of plans that
everybody’s uncomfortable
with but are the only things
that get support,” said Maya
MacGuineas of the Committee
for a Responsible Federal
Budget, a group that advocates
fiscal responsibility.
By JULIE PACE and
KEN THOMAS
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
U.S. and South Korea have
reached an agreement on
America’s largest trade pact
in more than a decade, a high-
ly coveted deal the Obama
administration hopes will
boost U.S. exports and create
tens of thousands of jobs at
home.
After a week of marathon
negotiations, representatives
from both countries broke
through a stalemate Friday
morning on outstanding issues
related to the automobile
industry, which have been
a sticking point in the talks.
The agreement would be the
largest U.S. trade deal since
the 1994 North American
Free Trade Agreement, or
NAFTA, with Canada and
Mexico and would bolster
U.S. ties with the fast-grow-
ing South Korea economy.
South Korea is agreeing
to allow the U.S. to lift a
2.5 percent tariff on Korean
cars in five years, instead
of cutting the tariff imme-
diately. The agreement also
allows each U.S. automaker
to export 25,000 cars to South
Korea as long as they meet
U.S. federal safety standards
and allows the U.S. to con-
tinue a 25 percent tariff on
trucks for eight years and
then phase it out by the 10th
year. South Korea would be
required to eliminate its 10
percent tariff on U.S. trucks
immediately.
President Barack Obama
hailed the agreement as a
“landmark trade deal” that
would support at least 70,000
U.S. jobs.
“We are strengthening our
ability to create and defend
manufacturing jobs in the
United States, increasing
exports of agricultural prod-
ucts for American farmers and
ranchers and opening Korea’s
services market to American
companies,” Obama said in a
statement.
South Korean President
Lee Myung-bak praised the
deal as bringing huge eco-
nomic benefits to both coun-
tries and further boosting the
two nations’ alliance.
“This agreement is mean-
ingful in that it has laid the
basis for a mutual win-win
by reflecting interests for the
two countries in a balanced
manner,” Lee said in a state-
ment posted on the presiden-
tial website.
The White House had
hoped to strike a deal last
month during Obama’s trip to
Seoul for the G-20 economic
summit, but both countries
were unable to broker a com-
promise on issues pertaining
to trade of autos and beef.
U.S. Trade Representative
Ron Kirk and his counterpart,
Korean Trade Minister Kim
Jong-hoon, resumed negotia-
tions outside Washington this
week.
The agreement did not
address issues with the beef
trade. The U.S. had sought
greater access to the beef
market in South Korea, which
restricts imports of older U.S.
meat. A senior administration
official said discussions on
beef are ongoing. The official
insisted on anonymity to dis-
cuss private negotiations.
The wider agreement
would eliminate tariffs on
more than 95 percent of indus-
trial and consumer goods
within five years, a move that
the U.S. International Trade
Commission estimated would
increase exports of U.S.
goods by at least $10 billion.
The deal would also open up
South Korea’s vast $560 bil-
lion services markets to U.S.
companies.
Lee expressed hope for a
quick ratification of the deal
by the legislatures of the two
countries. Obama administra-
tion officials offered no time-
line for ratification on Capitol
Hill.
The South Korea deal
has been widely supported
by those in the private sec-
tor and the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, which has criti-
cized other administration
policies as antibusiness.
Moderately confused
The Delphos Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Letters
should be no more than 400 words. The newspaper reserves
the right to edit content for length, clarity and grammar. Letters
concerning private matters will not be published.
Failure to supply a full name, home address and daytime
phone number will slow the verifcation process and delay pub-
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Letters can be mailed to The Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Defcit-reduction plan fails to advance
US, South Korea reach highly coveted trade deal
BP challenges
size of oil spill
1
Johnston
Travel
EXPECT THE MOST WHEN
YOU TRAVEL WITH THE BEST
•Thu., Dec. 9 - CLIFTON MILL - Clifton, Ohio -
For over 20 years Clifton Mill has celebrated the Christmas Season in a special
way. The light display is one of the county’s finest with over 3.5 million lights
illuminating the mill, the gorge, the riverbanks trees & bridges. There is even a
100 foot “waterfall” of twinkling lights! $87.00 meal included.
•Thu., Dec. 16- A HOLLYWOOD
CHRISTMAS - Eastlake, Ohio -
Enjoy the FOUR PREPS & the new
Chordettes after a family style lunch. These
groups will bring back the memories with
beautiful costumes, elegant choreography
& silky smooth harmonies. They send you
back to a simpler time. $89.00 Meal includ-
ed.
•Sat., Jan. 22 - NORTH AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL AUTO
SHOW - Detroit, Michigan. $56.00 Includes roundtrip transportation and
admission.
•Thurs., Feb. 17 “NANA’S NAUGHTY KNICKERS” - LaComedia,
Springboro, Ohio - Bridget & Grandma are moving in together. Will Bridget be
able to handle all the excitement that Grandma has been doing? Come with us
and find out. $89.00 Meal included.
•Wed., Mar. 30 - “#1 Hits of the 60’s” - Eastlake, Ohio - You’ll see
a fast-paced, high-energy show from Branson, MO, that captures the heart and
soul of this era through a colorful tapestry of music and dance. $89.00 Meal
included.
•Thu., Apr. 7 - “Whistling Good Time in the Capital City” -
Columbus, Ohio - Visit the only metal whistle factory in the United States. Eat
lunch at Schmidt’s in German Village. Have other stops before leaving. $79.00
Meal included.
•Tue., Apr. 12 - “Church Basement Ladies II - A Second
Helping” - Stranahan Theatre, Toledo,
Ohio- A second helping of the musical comedy
“Church Basement Ladies”. Be prepared to
laugh. $89.00 Meal Included.
•Wed., Apr. 20 - “International Tour
of Cleveland” - A local step-on guide will
lead us on this special international & historic
tour of Cleveland that will combine culture,
food, history to give everyone a unique view
of the rich tapestry of culture & heritage that
makes Cleveland. $89.00
2010 Schedule
Call 419-423-9160
For a detailed itinerary on any of these tours or a complete schedule.
JOHNSTON TRAVEL
12657 C.R. 8, Findlay, OH 45840-9268
VANCE STREET APARTMENTS
Attention Folks 62 and older:
Want to live independently and still save money?
NOW’S THE TIME! Our Waiting List Has Never Been Shorter!
Sign up now and receive:
•Independent living for Seniors 55 & Older
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for Qualifed Individuals
•Hot Water and Trash Service Included
•24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
•On Site Managers •On Site Laundry
•On Site Elevator
•Off-Street Private Parking for Residents and Guests
• Walking Distance to Downtown
Contact us at: 137 Vance St., Bluffton, OH 45817
419-358-7795 TDD 1-800-750-0750
Professionally
Managed by Show
Management Corp.
248 N.Main St. Delphos • 419-692-7600 • www.findlayhearing.com
RIC Hearing Aid
• 100% Digital
• 100% Affordable
$
995
Half the Joy of the Holidays
is Hearing them
DELPHOS
Total Package Shopping
Extravaganza!
The Circle ... 134 N. Main St., Lima
Dec. 12, 2010 • 4 p.m.-8 p.m.
All your CHRISTMAS SHOPPING NEEDS
under one roof!
Gold Canyon, Amanda Scents-N-Stuff, Tastefully Simple,
Thirty-One Purses, Lia Sophia Jewelry, Pampered Chef,
Photography, Massages & much, much more!!
$2.00 cover charge
You receive 1 FREE raffle ticket to each vendors booth!
That’s a chance to win at least 15 different prizes!!!
Additional chances available at each booth for $1 each or 6 for $5.
Over 15 vendors will be present offering their services at great
prices! Bring your shopping list, your wish list, and a buddy!
Handmade items, baked goods and gift certificates available!
Come on out and enjoy a great event!
Contact Amanda Spencer 567-712-0333.
Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
Niswonger Performance
Arts Center
DEC. 7
Dick Culp
Steve Waldick
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
7 p.m. — Delphos Parks
and Recreation board meets
at the recreation building at
Stadium Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
11:45 a.m. — Rotary Club
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
4 p.m. — Delphos Public
Library board members meet
at the library conference
room.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
Club donates to art center
The Wassenberg Art Center of Van Wert recent-
ly received a sponsorship donation from the Wetzel
Motorcycle Club to help support the art center’s
summer Art Camps for Children. From left, Interim
Director of the art center Seth Baker accepts the dona-
tion from Danny McPhail, representing the Wetzel
Motorcycle Club. For information on the Wassenberg
Art Center and its programs and exhibits visit www.
vanwert.com/wassenberg or call 419-238-6837 or 1-888-
238-3837.
Photo submitted
COLUMN
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CDofA to hold holiday gathering
The Catholic Daughters
of America, Delphos Court
will hold its annual Christmas
Dinner Dec. 14.
Dinner will be served at
6:30 p.m., with a holiday
party to follow.
Members are asked to
bring a $5 gift exchange item
and paper-goods donations.
CAMPUS NOTES
ONU names fall
dean’s list
Ohio Northern University
has announced its fall quarter
dean’s list students. Those on
the list include:
— Ashley N. Hoehn,
daughter of Arthur and
Kathleen Hoehn, Cloverdale.
She is a first-year pharmacy
major.
— Jared L. Horstman, son
of Jerry and Lisa Horstman,
Fort Jennings. He is a fresh-
man majoring in accounting.
— Lyndsi M. Kill, daugh-
ter of Ted and Kim Kill,
Delphos. She is a sixth-year
pharmacy major.
— Lynn M. Lindeman,
daughter of Kevin and Lisa
Lindeman, Ottoville. She
is a second-year pharmacy
major.
— Nicole M. Mesker,
daughter of Carl and Sharon
Mesker, Spring Lake. She is
a senior majoring in language
arts education.
— Brett A. Wiechart, son
of Laura Conrad, Columbus
Grove, and Anthony
Wiechart. He is a senior
majoring in computer sci-
ence.
The deans’ list includes
students who attain a grade
point average of 3.5 or better
on a 4.0 grading system.
Otto CL of C members
enjoy Christmas dinner
Catholic Ladies of
Columbia Council 30
of Ottoville met for its
Christmas dinner at the Dew
Drop Inn on Dec. 1.
Twenty-two members
were in attendance, with the
Rev. John Stites as a guest.
Cocktail hour and dinner
were enjoyed. Games and
contests were played, with
Cathy Schimmoeller, Agnes
Swint and Marilyn Kaufman
in charge.
A fun time was had by
all with the Christmas triv-
ia; X-mas bingo and gift-
wrapping contest. Everyone
received a special gift.
A short business meet-
ing followed. Members at
the nursing home will be
remembered with a card and
small gift.
Matching funds projects
will be taken care of.
It was noted that group
will be honoring five mem-
bers with golden weddings
in 2011 at the April meet-
ing.
Delphos CLC
schedules
Christmas party
Delphos CL of C will hold
it annual Christmas party at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the K of
C hall.
A $3 gift exchange is
optional.
NOW
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6A– The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
St. John’s head football coach Todd Schulte shares his
thoughts on the team’s sixth state title Sunday before play-
ers and fans at Arnzen Gymnasium.
Tom Morris photo
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delpho-
sherald.com
ST. MARYS — Senior
Tiffany Geise downed an
inside basket with 16 ticks
left and she hit 1-of-2 singles
with 3.3 ticks left to give St.
John’s a 41-39 non-league
girls basketball triumph
Saturday night over host St.
Marys Memorial at
the new “Horseshoe”
in St. Marys.
The teams were
tied at 23-all to
commence the
fourth period and
the battle was on.
Neither team could
get much headway
— with host senior
Jo Steva fouling
out at 3:20 — and the Lady
Roughriders (2-1) grabbed
a 37-34 lead on a 3-point
play by Carrie Schlatter at
the 2:05 mark. The Jays (2-1)
had the finishing kick. Geise
(13 markers, 5 boards) hit
a second-chance basket at
1:45. DeeDee Sudhoff hit the
second-of-2 free shots with
56.9 ticks left for the hosts
but St. John’s senior Becca
Saine (4 assists) tied it with a
hoop with 43 seconds left. St.
Marys senior 6-footer Erika
Thornsberry (19 counters,
10 boards) then fouled out
on an offensive foul at the
30.4-second mark, leaving
the Roughriders with a hole
in the middle. The Jays took
advantage by running a high-
low set, with junior Shelby
Reindel feeding Geise on a
lob for a deuce with 16 ticks
to go for the lead. Schlatter
hit the first-of-2 freebies with
3.7 ticks left and Geise was
fouled on the carom. She hit
the first and missed the sec-
ond with 3.3 ticks left and the
Roughriders couldn’t get a
3-pointer off before the horn
sounded.
“We wanted to run a
screen-and-roll but if that
didn’t work,
we had the
h i g h - l o w
set. We
e x e c u t e d
that well,”
St. John’s
mentor Dan
Gr ot house
expl ai ned.
“ T h a t ’ s
what it
comes down to in a game like
this; executing just enough.
You had two teams that are
physical and tough defen-
sively; neither defense made
it easy for the offenses to
execute. This was a hard-
fought basketball game.”
That foul trouble really
stymied Memorial, according
to head coach Kelly Fulmer.
“Without Erika and Jo, we
really don’t have a lot behind
them. We lack some talent
any time those girls are on
the bench,” Fulmer said. “We
fell behind again in the sec-
ond period and battled back;
we showed more patience to
get back. We just need to
do that on a more consistent
basis.”
The Lady Roughriders
started out with the first six
points and eight of the first
10 as Thornsberry scored
six. The Lady Blue Jays
righted the ship by extending
their trademark man-to-man
defense more full-court and
scored the next four before
in a low-scoring first period
before Steva hit a basket to
make it 10-6 to end the first.
The Jays had the better
of the proceedings in the
second period, with
sophomore Katie
Vorst (11 markers, 6
boards, 3 thefts) net-
ting six of the Jays’
12 in the quarter. The
visitors’ ‘D’ held the
Roughriders without
a fielder (0-of-8) and
gave up only 3-of-4
free throws. The Jays’
halftime lead stood at
18-13 as Vorst hit a tough
inside basket with 17 seconds
left.
The Jays built their lead
to 22-15 in the third canto
before the Roughriders out-
scored them 8-1, including
a putback by Steva with 15
ticks to go, for a 23-all tie.
“We did not want to let
their guards get comfortable
in setting up and getting the
ball inside to Thornsberry and
Steva. Thornsberry is a tough
matchup inside,” Grothouse
added. “I felt our defense
started to do a much better
job of contesting their shots
and making it more difficult
for their offense. When they
did get the ball inside, we
did a nice job of boxing them
in and not giving up open
threes when they kicked it
back out.”
St. John’s downed 13-of-
37 fielders (0-of-13 3s) for
35.1 percent and 15-of-
18 singles (83.3%). They
amassed 23 caroms (7 offen-
sive); 13 errors; and 18 fouls.
They host Van Wert (6 p.m.
JV start) Tuesday
Memorial canned 15-of-38
shots (0-of-6 triples) for 39.5
percent and 9-of-15 freebies
(60%). They added 28 boards
(11 offensive); 18 turnovers;
and 18 fouls. Memorial hosts
Kenton Thursday.
Late Geise bucket lifts Lady Jays
VARSITY
ST. JOHN’S (41)
Courtney Grothouse 1-8-10, Becca
Saine 1-0-2, Shelby Reindel 1-0-2,
Katie Vorst 4-3-11, Jessica Recker
1-1-3, Samantha Stant 0-0-0, Tiffany
Geise 5-3-13. Totals 13-15-41.
ST. MARYS MEMORIAL (39)
Rachel Wale 2-0-4, Ashleigh Falk
0-0-0, DeeDee Sudhoff 1-1-3, Carrie
Schlatter 4-2-10, Jo Steva 2-0-4, Erika
Thornsberry 6-7-19, Kelly Heitkamp
0-0-0. Totals 15-9-39.
Score by Quarters:
St. John’s 6 12 5 18 - 41
Memorial 10 3 10 16 - 39
Three-point goals: St. John’s, none;
St. Marys Memorial, none.
-----
JUNIOR VARSITY
ST. JOHN’S (16)
Madison Zuber 0-0-0, Emily
Fischbach 0-0-0, Brooke Zuber 3-0-
6, Christie Carder 1-0-2, Erica Saine
0-0-0, Madison Kreeger 0-3-3, Casey
Schnipke 0-0-0, Mallory MacLennan
1-0-2, Amanda Boberg 0-0-0, Julie
Bonifas 1-1-3. Totals 6-4/13-16.
ST. MARYS MEMORIAL (27)
Alex Spencer 0-0-0, Mallory Kill
0-0-0, Reagan Aller 3-1-8, Kelsey
Rohrbach 1-0-2, Molly Albert 3-2-9,
Rachel Geeslin 0-1-1, Kelly Haitkamp
0-0-0, Hannah Wumer 3-0-6, Paige
Dicus 0-1-1. Totals 10-5/14-27.
Score by Quarters:
St. John’s 3 2 2 9 - 16
Memorial 6 7 5 9 - 27
Three-point goals: St. John’s,
none; St. Marys Memorial, Aller,
Albert.
Geise Vorst
(Continued from page 1A)
Blue Jay community and
administration, such as all-
purpose superfan Ronnie
Grothaus, assistant athletic
director/boys basketball coach
Aaron Elwer, Dick Clark of
the Alumni Association and
defensive coordinator Steve
“Peanut” Recker, shared their
thoughts on the team’s run
through the regular season
with only a couple of close
games along the way, as well
as the team’s dominant per-
formance in the 5-game run
through Fawcett Stadium.
St. John’s pastor Fr. Mel
Verhoff not only shared
prayers but also his enjoy-
ment at watching this team
do its thing.
Mayor Michael Gallmeier
represented the city in his
remarks about the season and
how much joy that the team
brought to the Delphos com-
munity.
St. John’s Principal Don
Huysman emceed the event,
sharing his insights and
thanking the unsung people
behind the scenes that make
the whole process work.
He especially pointed out
the seniors on this year’s team
and spoke about how proud he
was about the group’s accom-
plishments, not only about
this season but in the three
previous ones.
“I am very proud for these
seniors and what they have
been able to do over these
past four years and I would
just thank to thank all of them
and the fans, family and all of
the coaches as well for a very
good year,” Huysman said.
Of the four senior captains:
quarterback Jordan Leininger,
tailback Evan Burgei, 2-way
lineman Austin Vogt and free
safety/wide receiver Tyler
Bergfeld; perhaps Leininger’s
were best at summing up the
players’ feelings.
“We will be graduating
this spring and all of this is
finally starting to set in. I am
just now realizing that there
are no more Friday night
games for me in high school
and I am just very happy to
be able to go out on top as a
state champion,” Leininger
added.
Schulte has amassed four
titles and a 127-32 mark in
his 12th season.
He has gotten used to suc-
cess — with only one losing
season in 12 — and over
the years has also realized
the seniors on the team set
the tone from the previous
season.
This year’s group has been
key in a 42-3 3-year stretch
and most definitely will leave
a huge hole when the team
convenes for pre-season con-
ditioning and two-a-days
starting next July.
Schulte summed up his
thoughts about this year’s
unit.
“We will be graduating
21 talented and experienced
seniors from this team in the
spring; these guys are really
going to be missed around
here. We’re going to have
a lot of big shoes to fill,”
Schulte concluded. “I am
optimistic for the future. I
have told the underclassman
that they are going to have to
fill those shoes but that is up
to them to decide what they
are going to do from there
and the work they are willing
to put in.
“They are going to have to
get back at it here in a couple
of weeks and it’s going to
start with what type of pride
that they have and how hard
they are willing to work in the
offseason to get to where they
need to be.”
Jays
Wildcats 3rd at Stryker
STRYKER — The
Jefferson matmen finished
third out of 10 teams at the
Stryker Invitational Saturday.
Junior Curtis Miller
became a 2-time winner in
the 215-pound category
Ayersvillee’s 125-pound-
er Cade Mansfield was the
Outstanding Wrestler, as well
as a 3-time champion.
Other repeat champions
were 140-pounder Cody
Lamberson (Montpelier
– 3 times) and Stryker’s
152-pounder Nolan Short
(2 times); Ayersville’s
103-pounder Behringer
(round robin); and Edgerton’s
119-pounder Skylar Muehlfeld
(round robin).
Jefferson is in the
Lincolnview Invitational 10
a.m. Saturday.
2010 Stryker Invitational Scores:
1. Ayersville 357.5; 2. Edgerton 304;
3. Del. Jefferson 223.5; 4. Defiance
205; 5. Tinora 195; 6. Montpelier 183;
7. Fairview 178; 8. Bryan 169; 9.
Archbold 101.5; 10. Stryker 62.
Two Pools:
First Place: 112: F. Alvarado
(AY) maj. dec. Johnston (TI) 13-5;
125: Mansfield (AY) dec. VanVleet
(ED) 6-5; 130: Moore (AY) pin Tanner
Vermule (DJ) 1:18; 135: Haury (ED)
dec. Parsley (AR) 6-3; 140: Lamberson
(MO) dec. J. Alvarado (DE) 9-5; 145:
Sheets (ED) maj. dec. Dan. Marshall
(TI) 9-0; 152: Short (ST) pin M. Meyer
(FV) 1:40; 160: Trent (FV) dec. Cliffton
(ED) 10-4; 171: Ankney (AY) maj.
dec. Bogosian (BR) 12-1; 189: Jacob
Leach (DJ) dec. Bergeon (AY) 9-2;
215: Curtis Miller (DJ) tech. fall Lewis
(AY) 15-0; 285: Moser (TI) pin Nickells
(ED) 2:31.
Third Place: 112: A. Barrientos
(DE) tech. fall Green (AY) 17-1; 125:
Davilla (DE) pin Hulbert (BR) INJ;
130: Hitzeman (MO) dec. Cocke
(TI) 4-2; 135: Esparza (AY) dec. S.
Meyer (DE) 9-2; 140: Knecht (ED)
dec. Darren Edinger (DJ) 6-2; 145: Z.
Clark (AY) dec. Johnson (BR) 4-2ot;
152: Nagel (BR) pin Bradford (DE)
2:05; 160: Pease (BR)) pin B. Clark
(AY) 4:30; 171: Colin McConnahea
(DJ) dec. Harrison (MO) 13-11ot; 189:
Edmondson (ED) dec. Rossman (FV)
4-3; 215: Dam. Marshall (TI) pin Nicely
(FV) 1:15; 285: Geesey (MO) pin Geoff
Ketcham (DJ) 0:27.
Fifth Place: 112: Taylor (MO) dec.
Kurtz (BR) 4-2; 125: Alexander (FV)
pin John McRedmond (DJ) 0:46; 130:
K. Zimmerman (AR) pin Hammond
(FV) INJ; 135: J. Zimmerman (AR)
pin Chris Truesdale (DJ) 2:42; 140:
Carnahan (DE) pin Mavis (FV) 4:15;
145: L. Barrientos (DE) pin Czartoski
(FV) 3:28; 152: Callaway (ED) pin
Benner (MO) 4:42; 160: Martinez (DE)
dec. Franklin (BR) 6-4; 171: Jaramillo
(AR) dec. Readon (DE) 8-1; 189:
Martin (BR) pin Jones (MO) 2:33; 215:
A.J. Cross (DJ) pin Mahan (TI) 0:34;
285: Adam Crabtree (DJ) pin Friesner
(AY) 2:40.
Seventh Place: 112: Birky (ST)
pin Pilarski (ED) 2:34; 125: Manz (AR)
pin Fackler (AY) 0:30; 130: Graves
(AY) pin Stantz (MO) 2:00; 135:
Whitlock (ST) pin Savage (BR) INJ;
140: Shreve (AY) dec. Williams (DE)
9-5; 145: Lewellen (MO) pin Olivarez
(AY) INJ; 152: Carr (AY) pin Bouza
(TI) 3:45; 160: Cotey Nichols (DJ)
dec. Urivez (TI) 9-8; 171: Herman
(ED) pin Klopfenstein (AR) 0:54; 189:
Hammersmith (AR) pin Curtis (TI)
4:06; 215: Hernandez (AR) pin Robb
(BR) 0:50; 285: C. Marshall (TI) pin
Farris (DE) 1:30.
Round 5 (Jefferson wrestlers):
125: John McRedmond (DJ) pin
Manz (AR) 0:40; 130: Tanner Vermule
(DJ) pin Hitzeman (MO) 1:24; 135:
Chris Truesdale (DJ) pin Croft
(MO) 1:04; 140: Lamberson (MO)
pin Darren Edinger (DJ) 5:56; 152:
Bouza (TI) pin Michael Joseph (DJ)
1:40; 171: Ankney (AY) maj. dec.
Colin McConnahea (DJ) 12-2; 189:
Jacob Leach (DJ) pin Long (DE)
0:43; 215: Curtis Miller (DJ) pin Nicely
(FV) 2:15; 285: Moser (TI) pin Adam
Crabtree (DJ) 2:50; Geoff Ketcham
(DJ) pin Brink (AY) 3:01.
Round 4: 125: Mansfield (AY)
pin John McRedmond (DJ) 4:26;
130: Tanner Vermule (DJ) advanced
with bye; 135: Chris Truesdale (DJ)
pin Savage (BR) 1:30; 140: Darren
Edinger (DJ) pin Rocha (AR) 1:18;
145: Johnson (BR) pin Willy Neeley
(DJ) 2:43; 152: Bradford (DE) maj.
dec. Michael Joseph (DJ) 17-9; 160:
Cotey Nichols (DJ) pin Davis (AR)
3:37; 171: Colin McConnahea (DJ)
pin Herman (ED) 2:57; 189: Jacob
Leach (DJ) dec. Rossman (FV) 10-6;
215: Curtis Miller (DJ) pin Robb (BR)
0:45; Lewis (AY) dec. A.J. Cross (DJ)
5-2; 285: Adam Crabtree (DJ) pin
Farris (DE) 1:23; Geoff Ketcham (DJ)
pin C. Marshall (TI) 3:13.
Round 3: 125: Davilla (DE) pin
John McRedmond (DJ) 1:50; 130:
Tanner Vermule (DJ) pin Graves (AY)
1:27; 135: S. Meyer (DE) pin Chris
Truesdale (DJ) 4:24; 145: Olivarez
(AY) pin Willy Neeley (DJ) 3:23; 152:
Benner (MO) pin Michael Joseph
(DJ) 0:58; 160: B. Clark (AY) pin
Cotey Nichols (DJ) 1:42; 171: Colin
McConnahea (DJ) pin Garret (DE)
0:44; 189: Jacob Leach (DJ) pin Curtis
(TI) 1:15; 215: Curtis Miller (DJ) pin
Facundo (DE) 0:28; A.J. Cross (DJ)
pin Royer (FV) 1:15; 285: Nickells (ED)
pin Geoff Ketcham (DJ) 0:58.
Round 2: 125: John McRedmond
(DJ) pin Dewitt (FV) 2:50; 140: Darren
Edinger (DJ) pin Mavis (FV) 5:20;
145: Czartoski (FV) dec. Willy Neeley
(DJ) 8-4; 152: Short (ST) pin Michael
Joseph (DJ) 0:40; 160: Franklin (BR)
pin Cotey Nichols (DJ) 1:49; 215: A.J.
Cross (DJ) pin Hernandez (AR) 2:23;
285: Adam Crabtree (DJ) pin Morin
(AY) 0:52; Geoff Ketcham (DJ) pin
Friesner (AY) 2:42.
Round 1: 130: Tanner Vermule
(DJ) pin K. Zimmerman (AR) 1:31;
135: Parsley (AR) pin Chris Truesdale
(DJ) 4:36; 140: Darren Edinger (DJ)
pin Williams (DE) 2:45; 145: Sheets
(ED) pin Willy Neeley (DJ) 0:40; 160:
Trent (FV) pin Cotey Nichols (DJ)
0:34; 171: Colin McConnahea (DJ)
dec. Jaramillo (AR) 11-9ot; 189: Jacob
Leach (DJ) pin Jones (MO) 3:56; 215:
Curtis Miller (DJ) pin Mahan (TI)
1:02; Dam. Marshall (TI) pin A.J.
Cross (DJ) 4:43; 285: Geesey (MO)
pin Adam Crabtree (DJ) 0:28.
103-Pound Placers - Round
Robin 1. Ryan Behringer, Ayersville, 2.
Drew Coffey, Archbold, 3. Evan Bates,
Defiance, 4. Seth Ries, Montpelier.
119-Pound Placers - Round
Robin 1. Skylar Muehlfeld, Edgerton,
2. Kyle Behringer, Ayersville, 3.
Josh Gares, Tinora, 4. Cole Ries,
Montpelier, 5. Sam Breneman, Bryan,
6. Pete Flores, Defiance.
The Associated Press
The San Diego Chargers don’t lose
in December, when they prove they
own the AFC West. The Indianapolis
Colts usually clinch the AFC South
before Christmas.
On Sunday, both teams saw their
division title hopes take huge hits and
with wild-card aspirations farfetched,
their chances of making the playoffs
diminished, too.
Oakland, which snapped a
13-game slide against San Diego on
Oct. 10, swept the season series for
the first time since 2001 with a 28-13
victory. The Chargers’ streak of 18
straight December victories, which tied
an NFL record for most victories in any
month, came to a thudding end.
San Diego (6-6) had won four in
a row, but now is tied with Oakland in
a division Kansas City leads by two
games.
“Everyone was talking all week
long about the hottest team in football
and on and on,” Raiders defensive
tackle Richard Seymour said. “We
give them a lot of credit. They are a
good football team but we just under-
stand what we need to in order to beat
these guys. And we give a lot of credit
to the offensive line. We just wanted to
run it at them.”
Oakland did, piling up 251 yards.
Darren McFadden ran for 97 yards
and a TD, and Michael Bush rushed
for 95 yards and a score.
Dallas was nearly as effective with
the run in stunning Indianapolis 38-35
in overtime. Dallas (4-8) rushed for a
season-high 217 yards and led most
of the way thanks to Peyton Manning’s
four interceptions, two returned for
TDs — by Sean Lee and Orlando
Scandrick. The Colts (6-6), undefeat-
ed at this point a year ago, fell one
game behind first-place Jacksonville
in the AFC South.
“We certainly have put ourselves
in a hole,” Manning said after Lee’s
second interception set up David
Buehler’s winning 38-yard field goal.
“Unfortunately, we have to score-
board-watch a little bit and that’s not
a situation you want to be in. I’m
disappointed that I’ve put our team in
a hole but we do have some division
games left.”
The defending conference champs
might need to win every remaining
game to get into the postseason.
Elsewhere, Brett Favre lasted
only one series in Minnesota before
damaging his right shoulder. Tarvaris
Jackson threw three picks but also hit
Sidney Rice for two scores in a 38-14
win against Buffalo. Favre sprained
his throwing shoulder after getting
crunched by linebacker Arthur Moats,
an injury that leaves the Vikings quar-
terback unsure whether he will be
able to start his 298th straight regular-
season game next week.
“If we were talking ankles or
elbows, thumbs or something like that,
I would probably be a little more up
to date on how to deal with it,” the
41-year-old Favre said. “First time in
20 years I have ever done anything
like that, so it is kind of surprising.”
Also Sunday, it was: Kansas City
10, Denver 6; Pittsburgh 13, Baltimore
10; Atlanta 28, Tampa Bay 24; New
Orleans 34, Cincinnati 30; Jacksonville
17, Tennessee 6; Chicago 24, Detroit
20; Green Bay 24, San Francisco
16; Seattle 31, Carolina 14; St. Louis
19, Arizona 6; the New York Giants
31, Washington 7; and Cleveland 13,
Miami 10.
On Thursday night, Philadelphia
beat Houston 34-24.
Tonight’s game is for AFC East
supremacy, with Jets and Patriots fac-
ing off in Foxborough. Both are 9-2.
Raiders 28, Chargers 13
At San Diego, Jason Campbell
ran for a touchdown and threw for
another as the Raiders overcame 13
penalties for 105 yards. The Chargers
had a season-low 286 yards in total
offense and Philip Rivers was sacked
four times.
“It’s obviously very disappoint-
ing we weren’t able to play at the
level we’ve been playing over the last
month,” coach Norv Turner said.
Cowboys 38, Colts 35, OT
At Indianapolis, four-time MVP
Manning finished 36 of 48 for 365
yards with two touchdowns and his
second straight four-interception game
as the Colts dropped their third in a
row. He’s thrown a career-high 11
picks in the past three weeks, four
going back for TDs.
“There’s nothing new or different
about the defense Dallas was playing,”
Manning said. “The four interceptions,
guys were covered, they shouldn’t
have been thrown. That’s basic foot-
ball.”
Dallas has won three of four since
Jason Garrett replaced Wade Phillips
as coach, but lost rookie receiver Dez
Bryant with a broken right ankle.
Vikings 38, Bills 14
At Minneapolis, Adrian Peterson
rushed for 107 yards and three touch-
downs on a gimpy right ankle for
the Vikings (5-7), who are 2-0 under
interim head coach Leslie Frazier.
Drayton Florence had two inter-
ceptions, returning one for a score, for
the Bills (2-10). But Buffalo committed
five turnovers.
Chiefs 10, Broncos 6
At Kansas City, Jamaal Charles
rushed for 116 yards and Matt Cassel
threw a 3-yard pass to Leonard Pope
for the only touchdown for the Chiefs
(8-4).
Knowshon Moreno ran for 161
yards for the Broncos (3-9), who are
enduring one of their worst stretches
in decades, losing 17 of their past 22
games under coach Josh McDaniels.
Steelers 13, Ravens 10
At Baltimore, the Steelers (9-3)
took first place in the AFC North when
Ben Roethlisberger threw a 9-yard
touchdown pass to Isaac Redman
with 2:51 left after Troy Polamalu
forced a fumble with a sack of Joe
Flacco. LaMarr Woodley grabbed the
loose ball and ran it 19 yards to the
Ravens 9.
After two incomplete passes,
Roethlisberger dumped a short toss
over the middle to Redman, who broke
tackles by Dawan Landry and Jarret
Johnson on his way to the end zone.
The victory left the Steelers a
game ahead of the Ravens (8-4).
Falcons 28, Bucs 24
At Tampa, Eric Weems scored
on a 102-yard kickoff return and Matt
Ryan threw a 9-yard touchdown pass
to Michael Jenkins as Atlanta rallied
from a 10-point deficit for its sixth
straight victory.
Ryan led his sixth fourth-quarter
comeback of the season for the NFC
South leaders, and the Falcons (10-
2) benefited from costly penalties on
the Bucs.
Rookie LeGarrette Blount rushed
for 103 yards and fullback Earnest
Graham threw a 2-yard TD pass to
John Gilmore for Tampa Bay (7-5).
Saints 34, Bengals 30
At Cincinnati, Drew Brees threw
a 3-yard touchdown pass to Marques
Colston with 31 seconds left, rally-
ing New Orleans to its fifth straight
victory.
The Saints (9-3) trailed for the
first time after newcomer Clint Stitser
made a 47-yard field goal with 4:25
to go, putting the Bengals (2-10) up
30-27.
Brees passed Archie Manning as
the Saints’ career passing leader ear-
lier in the game. Brees 42-yarder to
Robert Meacham got New Orleans
into field-goal range. On fourth-and-2
from the Cincinnati 7, the Saints tried
to draw the Bengals offside.
Lineman Pat Sims jumped, giving
the Saints a first down. Brees threw
his second touchdown pass on the
next play, sending the Bengals to their
ninth straight loss.
Jaguars 17, Titans 6
Maurice Jones-Drew rushed for
a career-best 186 yards and Rashad
Jennings and David Garrard each ran
for a touchdown. The win allowed the
host Jaguars (7-5) to take over first-
place in the AFC South.
Tennessee (5-7) started veteran
Kerry Collins at quarterback, but the
Titans were unable to avoid their fifth
straight loss and have gone 13 quar-
ters without scoring a touchdown.
Bears 24, Lions 20
At Detroit, Jay Cutler threw a go-
ahead touchdown pass to Brandon
Manumaleuna one play after a ques-
tionable call midway through the fourth
quarter.
The NFC North-leading Bears
(9-3) took advantage of referee Ed
Hochuli flagging Ndamukong Suh
for unnecessary roughness. Suh hit
Cutler’s shoulder pads hard from
behind when the quarterback was run-
ning downfield. Cutler then connected
with Manumaleuna on a 7-yard pass.
The Lions (2-10) have lost five
straight this season and an NFL-
record 19 within the division for the
longest skid since the 1970 merger.
Packers 34, 49ers 16
Donald Driver’s catch-and-run for
a 61-yard touchdown broke open a
tight game in the third quarter.
Greg Jennings caught six passes
from Aaron Rodgers for 122 yards
and a pair of touchdowns for the host
Packers (8-4). Vernon Davis had 126
yards receiving and a touchdown for
the 49ers (4-8).
Seahawks 31, Panthers 14
At Seattle, Marshawn Lynch
rushed for a career-high three touch-
downs, Lofa Tatupu returned an inter-
ception 26 yards and Seattle used a
21-point third quarter.
Lynch scored on a pair of 1-yard
runs in the third quarter, sandwiched
around Tatupu’s interception of
Carolina rookie Jimmy Clausen. Lynch
added a 22-yard touchdown run in the
fourth quarter.
Carolina (1-11) dominated the
first half, but couldn’t hold off the
Seahawks (6-6).
Rams 19, Cardinals 6
Steven Jackson ran for 102 yards,
including 27 on the game’s lone touch-
down, and Josh Brown kicked four
field goals as St. Louis (6-6) won con-
secutive road games for the first time
in more than three years.
The Rams also ended an eight-
game losing streak against Arizona
(3-9), which dropped its seventh in
a row. St. Louis remained in a first-
place tie with Seattle in the weak
NFC West.
Giants 31, Redskins 7
Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad
Bradshaw ran for two touchdowns
apiece. Jacobs ran eight times for
103 yards and scored on jaunts of 8
and 28 yards, while Bradshaw had 97
yards and TD runs of 4 and 10 yards
as the Giants (8-4) moved back into
first-place tie with Philadelphia in the
NFC East. Bradshaw also went over
1,000 yards rushing this season.
A harried Donovan McNabb threw
a 33-yard touchdown pass to Anthony
Armstrong for visiting Washington
(5-7), which had six turnovers.
Browns 13, Dolphins 10
At Miami, Mike Adams’ intercep-
tion set up a short field goal on the
final play, and Cleveland overcame a
comedy of errors.
When Browns lineman David
Bowens deflected Chad Henne’s third-
down pass, Adams snatched the ball
and ran 25 yards to the 2. On fourth
down, Phil Dawson kicked a 23-yard
field goal.
Cleveland (5-7) won for the fourth
time in six games and for the first time
in Miami since 1970. The Dolphins
(6-6) lost for the seventh time in their
past eight home games.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
NFL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7A
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Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald — 7A
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — There
weren’t many ways that the
Ottoville girls basketball team
didn’t dominate Lincolnview
Saturday afternoon at L.W.
Heckman Gymnasium.
They outshot the Lady
Lancers 29-of-49 (5-of-11
downtown) for 59.2 percent
versus 14-of-43 (0-of-4 treys)
for 32.6 percent; 14-of-17
free throws (82.4%) vs. 1-of-4
(25%); owned the glass 36-18
(10-6 offensive); and had 15
turnovers to 22.
That all led up to the Lady
Big Green crushed the Lancers
77-29.
Sophomore Abby Siefker
— at 6-3 — led the Green
and Gold (2-1) with a double-
double: 17 markers and 10
rebounds. Senior Kari Beining
added 14 markers and class-
mate Tasha Kaufman (4 assists,
4 steals) 13.
“I’ve never had a center like
Abby; I’ve had a couple close
but the way she can change
shots and defend the paint,
I’ve never had someone like
her,” Ottoville mentor Dave
Kleman observed. “I felt we
played much better today than
last weekend. I didn’t feel we
played well either game (at
the Van Wert Tip-Off) and we
focused on techniques on the
defensive end. So much of our
offense comes off the defen-
sive end and when we defend
well, we play better offense.
We even threw in a 1-3-1 and
2-3 zone at times just to try
them and see how’d we do.”
Sophomore Kaitlyn Brant
for Lincolnview — who will
not have senior wing Shelby
Osborne, expected to be the top
player, for the entire season —
led the Lady Lancers with eight
markers and sophomore Katie
Dye (6 assists) added seven.
“It’s unfortunate we won’t
have Shelby; we were expect-
ing so much out of her,”
first-year Lancer coach Dan
Williamson explained. “We’re
going to need younger girls
to step up and replace her.
We’re all disappointed and so
is Shelby.”
Ottoville’s defense forced
seven turnovers in the first
period and scored the first 13
points of the contest. With
Kaufman dropping in eight
markers, her team shot 9-of-
14 in the period in building
up a 21-5 margin capped by
her 10-foot banker that beat
the horn.
The Lady Lancers, at a
major height disadvantage,
simply could not get much
going offensively. Though the
hosts slowed down offensive-
ly, netting 13 in the canto, the
Lancers could not keep up.
When junior Lauren Kramer
(5 boards, 4 assists) banged a
3-ball from the left corner at
the horn, Ottoville’s lead grew
to 34-11.
Lincolnview had its best
scoring in the third period —
hitting 5-of-10 from the floor
as Brant netted six counters
— but they still fell behind as
much as 30 twice. They trailed
48-21 as Kramer hit a trifecta
from just right of the key with
25 ticks showing.
Both teams gave more play-
ing time to their benches in
the finale and the Lady Green
exploded for 29 points — hit-
ting 11-of-18 as Beining had
eight and Siefker six — as they
finished the blowout.
“We have a lot of girls
capable of scoring. We shot
very well, especially the 3s,”
Kleman added. “I liked our
aggressiveness, especially
on defense. It’s hard to play
this game on your heels. Our
aggression started defensively
and carried over to the offen-
sive end. Plus, I feel I have
a strong bench, with a good
junior varsity team, and want
to build even more depth as we
go along toward the tourna-
ment.”
Both teams added 13 fouls.
Sophomore Kaylee Thatcher (4
steals) and senior Abbi Alvarez
led the Lady lancers with four
rebounds each.
“We just don’t match up
with a team with any size.
We have very little size,”
Williamson added. “We have
to rely on our speed and quick-
ness but when a team shoots
like Ottoville today, you are in
trouble. We fell behind by 13
and we don’t have the offense
to come from behind like that.
We just have to move on.”
In junior varsity action, the
Lady Green (3-0) destroyed
the Lady Lancers (1-2) 67-17.
Four players hit double fig-
ures for the hosts: freshman
Tanya Kaufman 16, 6-0 sopho-
more Rachel Beining 13 and
10 each by classmate Nicole
Vorst and freshman Taylor
Mangas.
Freshman Christine Stemen
topped Lincolnview with
eight.
Ottoville entertains Fort
Jennings 6 p.m. Tuesday (JV
tip). Lincolnview entertains
Bluffton Thursday.
Lady Green crushes Lancer cagers
VARSITY
LINCOLNVIEW (29)
Abbi Alvarez 1-0-2, Kaylee Thatcher
2-0-4, Courtney Gorman 0-0-0, Katie
Dye 3-1-7, Audrey Bowen 1-0-2, Carley
Springer 3-0-6, Morgan Peel 0-0-0,
Kaitlyn Brant 4-0-8. Totals 14-1-29.
OTTOVILLE (77)
Rachel Turnwald 2-3-7, Megan
Bendele 0-0-0, Lauren Koch 3-3-9,
Kari Beining 5-3-14, Nicole Vorst 2-0-4,
Lauren Kramer 2-2-8, Tasha Kaufman
6-0-13, Rachel Beining 1-0-2, Krista
Schimmoeller 0-0-0, Abby Siefker 7-3-
17, Melissa Schnipke 0-0-0, Tonya
Kaufman 1-0-3. Totals 29-14-77.
Score by Quarters:
Lincolnview 5 6 10 8 - 29
Ottoville 21 13 14 29 - 77
Three-point goals: Lincolnview,
none; Ottoville, Kramer 2, Ta. Kaufman,
K. Beining, To. Kaufman.
JUNIOR VARSITY
LINCOLNVIEW (17)
Haley McAbee 0-1-1, Tori Abdul
0-0-0, Taylor Miller 1-1-4, Courtney
Gorman 1-0-2, Christine Stemen 4-0-
8, Cassie Hale 1-0-2, Sarah Harris
0-0-0, Ruixingchen Liu 0-0-0, Kennedy
Mengerink 0-0-0, Katie Marbaugh 0-0-
0. Totals 7-2/6-17.
OTTOVILLE (67)
Rachel Turnwald 1-0-2, Taylor
Mangas 5-0-10, Nicole Vorst 3-2-10,
Tanya Kaufman 7-2-16, Monica Sarka
0-0-0, Kendra Eickholt 3-0-6, Danielle
Trenkamp 3-2-8, Rachel Beining 6-1-
13, Krista Schimmoeller 1-0-2. Totals
29-7/12-67.
Three-point goals: Lincolnview,
Miller; Ottoville, Vorst 2.
Dec. 5, 2010
Harris USA Today Computer BCS
Rk Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct Rk Pct Avg Pv
1. Auburn 1 2809 .9856 2 1437 .9742 1 1.000 .9866 1
2. Oregon 2 2773 .9730 1 1450 .9831 2 .960 .9720 2
3. TCU 3 2613 .9168 3 1348 .9139 3 .900 .9102 3
4. Stanford 5 2421 .8495 5 1239 .8400 5 .820 .8365 4
5. Wisconsin 4 2443 .8572 4 1276 .8651 8 .690 .8041 5
6. Ohio St. 6 2293 .8046 6 1200 .8136 9 .680 .7660 6
7. Oklahoma 9 1926 .6758 t8 1008 .6834 4 .830 .7297 9
8. Arkansas 8 1992 .6989 t8 1008 .6834 6 .800 .7274 7
9. Michigan St. 7 2104 .7382 7 1104 .7485 11 .590 .6922 8
10. LSU 11 1625 .5702 12 826 .5600 7 .720 .6167 10
11. Boise St. 10 1800 .6316 10 914 .6197 12 .580 .6104 11
12. Missouri 13 1368 .4800 14 712 .4827 10 .620 .5276 12
13. Virginia Tech 12 1623 .5695 11 900 .6102 18 .330 .5032 15
14. Oklahoma St. 15 1232 .4323 13 718 .4868 13 .550 .4897 14
15. Nevada 14 1302 .4568 15 640 .4339 16 .410 .4336 17
16. Alabama 16 1155 .4053 18 521 .3532 14 .540 .4328 16
17. Texas A&M 18 1077 .3779 17 542 .3675 15 .500 .4151 18
18. Nebraska 17 1136 .3986 16 607 .4115 17 .370 .3934 13
19. Utah 19 685 .2404 19 375 .2542 t19 .270 .2549 20
20. South Carolina 20 631 .2214 20 345 .2339 t19 .270 .2418 19
21. Mississippi St. 22 500 .1754 22 255 .1729 21 .200 .1828 22
22. West Virginia 21 519 .1821 21 261 .1769 24 .040 .1330 24
23. Florida St. 23 274 .0961 23 156 .1058 22 .140 .1140 21
24. Hawaii 24 191 .0670 25 98 .0664 23 .100 .0778 NR
25. Cent. Florida 25 190 .0667 24 143 .0969 28 .000 .0545 NR
———
AH RB CM KM JS PW
1. Auburn 1 1 1 1 1 1
2. Oregon 2 2 2 2 2 2
3. TCU 3 3 4 4 7 3
4. Stanford 8 7 5 5 4 5
5. Wisconsin 5 4 12 10 12 8
6. Ohio St. 6 6 7 13 16 10
7. Oklahoma 4 11 3 6 5 6
8. Arkansas 9 8 11 3 3 4
9. Michigan St. 7 12 8 15 14 11
10. LSU 11 9 9 7 6 7
11. Boise St. 13 5 10 14 15 9
12. Missouri 10 18 6 11 9 12
13. Virginia Tech 18 16 16 21 20 17
14. Oklahoma St. 12 13 13 9 11 15
15. Nevada 17 14 15 17 18 14
16. Alabama 15 10 17 12 8 13
17. Texas A&M 14 19 14 8 10 16
18. Nebraska 16 17 18 16 13 18
19. Utah 20 15 19 19 21 19
20. South Carolina 19 20 20 18 17 20
21. Mississippi St. 22 21 25 20 19 21
22. West Virginia 24 0 23 0 0 24
23. Florida St. 21 22 21 24 24 23
24. Hawaii 23 24 22 25 0 22
25. Cent. Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0
———
Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of the Harris
Interactive, USA Today Coaches and Computer polls. Team percentages are derived
by dividing a team’s actual voting points by a maximum 2,850 possible points in the
Harris Interactive Poll and 1,475 possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll.
Six computer rankings are used to determine the overall computer component. The
highest and lowest ranking for each team is dropped and the remaining four are added
and divided to produce a Computer Rankings Percentage. The six computer ranking
providers are Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth Massey,
Jeff Sagarin and Peter Wolfe. Each computer ranking accounts for schedule strength
in its formula.
BCS STANDINGS
By DAVE BONINSEGNA
The Delphos Herald
zsportslive@yahoo.com
KALIDA — A combina-
tion of poor foul shooting on
the part of the Kalida Lady
Wildcats and a strong defen-
sive effort by the Ottawa-
Glandorf Lady Titans led to
a 49-38 cage victory
on the part of O-G
Saturday afternoon
at The Wildcat Den,
giving the Titans
their first victory of
the season.
Kari Schroeder tallied 14
markers in the game, including
an 8-of-10 shooting perfor-
mance from the free-
throw line, to help
Ot t awa- Gl andor f
in this non-league
scuffle.
The hosts were led
by Nikki Kaufman’s
11 points; Emily Turnwald
added seven points in the
Wildcats’ effort.
“Kari came out and had
some nice penetrations for
us and we were able to fin-
ish some of those.” Ottawa-
Glandorf coach Lori Smith
commented.
The Titans controlled the
defensive boards in the game,
gaining a 23-16 advantage (33-
29 overall), while shooting
19-of-28 from the free-throw
line (68%); Kalida managed
to make just 6-of-15 attempts
from the stripe (40%).
The contest went back and
forth early before the guests
pulled away late in the first
quarter. Kylee Pothast nailed
a 3-pointer with 1:08 to go,
giving the Lady Titans a 13-9
advantage.
Schroeder scored five con-
secutive points for the visitors
to extend the lead to 23-16
with just over a minute to go
in the first half.
“If you have a good
defense, it gets your offense
going and gets you excited,”
Schroeder remarked.
Kalida made a valiant effort
in the second half, outscoring
the Titans 23-22. Kaufman
was able to help the hosts
get back to within seven in
the third, hitting a shot from
beyond the arc and draining a
basket from the paint to make
it a 29-22 contest with 5:24
left in the stanza.
However. the foul
shooting woes continued
for the LadyCats. In the
first half, Kalida missed
its first 10 free throws
and ended the first half
2-for-11.
“We work a ton on them
in practice but for whatever
reason, our percentage goes
up in practice but
it’s not translating to
games. We’ve had
too many games and
scrimmages where
we fall down and
come back,” Kaldia
coach Adam Huber said. “We
need to figure out what we
need to do in the first-half.”
The Titans grabbed a
37-28 lead going into the
final stanza and were paced
by Schroeder’s seven points
in the final eight minutes to
cap off their first win of the
season and send Kalida to an
0-3 mark.
Kalida forced 18 turnovers
to 10 of its own.
Kalida hosts Antwerp 6
p.m. Thursday.
OTTAWA-GLANDORF (49)
Sara Basinger 4-0-8, Haley
Warnecke 0-1-1, Katie Ruhe 2-4-8,
Crystal Recker 0-1-1, Kristen Miller 0-2-
2, Chelsea Maag 1-0-3, Kylee Pothast
1-0-3, Melissa Verhoff 0-2-2, Alyssa
Ebbeskotte 3-1-7, Kari Schroeder 3-8-
14. Totals 14-19-49.
KALIDA (38)
Emily Turnwald 2-3-7, Samantha
Edwards 2-0-5, Nikki Kaufman 5-0-
11, Christy Ellerbrock 0-0-0, Brandi
Merschman 1-2-4, Chelsea Verhoff
0-0-0, Alexis Wurth 0-0-0, Haley
McIntyre 3-0-6, Julia Vandemark 1-1-3,
Amy Smith 1-0-2. Totals 15-6-38.
Score by Quarters:
Ott.-Glan. 15 12 10 12 - 49
Kalida 9 6 13 10 - 38
Three-point goals: Ottawa-
Glandorf, Maag, Pothast; Kalida,
Edwards, S. Kaufman.
JV score: Kalida won.
Foul shooting, defense
carry Lady Titans
Lady Musketeers
hold off Pirates
BLUFFTON — Fort
Jennings grabbed a 47-38 lead
after three periods Saturday
and held off host BLuffton to
grab a 61-59 non-league girls
basketball triumph Saturday
in Bluffton.
Senior Taylor Wallenhorst
popped for a game-high 24
points (5 steals), including two
3s, to pace the Lady Musketeers
(3-1), while Morgan Schroeder
added 12 (2 treys) and Lauren
Norbeck 10 (6 boards). The
visitors canned 21-of-56 shots,
7-of-16 downtown, and 13-of-
24 free throws. They grabbed
30 boards and added 22 turn-
overs. Macy Schroeder added
four assists.
Lengyel topped the Pirates
(1-3) with 21, with Welch
adding 18 and Amstutz 10.
Jennings also won the
junior varsity game 28-26.
Fort Jennings is at Ottoville
6 p.m. (JV start) Tuesday.
FORT JENNINGS (61)
Morgan Schroeder 4-2-12, Kristina
Clippinger 1-0-2, Macy Schroeder 3-0-
8, Kelsey Von Lehmden 2-1-5, Taylor
Wallenhorst 8-6-24, Lauren Norbeck 3-4-
10. Totals 21-13-61.
BLUFFTON (59)
Welch 9-0-18, Crisp 1-0-2, Lengyel
9-3-21, Harrod 2-0-6, Amstutz 5-0-10,
Prichard 1-0-2. Totals 27-3-59.
Score by Quarters:
Ft. Jennings 19 16 12 14 - 61
Bluffton 13 14 11 21 - 59
Three-point goals: Fort Jennings, Mo.
Schroeder 2, Ma. Schroeder 2, Wallenhorst
2; Bluffton, Harrod 2.
JV score: 28-26 (Fort Jennings).
----
Pilots soar over Jennings
AYERSVILLE —
Ayersville was outscored
14-11 in the fourth period
Saturday night but held on for
a 51-48 non-conference bas-
ketball win over Fort Jennings
in “The Hangar”.
Jeremy Kohli led the
Musketeers (0-2) with 18
markers and Cody Warnecke
added eight.
Tops for the Pilots were
Dallas Smith with 19 and
Clay Fry 10.
Jennings visits Antwerp 6
p.m. Friday.
FORT JENNINGS (48)
Tyler Good 3-0-6, Austin Norbeck 1-2-
5, Tyler Weideman 0-0-0, Nolan Neidert
3-1-7, Cody Warnecke 3-2-8, Jeremy Kohli
4-9-18, Kort Warnecke 1-0-2, Chad Recker
1-0-2. Totals 16-14/22-48.
AYERSVILLE (51)
Shawn Carnahan 2-0-4, Clay Fry 4-2-
10, Garrett Mansfield 1-0-2, Jared Lamb 3-3-
9, Jacob Smith 1-1-3, Dallas Smith 9-1-19,
Charlie Florence 0-4-4. Totals 20-11/19-51.
Score by Quarters:
Ft. Jennings 11 10 13 14 - 48
Ayersville 12 14 14 11 - 51
Three-point goals: Fort Jennings,
Norbeck, Kohli; Ayersville, none.
----
T-Birds capture Elida Tip-Off
ELIDA — Lima Central
Catholic’s boys basketball
team has only had one full
week of practice.
The Thunderbirds might
have been excused for not being
in top form for first-year head
varsity coach Frank Kill.
However, after beating
host Elida 56-52 in Saturday’s
night’s championship clash of
the Elida Tip-Off Classic, the
defending Division III state
champions stand at 2-0.
The T-Birds were led by All-
Classic team member Austin
Stolly (7 markers, 5 boards, 3
assists, 2 steals), Bubba Krieg
(16 counters), Tre’on Johnson
(11 markers) and Derek Allen
(9 points, 10 boards). LCC shot
22-of-49 from the field (1-of-6
downtown) for 44.9 percent and
11-of-14 free throws (78.6%).
They amassed 35 rebounds (14
offensive), 11 turnovers, 16
fouls, 12 assists, five steals, one
blocked shot, 31 bench points
and 40 points in the paint.
The Bulldogs (1-1) were
led by two All-Classic team
members: Reggie McAdams
(19 points, 7 boards, 3 assists,
4 blocks) and Alex McAdams
(4 counters, 9 caroms). Aric
Thompson added 11 mark-
ers and Daokta Mathias with
10 (5 boards, 3 dimes). The
Bulldogs canned 17-of-51
fielders (9-of-25 3-pointers)
for 33.3 percent and 9-of-13
singles (69.2%). They totaled
29 caroms (13 offensive), 11
assists, 10 errors, four steals,
five rejections, 14 fouls, 12
points in the paint and 13
markers off the pine. Elida’s
next game was scheduled to
be at home versus St. John’s
Saturday but instead will be at
St. Marys Memorial Dec. 17.
In the consolation battle,
Bath improved to 1-1 with a
51-47 victory over Shawnee.
All-Classic team member
Brad Davis was a key cog for
the Wildcats with 10 mark-
ers and five assists, while
Nate Heffner topped the scor-
ing with 15 counters and five
rebounds and Keaton Sullivan
added nine counters and nine
caroms. Johny Simindinger
tacked on five boards and
four dimes. Bath connected
on 20-of-50 shots (3-of-17
triples) for 40 percent and
8-of-16 charity tosses (50%).
They compiled 30 boards (16
offensive), 16 assists, 12 turn-
overs, seven steals, nine fouls,
28 markers in the paint.
All-Classic member Trey
Howard led Shawnee (0-2)
with 15 markers, while Cory
Royster added a double-dou-
ble (14 markers, 10 caroms)
and Jamiil Williams added
eight markers and four assists.
The Tribe shot 20-of-45,
1-of-7 trios, for 44.4 percent
and 6-of-8 free tosses (75%).
They accumulated 29 boards
(9 offensive), 12 assists, 16
errors, six steals, three blocked
shots, 21 fouls, 30 points in the
paint and six bench points.
ELIDA (52)
Reggie McAdams 7-1-19, Aric
Thompson 3-2-11, Dakota Mathias 3-2-
10, Mackenzie Hampshire 2-0-4, Alex
McAdams 0-4-4, Andrew Clevenger 1-0-
2, Mike McDonald 1-0-2, Ebin Stratton
0-0-0. Totals 17-9-52.
LIMA CENT. CATHOLIC (56)
Bubba Krieg 7-2-16, Tre’on Johnson
4-3-11, Derek Allen 4-1-9, Billy Taflinger
2-2-7, Austin Stolly 3-1-7, Taylor Royster
2-0-4, John Kidd 0-2-2, Bruce Hodges
0-0-0, Jon Steiger 0-0-0. Totals 22-11-56.
Score by Quarters:
Elida 17 10 9 16 - 52
Lima CC 15 10 20 11 - 56
Three-point goals: Elida, R. McAdams
4, Thompson 3, Mathias 2; Lima Central
Catholic, Taflinger.
BATH/SHAWNEE
BATH (51)
Nate Heffner 7-1-15, Brad Davis
4-2-10, Keaton Sullivan 2-5-9, Quavon
Johnson 2-0-6, Johny Simindinger 2-0-5,
Cole Chambers 2-0-4, Cam Baker 1-0-2,
Logan Rockhold 0-0-0, Tyler Ash 0-0-0.
Totals 20-8-51.
SHAWNEE (47)
Trey Howard 5-4-15, Cory Royster
6-2-14, Jamiil Williams 4-0-8, Tyler
Rambin 1-0-2, TJ Sloan 1-0-2, Clint
Spencer 1-0-2, James Williamson 1-0-2,
Keenan Newland 1-0-2, Casey Norris 0-0-
0. Totals 20-6-47.
Score by Quarters:
Bath 12 18 4 17 - 51
Shawnee 16 6 14 11 - 47
Three-point goals: Bath, Johnson 2,
Simindinger; Shawnee, Howard.
----
Elida matmen 3-5
at Dick Hoover Duals
SPRINGFIELD — The
Elida wrestlers went 3-5 at
the Dick Hoover Duals over
the weekend to commence the
2010-11 season.
The Bulldogs went 1-2
Friday and 2-3 Saturday.
The Bulldogs defeated
McComb 43-31, Whitmer
36-34 and Evergreen 42-33.
They lost to Anthony
Wayne 44-30, Evergreen
41-36, North Canton Hoover
54-18, Springfield 42-21 and
Anthony Wayne 37-34.
They totaled 260 team
points to 316 for the oppo-
nents — giving up 18 points
per match on three voided
weight classes (144 total
points). They went 50-38 in
88 total matches wrestled.
“I’m very proud of our
team and what they accom-
plished this weekend. They
represented themselves as
a first-class Bulldog,” head
coach F. Kevin Bowers noted.
“We must improve in all areas
of wrestling in this great sport.
We must really improve in
our down position. However,
we will bring it.”
Elida is next in action at
Defiance 6 p.m. Thursday in
a Super Tri-meet.
Elida’s Line-up and Results:
103: 9 Riley Overholt: 2-6
112: 10 Dakota Rolfe: 1-7
119: void
125: 10 Nick Pauff: 7-1 (lost a close one
with Shiekh from Springfield 0-2. Nick
pushed the pace the entire way.)
130: 11 Adam Troyer: 5-3
135: void
140: 11 Tyler Dunlap: 5-3
145: 11 Zach Green: 8-0 Tournament
CHAMPION
152: 9 Tyler Smith: 1-7
160: 11 Ian Dukehart: 7-1
171: void
189: 10 Nickoli Sackinger: 4-4
215: 11 Theran Carroll: 4-4
285: 12 Nate Sackinger: 5-3
Grove wrestlers 3-2 at
Cory-Rawson
CORY-RAWSON — The
Columbus Grove mat team fin-
ished 3-2 at the Cory-Rawson
Duals Saturday.
Grove hosts Cory-Rawson
6 p.m. Wednesday.
Ottawa-Glandorf 48, Col. Grove 36
103: Tregg Keysor (CG) pin Siebeneck, 1:21.
112: Escobedo (OG), void.
119: Bret Sampson (CG), void.
125: Klausing (OG) pin Thomas Martin, 1:22.
130: Jake Graham (CG), void.
135: Patino (OG), void.
140: Hanneman (OG) pin Ty. Schroeder, 3:30.
145: Delgado (OG) pin Hunter Giesige, 1:24.
152: Bran. Benroth (CG) pin Ebbeskotte, 2:18.
160: McFarland (OG) pin Marty Stever, 3:15.
171: Siefker (OG) pin Dakota Fischer, 1:56.
189: Gavin Windau (CG) pin Wells, 1:44.
215: Karhoff (OG) pin Ant. Spangler, 1:32.
275: Greg Martin (CG) pin Inninger, :38.
Columbus Grove 54, Lima Senior 24
103: Keysor (CG), void.
112: Double void.
119: Sampson (CG), void.
125: Hammens (LS) pin T. MArtin, 1:05.
130: Graham (CG), void.
135: Dylan Kleman (CG), void.
140: Orbo (LS) pin Schroeder, 2:57.
145: Giesgie (CG) pin Williams, 1:10.
152: Shafer (LS) pin Benroth, 1:36.
160: Burdon (LS) pin Stever, 1:16.
171: Fischer pin Proby, 1:01.
189: Windau (CG) pin Wick, :29.
215: Spangler (CG), void.
275: G. Martin pin Bodine, :15.
(JV score: Lima Senior 12, Col. Grove 0).
Cory-Rawson 42, Columbus Grove 35
103: Keysor (CG), void.
112: Double void.
119: Smith (CR) pin Sampson, 2:35.
125: Swisher (CR) pin T. Martin, 1:58.
130: Graham (CG) major dec. Brown
17-0.
135: Hartman (CR), void.
140: Hanneman pin Schroeder, 3:40.
145: J. Simpson (CR) pin Giesige, 5:53.
152: Benroth (CG) pin Hummel, :46.
160: Heath (CR) pin Stever, :59.
171: Fischer (CG) pin G. Simpson, 2:48.
189: Windau (CG) pin Davis, :57.
215: Cramer (CR) pin Spangler, 1:07.
275: G. Martin pin Karhoff, :19.
JV: Col. Grove 12, Cory-Rawson 12,
Columbus Grove 60, Kenton 18
103: Keysor (CG), void.
112: Double void.
119: Sampson (CG) pin Fitzgerald, 2:40.
125: T. Martin (CG), void.
130: Graham (CG), void.
135: Kleman (CG), void.
140: Schroeder (CG), void.
145: Giesige (CG), void.
152: Castle (K) pin Benroth, 5:45.
160: Smith (K) pin Stever, 1:22.
171: Fischer (CG), void.
189: Windau (CG) pin Ray, 1:14.
215: King (K) pin Spangler, :51.
275: G. Martin (CG) pin Adams, :52.
Columbus Grove 78, Ada 0
103: Keysor (CG), void.
112: Double void.
119: Sampson (CG), void.
125: T. Martin (CG), void.
130: Graham (CG), void.
135: Kleman (CG), void.
140: Schroeder (CG), void.
145: Giesige (CG), void.
152: Benroth (CG), void.
160: Stever (CG), void.
171: Fischer (CG), void.
189: Windau (CG) pin Woodlan, :38.
215: Spangler (CG), void.
275: G. Martin (CG) pin Doston, :33.
(JV score: Columbus Grove 6, Ada 0)
Roundup
By SUSAN MONTOYA
BRYAN
The Associated Press
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. —
Don Meredith, one of the most
recognizable figures of the early
Dallas Cowboys and an origi-
nal member of ABC’s “Monday
Night Football” broadcast team,
died Sunday. He was 72.
Meredith’s wife, Susan, told
The Associated Press on Monday
her husband died in Santa Fe after
suffering a brain hemorrhage and
lapsing into a coma.
Meredith played for the
Cowboys from 1960-68, becom-
ing the starting quarterback in
1965. While he never led the
Cowboys to the Super Bowl,
Meredith was one of the fran-
chise’s first stars. Over his 9-year
career, Meredith threw for 17,199
yards and 111 touchdowns. He
retired unexpectedly before the
1969 season.
Just two years after retiring
from football, Meredith joined
Keith Jackson and Howard Cosell
in the broadcast booth as part
of the “Monday Night Football”
crew.
He quickly became one of
the most popular broadcasters
in sports because of his folksy
sayings and country humor.
Meredith’s signature call was
singing the famous Willie Nelson
song “Turn Out the Lights” when
it appeared a game’s outcome
had been determined.
Meredith left ABC after the
1973 season for a 3-year stint at
NBC. He returned to the “MNF”
crew in 1977 before retiring in
1984, one year after Cosell left
the team.
Before a generation knew
Meredith for his colorful broad-
casting career, he was one of the
most recognizable figures of the
early Dallas Cowboys teams.
Meredith was drafted in the
third round by the Chicago Bears
in 1960 and was traded to the
expansion Cowboys franchise for
future draft picks.
Meredith and Don Perkins
were the second and third play-
ers inducted to Cowboys Ring of
Honor in 1976.
Cowboys’ Don Meredith
dies after brain hemorrhage
2
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8A – The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
Wedding Engagement
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery Edward Bailey Mack/Prendergast
Amy Jo Roessner and Jeffery Edward Bailey were
united in marriage on Sept. 4 at Delphos Wesleyan Church,
Pastor Wayne Prater officiating.
The bride’s parents are Susan Brunswick of Wauseon,
and Bernard and Kathy Roessner of New Knoxville. The
groom’s parents are Susan Bailey of Delphos and Charles
Bailey of Van Wert.
Nuptial music was provided by vocalist Doug
Mullenhour and pianist Josie Kent.
Maid of honor was Courtney Schemmel, best friend of
the bride.
Bridesmaids were Stacey Pressley, friend of the bride;
Ashley Froning, friend of the bride; Renee Unland, cousin
of the bride; and Makenna Cooley, cousin of the bride.
Flower girl was Madison Cross, daughter of best man.
Ring bearer was Cody Bailey, son of the groom.
Best man was Matt Cross, best friend of the groom.
Ushers were Ron Brunswick, uncle of the bride; and
Ben Norbeck, cousin of the groom. Groomsmen were
Joshua Kohli, friend of the groom; Matt Reynolds, friend
of the groom; Chase Bailey, son of the groom; and Colin
Bailey, son of the groom.
The bride’s grandparents are Marianne Brunswick and
the late Maurice Brunswick, Gene Sandy and the late
Bruno Roessner.
The groom’s grandparents are Mase and Penny Bailey
and Lynn and Roger Unland.
A reception was held at the Spencerville VFW follow-
ing the ceremony.A wedding trip to Las Vegas is planned
for 2011. The couple now resides in Delphos.
The bride is a 2006 graduate of New Knoxville High
School and is employed by Vancrest.
The groom is a 2001 graduate of Jefferson High School
and a 2006 graduate of Vantage Police Academy. He is a
master cabinet maker.
Franklin and Stacia Mack of Lima announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Jennifer, to Neal Prendergast, son
of Michael and Carrie Prendergast.
A winter wedding is planned.
The bride-elect is a graduate of Elida School and The
Ohio State University. She is currently attending graduate
school for a masters of nursing. She is a veteran of the
U.S. Army and employed by a Cincinnati hospital.
Her fiance is a graduate of Gaylord High School,
Gaylord, Mich., and Embry Riddle Aeronautical
University. He is currently attending Xavier University
for masters in business administration. He is also a U.S.
Army veteran and employed as a design engineer in
Cincinnati.
By BRETT ZONGKER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Oprah
Winfrey has come a long way
since her childhood years in a
Mississippi shack and in pub-
lic housing with a poster of
The Beatles on her bedroom
wall. Sunday, she was honored
with Paul McCartney, one of
the Beatles she so loved.
Stars from Hollywood,
Nashville and Broadway gath-
ered in the nation’s capital to
salute Winfrey, McCartney
and three others — coun-
try singer Merle Haggard,
Broadway composer Jerry
Herman and dancer Bill T.
Jones — with the Kennedy
Center Honors. The president
and first lady Michelle Obama
sat with the honorees and for-
mer Secretary of State Colin
Powell.
Julia Roberts opened the
show with a surprise nod to
her friend, Winfrey.
“It’s a universal conver-
sation starter: Did you see
what was on ’Oprah’ today?”
Roberts said. “The first time
I heard of a better fitting bra
... or a fascinating politician
named Barack Obama was on
’The Oprah Winfrey Show.”’
John Travolta took the
stage to host a mock ver-
sion of Winfrey’s show with
Barbara Walters as his guest.
He recounted a phone call
he got from Winfrey when
Hurricane Katrina struck
New Orleans. She told him
to fill his plane with medi-
cal supplies and meet her in
Louisiana.
“So when Oprah calls,
you answer,” he said. “Oprah
makes it exciting to be respon-
sible.”
Walters said she should
get credit for jump-starting
the 56-year-old Winfrey’s
career. She said the future
talk show host once imitated
Walters’ style to win a Miss
Fire Prevention contest but
developed a style all her own.
“Simply put, she is the best
interviewer ever,” Walters
said. “No one comes close
— not even me. And those
of you who know me know
how painful it was for me to
say that.”
Jennifer Hudson sang
“I’m Here” from “The Color
Purple,” which Winfrey pro-
duced on Broadway after
starring in the film. Hudson
was joined by a choir from
Winfrey’s alma mater,
Tennessee State University.
For Winfrey, the prize
comes during the 25th and
final season of her talk show
and just before she launch-
es her new cable network,
OWN, on Jan. 1. After her
Washington visit, Winfrey
will take about 300 audience
members to Australia.
Alec Baldwin introduced
the tribute for McCartney, 68,
lamenting the singer’s “long
and winding road” to a solo
career, being forced to sing in
stadiums and requiring police
protection.
“The National Institutes
of Health called the epidemic
Beatlemania,” Baldwin said.
“There was no cure.”
The former Beatle was
making his second visit to
Washington this year for a
culture award. In June, he
won the Gershwin Prize for
Popular Song from the Library
of Congress.
Gwen Stefani, dressed
in a gray “Fab Four-style”
pant suit, and her band, No
Doubt, opened the musical set
with “Hello, Goodbye.” Dave
Grohl and Norah Jones sang
“Maybe I’m Amazed.”
In what’s perhaps a first,
Aerosmith frontman Steven
Tyler performed an “Abbey
Road” medley live. Show pro-
ducer George Stevens Jr. said
The Beatles never performed
it live after the recording was
made.
James Taylor and Mavis
Staples closed out the show
with “Let It Be” and “Hey
Jude.” They had McCartney
— and the president — on
their feet the entire time.
When The Beatles were
storming America, Haggard,
73, was free from prison and
making music, Herman, 79,
was making Broadway sing
and Jones, 58, was not yet a
dancer but growing up in a
migrant labor camp.
Since the 1960s, the new
Kennedy Center honorees
have helped define television,
dance, theater and music.
At a White House ceremo-
ny before the show Sunday,
they heard accolades from
President Barack Obama who
said the awards are important
because the arts are neces-
sary.
“Although the honorees
on this stage each possess a
staggering amount of talent,
the truth is, they aren’t being
recognized tonight simply
because of their careers as
great lyricists or songwriters
or dancers or entertainers,”
Obama said. “Instead, they’re
being honored for their unique
ability to bring us closer
together and to capture some-
thing larger about who we are
— not just as Americans, but
as human beings.”
The show was recorded
Sunday night for broadcast
Dec. 28 on CBS.
At the gala perfor-
mance, Angela Lansbury,
Carol Channing and Kelsey
Grammer performed some of
Herman’s famous tunes from
“Hello, Dolly!,” “Mame,” and
“La Cage aux Folles.”
Lansbury said Herman
gave her a huge break when
he pressed for her to be cast in
the lead role of “Mame” over
the objections of some pro-
ducers. She said she’s never
had a better entrance than
sliding down a long banister
on stage with bugle in hand.
Channing, 89, who starred
in “Hello, Dolly!” sang “Hello,
Jerry.” She said she knew it
would make him cry.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska
(AP) — Bristol Palin says
her mother didn’t force her
to go on Dancing with the
Stars.
The 20-year-old daugh-
ter of 2008 vice presidential
candidate Sarah Palin used
a Facebook post to react to
a blog entry by a fellow con-
testant, comedian Margaret
Cho. Cho wrote that the for-
mer Alaska governor blamed
her daughter for the 2008
loss and told her she “owed”
it to her to go on Dancing
with the Stars to win back
America’s love.
Bristol Palin — who was
an unmarried teenager when
she had her son, Tripp —
says it saddens her that any-
one would think her mother
blamed her for anything
that occurred in the elec-
tion. She says her parents
were her top supporters on
the show.
Palin finished third in the
contest.
Bristol Palin: Mom didn’t force her to dance
BEVERLY HILLS,
Calif. (AP) — Items from
the Michael Jackson’s stage
wardrobe, including one of
the King of Pop’s famous
gloves, attracted furious bid-
ding at an auction of celeb-
rity memorabilia in Beverly
Hills.
Julien’s Auctions says a
lone glove worn by Jackson
during the “Bad” tour in the
late 1980s sold for $330,000
at the “Icons & Idols” auc-
tion Saturday night. A jacket
signed by Jackson brought in
$96,000 and a fedora he wore
on stage went for $72,000 at
the Julien’s Auctions event.
Other highlights from
the auction were an x-ray of
Albert Einstein’s brain, which
brought $38,750, and a pair
of Marilyn Monroe’s empty
prescription bottles sold for
$18,750.
A military-style jacket
worn by John Lennon for a
1966 Life Magazine photo
shoot sold for $240,000.
Michael Jackson glove brings $330,000
Expand
Your
Shopping
Network
You’ll love shopping
the Classifieds!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Winfrey, McCartney
join top Kennedy
Center artists
BY DAVID GERMAIN
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — Hair
has won out over Harry Potter
at the weekend box office.
Mandy Moore’s animated
musical “Tangled,” a new
take on long-haired fairy-tale
princess Rapunzel, sewed up
the No. 1 spot with $21.5
million in its second week-
end, according to studio esti-
mates Sunday. That raised
the Disney release’s domestic
total to $96.5 million.
“Tangled” had debuted
in second-place over
Thanksgiving behind “Harry
Potter and the Deathly Hallows:
Part 1,” which had been at the
top of the box office the two
previous weekends.
“Harry Potter” slipped
to No. 2 this weekend with
$16.7 million. The next-to-
last chapter in the Warner
Bros. franchise about the teen
wizard lifted its domestic haul
to $244.2 million.
Playing largely to fam-
ily crowds, “Tangled” should
hold on well through the holi-
days, said Chuck Viane, head
of distribution for Disney.
Business was off sharply
after a brisk Thanksgiving
weekend, which is one of the
busiest periods of the year at
movie theaters.
With just $88 million in
overall receipts, this was
Hollywood’s second-worst
weekend of the year, behind
the meager $81.8 million haul
the weekend after Labor Day,
according to box-office track-
er Hollywood.com.
Overall revenues also were
down from last year. The $88
million in revenue was off
11.5 percent compared to the
same weekend in 2009, when
“The Blind Side” led the
box office with $20 million,
according to Hollywood.com.
The weekend’s only new
wide release, Rogue Pictures’
action tale “The Warrior’s
Way,” was a dud with just
$3.1 million. Playing in 1,622
theaters, “The Warrior’s Way”
averaged a weak $1,881 a cin-
ema, compared to $5,967 in
3,603 cinemas for “Tangled.”
Estimated ticket sales for
Friday through Sunday at
U.S. and Canadian theaters,
according to Hollywood.com.
1. “Tangled,” $21.5 million.
2. “Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 1,” $16.7
million.
3 (tie). “Burlesque,” $6.1 mil-
lion.
3 (tie). “Unstoppable,” $6.1
million.
5. “Love & Other Drugs,”
$5.7 million.
6. “Megamind,” $5 million.
7. “Due Date,” $4.2 million.
8. “Faster,” $3.8 million.
9. “The Warrior’s Way,” $3.1
million.
10. “The Next Three Days,”
$2.7 million.
Hairy vs. Harry: ‘Tangled’
wins weekend box office
1
Alexander & Bebout, Inc.
Engineering • Design • Construction
10098 Lincoln Highway 419-238-9567 Van Wert, Ohio
www.AlexanderBebout.com
1965 - 2010
•Commercial
•Industrial
•Institutional
•Churches
•SiteSelection
•Design
•Preliminary
Drawings
•Engineering
•StatePermits
45 YEARS of building Northwest
& West Central Ohio ...
one project at a time
Complete Turnkey
Operation
Kitchens • Baths • Appliances
10098 LINCOLN HWY. • VAN WERT
419-238-5650
Your dream, our goal
Kitchens & Baths is what we do!
John Odenweller’s
Lion Clothing
Formalwear Headquarters
Phone 419-692-9981 206 N. Main St.
Dress Up
for the holidays
Save on gifts for the
men on your list.
Men’s
Top Coats 25% off
Styles: 505, 550, 560
Levi Jeans
$
29
95
Men’s Casual
Sport Coats 25% off
•Spirit Wear
St. John’s and Jefferson
•T-Shirts
•Sweatshirts
•Knit Shirts all 20% off
Pullovers,
Cardigans
& Quarter Zip
Men’s
Sweaters 25% off
Delphos
Hardware
242 North Main St. Ph. 419-692-0921
Open evenings til 7:30; Sat. til 5; Open Sunday 12-4 til Christmas
OPEN SUNDAY 12-4 til Christmas
• FRESH BULK CANDY & PEANUTS
• GIFT CERTIFICATES!
Weber
Genesis
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Weber
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WITH SIDE BURNER
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Regular
$
699
95
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599
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749
99
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$
649
99
149
99
After $20
Mail-in Rebate.
You Pay $169.99
DeWalt® 18 Volt
Compact Drill
& Impact Driver Kit
59
99
Makita® 4-1/2”
Angle Grinder
Includes drill driver, impact driver, 2 batteries,
charger, case. 2302008. Limit 1 rebate.
6.0 amp motor, 11,000 rpm. Small cir-
cumference barrelgrip for added comfort.
Labyrinth construction seals and protects
motor and bearings. 2292662
12 volt. Compact size, lightweight design.
Includes 2 batteries, charger and case.
2192375
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after mail-in rebate • $219.99 value
99
99
Milwaukee® Lithium-
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19
99
Craftsman®
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Work Light
Craftsman® Multi-Purpose Tool
35 LED lights. Weighs
just 2-1/2 lb. Durable
plastic lens and body.
Includes magnet, AC and
DC chargers. 3302502
Compact 2.0 amp AC/DC motor. 0-15,000 variable
opm. +/- 1.4º oscillation. LED light. 1-1/4” vacuum at-
tachment. Includes attachments for cutting, sanding,
scraping, filing, grout
removal, and mre.
2302636
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59
99
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32
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• 600 lb.
capacity
• 10” pneumatic
tires
SPECIAL PURCHASE
Limited Quantity Available
19
99
6” Bench
Grinder
Includes one
edium and
one coarse
grinding wheel.
2302099
After $25 mail-in rebate.
You pay $44.99
Black & Deck 18 Volt
Cordless Drill/Driver Kit
Variable speed. Keyless chyck. Includes
accessories, battery charger, battery, kit
box. 2192268. Limit 1 rebate.
Large 30 inch
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200 tips + 70 lights
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19
99
9
99
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Black & Deck 120 pc. Drilling
& Screwdriving Bit Set
Includes assorted drill bits, screwdriver
bits, nut drivers, and more. 2188373.
Limit 1 rebate. Save 50%
After mail-in rebate
BUSINESS SHOWCASE
THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES ARE PROUD TO OFFER
THE BEST IN SERVICE AND PRODUCTS.
Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald — 9A
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
Edward Albee found the title for his hit play “Who’s
Afraid of Virginia Wolf?” scrawled on a mirror in a
Greenwich Village tavern that invited customers to write
slogans and graffiti with a bar of soap. Albee, who spot-
ted the phrase in 1954, gave it immortality in 1962 after
discarding “Exorcism” as the title of his play.
It took 25 years after the 1929 crash for the stock
market to reach its pre-crash peak. The pre-crash peak of
381 was recorded in September 1929; it was not reached
again until 1954.
Today’s questions:
Which U.S. president had a seven-seat hot tub installed
on the White House lawn?
Who was the first jazz musician to win a Pulitzer
Prize?
Answers in Tuesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Caprylic: like an animal’s strong smell
Lant: stale urine used in manufacturing
By GEORGE JAHN
The Associated Press
GENEVA — Iran and
six world powers came to
the table today for the first
time in a year, exchanged
pleasantries, but remained far
apart on how deeply their
talks should tackle the West’s
greatest concern — Iranian
nuclear activities that could
make atomic weapons.
Tehran says it does not
want atomic arms, but as
it builds up its capacity to
make such weapons, neither
Israel nor the U.S. have ruled
out military action if Tehran
fails to heed U.N. Security
Council demands to freeze
key nuclear programs.
The long-term aim for the
six nations is nudging Iran
toward agreeing to stop ura-
nium enrichment, which can
make both fuel for reactors
and the fissile core of nuclear
arms.
Delegates from Iran, the
European Union, the U.S.,
Russia, Britain, France and
Germany hurried inside a
conference center in Geneva
to escape the pouring rain,
and EU foreign policy chief
Catherine Ashton met Saeed
Jalili, Iran’s chief negotiator,
in the foyer.
As the doors closed to
reporters this morning, the
two had joined the other del-
egations sitting around a light
brown oval table, with flags
of their nations behind them.
“The two sides exchanged
pleasantries — the atmo-
sphere was pleasant but busi-
nesslike,” an official from
one of the delegations said.
The official, who asked for
anonymity because his infor-
mation was confidential, told
The Associated Press the first
hour was taken up by the
six powers making a case
for why they thought Iran’s
nuclear program needed to be
discussed.
Iran’s semi-official Fars
news agency said Jalili began
the meeting with a reference
to the slaying last week of a
senior Iranian nuclear scien-
tist “and a strong condemna-
tion of the terror act against
him.”
The attack, which left
another scientists wounded,
has burdened the atmosphere,
with Iranian officials linking
the West and the International
Atomic Energy Agency to
the assault.
Before the talks began,
the chief negotiator from one
of the six powers warned:
“Don’t expect much of any-
thing,” in a comment reflect-
ing the deep divide separating
the two sides. He also asked
not to be named because he
was not authorized to talk to
the media.
Iran’s defiance was high-
lighted Sunday when it
announced it had delivered
its first domestically mined
raw uranium to a processing
facility, claiming it was now
self-sufficient over the whole
enrichment process.
Salehi, head of the Atomic
Energy Organization of Iran
and the country’s vice presi-
dent, said Iran had for the
first time delivered domesti-
cally mined raw uranium to a
processing facility — allow-
ing it to bypass U.N. sanc-
tions prohibiting import of
the material.
Salehi said the delivery
proved that the mysterious
bombings which targeted the
Iranian scientists would not
slow the country’s progress.
Iran acquired a con-
siderable stock of yellow-
cake from South Africa in
the 1970s under the former
U.S.-backed shah’s original
nuclear program, as well as
unspecified quantities of yel-
lowcake obtained from China
long before the U.N. sanc-
tions.
Western nations said last
year that Iran was running
out of raw uranium as that
imported stockpile dimin-
ished and asserted that
Tehran did not have suffi-
cient domestic ore to run the
large-scale civilian program
it said it was assembling.
“Given that Iran’s own
supply of uranium is not
enough for a peaceful nuclear
energy program, this calls
into further question Iran’s
intentions and raises addi-
tional concerns at a time
when Iran needs to address
the concerns of the inter-
national community,” said
Mike Hammer, spokesman
of the U.S. National Security
Council.
But Salehi denied that
local stocks were lacking and
said Iran was now self-suffi-
cient over the entire nuclear
fuel cycle — from extracting
uranium ore to enriching it
and producing nuclear fuel.
Since Iran’s clandestine
enrichment program was
discovered eight years ago,
Iran has resisted both rewards
— offers of technical and
economic cooperation — and
four sets of increasingly harsh
U.N. sanctions meant to force
it to freeze its enrichment
program.
Iran, 6 world powers resume nuclear talks
2
2008 Ford Taurus
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2007 Ford F 150 XLT
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# 9586P. 4X4, only 32,000 miles, 5.4
triton V8, trailer tow pkg!
$
20,486
2008 Lincoln
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# 9612P. Heated & cooled seats, low
miles! One owner. Lots of warranty!
$
22,986
2010 Buick
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# 3870A. Only 5,000 miles, 1-owner,
local trade-in, like new condition!
$
23,988
2008 Lincoln
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# 9631P. Chrome wheels, moonroof,
heated & cooled seats, low miles!
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2008 Ford Escape
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# 9603P. Only 23,000 miles! Chrome
wheels, moonroof, heated leather!
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2007 Lincoln
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# 9594P. Signature series, only 35,000
miles! Priced well below market!
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16,999
2008 Chevrolet
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# 9591A. 1-owner, local trade, 21,000
miles, 5.3 V8, Extended Cab!
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2007 Ford
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# 9611P. Super fuel economy, only
31,000 miles, like new condition!
$
11,976
2003 Ford Focus ZTW
Wagon
# 95959A. Hard to fnd, local trade-in,
alloy wheels, nice price!
$
6,271
2001 Lincoln Town
Car
# 95999A. Only 40,000 miles, cloth
top, local trade-in, great value!
$
8,997
2008 Ford
Focus SE
# 9579A. 1-owner, 4 door, only 28,000
miles, alloy wheels, nice!
$
10,678
2006 Ford
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# 9607P. Xlt Supercab, 4 door, only
52,000 miles! Hard to fnd truck!
$
14,889
2007 Ford Edge SEL
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# 9548P. Chrome wheels, heated leath-
er seats, great color, priced to sell!
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2009 Chrysler PT
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equipment, don’t miss it!
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2010 Ford
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25,996
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2006 Chevrolet
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model with low price!
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1108 West Main St., Van Wert, OH
800-262-3866 or 419-238-0125
Mon. & Wed. 9 AM - 8 PM;
Tues., Thurs., Fri. 9 AM-6 PM; Sat. 9 AM-3 PM
PERSONAL
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2003 Lincoln
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2008 Mercury
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economy, CD, 24,000 miles!
$
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AT STATEWIDE
2004 Mercury Grand
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$
9,847
GET 0.0% APR FINANCING
– PLUS –
$1,500 TOWARD YOUR FIRST THREE PAYMENTS
2
2 Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing. $1,500 cash back may be used to make payments. Customer is required to make all actual payments. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer
stock by 1/3/11. See dealer for complete details.
2011 Ford Fusion Sport
2011 Ford Taurus SEL
2011 Ford Edge LTD
10A – The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
2
of Ottoville
190 3
rd
St., Ottoville
419-453-7827
CASH CARDS
AVAILABLE
Express Mart
GAS CARDS MAKE GREAT GIFTS
150 W. Canal, Ottoville
419-453-3858
Hours: 9:30-5:00 M-F
9:00-3:30 Sat.
Sharon Cox
THE COUNTRY CUPBOARD
Fabric • Patterns • Gifts • Classes
GIFT CERTIFICATES
229 S. Washington St., Van Wert, O. 45891
(419) 238-7742
HOURS:
HONDA OF VAN WERT
www.hondaofvanwert.com
10852 US 127S
Van Wert, OH 45891
Ph. 419-238-1776
Fax: 419-238-6151
E-Mail: sspinc@earthlink.net
Mar - Aug
Tue-Fri 9-6
Wed 9-8
Sat 9-3
Sep - Feb
Tue-Fri 9-5
Sat 9-1
Closed Sunday & Mondays
GIFT CERTIFICATES
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MOTORCYCLES
ATV’s and Scooters
LEHMAN TRIKE CONVERSIONS
CHAMPION TRIKE CONVERSIONS
P &R Medical Connection
1-800-587-7670
Defance & Van Wert
M-F 9-5 Sat. 9-1
Decatur
M-F 8:30 -4:30
“Your local full service home medical company since 1985”
Large selection of uniforms at 20% off everyday
www.prmedicalconnection.com
Gift certificates available • any amount
offer expires 12/31/10
for
Collectors
Got a collector on your list?
We have the perfect gift!
GIFT CERTIFICATES IN ANY AMOUNT
“Specializing in Yesterday’s Treasures”
Open Daily 10-6
I-75 Exit 161 • 11326 Co. Rd. 99 Findlay
419-423-7500
www.jeffreysantique.com
119 S. Main
Bluffton, OH419-358-1141
GIVE THE GIFT OF ENTERTAINMENT
WITH GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM...
11 MOVIE
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Dec. 24 ONLY
FOR ONLY
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349 Towne Center Blvd • Van Wert, OH 45891
419-238-5888
1825 N. Scott St. • Napoleon, OH 43545
For Every $20
00
worth of gift
certifcates you
purchase - Get
$2
00
bonus
For Every $30
00
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00
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at 4129 Elida Road • Lima
(across from Tracy’s Appliances)
419-223-3200
M-F 10-6, Sat. 10-4
Gift Certificates available
in a variety of prices.
The Therapeutic Touch II
113 E. Kiracofe Ave. Elida
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
419-235-2106
Lisa Edelbrock Ricker, LMT
Walk-ins welcome
Bring in / or mention this ad and get $5 off
2720 Elida Road
Suite 144
Lima, Ohio 45805
419.221.1010
Gift Certificates
AVAILABLE IN
ANY AMOUNT
• Variety Wine
Selection
• Now Available ...
Specialty Beer
419-695-PEAK (7325)
333 North St. • Delphos, OH
Coming Soon ...
• Gift Cards • Stocking Stuffers
• Classes - Training
• Mary Ricker - Therapeutic Massage
We Accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover & EBT
Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-9 p.m.
419-238-0944
NEW - NOW AVAILABLE
Gift Cards
Lion Clothing
206 North Main St., Delphos Phone: 419-692-9981
“Known for Good Clothes”
Open Daily: 9am to 5:30; Mon. & Fri. till 8
GIFT CERTIFICATES
IN ANY AMOUNT
Great for school/spirit apparel for St. John’s & Jefferson!
Always personal service. FREE gift wrapping.
S
H
U
T

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AIR/N
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IL

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A
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LIMA AREA
IN YOUR
HOME
Prices starting at:
•PERM $30
•HAIRCUT $8
•SHAMPOO/SET $15
•NAILS $4
LINDA
419-230-0030
AVAILABLE THIS
HOLIDAY SEASON
eavenly
titches
Located at: 2696 Greely Chapel Rd., Lima
419-979-0218
2 miles South of Sams Club on Greely Chapel
I-75 - 4th Street Exit (turn east) then south on Greely Chapel (by Pepsi)

• 10% off
any regular priced item
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
(Not valid on gift certificates)
A gift for everyone on your
list with just one stop!
A DELPHOS AREA CHAMBER of
COMMERCE GIFT CERTIFICATE!
Any amount you choose.
Everyone loves to pick their own gift.
Stop in at the
Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce
310 N. Main St., 419-695-1771
865 N. Washington St., Van Wert, OH 45891
Phone 419-238-0123
www.MiRanchitoMexican.com
GIFT
CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
This Christmas...
Give a gift that is always the right size
and color...and always APPRECIATED!
We have something for everyone on your list.
A GIFT CERTIFICATE FROM
242 N. Main St.
Ph. 419-692-0921
Mon.-Fri. 8-7:30 Sat. 8-5
Open Sundays
until Christmas
12-4 p.m.
Delphos
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
Ebel’s Butcher Shop
17146 SR 114
Grover Hill, Ohio
419-587-3524
•Seafood
•Steaks
•Chicken
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
419-532-3029
833 N. Main St., Delphos, OH
Ph: 419-692-6936
WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!
GIFT CERTIFICATES
Tri-County
in any amount
fill your Christmas list at...
Gifts
from the Heart
Gifts for all occasions
Candleberry Candles
Wind & Willow,
Robert Rothschild
Dip Lines
Funeral &
Religious gifts
Gift Certificates
249 N. Main St., Delphos 419-692-000
DEC. HOURS:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-5:00
Thurs. 10:00-7:00, Sat. 10:00-4:00
FREE $5 CERTIFICATE FREE $5 CERTIFICATE
with purchase of $25 Gift with purchase of $25 Gift
Card with coupon. Card with coupon.
ELIDA ROAD ACROSS FROM THE LIMA MALL • 419-225-PACK
No Limit. Exp. 12-31-10.
Home Home Cellular Satellite Commercial Car
Audio Theater Phones TV Audio Audio
1196 Westwood Dr.
Van Wert
419-238-4345
2311 Elida Rd.
Lima
419-331-0050
800 N. Main St.
Celina
419-586-0999
GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE
“For all your Audio/Video needs”
Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald – 1B www.delphosherald.com
Your Holiday Party Headquarters!
•Donuts •Cookies •Muffns •Danish •Baked Cinnamon Rolls
•Pizza • Sandwiches • Ice cream
•Fresh Ground Coffee •Cappuccino •Hot Chocolate
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
662 ELIDA AVENUE • DELPHOS
OPEN 5AM-9PM - 7 DAYS A WEEK 419-692-0007
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2B – The Herald Monday, November 6, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
By ALICIA CHANG
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES —
Andrea Ybarra’s donated
heart was beating rhythmi-
cally by the time she awoke
from the grogginess of her
surgery.
Lub-dub. Lub-dub. Lub-
dub. In fact, it was warm and
pumping even before doctors
transplanted it.
Ybarra belongs to a small
group of people who have
had a “beating heart” trans-
plant, an experimental opera-
tion that’s mostly been done
in Europe. The donor heart
is placed into a special box
that feeds it blood and keeps
it warm and ticking outside
the body.
“I felt peaceful when I
woke up. I wasn’t scared,”
recalled the 40-year-old
from a Los Angeles suburb
who suffers from lupus. “It
felt like the heart was a part
of me all the time.”
Despite advances in heart
transplantation, the way
hearts are moved around the
United States and most plac-
es remains low-tech.
A team of doctors and
organ recovery specialists
stuffs an off-the-shelf picnic
cooler with ice and jets
off at odd hours to a donor
hospital where a heart from
a brain-dead patient awaits.
They inject a chemical to
stop the organ and preserve
it in the ice chest for the trip
home.
Once a heart is harvest-
ed, it’s a race against time.
A heart can stay fresh in
the cooler for 4 to 6 hours
before it starts to deteriorate.
Because of this constraint,
doctors can’t travel too far to
heart-hunt.
It’s been done this way
for more than four decades,
ever since the first U.S. heart
transplant was performed on
Dec. 6, 1967.
Research has shown that
the longer it takes to remove
a heart and transplant it, the
greater the patient’s chance
of death or heart disease.
But what if a heart could
beat on its own after removal
from a cadaver?
It may sound a bit maca-
bre, more like an Edgar Allan
Poe story. The new high-tech
heart box circulates blood
from the donor to the heart
so that it continues throbbing
while in transit from hospital
to hospital.
Based on some success
overseas, the University of
California, Los Angeles is
currently heading an experi-
ment along with several
other schools that compares
the safety and effectiveness
of the new preservation
method versus the standard
cooler.
If the new technology
succeeds in preserving hearts
longer, it could change the
field, experts say.
No longer will patients
be limited by location.
Doctors could make cross-
country heart runs without
worrying about how long it
takes. Hearts are now given
first to people on the wait-
ing list who live near where
the donor is hospitalized. If
there’s no match, then the
circle widens until a recipi-
ent is found.
“The rush factor will be
taken out. I can go all the
way to the West Coast to
get a heart,” said Dr. Bruce
Rosengard of Massachusetts
General Hospital, who per-
formed the first beating
heart transplant in the United
Kingdom in 2006.
It may also potentially
help ease the organ short-
age crisis. Some 3,000
Americans are currently on
the heart transplant waiting
list. Last year, 359 died wait-
ing for a heart — almost one
person a day.
The thinking is that hearts
may be in better condition if
they’re kept beating instead
of being cooled in ice. And
if hearts can be monitored
outside the body, proponents
say this may help increase
the organ pool by allowing
less-than-perfect hearts to be
transplanted.
Ybarra’s surgery began
like any other. The call came
in to Ronald Reagan UCLA
Medical Center shortly
before 4 p.m. on Aug. 24.
There is a heart available.
Do you have a match?
The transplant team
dialed Ybarra. Her lupus,
an immune system disease
in which the body attacks
its own organs, had ravaged
her heart, leaving it enlarged
and weak. She desperately
needed a transplant.
The following day, a bri-
gade of doctors and techni-
cians set off before dawn
by limo to the Van Nuys
Airport to board a private jet
to the donor hospital in the
Palm Springs area east of
Los Angeles.
Since Ybarra signed up to
be part of the beating heart
experiment, she had a 50-50
chance of having the new
operation.
Before the team left,
a nurse practitioner drew
a card at random: Ybarra
was getting the experimental
heart transplant.
The doctors arrived at the
donor hospital at 6:20 a.m.
and cut open the patient’s
chest an hour later. After
examining the heart, they
stopped it to remove it.
Instead of packing the heart
on ice, doctors transferred
it to a box filled with blood
and nutrients to revive it.
The box was then tucked
inside a portable machine for
transport.
On the way back to
UCLA, the heart was closely
checked to make sure it was
stable.
In the meantime, Ybarra
was wheeled into the operat-
ing room and put under. She
was placed on a heart-lung
machine as doctors took
out her failing heart. The
new one was ticking near-
by. Surgeons re-stopped the
donor heart and sewed it into
Ybarra. As her own blood
coursed through, it began to
pound.
All told, the donated heart
had been beating in the box
for a little over three hours.
If a heart can survive out-
side the body longer than
the current limit, heart trans-
plants may someday be less
an emergency procedure
and more like an appoint-
ment that can be scheduled
— a convenience for both
patients and doctors.
“If you knew an organ
could be preserved, instead
of doing a transplant at 3
a.m., you can push it back
to 6 a.m.,” said UCLA’s Dr.
Richard Shemin, who per-
formed Ybarra’s operation
on his 39th wedding anni-
versary.
The world’s first beating
heart transplant was per-
formed in Germany in 2006,
using an organ box invented
by TransMedics Inc., a pri-
vate medical device com-
pany in Andover, Mass., as
part of a multi-center study
in Europe.
The company followed
up with a pilot study in the
U.S. It is currently fund-
ing the UCLA-led experi-
ment, which will enroll 128
patients nationwide, ran-
domly chosen to get a beat-
ing heart transplant or the
traditional kind.
About 100 patients,
mostly in Europe, have had
a beating heart transplant,
according to TransMedics.
Early signs from two
European experiments
involving 54 patients are
encouraging. There has been
97 percent survival a month
after the operation and few
episodes of rejection and
heart-related complica-
tions. But since there were
no comparison groups in
either study, it’s impossible
to know whether a beating
heart transplant is actually
better.
The current U.S. study
is the first to test the methods
head-to-head.
Doctors admit some
patients are spooked by the
idea of a heart beating on its
own before the transplant.
“It’s very difficult to
remedy their anxiety. But
when you think about it,
the human heart was never
meant to be in a cooler on
ice,” said lead investiga-
tor Dr. Abbas Ardehali of
UCLA. TransMedics paid
his travel expenses to a med-
ical meeting, but he does not
have other financial ties to
the company.
Transplant doctors with
no connection to the research
note that the current sys-
tem works despite the anti-
quated way hearts are carted
around. Before beating heart
transplants can be routine,
researchers must not only
prove that the technology can
preserve hearts better and
longer, but that recipients
also have improved survival
and health than if they had a
regular heart transplant.
“In theory, it’s a fabu-
lous idea,” said Dr. Stuart
Russell, heart transplant chief
at Johns Hopkins University.
But more data is needed to
determine whether “it will or
won’t fly.”
There’s also the issue of
cost. A typical heart trans-
plant in the U.S. costs about
$787,000 including hospital
stay and anti-rejection drugs.
An Igloo cooler costs $35
compared with the heart box,
which is sold in Europe for
about $200,000. The interior
is not reusable so there’s an
added expense each time a
hospital does such an opera-
tion.
Like other transplant
recipients, Ybarra was
monitored closely after her
August surgery to make
sure her body wasn’t reject-
ing the foreign organ. Her
health slowly improved. She
could walk around the block
without getting tired — a
small victory for someone
who couldn’t even take a
few steps before.
During a recent checkup
in October, Ybarra laid on
a table as a doctor snaked a
thin tube into her jugular vein
and removed small pieces of
her heart for a biopsy. She
then walked over to her car-
diologist’s office where she
got the scabs on her chest
checked out.
Her last stop was getting
an echocardiogram, a sono-
gram of the heart.
It looked normal.
Doctors testing warm, beating hearts in transplant
Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald - 3B www.delphosherald.com
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6758 2008 FORD F150 S. CREW XLT. .......4x2, V/8, full power ........................................... $20,995
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6753 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT . .........Quad cab, 4x4, 5.7 hemi, 42,000 miles ........... $21,995
6750 2006 GMC ENVOY SLT 4x4................V/6, full power, leather moonroof, 59,000 mi. $16,795
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6783 2004 FORD F150 S. CAB....................XLT, 4x2, V/8, full power, 49,000 miles .......... $14,995
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6746 1999 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO. .......Ext. Cab 4x4, V/8, full power ............................... $7,985
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FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
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Tues.-Thurs. 8:30 to 5
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Table or floor.
Come to our store.
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419-695-1229
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ACCEPTING APPLICA-
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AUTO / Diesel technician
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Apply in person at Knip-
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419-692-3951
080

Help Wanted
PART-TIME WITH flexible
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very detail oriented and
organized. Job duties will
include management and
implementation of a stor-
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changing inventory. Mate-
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must go out according to
customers’ instructions.
Must work well with peo-
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at $8.00 per hour and in-
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1-800-462-0468, before
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Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
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(419) 229-2899
300

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CENTRAL BOILER out-
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580

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DELPHOS SELF Storage
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590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, 1 1/2 BA, At-
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600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM Apt. 321 S. Ca-
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(419)695-2761
2 BDRM Apt. 317 S. Ca-
nal St. (419)695-2761
620

Duplex For Rent
619 DEWEY
2BR 1/2 a double. Credit
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House For Sale
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Auto Repairs/
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Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
Over 85
years
experience
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00
Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
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GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
$
109
95
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Install genuine Motorcraft® pre-
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most cars/light trucks. One axle.
Excludes machining rotors and
drums. Some vehicles slightly
higher. taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for details.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
8 BAGS of Morton water
softener salt. $20 for all
(419)236-5239
FEMALE GOLDEN Re-
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Excellent family dog. All
shots up-to-date. Retured
br eedi ng dog. Cal l
419-230-3080
HAMMOND ORGAN
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Call (419)692-3222
MALE GUI NEA Pig
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Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Catch
5 Urban transport
8 Take a breather
12 She, to Yves
13 Mouths, in zoology
14 Della’s creator
15 Debatable
16 Yummy
18 From Berlin
20 Mini-map
21 W-2 collectors
22 Did lunch
23 Burglary
26 College unit
29 Obligation
30 Razor-billed birds
31 Sundial numeral
33 Ocean
34 Co. honcho
35 Ego
36 Impassive
38 Shade-loving plant
39 Hippie’s digs
40 Sushi fsh
41 Be in store
44 Oath
47 Flowering tree
49 Noble rank
51 Curved molding
52 Poetic adverb
53 Viking letter
54 Bright colors
55 Come to a halt
56 Husky’s vehicle
DOWN
1 Skirt border
2 Sleep like — —
3 Gin-fzz favor
4 Turn to stone
5 Rum mixers
6 Make — — for it
7 Undergrad degs.
8 — in (curbed)
9 Mythical archer
10 Slide sideways
11 Pop quiz
17 Quotes from
19 Mohawk-sporting
actor (2 wds.)
22 Places of refuge
23 Six-pointers
24 Tints
25 Coup d’—
26 Prompted
27 “Blue Tail Fly” sing-
er
28 Slope
30 Extra dry
32 — — woodchuck
would ...
34 Greek philosopher
35 Joins metals
37 Reckons
38 Laugh syllable
40 Veld grazer
41 Crosby tune
42 Hourly pay
43 Like good brandy
44 Subatomic particle
45 Old Roman province
46 Urn homophone
48 Caustic substance
50 Went frst
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14
15 16 17
18 19 20
21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 32
33 34 35
36 37 38
39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46
47 48 49 50
51 52 53
54 55 56
H A S P C A B R E S T
E L L E O R A E R L E
M O O T L U S C I O U S
G E R M A N I N S E T
I R S A T E
T H E F T C R E D I T
D U T Y A U K S V I I
S E A P R E S S E L F
S T O L I D H O S T A
P A D E E L
A W A I T P L E D G E
M A G N O L I A E A R L
O G E E Y O N R U N E
R E D S E N D S L E D
Answer to Puzzle
Newsboys.
Newsstands.
Home delivery.
On-line access.
The Delphos
Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR NEWSPAPER ...
STILL THE BEST
MEDIUM IN TODAY’S
INFORMATION AGE.
DEAR DR. GOTT:
Recently, all three of my
children went to a chiropractor,
since all have back problems.
The doctor suggested having
my middle child seen by a
heart specialist because he has
flat feet, a curved spine, an
indented chest and protruding
shoulder bones. It was a good
call because the cardiologist
found that he has an enlarged
aortic valve (following an EKG
and an ultrasound). He is now
recommending that my son have
an MRI of his heart and see a
geneticist to determine if he
has Marfan syndrome. My son
is 14 years old and has asthma,
but otherwise, we just thought
he was skinny. What are your
suggestions about
any information the
geneticist needs?
D E A R
READER: Marfan
syndrome is a genetic
disorder that affects
connective tissues.
These tissues are
present throughout
the body and
integral to normal
functioning. Because
of this, Marfan
syndrome can disrupt
development and
function in several
areas of the body,
including (but not
limited to) the heart,
eyes, skeleton and
blood vessels.
S y m p t o m s
vary greatly among
sufferers, even among family
members who are affected.
Some experience life-
threatening complications while
others have only mild effects.
Some may not even know they
are affected. Marfan typically
worsens with age.
Signs and symptoms may
include a breastbone that
protrudes outward or dips
inward; a tall, slender build; flat
feet; heart murmurs; a curved
spine; disproportionately long
arms, legs, fingers and toes;
extreme nearsightedness; and
a high, arched palate with
crowded teeth.
Marfan syndrome is caused
by a defect (there are actually
several defects, all of which can
lead to Marfan) in the gene that
enables the body to produce a
protein that gives connective
tissue strength and elasticity.
This defect is inherited
dominantly, meaning that
only one copy of the defective
gene is needed in order for the
disorder to present. This means
that most of those affected also
have a parent who is affected.
About 25 percent of cases are
the result of a spontaneous
mutation. Chances of two
unaffected individuals having a
child with Marfan in about one
in 10,000. An individual who is
affected on the other hand has
a 50 percent chance of having
a child with the disorder if the
other parent is unaffected.
I did find a case of a
newborn who had two affected
parents (neither of whom
knew they had the syndrome).
The baby exhibited symptoms
from birth and suffered severe
congestive heart failure. He
passed at 4 months of age from
complications of pneumonia,
and it was thought by the
researchers that the baby had
inherited defective genes from
both parents, thus causing his
exacerbated symptoms at birth.
The chances of this happening
again are slim. Two affected
individuals have a 25 percent
chance of having a totally
unaffected child or a child with
two defective genes (likely
fatal) and a 50 percent chance
of having a child with only one
defective gene and the disorder.
Men and women are equally
affected. Marfan occurs in all
races and ethnic groups.
Complications depend
on what areas of the body are
affected. This differs depending
on the defect. The most serious
complications arise when the
heart and blood vessels are
affected. Valve malformations
and aortic aneurysm or
dissection are most common.
If the eyes are affected, lens
dislocation, retinal tears or
detachment, cataracts and
glaucoma may occur. COPD,
sleep apnea, emphysema
and collapsed lung can result
when the lungs are affected.
Shortness of breath during mild
or moderate activity may also
result if the chest is concave
(indented) or if the spine is
severely curved, as it restricts
the expansion of the lungs on
inhalation.
Many cases of Marfan
syndrome can be diagnosed
without genetic testing, but in
some cases, these tests may not
provide a clear answer. In this
instance, referral to a geneticist
for testing may be necessary. If
Marfan is present in a family
member, other members should
consider testing to determine if
they also have the disorder. As
stated above, some cases may
be mild and unnoticed, but it is
important to know, especially if
you plan on having children, to
assess your risk and the risk to
the child.
There is no cure or treatment
for Marfan syndrome; however,
treatment of specific issues
that result from the condition
can help. It is important to
avoid high-risk activities such
as weight lifting, football,
surfing, ice hockey, scuba
diving and rock climbing. Low-
risk activities include bowling,
snorkeling, skating, golf, modest
hiking and doubles tennis.
As for what you need to
provide the geneticist, you
would be best served by
providing your son’s entire
medical history, as well as that
of your wife, other children and
yourself because the odds are
that you or your wife is affected
and your other children may be,
despite outward symptoms.
Family should be tested
for Marfan syndrome
Found: Blue stroller with
plaid lining in front of
Delphos Herald Saturday
morning.
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4B - The Herald Monday, December 6, 2010
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Annie, I’m
being nosey;
what do I do?
Dear Annie: For 30 years,
my brother has been unhappi-
ly married to a horrible, self-
ish, evil woman who treats
him terribly. Our entire fam-
ily tolerates her only to keep
the peace.
Recently, I found out that
my brother is involved with
a beautiful, kind woman I
know. I don’t know what to
do. While I can’t stand my
sister-in-law, how
do I condone his
affair? My sister
and brother are
also aware that he
is cheating, but
they support it.
They want him
to leave his awful
wife. What should
I do? -- Caught in
the Middle
Dear Caught:
Nothing. This
is not your busi-
ness. Rather than take sides,
encourage your brother to
resolve the issues in his mar-
riage. For whatever reasons,
he has stayed with your sister-
in-law for 30 years, and there
may be more going on than
you realize. He and his wife
can seek counseling to work
through their difficulties and
perhaps improve their lives.
And if he wants out of the
marriage, he should be brave
enough to get a divorce so he
can see this “beautiful, kind
woman” without turning it
into some sordid affair that
will eventually make them
both miserable. Life is too
short to spend it being unhap-
py when you have the choice
to do otherwise.
Dear Annie: New neigh-
bors recently moved in
behind us. Our backyards are
separated by a fence, and
our houses are pretty close
together. After moving in,
our neighbors installed out-
side speakers on either side
of the sliding glass door on
their back porch. When their
music is on, it may as well be
in my living room.
I did go talk to them, but
I don’t think they really lis-
tened. All they heard was that
I have small children who are
in bed by 8 p.m., so the music
will be off by 8 p.m. But I am
a stay-at-home mom and have
to listen to this music all day
long. Now that the weather is
becoming so beautiful in my
area, I would love to have
my windows and doors open
to enjoy the sunshine and
cool breeze. But then I can’t
even hear the TV in my own
living room. What can I do?
-- Florida
Dear Florida: People
are entitled to have speak-
ers outside their home as
long as they don’t blast the
eardrums of their neighbors.
If the music is playing at a
normal volume, even though
you don’t like it, there’s not
much you can do. However, if
the music violates local noise
ordinances, you can report it
to the authorities. We sug-
gest talking to your neighbors
again and asking them, nicely,
if they could please turn down
the volume during the day so
you can have some peace and
quiet now and then. They may
not realize how far the sound
carries.
Dear Annie: I would
like to respond to the letter
from “Lonely, but
Afraid,” who had
a terrible dating
experience and now
thinks all men want
from her is sex.
For religious
reasons, I was never
sexually active, but I
dated a lot. Anyone
who didn’t respect
my feelings about
sex would be told to
get lost. A woman
must have enough
self-respect to make sure men
understand her wishes. Here
is a secret that has been lost:
Men like the chase. Even
now, some old boyfriends
consider me “the one who
got away” -- and trust me, I
am not that cute.
I waited for my husband.
He appreciates the fact that
I didn’t sleep with the entire
world before we met. We
have been married 10 happy
years, with wonderful kids,
no STDs and no fertility
issues -- just love, plain and
simple. Tell “Lonely” to hold
on to her convictions. She
will love herself more for
it in the end. There are so
many women I know who
wish they had been like me.
-- Waited in Pennsylvania
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010
The only way substantial
achievements can be made in
upcoming months is if you’re
persistent and strong-willed in your
efforts. But even if you experience
tough times, it will strengthen your
character and resolve, not diminish
them.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) - It always behooves you
to be protective of your cherished
possessions, but also watch out for all
of your belongings. Temptation might
be too great for someone with sticky
hands.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
- The probability of a request or favor
being rejected is greater than usual, so
try to handle things on your own. Don’t
put yourself in the uncomfortable
position of being turned down.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
People in general are more susceptible
to accepting advice on important
matters without question, so unless
you are an expert on something, don’t
offer any. It would stink to be wrong.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Business and pleasure do not make
for a good mix just now, so if you
were hoping to approach someone
at a social gathering, rethink that
plan. You could end up being highly
embarrassed.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -
Upon occasion you enjoy a stimulating
challenge, which is exactly what is
likely to appeal to you at this juncture.
Be careful, however, because you could
bite off more than you can chew.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Your splendid characteristic of
positive thinking might not be too
operative, so if you find yourself in a
negative mood, take measures to snap
yourself out of it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
There is nothing wrong with taking
on a tough assignment, as long as you
are as methodical and organized as
possible about it. A lack of preparation,
however, would invite poor results.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Take great pains to skirt issues upon
which you and your mate disagree.
There is a strong likelihood that a
small discord could get blown totally
out of proportion.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - That
advice you’re giving to others won’t
be followed if they see that you’re
not following it yourself. Unless you
set the proper example, don’t expect
others to comply.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
Be able to distinguish the difference
between prudence and stinginess. If
you want others to loosen up their
purse strings, you had better treat
them generously as well.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
Because you can see both sides
of an issue, you usually go out of
your way to treat others fairly and
impartially. Today, however, it might
be impossible for you to identify with
the other guy.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - It’s
a waste of your energy to get uptight
and nervous over something that may
never happen. Even if conditions look
unfavorable, chances are only minor
irritants will rear up.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
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Monday, December 6, 2010 The Herald — 5B
www.delphosherald.com
By AUDREY McAVOY
The Associated Press
PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii
— The morning of Dec. 7,
1941, Yeoman 2nd Class
Durrell Conner was wrapping
Christmas presents aboard the
USS California when he heard
a commotion. Peering through
a porthole of the battleship, the
23-year-old saw an airplane
approaching low.
“He dropped something,
and as he banked away I saw
the red emblem of the Japanese
on his wings so I knew we were
under attack,” Conner said. “He
dropped the torpedo that struck
the ship right below where I
was standing.”
The battleship shook like an
earthquake, and the cryptogra-
pher rushed to his battle station
where he coded and decoded
messages for the California’s
commander. Since no messages
were coming in, he joined a
chain passing ammunition to
Marines and sailors firing guns
on the deck.
Another Japanese plane
dropped a 500-pound bomb on
the California, sinking the ship.
The vessel lost nearly 100 of its
1,800 officers and crew.
On Tuesday, Conner plans
to return to Pearl Harbor along
with about 120 other survivors
for a ceremony in remem-
brance of those who died in the
Japanese attack 69 years ago.
About 580 family and friends
are due to join them, as are
several hundred members of
the public.
The Navy and the National
Park Service are jointly hosting
the event at a grassy site across
the harbor from the sunken hull
of the USS Arizona, where
1,177 lives were lost. In all,
some 2,400 sailors, Marines
and soldiers were killed in the
attack.
Conner, 92, attended the
annual remembrance for the
first time last year with his
daughter.
He so enjoyed the displays
of patriotism and tributes —
including the sailors who lined
the deck of the USS Lake Erie
guided missile cruiser as it ren-
dered honors to the Arizona —
that he’s coming back with his
wife, four daughters and their
husbands, and several grand-
children.
“The patriotic feeling that
everybody had — it was just
wonderful,” Conner said. “I
decided from then on, if I physi-
cally would be able, I would be
there every year.”
He reckons he’ll keep com-
ing back for a while.
“I play golf three times
a week. I hope to be around
for another five or 10 years,”
Conner said in a telephone
interview from his home in Sun
City, Calif.
This year, Conner will rep-
resent the California by laying a
wreath for his fallen shipmates
during the ceremony.
“It’s really quite an honor,”
he said.
Conner, who made a career
in the Navy after the war, said
he probably wasn’t as surprised
by the Sunday morning assault
as some of his fellow sailors
because he had recently decod-
ed a message from Washington
telling his ship to be on the alert
for a sneak attack.
His commanders, though,
didn’t envision they’d be fight-
ing airplanes. They expected
Japanese in Hawaii to some-
how sabotage them — some-
thing that never happened.
“Everyday I was wondering
’Well is it going to be today?’
— kind of laughing because I
thought they were being over-
cautious,” Conner said.
He recalled simply getting
to work when the attack began.
“I just took it in stride, tried
to do what was asked of me,”
said Conner.
At about 10 o’clock,
Conner noticed the Stars and
Stripes wasn’t flying above the
California because the assault
began just as Marines usually
raised the colors at 8 a.m. He
saw the Marines had dropped
the flag on the deck as they
rushed to return fire.
So Conner and a seaman
raised the flag, giving troops
a morale boost as they strug-
gled to fight back and save
the wounded while battleships
burned and sank.
“It should be up, and I knew
it would raise morale,” he said.
“There was a motor launch
going by right at the stern, and
I knew some of the people, and
they yelled my name and they
said ’Hey!’ and cheered. It was
quite a thrill.”
Conner is looking forward
to seeing the new $56 million
Pearl Harbor visitor’s center
the National Park Service just
finished building to replace an
older structure that had to be
scrapped because it was sink-
ing.
It has twice the exhibition
space of the old facility, offer-
ing the 1.6 million people who
visit the USS Arizona Memorial
each year a deeper understand-
ing of the attack that pushed the
U.S. into World War II.
Sailor remembers Pearl
Harbor attack 69 years ago
By TODD RICHMOND
The Associated Press
MENOMINEE, Mich. —
Hundreds of people showed
up Sunday for a memorial to
a 15-year-old Wisconsin boy
who held his social studies class
hostage before shooting himself
last week, setting aside the ter-
rifying standoff to remember
him as a quiet, helpful leader
who loved the outdoors.
Sam Hengel’s family held
the gathering in a school audi-
torium in Menominee, Mich.,
because they expected so many
supporters. Menominee lies just
across the Menominee River
from Marinette, Wis., where
Hengel held 26 classmates and
his teacher at gunpoint for near-
ly six hours.
Barb Post of Marinette, Wis.,
said she didn’t know Hengel’s
family but attended anyway to
show support.
“You care about the people
and the family, and you under-
stand it could happen to any-
body,” Post said.
Why Hengel took his class
hostage remains a mystery.
Other students and his teacher
have said he was well-liked and
had many friends.
The standoff last Monday at
Marinette High School began
when Hengel returned to his
sixth-hour Western Civilization
class from a bathroom break.
He had two semi-automatic pis-
tols and a backpack jammed
with more than 200 rounds
of ammunition and a pair of
knives.
Students and police said he
immediately fired three shots,
blasting a hole in a wall and
tearing apart a film projector.
Students talked to him about
everything from hunting and
fishing to his favorite movies in
an attempt to keep him calm.
No one else in the school
apparently recognized the
sound of the shots as gunfire,
and Hengel told the teacher to
post a note on the door tell-
ing seventh-period students to
report to the library. As a result,
no one realized the class was in
danger until about a half-hour
after school ended, when a man
came to the school office look-
ing for his daughter.
Principal Corry Lambie
determined the last class the
girl attended was Western
Civilization and went to the
room to find the door locked.
When Lambie unlocked the
door, Hengel pointed his gun
at him and told him to leave.
Hengel allowed the girl to go
with Lambie.
The standoff dragged on for
four more hours, with teacher
Valerie Burd acting as a go-
between for Hengel and police.
A SWAT team stormed the
room after Hengel fired three
shots about 8 p.m., destroying
the classroom phone and hit-
ting a computer. Hengel shot
himself as officers reached him.
He died the next morning.
Flurries fell under an over-
cast sky Sunday afternoon,
adding to a feeling of gloom.
The line to greet the teen’s par-
ents and two younger brothers
stretched out of the auditori-
um and into the lobby, where
mourners gazed at collages of
photos depicting Hengel as a
small child, holding a string of
fish and paddling along on a
canoe trip with his family.
On a table was a message
board. Hengel’s brother, Ben,
had written “I will always miss
you, brother” on it. Hengel’s
family stood in front of the
auditorium’s stage and hugged
one well-wisher after another
for more than two hours.
Hundreds attend hostage taker’s memorial
Visit www.delphosherald.com
By LISA LEFF
The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — The
defenders of California’s gay
marriage ban took a pummel-
ing during the first federal trial
to explore the civil rights impli-
cations of outlawing same-sex
marriages. They summoned
only two witnesses, one of
whom left the stand looking
thrashed. Even the lead attor-
ney was left groping for words
when pressed to explain how
allowing gays and lesbians to
wed would undermine tradi-
tional unions.
If the courtroom had been a
boxing ring, the referee would
have called a knockout.
Yet lawyers for the ban’s
sponsors say their side was
on the ropes for a reason:
They disputed that live testi-
mony and reams of evidence
were relevant to a lawsuit
against the voter-approved
Proposition 8, so they did not
provide it. In their view, the
proceedings were a “a show
trial,” and they were willing
to invite the unfavorable ver-
dict they eventually got while
betting they would win in a
later round where the ground
rules would be different.
“Something that has been
lost sight of is who has the
burden of proof in this case,”
Andrew Pugno, a lawyer for
Proposition 8’s sponsors,
said at the 13-day-long trial’s
close. “The burden is not on
the defendants and the people
who voted for Prop 8.”
That strategy’s wisdom will
be put to its first test Monday,
when a federal appeals court
is set to hear arguments in
Perry v. Schwarzenegger, the
landmark constitutional chal-
lenge to the gay marriage ban.
The coalition of religious and
conservative groups that won
Proposition 8’s passage two
years ago has asked the 9th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
to reverse the San Francisco
judge who pointed to their
“rather limited factual pre-
sentation” when he struck
down the measure.
Gay marriage foes gamble on win in Round 2
2
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www.delphosherald.com

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