When Does Daylight Time Begin and End?

Currently, daylight time begins in the United States on the first Sunday in April and ends on the last Sunday in October. On the first Sunday in April, clocks are set ahead one hour at 2:00 a.m. local standard time, which becomes 3:00 a.m. local daylight time. On the last Sunday in October, clocks are set back one hour at 2:00 a.m. local daylight time, which becomes 1:00 a.m. local standard time. These dates were recently modified with the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub. L. no. 10958, 119 Stat 594 (2005). Starting in March 2007, daylight time in the United States will begin on the second Sunday in March and end on the first Sunday in November. Not all places in the U.S. observe daylight time. In particular, Arizona, Hawaii, and most of Indiana do not use it.
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In 2005, daylight time begins on April 3 and ends on October 30. In 2006, daylight time begins on April 2 and ends on October 29. In 2007, daylight time begins on March 11 and ends on November 4. [New law goes into effect.]

Many other countries observe some form of "summer time", but they do not necessarily change their clocks on the same dates as the U.S. Daylight time and time zones in the U.S. are defined in the U.S. Code, Title 15, Chapter 6, Subchapter IX - Standard Time.

History of Daylight Time in the U.S.
Although standard time in time zones was instituted in the U.S. and Canada by the railroads in 1883, it was not established in U.S. law until the Act of March 19, 1918, sometimes called the Standard Time Act. The act also established daylight saving time, a contentious idea then. Daylight saving time was repealed in 1919, but standard time in time zones remained in law. Daylight time became a local matter. It was re-established nationally early in World War II, and was continuously observed from 9 February 1942 to 20 September 1945. After the war its use varied among states and localities. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 provided standardization in the dates of beginning and end of daylight time in the U.S. but allowed for local exemptions from its observance. The act provided that daylight time begin on the last Sunday in April and end on the last Sunday in October, with the changeover to occur at 2 a.m. local time. During the "energy crisis" years, Congress enacted earlier starting dates for daylight time. In 1974, daylight time began on 6 January and in 1975 it began on 23 February. After those two years the starting date reverted back to the last Sunday in April. In 1986, a law was passed permanently shifting the starting date of daylight time to the first Sunday in April, beginning in 1987. The ending date of daylight time has not

been subject to such changes, and has remained the last Sunday in October. With the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the starting and ending dates have once again been shifted. Beginning in 2007, daylight time will start on the second Sunday in March and end on the first Sunday in November.

When the U.S. went on extended DST in 1974 and 1975 in response to the 1973 energy crisis, Department of Transportation studies found that observing DST in March and April saved 10,000 barrels of oil a day, and prevented about 2,000 traffic injuries and 50 fatalities saving about U.S. $28 million in traffic costs. (Stats from this article). Indiana DST is a long-standing controversy in Indiana, not only as an agricultural state, but also because the border separating the Eastern and Central time zones divides the state. In the past, neighboring communities sometimes ended up one or even two hours apart. Being out-of-sync with neighboring states and the national changing of clocks, it is argued, has a negative economic impact on the state. It has been demonstrated that some businesses have located out of state due to the time-related confusion. Prior to October 30, 2005, the state has three kinds of time zones: • 77 counties, most of the state, are on Eastern Standard Time but do not use DST; • 5 counties near Chicago, Illinois and 5 counties in the southwestern corner of the state are on Central Standard Time and do use DST; and • 2 counties near Cincinnati, Ohio and 3 counties near Louisville, Kentucky are on Eastern Standard time but do observe DST. Their observance of DST is unofficial in this case, as a strict reading of the Uniform Time Act would not allow for this situation, but by observing DST, they remain synchronized with the greater Louisville and Cincinnati metropolitan areas. On April 29, 2005, the Indiana legislature voted to begin observing daylight-saving time in 2006. Currently, most of the state is in the Eastern time zone; however, its time zone is currently under federal review, as discussed in this article. There was further controversy after this passed, as some people that supported it initially had thought that the time would fall back an extra hour in winter instead of going ahead an extra hour in summer. Begining October 30, 2005, the state will have two time zones: 82 counties, most of the state, are on Eastern Standard Time and do use DST. 5 counties near Chicago, Illinois and 5 counties in the southwestern corner of the state are on Central Standard Time and do use DST. • Arizona • Arizona does not generally observe DST, unlike most other states. However, the large Navajo Indian Reservation does. • • Hawaii Hawaii does not observe DST.

It’s time to run the clock back… We need to believe in things such as…. Jeremiah 6:16 Thus saith the LORD, Stand ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk therein.
Bible God Father Son Holy Ghost Sin Salvation Water Baptism Mode of Baptism Formula for Baptism Baptism of Holy Ghost Tongues Holiness Divine Healing Second Coming of Christ Resurrection Judgment

Pentecostals of Alexandria. These people know how to praise the Lord the old-fashioned way. (website) There are people know how to praise the Lord the old-fashioned way. The volume is loud, the atmosphere is electric, and everyone is excited. The organist and a drummer pump the audience with an infectious beat. People in the crowd stand and shout as they sing "Send It on Down." Later in the service, the preacher preaches an emotion-packed message on his favorite topic, the baptism in the Holy Spirit. People jam the altar after the sermon. They kneel, some weeping, while scores others gather around and lay hands on those who want a touch from God. Because of the upbeat praise, the hand clapping, the shouting, the fiery preaching and the ever-present practice of speaking in tongues, a casual observer might assume these people are typical Pentecostals. 2 Timothy 4:5 But watch thou in all things, endure afflictions, do the work of an evangelist, make full proof of thy ministry. The word evangelist comes from the Koine Greek word εὐάγγελος ("eu-angelos"), meaning bringer of good news. Proof - referring to the testing process for determining the integrity A ministry is any or all activity conducted by members of various faiths.