December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010, The Afro-American A1

By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
When Hattie Peartree of Pikesville
received a call from the law offce
of Mark H. Klein last July, she
thought she had found relief for
her high mortgage payments. The
representative told Peartree he would
reduce her home loan if she paid
$3,000.
“I told the person I didn’t have it,”
she said. “And he indicated ‘well we
can make a payment plan’.”
Since August, Peartree says
she paid more than $2,000 to the
Florida-based company and per their
advice, stopped making her mortgage
payments.
She said she “felt good” about the
plan until she received notifcation
from her lender threatening
foreclosure. She realized the Mark
Klein offce was fraudulent in
October, when she learned most
legitimate modifcation companies
offer free services.
Her tale echoes the experiences
of many homeowners across
the nation, who, blind-sided by
seemingly opportune deals to reduce
their mortgages, fall victim to
scammers. The Federal Trade
Commission has brought more
than 30 cases against such
companies.
In response to the swarm of
mortgage swindlers, the FTC will
enact new regulations for mortgage
modifcation companies January
2011.
U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings
hosted a news conference, Dec. 6,
informing the public of these critical
measures to protect residents “already
in danger of losing everything.”
“There are many unscrupulous
people out there who are preying
on the vulnerability of those
homeowners,” he said at the news
conference. “While we cannot prevent
every foreclosure and eviction, we
must try to protect those who are
facing these troubling times from
being ripped off by unscrupulous
people who seek to proft on the
misery of others.”
Since the recession began in Dec.
2007, Americans experienced more
than 2.5 million home foreclosures.
Another 3.3 million homes are
expected to face foreclosure in the
next four years, Cummings said.
It is already illegal in Maryland
for loan modifcation companies to
charge up-front fees for services,
By Talibah Chikwendu
AFRO Executive Editor
The ongoing recession has
hit families hard and from
many sides. From losing
work hours or losing jobs,
to the end of unemployment
insurance payments, evictions
and foreclosures, families are
struggling to stay afoat. Throw
in the rising costs of food, energy
and medical services and people
not traditionally thought to be
dealing with poverty are now
trying to fnd ways to weather
this storm, which at ground level,
is not projected to end before the
fall of 2012.
William Spriggs, U.S.
Department of Labor’s assistant
secretary for policy, said
this recession is on record as
the most severe, citing how
the across- the -board drop
in consumption – including
groceries – was devastating to
local communities, increasing
www.afro.com Volume 119 No. 18
DECEMBER 11, 2010 - DECEMBER 17, 2010
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Copyright © 2010 by the Afro-American Company
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75 CENTS
Continued on A6
B6
Protecting Our Homes
A9
Continued on A6
Continued on A4
Dunbar Wins State
Championship
The ‘Next Three Days’
Interview
B3
Cummings Promotes New
Foreclosure Scam Protections
Taking a Look
at Poverty in 2010
AFRO File Photo/Rob Roberts
U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings
continues to fght for homeowners
in trouble by supporting
legislation that protects them
from scams.
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
City grocers urged Baltimore
offcials to repeal the 2 cent bottle
tax last week, saying the charge drive
cash-strapped shoppers to county
businesses. At a press conference
Dec. 2, retailers said city stores had
seen a 4-7 percent decrease in sales
since the tax was enacted last July.
Sandy Vary, co-owner of Bel-
Garden Bi-Rite Supermarket in
Gardenville, said her store’s beverage
sales are down 7 percent and overall
sales by 5 percent. She had to lay off
fve of her 90 employees because of
slow business, she added. The latest
came last month. “If the goal is to
drive small businesses out, they are
right on track,” she said at the press
conference.
Vary said grocers are not allowed
to post signage informing customers
about the “hidden” tax. Those aware
of the measure are vocal against it,
she said, or choose to shop outside of
the city’s borders.
“When I have to raise a couple
of pennies that is a reason to go
somewhere else,” she said. “We know
customers that make the trip out of
the city ... Our margins are based
strictly on food ... We can’t make it
up on other items like Wal-Mart; we
have a smaller footprint. We have to
give them a real reason to shop in our
stores.”
To ease strains on customers,
some grocers, like Rob Santoni, have
resorted to absorbing the tax and
keeping prices fat for customers.
But he says beverage sales at his
supermarket in Highlandtown still
lag by 4.8 percent, and compared to
last year, 2-3 percent fewer customers
enter his store.
“Those [customers] that know
the tax went into effect; they aren’t
even giving me a chance,” he told
reporters. “They aren’t shopping in
the city ... It’s hard when people see
so much irresponsible spending in
local government ... who ignored the
outcries of business leaders to not
pass it.”
Offcials say the tax is necessary
to shave down the city’s $121 million
defcit and sustain the city’s general
fund, which supports police, fre
offcials and public education. “The
bottle tax revenues are on target,”
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake
recently told reporters. “We’ve got
$5 million in the city’s coffers for
essential services. And when we took
this issue to the public, they were very
comfortable with two cents.”
Rawlings-Blake proposed a four-
cent beverage tax last spring, but a
divided City Council compromised
with a 2 cent tariff July 25. Retailers
and bottlers, including Santoni and
City Retailers: Repeal
Beverage Tax
AFRO File Photo
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
Congregants of a local church held a protest for the second time Dec. 6,
for what they call their landlord’s deliberate violation of state law.
Pastor Mario Ogans and others from God’s Kingdom Builders Church of
Jesus Christ on Bel Air Road are outraged because their landlord authorized
a liquor shop to open in a storefront directly below them.
They say Maryland law prohibits liquor stores within 300 feet of
churches.
Steven Fogleman, chairman of the city Liquor Board, told reporters after
the church’s frst protest Dec. 3 that Garden Liquors was approved for the
move two-weeks before the church.
Pastor Ogans contends he has documents proving his church was the
frst legal tenant. God’s Kingdom signed their lease in June 2009 and were
scheduled to move in October 2009, he said, but slow construction didn’t
allow physical relocation until February 2010.
The liquor store received approval for their liquor license Jan. 14.
In an interview with the AFRO, Fogleman said the landlord—Luis
Bnrich—did not mention the church when his board approved the liquor
store in January.
“We didn’t receive any testimony, letters…there was no evidence that a
church was there and the landlord didn’t say there was.”
After complaints from church members last summer, the board launched
an investigation and discovered the church.
Local Church Protests
Liquor Store Opening
Photo by Bill Tabron
Pastor Mario Ogans of God’s Kingdom Builders Church of Jesus
Christ, center, and members of his congregation protest the liquor
store authorized to operate next door to the church.
Continued on A6
Baltimore
merchants have
renewed their
objection to the
two cent bottle
tax.
A2 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
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AFRO National Briefs
Alicia Keys, Other Celebs ‘Kill’ Social Media Identities for
HIV/AIDS Charity
Alicia Keys and two dozen other celebrities began an
innovative HIV campaign this World AIDS Day by “killing” their
social media identities for charity.
To support Keys’ Keep a Child Alive charity, the stars signed
off of social media sites such as
Twitter and Facebook. While those
sites remain active with information
on how to donate, the stars
themselves will refrain from posting
personal updates or new information
to their social media profles while
the campaign is underway.
Supporters can donate $5 or $10
through text messages or through the
Keep a Child Alive website. Once the
charity’s $1 million goal is reached,
the stars will resume posting on the
sites.
Charity leaders are also urging
everyday people to similarly sacrifce
their social media lives for the cause,
which supports African and Indian
families affected by HIV/AIDS.
Six days after the campaign’s
Dec. 1 launch, fans had contributed
more than $420,500 to bring their
favorites back to “life.” Nearly 3,700
non-celebrities had also sacrifced
their web presences, according to
The Keep a Child Alive website,
which logs all “deaths” by the minute.
“We’re trying to sort of make the
remark: Why do we care so much about the death of one celebrity
as opposed to millions and millions of people dying in the place
that we’re all from,” said Leigh Blake, president and co-founder of
Keep a Child Alive.
The campaign—which also includes Usher, Lady Gaga,
Jennifer Hudson, Serena Williams, Lenny Kravitz and Keys’
husband Swiss Beats—advertised celebrities photographed in
coffns to symbolize their “digital deaths.”
The campaign hopes that the Web absence of these celebs,
who have tremendous presences online, will entice fans to donate.
Keys has more than 2.6 million followers on Twitter and almost
8 million fans on Facebook. Lady Gaga may top the fans’ list, as
some 24 million people “like” her on Facebook and 7.2 million
follow the pop star on Twitter.
“This is such a direct and instantly emotional way and a little
sarcastic, you know, of a way to get people to pay attention,” Keys
told The Associated Press.
Only one participating celebrity has broken their digital silence
so far. R&B singer Usher caught heat for tweeting on Dec. 5:
“Twit fam, I’m whack for being late, I need your help. Twit Happy
Birthday Rico Love!!! He is the man that wrote you ‘There goes
my baby’.”
NAACP Alleges School Re-segregation
Jim Crow is rearing its head again, eroding the gains of
education parity in school rooms across the nation, according to
the nation’s largest civil rights group.
The NAACP recently held its annual Daisy Bates Education
Summit in Raleigh, N.C., and pointed to the county’s troubles
over school diversity as an example of the retrenchment from the
equity standards established by the seminal case Brown v. Board of
Education.
“Ending bussing to integrate schools and dwindling funding
for public schools is the newest form of re-segregation,” stated
NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous, who joined
North Carolina State Conference President William Barber, Florida
State Conference President Adora Obi-Nweze and other NAACP
offcials in a press conference to discuss the current state of
schools in the state.
“All children of all backgrounds, of all races, colors and creeds
deserve an accessible, high quality public education. School
boards across this country are rolling the clock back to the time
before Brown vs. The Board of Education and the NAACP will not
continue to let this happen.”
Wake County, where Raleigh is located, gained national
attention when its school board voted to end a 10-year policy
of busing to foster socioeconomic balance in public schools.
Advocates say the move is aligned with a 2007 Supreme Court
decision, which found that school districts cannot use students’
race as basis for integration policies. And that’s what busing for
diversity amounts to, according to Roger Clegg, president of the
Falls Church, Va.-based Center for Equal Opportunity.
““Even if you think there’s something desirable about having
a politically correct racial and ethnic mix, it doesn’t justify the
enormous costs of engaging in racial discrimination,” he was
quoted as saying in an Associated Press article.
S.C. Teens Batter Toddler
A Charleston, S.C. mother and three teens have been charged
in the beating of a toddler that has left the 18-month-old in critical
condition.
According to police investigators, Shakera Suncelaree Wright,
the victim’s mother, told the Department of Social Services that
she and her son were visiting her friend Tyrek Varnes, 16, at his
home. Wright said Varnes and his 14- and 15-year-old friends
were “play wrestling” with the victim, Louis, when they began
pummeling him in the chest and stomach while he hung upside
down from his ankles in a closet.
The next morning Wright said she checked on Louis—who
slept in Varnes’ room—and said he looked “like he wanted to die.”
By the time the toddler arrived at the hospital he was in respiratory
distress, and he was immediately taken to an intensive care unit.
A CAT scan revealed fve rib fractures, air and blood in his
thorax, multiple lacerations of his liver, spleen and pancreas. Louis
was in shock, and the scan also showed that he had suffered a skull
fracture at some undetermined point.
The results prompted physicians to call the police and DSS.
Varnes confessed to everyone’s role in the abuse and he, Wright
and the other two youths have been charged with infiction or
allowing infiction of great bodily injury to a child. If convicted on
the felony charge, the defendants face a 20-year sentence.
Courtesy Photos
Alicia Keys
Usher
Dr. Garth Graham, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health in the Office of Minority Health at HHS, administers the seasonal flu vaccine to Tom Joyner.
“If I’m the hardest working man in radio,
I can’t miss any time from work or with my loved ones.
I bet you can’t either.
That’s why I got my flu vaccine,
and I urge you to get yours.”
—Tom Joyner
Protect yourself and those around you
Get a fu vaccine
The Afro American (Baltimore) - 11_5x10_Baltimore2.indd 1 12/5/10 1:37 PM
A2 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Jennifer Hudson and other
relatives positively identified
the body of her 7-year-old
nephew Monday, just hours
after his body was found in a
sport-utility vehicle sought in
connection with the murder of
Hudson’s mother and brother.
The white, 1994 Chevrolet
Suburban with Illinois license
plate X584859 was found on
Chicago’s West Side after
police received a 7 a.m. call
from a neighbor about a suspi-
cious vehicle. The man noticed
the vehicle while walking his
dog. According to the Chicago
Tribune, the boy had been shot
multiple times in the back seat
of the vehicle. The SUV, regis-
tered to Hudson’s murdered
brother, was towed with the
boy’s body inside and is being
processed by evidence techni-
cians and workers. The body
was later removed and taken to
the Cook County Medical
Examiner’s office.
Hudson and other family
members arrived at the Medical
Examiner’s office mid-after-
noon to identify the body.
Given the choice between look-
ing directly at the body or
viewing it on a wall-mounted
video screen, the family chose
the latter. According to the
Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes,
that’s him.”
A spokesman for the office
told the newspaper that Hudson
“remained strong for her fami-
ly” and was clearly its leader.
“She held hands with her fami-
ly,” the spokesman said. “It
was obviously a very emotional
moment.”
The boy – the son of Julia
Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had
been missing since Friday,
when a relative found Julian’s
grandmother, Darnell
Donerson, 57, and his uncle,
Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death
in his grandmother’s home in
the 7000 block of South Yale
Avenue.
An Amber Alert – a desig-
nation for high-risk missing
children – was issued Friday
after Julian was discovered
missing after the murders.
Police arrested William
Balfour, the missing boy’s step-
father and estranged husband
of Julia, at his girlfriend’s
Southside apartment several
hours after the murders.
Balfour’s mother, Michele, has
told reporters that her son had
nothing to do with the slayings.
Balfour remains a suspect in
the murders but is being held in
jail for parole violation after
being convicted of attempted
murder and vehicular hijack-
ing. Cook County records show
that he pleaded guilty to both
charges in 1999. He was also
convicted in 1998 for posses-
sion of a stolen motor vehicle.
He was released from prison in
2006 after serving seven years
for the attempted murder and
car hijacking charges.
The boy remained missing
through a long weekend in
which police and volunteers
posted fliers bearing his photo-
graph around the city. On
Sunday, Jennifer Hudson asked
for the public’s help in finding
her nephew. In her MySpace
blog, she thanked fans and sup-
porters for their prayers and
offered a $100,000 reward to
anyone who returned the boy
alive.
Since the investigation,
Hudson – who gained stardom
after appearing on “American
Idol,” and then won an
Academy Award for her role in
the movie Dreamgirls – has
stayed out of the public eye.
The Chicago Tribune report-
ed that a parade of cars moved
slowly past her family’s home
Monday morning, past the
news vans, reporters and curi-
ous onlookers.
Neighbors stood
quietly and
reflected on the
violence.
In front of the Hudson’s
home, men in heavy jackets
and hooded sweatshirts came to
kiss the twin white crosses bar-
ing the names of Donerson and
Jason.
“Everybody is sick of going
through stuff like this,” Artisha
West, a former resident of the
area told the Tribune. “We all
have to stick together. All these
young children are dying, and
for what?”
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Presidential candidate John
McCain’s attack on ACORN –
Associated Community
Organization for Reform Now –
confirms the success of the
organization, the head of the
group says.
“This is testimony to the work
we’ve done and success we’ve
had,” Maude Hurd, president of
ACORN, said in an interview
with the AFRO.
“When this attack started, we
had just announced that we had
registered 1.3 million new vot-
ers,” she said. “That’s just to say
that someone’s running scared
because of ACORN’s success.”
McCain, who is running for
president on the Republican tick-
et, lashed out at ACORN in the
final debate against Barack
Obama, contending the group “is
on the verge of maybe perpetrat-
ing one of the greatest frauds in
voter history in this country,
maybe destroying the fabric of
democracy.”
Factcheck.org, a non-partisan
Web site, found those claims to
be “exaggerated,” with “no evi-
dence of any such democracy-
destroying fraud.”
Hurd believes the McCain
charges were politically motivat-
ed.
She said, “Because it’s low-
and moderate-income people,
and people of color, I believe the
McCain campaign thinks those
voters are going to vote
Democratic, which is not neces-
sarily true.”
ACORN is no stranger to
controversy.
For 38 years, the non-partisan
organization has fought for social
and economic justice for low-
and moderate-income
Americans. With 400,000 mem-
ber families organized into more
than 1,200 neighborhood chap-
ters in 110 cities nationwide,
ACORN has over the years seen
its share of criticism while advo-
cating for affordable housing,
living wages, healthcare for the
underserved— and while organ-
izing voter registration drives.
But none has been as withering
and baseless as this one.
With the presidential election
less than two weeks away,
ACORN’s detractors allege the
organization has engaged in mas-
sive voter registration fraud after
the reported discovery of bogus
names, such as Mickey Mouse
and Dallas Cowboys players
Tony Romo and Terrell Owens,
among the names submitted to
election officials.
Hurd said those workers, who
were doing those things without
ACORN’s knowledge or permis-
sion, were fired.
“The evidence that has sur-
faced so far shows they faked
forms to get paid for work they
didn’t do, not to stuff ballot
boxes.” ACORN, she said, is the
victim of fraud, not the perpetra-
tor of it.
Hurd said the only things
bogus are the charges them-
selves. And factcheck. org
agrees.
It concluded, “Neither
ACORN nor its employees have
been found guilty of, or even
charged with, casting fraudulent
votes.”
The problem came about pri-
marily because of the way
ACORN operates. Rather than
rely on volunteers, it pays peo-
ple, many of them poor or unem-
ployed, to sign up new voters.
The idea was to help both those
being registered and those doing
the registration.
Maud explained, “We have a
zero tolerance policy for deliber-
ate falsification of registration.”
Most news account neglect to
point out that ACORN is
required by law to turn in all reg-
istration forms. And they also fail
to note that it was the organiza-
tion, in many instances, that first
brought the phony registrations
to the attention of authorities.
The McCain camp apparently
isn’t interested in those fine
points, preferring to air mislead-
ing ads that seek to link Obama
to ACORN, thereby undercutting
his political support.
McCain: I’m John McCain
and I approve this message.
Announcer: Who is Barack
Obama? A man with “a political
baptism performed at warp
speed.” Vast ambition. After col-
lege, he moved to Chicago.
Became a community organizer.
There, Obama met Madeleine
Talbot, part of the Chicago
branch of ACORN. He was so
impressive that he was asked to
train the ACORN staff.
What did ACORN in Chicago
engage in? Bullying banks.
Intimidation tactics. Disruption
of business. ACORN forced
banks to issue risky home loans.
The same types of loans that
caused the financial crisis we’re
in today.
No wonder Obama’s campaign is
trying to distance him from the
group, saying, “Barack Obama
Never Organized with ACORN.”
But Obama’s ties to ACORN run
long and deep. He taught classes
for ACORN. They even endorsed
him for President.
But now ACORN is in trouble.
Reporter: There are at least
11 investigations across the
country involving thousands of
potentially fraudulent ACORN
forms.
Announcer: Massive voter
fraud. And the Obama campaign
paid more than $800,000 to an
ACORN front for get out the vote
efforts.
Pressuring banks to issue risky
loans. Nationwide voter fraud.
Barack Obama. Bad judgment.
Blind ambition. Too risky for
America.
Since McCain’s comments,
ACORN’s 87 offices have been
bombarded with threats and
racist mail.
The day after the presidential
debate, vandals broke into the
organization’s Boston and Seattle
offices and stole computers.
After a Cleveland representative
appeared on TV, an e-mail was
sent to the local office saying she
“is going to have her life ended.”
Aworker in Providence, R.I.,
received a threatening call say-
ing, “We know you get off work
at 9” and uttered racial epithets.
Acaller to one office left a
message on the answering
machine, saying: “Hi, I was just
calling to let you know that
Barack Obama needs to get
hung. He’s a (expletive deleted)
nigger, and he’s a piece of
(expletive deleted). You guys are
fraudulent, and you need to go to
hell. All the niggers on oak trees.
They’re gonna get all hung hon-
eys, they’re going to get assassi-
nated, they’re gonna get killed.”
Another message said, “You
liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive
deleted). Welfare bums. You
guys just (expletive deleted)
come to our country, consume
every natural resource there is,
and make a lot of babies. That’s
all you guys do. And then suck
up the welfare and expect every-
one else to pay for your hospital
bills for your kids. I jus’ say let
your kids die. That’s the best
move. Just let your children die.
Forget about paying for hospital
bills for them. I’m not gonna do
it. You guys are lowlifes. And I
hope you all die.”
Hurd thinks the hate calls will
cease soon.
“In two weeks, I think these
attacks will be over. But I think it
will be harder for us to get our
name back on good graces
because they really trashed us in
the last few weeks.”
But ACORN will not be
deterred.
“We’ve been fighting for a
long time, for over 30 years, for
the rights of low- and moderate-
income people all across the
country,” Hurd said. “We’re
going to continue to fight for
economic justice in our commu-
nities.”
November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American A3
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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain Nephew
“She held hands with her family. It was obviously a very emotional moment.”
Courtesy Photos
Jennifer Hudson and her mom, Darnell Donerson who
was killed, as well as her brother, Jason.
Jason Hudson
Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew.
ACORN Fights Back
Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

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December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American A3
Prince George’s Inauguration Ushers in New Day
By George Barnette
AFRO Staf Writer
Before the real work in
Prince George’s County
begins, the newly elected
offcials had their day in the
sun as inauguration offcially
ushered in a new era in the
county’s politics.
“Today, as we journey
down the path to greatness,
remember that we will
start together and we
will fnish together,” said
Prince George’s County
Executive Rushern Baker.
“In one unifed voice, we
say to people of this state,
this region: We are Prince
George’s County.”
One of the big questions
of the day was answered
with little controversy
as Councilwoman Leslie
Johnson, D.-Dist. 6, took
her oath to one of the larger
ovations of the day. Johnson,
along with her husband,
former Prince George’s
County Executive Jack
Johnson, was arrested last
month on federal corruption
charges. After the ceremony,
Johnson said, “The voters
have spoken,” in response
to why she felt comfortable
taking her oath.
The inauguration
took place in blistering
cold conditions on the
outside deck of the County
Administration Building
in Upper Marlboro. The
luminaries were great
Rep. Donna Edwards
(D-Dist.4), Maryland
Attorney General Doug
Gansler (D), Washington,
D.C. Councilman Marion
Barry (D-Ward 8), District
Mayor-elect Vincent Gray
(D), former Prince George’s
County Executives Wayne
Curry and Paris Glendening
and various members of the
state legislature.
The Surrattsville High
School Marching Band
provided pre-inauguration
entertainment followed by
the Prince George’s Police
Bag Pipe band. Former
Prince George’s County
Councilwoman Dorothy F.
Bailey presided over the
proceedings.
The nine Prince George’s
Council members, four
returning and fve new,
were sworn in by former
Councilwoman and current
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Marilyn Bland. Bland
remarked that it was a
bittersweet day because she’s
no longer working on the
council yet she still gets to
take part in the special day
for the nine council members.
Councilwoman Andrea
Harrison, D.-Dist. 5, made
comments on behalf of the
entire council as she enters
her second term. In her
speech, Harrison copied
Baker’s campaign motto,
“making a good county great”
and took it to another level.
“Well, Mr. Baker, I see
your message and I raise you
even higher,” Harrison said.
“We’re going to make a great
county even greater.”
Baker then took his oath
followed by a speech to the
crowd. In his speech, he
spoke about restoring trust in
the County’s government in
the wake of the controversy
surrounding the Johnsons.
“I’m going to start by
working to restore confdence
in our county government,”
Baker said to a murmuring
crowd. “Overall, I believe
we have good people working
for our government who are
committed to serving you and
I believe that they are critical
to the success of this county
and your quality of life.
“I will remind them that
they must be good stewards
of your tax dollars being
ever mindful that you pay
their salaries and fund this
government,” he continued.
Baker immediately made
his frst offcial decisions as
well. Baker named several
new interim heads of Prince
George’s County agencies
including the replacement for
Police Chief Roberto Hylton,
Mark Magaw, a 27-year
veteran of the department.
Later that night, the mood
relaxed as people migrated
to the Potomac Room at
the Gaylord National at
the National Harbor for the
Inaugural Ball.
Many of the same
luminaries came decked out
in their best as the Council
and Baker got in one last
night of celebration before
their frst workday began.
Curry and “Good Times”
star, Bern Nadette Stanis,
hosted the ball. Abby Koya
performed an opera song
with the special performances
by Grammy-award winning
R&B singer Regina Belle and
XPD Band.
The night ended with
dancing as Prince George’s
now begins anew.
Photo by Rob Roberts
Prince George’s County Executive-elect Rushern Baker,
center, was sworn in on Dec. 6 on the outside deck of the
County Administration Building in the blistering cold.
December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010, The Afro-American A3
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A4 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
A charter amendment
to create a city account
designated for the restoration
of deteriorating schools
cleared the City Council Dec.
6. The non-lapsing account
redirects city council funds
to renovation projects for
existing schools as well as the
construction of new facilities.
Council President
Bernard C. “Jack” Young
and Councilman James
Kraft, D-1, introduced the
legislation late last month to
tackle the city’s $2.8 billion
shortfall for capital school
renovations.
City offcials say revenue
generated from fnes, fees,
grants, donations and
the annual Ordinance of
Estimates could fund the
project.
It now awaits approval
from Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake, who has
initiated similar plans for
school improvements. She
held a news conference with
city schools CEO Andres
A. Alonso Nov. 22 and
announced the formation
of a taskforce to study the
measure.
The 10-member unit –
which includes leaders in
construction, planning, city
schools and the Mayor’s
offce – will explore fnancing
and legislative options
to implement a school
restoration plan by Feb. 2011.
“The simple truth is that
existing funding sources –
both city and state – will
never meet the current and
future capital improvement
needs of our school system,”
Rawlings-Blake said at the
news conference.
The budget shortfall
threatens recent city gains
in student achievement, she
noted. “While we do not have
a solution to address this
massive problem today, one
thing is clear: doing nothing
is not an option.”
Young says his “out-of-
the-box” charter amendment
“will not singularly solve this
funding crisis, but it’s a step
in the right direction.”
“We owe it to the youth
of Baltimore that our schools
are second to none,” he said
on the City Hall foor Dec. 6,
“but you see our schools and
wonder what our priorities
are.”
The City schools system
needs over $1.5 billion for
basic facilities maintenance
and another $1.3 billion for
major renovations and new
school construction. The new
improvements would forge a
more competitive, healthier
learning environment, said
the mayor’s offce.
Studies show schools in
poor condition encumber
student success and lead to
higher rates of absenteeism
and dropouts. According to
a study conducted by the
National Center for Education
Statistics, students in urban
areas “founder in decaying,
violent environments” with
poor or limited resources.
“Our school buildings
send a message to our
students every day about how
we, as a community, value
their education,” Alonso said
in a written statement. “The
quality of our facilities must
match the high expectations
that we have for our
students.”
Baltimore City has some
of the oldest school facilities
in Maryland, yet receives less
state funding than any other
education system, the Mayor
said.
“By passing this
amendment,” said Kraft, “we
will be ensuring that we are
exploring every available
resource to improve the
conditions in which our
students are learning.”
If approved by Rawlings-
Blake, the new measure
would require a referendum,
or a popular vote by the
electorate, to become law.
Last month, voters approved
a charter amendment to
develop a similar fund for
sustainability.
A public hearing for the
school fund is scheduled for
early January.
“We owe it to the youth of Baltimore that
our schools are second to none.”
Young, Rawlings-Blake Introduce School Restoration Plans
Cummings said, but the new FTC rules provide an “additional
layer of protection for homeowners.”
Under the regulations, mortgage relief companies cannot
collect fees until customers receive a written offer from their
lender, claim affliation to a government or lending agency
or guarantee loan modifcation. Relief businesses must also
disclose service costs up front and are barred from advising
homeowners to cease their mortgage payments. Violators face
civil penalties and high fnes.
Laura Sullivan, a representative for the FTC said the new
rule allows federal and state regulators to prosecute fraudulent
companies regardless of their state location. Oftentimes,
swindles are perpetuated across state lines, she said.
“These companies have generally distracted and deterred
consumers from getting real relief,” said Sullivan. “This
rule culminates a nearly two-year effort on the FTC and our
state counterparts to prosecute these types of companies
aggressively.”
The provisions also apply to attorneys, who must deposit
all advance fees into a client trust account and follow
restrictions authorized by their state.
Mark Kaufman, Maryland Commissioner of Financial
Regulation says state offcials have conducted over 200
investigations into alleged scammers and have recovered over
$100,000 for victimized homeowners.
“The problem is, at the end of the day, I can get your
$3,000 back, hopefully and in many cases successfully, but I
can’t solve the underlying problem, which is the foreclosure,”
he said at the news conference.
Late last month, state offcials indicted a Virginia-based
lawyer, who allegedly defrauded 10 Prince George’s County
homeowners out of thousands of dollars in a widespread loan
modifcation scam. The FTC has ordered a temporary freeze
on his company’s assets and is taking measures to close the
business.
Peartree is hoping for a similar outcome in her case and is
working with the state to retrieve the thousands she’s lost. She
has not heard from the law offce in over a month. She is also
fghting to secure her home of 17 years. She faces a $10,000
bill for late mortgage payments.
“Be aware,” she warned homeowners at the news
conference.
Cummings will host a foreclosure prevention workshop for
city homeowners Dec. 18.
“There are many unscrupulous people
out there who are preying on the
vulnerability of those homeowners.”
Cummings Promotes New Protections
Continued from A1
Photo by Bill Tabron
Baltimore Council President Bernard C. “Jack”Young and
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake are working to restore
deteriorating schools.
A4 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010
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with the help of bge.com/WinterReady. When you visit the special section of our web site, you’ll find lots of tools and resources
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CORTINA & FAMILY
BGE CUSTOMERS | Windsor Mill
bge_clipboard_family_Afro_3_13.qxp:Layout 1 3/4/10 3:32 PM Page 1
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American A5
Jacquelyn Martinez
21 years, Pikesville Resident
“…If you don’t vote, you
cannot complain.”
“I vote every primary and
every general election because
it’s important to voice your
opinion and it’s important
to send a message to the
candidates to say that the same
way we put them there, we can
take them out. It’s important
that we show them that we
stand by them… that they keep
their promises and make sure
that they take care of the people.”
“The main purpose of voting is to voice your opinion. If you
don’t vote, you are not voicing your opinion. And, if you don’t
vote, you cannot complain.”
BLEWS Honor Sen. Delores
Kelley and Councilwoman
Rochelle Spector
The Black/Jewish
Forum of Baltimore
(BLEWS) recently honored
Maryland State Senator
Delores G. Kelley (District
10) and Baltimore City
Councilwoman Rochelle
“Rikkki” Spector (Fifth
District) at the organization’s
Annual Dinner Meeting.
Held at The Forum
Caterers, Nov. 30, the event
acknowledged the leaders
“for their exemplary public
service and contributions to
interracial understanding and
cooperation.”
Juernene Ferrell, daughter
Yvonne Ferrell, mother
20+ years, Randallstown Resident
“A lot of the issues are very important.”
“It’s, actually, my civic duty. I’ve been voting since I was
18 years old, and a lot of the issues are very important. The
governor’s race is extremely important [to me] because I’m a
state employee. As far as our delegates go, I need to make sure
that we have someone that is in there representing my area. My
daughter is still in school and I have to make sure that the funds
are going to be there for her to continue her education. ”
It is sad that unfortunately, a lot of people do not understand
the importance of coming out and voting. To understand that,
that one vote does count…”
Jim Roberts
13 years, Pikesville Resident
“Now it’s even more important now because we’ve made
certain strides in the area of elected offces in terms of having
more people of color…”
“Voting is important for several reasons. If you want to go
back in history in terms of what our parents’ parents and other
generations fought for, the right to vote, that’s number one, then
number two, we must continue
that tradition.
Now, it’s even more
important because we’ve made
certain strides in the area of
elected offces, in terms of
having more people of color
there – our president and so
forth and so on… And we
must do what we need to do to
have the right elected offcials
in offce to support what I feel
is the right thing to do in terms
of education, employment, our
community, etc…”
“I think there should be more emphasis on the importance of
voting.”
“If I vote, I have a voice. It’s important whether it’s the
primary or general election. We need to let these politicians
know that we are here, and we have voices.”
“I think there should
be more emphasis on the
importance of voting. There’s
always a big media frenzy
when it’s close to election
time, but I think it needs to be
prominent at all times. And,
that goes for the politicians,
as well. We don’t see them as
much until it’s almost election
time. Politicians need to let the
citizens know: ‘I’m here, all
the time,’ not just at election
time.”
Stories and photos by
Jannette J. Witmyer, with
the exception of Tifanie
S. McCoy’s image, which
was provided by Tifanie
S. McCoy.
During the 2008 presidential and 2010 primary and general
elections, voter turnout in Baltimore County spiraled from
76.15 percent to 30.68 percent and then yo-yoed back to 58.55
percent. The primary’s low numbers prompted renewed voter
registration and “Get out the vote” efforts, and generated
numerous conversations about the importance of voting and the
difference that each vote makes.
After casting their votes in the 2010 gubernatorial General
Election, a few residents of Pikesville, Randallstown and
Owings Mills were willing to share their thoughts about voting
and its importance.
Community members talk
about voting…
Tifanie S. McCoy
10+ years, Owings Mills Resident
Delores G. Kelley Rochelle “Rikkki”Spector
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

P
h
o
t
o
s
December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010, The Afro-American A5
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6110696.indd 1 11/24/10 6:04:47 PM
A6 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
the loss of jobs.
According to U.S. Department of
Agriculture data released in November, 14.7
percent of households – or 50 million people –
in the United State suffered from what is called
food insecurity in 2009. For Black households
the rate is 24.9 percent.
In terms of age groups, Spriggs said the
safety net of Social Security was crucial in
mitigating the impact of the economy on senior
citizens, but young adults were impacted in
ways they hadn’t been before. And just as
the impact of this recession is not distributed
equally among other demographic groups, it’s
also varying in its effect across the geographic
regions of the country, he added.
According to statistics from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, more people in
rural areas live in poverty than in metro areas,
with the highest incidence of poverty among
Blacks living in non-metro areas. Their report
on the 2009 fgures also shows that 40 percent
of female-headed households in rural areas
and 30.9 percent of female-headed households
in metro areas are in poverty. These numbers
also show that the largest percent of people
in poverty are children, with 23.5 percent of
those in rural areas and 20.2 percent of those in
metro areas living in poverty.
But those statistics include many people,
who before the onslaught of this economic
depression, would not be considered “poor.”
“The people who are going to food banks
now, who weren’t going to food banks fve year
ago, a lot of them are people on the edge of the
job market,” said David Beckman, president
of Bread for the World and World Food Prize
laureate. “They had a job and had their hours
cut back, they’ve been downgraded from a
high- paying job and now they are working at a
low-paying job.”
Noting that more people now have family,
friends and neighbors that have been forced
into poverty, he added, “More American voters
understand that if people are poor it’s probably
because of external circumstances ... Public
attitude towards poor people have become less
negative because of the recession. That’s an
encouraging thing.”
While the stimulus bill has kept things
from getting worse, Beckman said, the country
still hasn’t made a sustained effort to reduce
poverty. Citing examples of other nations’
efforts to improve the lives of poor residents,
he said the United States could have similar
success, but, “We don’t have enough ‘give a
damn.’”
“Even education isn’t saving us,” said Dr.
V. Nenaji Jackson, Ph.D., a visiting professor
in Howard University’s Department of Political
Science. “Everybody is suffering in this
economy except Wall Street.”
Dr. Jackson added that fxing poverty is
not just a political issue, but one that every
decision-maker in business, politics and the
non-proft sector should be actively working
against, but that has not been happening.
“[Poverty] has not been a priority for elites
in America. I don’t think the new Congress
is focused on poverty. They are focused on
protecting the status of upper middle and upper
class America,” she said. “They have not been
paying attention to this country falling apart on
their watch.”
Beckman talks about President Barack
Obama’s promise to end childhood hunger –
which is continuing to rise in this recession
and can have long-term health repercussions
for our population – by 2015 as an important
goal to achieve. Jackson thinks the Obama
administration can handle this problem but
sees it as “overwhelming,” in part because they
don’t understand how to handle poverty. “[The
administration] needs to begin by hiring and
utilizing staff members who are real experts on
poverty and not just Ivy League elite,” she said.
“This administration is not meeting poverty
where it is. It is not looking at those types of
grass root, hands on solutions to poverty. We
have to deal with this on the micro level.”
But in a letter to the
Liquor Board dated June 25,
Fogleman says, Bnrich wrote
that the church’s tenancy
began Feb. 1, 2010 and their
move was not approved by
the city until summer 2010.
He also called the church
temporary occupants.
The landlord told the
AFRO he doesn’t remember
which tenant moved in frst,
but says the church has always
been aware of the new liquor
store, which offcially opened
Dec. 5.
“Both participants knew
the other was there, as well as
the liquor board,” Bnrich said.
“As the landlord, I didn’t do
anything illegal or immoral
but I’m saddened the church is
unhappy.”
He said some churches
incorporate wine into their
service, so he didn’t know
God’s Kingdom would oppose
the new neighbors.
He added, “And landlords
don’t necessarily discuss new
tenants with old tenants.”
The church fled an appeal
with the Zoning Board, but
board Executive Director
David Tanner says the issue
must be regulated by the
liquor board.
“I sympathize with the
worshippers,” Fogleman said.
“This is not the best set up.”
The liquor store renews their
license next April, he said, but
until then, the tenants might
have to coexist.
“The reason I’m so against
it is because the church has
over 100 youth that come to
our service,” Pastor Ogans
said. Many members are
leaving an “alcoholic past”,
he said, and will have to fght
temptation whenever they
visit the church. “Our doors
are six inches apart,” he said,
noting that people often enter
the church mistaking it for the
entrance of the liquor store.
Paul, a manager at Garden
Liquors, says the church has
not spoken to him, but he is
aware of the protests.
“We did move here frst,”
he said simply. All other
questions, he said, should
be directed to his attorney.
Calls to the lawyer were not
immediately returned by
AFRO deadline.
The protests have
generated attention from
nearby residents. Several
have spoken to the liquor and
zoning boards and are signing
petitions to have the liquor
store’s license revoked. Other
churches are also getting
involved and protesting liquor
stores in their area, Pastor
Ogans said.
“This is just the
beginning,” he said. “People
don’t want this in their
community.” He and other
congregants protested a third
time when the AFRO went to
press Dec. 8.
For now, the church will
even have to contend with
the liquor store on Sundays.
As noted on a document
posted on the Garden Liquors
front entrance, the store is
authorized to remain open for
nine hours every Sunday until
New Year’s Day.
Vary heavily protested the three-year charge.
It applies to soda, bottled water and other
drinks, but excludes milk and beverages over
2 liters.
The city has collected $5.3 million from
the tax to date, receiving over $430,000 in the
frst month of ratifcation. Offcials expected
to bring in $5.8 million by January. Mayoral
spokesman Ryan O’Doherty said the city will
make up for the slight shortfall this month
when they begin an audit and enforcement
program to ensure that all city retailers
implement the 2 cent increase.
“As more distributors come into
compliance and enforcement efforts are put in
place, the city could achieve the full revenue
projected in the budget,” he said in a written
statement.
Santoni says local government should
be “allies” for city businesses and promote
competitiveness. “I think it’s another way 5
million dollars can be found,” he said.
“Until they walk a day in our shoes,” he
added, referring to Rawlings-Blake and city
council members, “they won’t understand.”
In 1989, Baltimore City and county
shoppers faced a 4 cent beverage tax. It was
later repealed after strong objections from
residents and grocers. “This is a rehash of
what happened before – déjà vu, but it didn’t
work then and it’s not working now,” said Jeff
Zellmar, head of government affairs for the
Maryland Retailers Association.
He says anti-bottle tax petitions are circling
city supermarkets. With a goal of 15,000
signatures by spring, grocers plan to pressure
offcials to repeal the tax. Three days after the
news conference, 2,035 people had signed the
petition, according to the “Stop the Baltimore
Beverage Tax” website.
“Everything else is going up; the economy
is going down and we are hanging by our
fngernails, Zellmar said. “Two cents means a
lot.”
Poverty in 2010
Local Church Protests
Repeal Beverage Tax
Continued from A1
Continued from A1
Continued from A1
“This is just the beginning. People don’t
want this in their community.”
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American A7
By Bobby Marvin
Special to the AFRO
The Rev. Deron Cloud passed out suddenly one day while riding his
exercise bike. When he woke up in an intensive care unit, doctors said
he’d suffered from an aneurism and could have died. He would not return
to ministering for about two months after being hospitalized.
“I didn’t even know I had passed out, and when I had came to, I
said that’s it. I said, ‘God, you’ve been trying to get my attention…I
need to exercise,’” said Cloud, who at the time was taking medicine for
high blood pressure, but has decreased the dosage since making several
lifestyle changes.
At more than 320 pounds, Cloud joins a stifing number of African
Americans across the nation living with high blood pressure. According to
the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, African Americans
are more likely to have high blood pressure compared to their non-
Hispanic White counterparts.
As pastor of Forestville, Md.’s Soul Factory for the past 14 years,
Cloud has taken a holistic approach to addressing his congregation’s
needs. The physical well-being is just as important as the spiritual, so
he asked the church to commit to a 90-day mandate promoting healthier
lifestyles and ftness.
“I came to a conclusion…we’re killing ourselves. We have to stop, we
have to exercise,” said Cloud.
Since the 90-day mandate and with the help of a personal trainer,
Cloud has created a stringent workout schedule that includes weight
training, swimming and maintaining a raw food diet.
Health
Courtesy Photo
The Rev. Deron Cloud, of Forestville,
Md.’s Soul Factory church, is taking an
holistic approach to addressing his
congregation’s needs.
Pastor Launches Initiative to Combat Obesity in the Pews
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
In attempts to raise
awareness about online
pornography, the War on
Illegal Pornography, a
coalition of more than 50
national and state groups
founded by Morality in
Media, will host its frst
online conference via its
Facebook page on Dec. 9 at
11 a.m. Among the topics
a three-person panel will
discuss are the pornography
pandemic and its relationship
to sex traffcking, effects on
marriages and the need to
prosecute obscene hardcore
adult pornography. The
lineup will include professor
of Women’s Studies at
the University of Rhode
Island, Dr. Donna M.
Hughes, senior fellow and
director of the Marriage and
Religion Research Institute
at the Family Research
Council in Washington,
D.C.; Dr. Patrick Fagan
and Robert Flores, former
administrator of the Offce
of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention
at the U.S. Department of
Justice in D.C. and former
deputy chief prosecutor in
the Child Exploitation and
Obscenity Section of the
Criminal Division at the
U.S. Department of Justice,
respectively.
The coalition’s response
to an increasing but
disturbing trend arrives at an
opportune time. According
to technology news site
gizmodo.com, 12 percent
(24,644,172) of websites are
pornographic, 25 percent
(68 million per day) of
all search engine requests
are pornography-related,
35 percent of all Internet
downloads are pornographic
and nearly 40 million
Americans are regular
visitors of porn sites.
“The numbers are big,
the change is huge and the
effects are bad,” said Fagan.
“[Pornography] wrecks
marriages, it totally alters
sexuality, it essentially makes
men less potent, it makes
men and women less capable
of living with each other and
it leaves children parentless,
fatherless particularly. All
indications are things are
getting worse, they’re not
getting better. There’s not a
single good that comes with
this stuff and there’s a host
of evils.”
Using race as a defning
factor, Flores - a former
child exploitation prosecutor
- said minority parents are
increasingly working long
hours due to the economy’s
slump, leaving their children
vulnerable to online
predators while they’re away.
“You have a lot of
parents who are desperately
working hard,” Flores said.
“A lot of parents are working
two jobs [but] who’s at home
with the kids with all this
technology? It raises some
very signifcant issues in the
minority community. I think
over time you’re going to see
more and more minority kids
swept up in this.”
Flores added, “In my
days as a prosecutor, the
defendants were almost
exclusively White and the
victims were also more
often than not White. I think
now you’re going to have a
situation where the minority
community is really going to
get socked by it because they
may not be as well-resourced
to protect their kids and that’s
really unfortunate.”
For more on the War on
Illegal Pornography visit www.
moralityinmedia.org. To join
Thursday’s discussion visit www.
facebook.com/PornHarms.
Coalition Aims to Raise Pornography
Awareness through Facebook
NNPA Helps Revamp
AIDS Awareness
The National Newspaper Publishers Association
(NNPA), which represents more than 200 newspapers and
15 million readers, has partnered with the Greater than
AIDS movement and the Black AIDS Institute to reengage
Black Americans in fghting the AIDS epidemic by making
an historic commitment to cover AIDS in Black America in
the nation’s Black press.
Greater Than AIDS is a national movement to unite and
mobilize Americans in response to the AIDS crisis in our
country, in particular the devastating epidemic facing Black
Americans. The Black AIDS Institute is the only HIV/AIDS
think tank in America focused exclusively on the impact of
HIV/AIDS on Black people.
“The importance of educating the African American
community about HIV has never been more important
than it is today,” said Dorothy Leavell, chair of the NNPA
Foundation Board of Directors and publisher of the Chicago
and Gary Crusader newspapers, in a statement. “Although
we are excited by breakthroughs in medicine, the fact
remains that the number of people living with HIV in our
community is still high, and that number is growing. We
have a lot to do. This epidemic is not over and we all have
to redouble our efforts.”
The commitment has also worked in many ways for Soul Factory
members Crystal and Shawn Hunter, although it wasn’t an easy change. “It
was a sacrifce for us; we sacrifce for so much in our life. If it’s a concert
coming up or something going on, we have to sacrifce our time to do it…
Whatever you want to do in life, you sacrifce your time. This is something
we wanted to do in our life. We wanted to live a better, longer life, so we
knew we had to make the sacrifce,” said Shawn Hunter.
In addition to being overweight, Crystal has to take insulin to manage
her diabetes, while their youngest daughter has a severe heart condition, so
getting healthy became a top priority. The change defnitely paid off and
the family was able to garner signifcant results.
“Once we started doing it [exercising], it was awesome. The energy was
there, my medication was cut down in half, my insulin was cut down in
half,” said Crystal Hunter.
Along with the mandate, The Soul Factory started Zumba classes, a
popular aerobics ftness training program inspired by traditional Latin
dances and rhythms.
Cloud selected his personal ftness trainer and Soul Factory member
Will Washington to lead the classes. Two nights a week, Washington
instructs female-only Zumba sessions. The new change has become
increasingly popular at the church.
“It’s prevalent in this area. Just Thursday night there were 30 people
that had never been here before. We average between 85 and 120 people
each class. A few people have had their cholesterol really drop. I have
defnitely had a couple of ladies come to me and say their [self]-esteem has
changed,” said Washington, who has worked as a personal trainer for three
years and a Zumba instructor for six months.
The 90-day mandate paid off and The Soul Factory participating
members were able to lose thousands of pounds and lower cholesterol by
hundreds of points. Cloud was able to shed 40 pounds during the mandate and said it was an
experience that greatly impacted his life.
“I feel like I’m 10 years younger and I got my life back, said Cloud. “Before I lost it [weight]
the physical way, I lost it the emotional way. I feel emotionally a hundred pounds lighter because
emotion no longer drives me to eat.”
A8 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
When J. Russell Fugett
founded his Maryland-based
business consulting company,
TLC JR, he had his uncle, the
late business icon Reginald F.
Lewis, in mind.
“As a small business
owner, my work is inspired
by what my Uncle Reg
was able to achieve,”
Fugett said in a prepared
statement. “My company
commemorates the legacy
of my uncle, Reginald F.
Lewis, founder of TLC (The
Lewis Companies). Also, the
‘J’ in TLC JR honors three
Josephs in my family, my
great-grandfathers, Baltimore
Attorney Joseph H. Payne
and Educator Joseph R.
Fugett, and my great-great-
grandfather who was born a
slave and went on to become
successful businessman,
Joseph M. Fugett.”
The tremendous legacy
and inheritance left upon him
by his elders have inspired
the 31-year-old Fugett to
carry on the inheritance,
which he said is “far more
valuable then any amount of
money.”
“I intend to build on
this through business and
service,” he added. And he is
doing just that by organizing
“Celebrate The Legacy: A
Reception For New Friends
of The Reginald F. Lewis
Museum of Maryland
African American History &
Culture,” which took place
at the Philippine Embassy in
Washington, D.C. on Dec. 7.
“Given the large and
affuent African American
and Filipino American
Community in Greater
Washington, DC, I wanted to
create more awareness of and
greater support for The Lewis
Museum in Baltimore,”
Fugett, a George Washington
University School of
Business graduate, said.
His cousin, 23-year old
Justin Wiley, agreed.
“RFL’s legacy is a
personifcation of our entire
family’s love and care for
each other,” said Wiley, now
a frst-year student at Harvard
Law School. “I see his name
everywhere throughout
campus and see his portrait
every time I go through
his building. His presence
on this campus and in our
family makes it easier to stay
focused and realize that the
tough work and hardships
only make you stronger and
will be worth it in the end.”
Fugett said the Dec. 7
reception was created to raise
awareness of his uncle’s
legacy and draw greater
crowds to the museum
bearing his name.
“I hope that people
will leave this event with
a stronger sense of who
my Uncle was, and why it
is important to support his
legacy which is represented
in large part by The Lewis:
the largest African American
History museum on the East
Coast.”
For more information
about the museum, visit www.
africanamericanculture.org.
Amory Place
827 Linden Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-225-8800
Bolton Hill
1501 W. Mount Royal Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21217
410-225-8855
Primary care is available at Linden Medical Group’s two midtown
locations – one in Bolton Hill and one at Armory Place. And for
health issues from diabetes and orthopedics to breast care
and ophthalmology, Linden Medical Group’s single network
of specialty physicians makes it easy and convenient for you
to get the care you need.
Primary care to keep you healthy. Specialty care when you need it.
That’s our commitment to our patients.
Because we care.
Primary Care to
keep you healthy.
Specialty Care
when you need it.
THANK YOU
T
he Board of Directors and Executive Director
Dr. David Taft Terry join with The Honorable
Robert M. Bell in acknowledging the contributions
and support of individuals and sponsors who made
the 2010 Reginald F. Lewis Museum Awards Gala a
success. Special thanks to the honorees:
The Honorable Andre M. Davis, U.S. Court of Appeals for
the Fourth Circuit; the frst African American appointed
from Maryland.

The Honorable Michele D. Hotten, Maryland Court of
Special Appeals; appointed as the frst African American
female to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.
Dean Phoebe Haddon, JD, LLM, University of Maryland
School of Law, the frst African American dean in the
University Of Maryland School of Law’s 185-year history.
Reginald F. Lewis Museum
830 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202
(two blocks east of Inner Harbor)
(443) 263-1800
www.AfricanAmericanCulture.org
Community
By Kristin Gray
AFRO Managing Editor

For many Americans, the holiday season conjures images of a crimson-clad Santa Claus and
cozy nights spent freside with friends and family. For others, like some residents in Baltimore
City grappling with the economy’s rollercoaster fuctuations, the season of giving brings
worries about food, gifts for children and clothing for the bitterly cold months.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2008 estimate, 19.2 percent of Baltimore City
residents live below the poverty line, although Maryland reports the highest median family
income nationwide. Even in Baltimore County, which has historically seen more fnancial
affuence than its urban neighbor, is facing diffcult times, with 6.1 percent of suburbanites
living on less than $21,834 for a family of four, according to a Brookings Institution report
issued earlier this year.
To make life easier for struggling families this winter, retired NFL star and Baltimore
native Keion Carpenter’s nonproft organization, The Carpenter House (TCH), the Baltimore
Entertainment Association and the AFRO’s Mrs. Santa program will host the annual “Special
Delivery” holiday bash, a four-hour after-work party and fundraiser on Dec. 15.
The event includes music from the area’s most popular deejays, food from A Taste of
Baltimore and a cash bar. Attendees are asked to bring a non-perishable food donation, clothing
item or pay $10 for entry.
LaRian Finney, founder and CEO of Baltimore-based Visionary Marketing Group (VMG),
said the event engages a unique audience, the city’s young movers and shakers” and 100 percent
of all donations go directly to a family in need.
“ I don’t know if there are any other organizations or causes where you can say, if I write
a check for $100, then $100 is going to this particular cause,” said Finney, whose company is
part of the Baltimore Entertainment Association and the marketing tour de force behind Jazzy
Summer Nights and the African-American Heritage Festival.
Last year’s Special Delivery fundraiser and donation assisted 100 local families with cash,
clothing and non-perishable food items. However, the 2010 program, held at Bourbon Street on
Guilford Avenue, will aid more than 500 families.
“AFRO Charities is excited to be part of Special Delivery and looks forward to helping even
more Baltimore families this year,” said Diane Hocker, public relations manager at the AFRO
and the face of Mrs. Santa. “As the event continues to thrive, the AFRO hopes others will be
moved to make donations and assist needy residents during these tough economic times.”
For Carpenter, a former Buffalo Bills and Atlanta Falcons star, Special Delivery and other
advocacy causes are part of his mission to give back. Carpenter was reared in a single-family
home and after seeing his mother’s struggles frsthand, the community activist strives to
empower underprivileged families by helping them purchase homes. Carpenter also uses his
nonproft as a conduit to tackle other social ills like joblessness, substance abuse and domestic
violence.
While preparing for Special Delivery is no easy task, Finney said the various hosts and
promoters have been supportive throughout the process.
“This entity started back in 2005 around [Hurricane] Katrina, and as soon as we sent out the
message that we wanted to mobilize all of the promoters in the city for the cause everyone was
on board,” Finney told the AFRO. “Everyone makes sure that networks have been engaged.
I think in that spirit, where it’s really not competition but a unique endeavor where folks are
coming together, it’s been received very well. I’ve been very pleased with the outcome.”
“Special Delivery” takes places Dec. 15, 5- 9 p.m., at Bourbon Street, 316 Guilford Ave.,
Baltimore. Bring a clothing item, non-perishable food or $10 for entry.
Baltimore Brings Special Delivery for Families in Need
Reginald F. Lewis’ Descendants Honor
Legacy of Late Business Mogul
Courtesy Photo
The Baltimore Entertainment Association
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American A9
NNPA HIV/AIDS Series
As you may know, Dec. 1 was World AIDS Day, a day
when we call attention to a pandemic that has touched so
many of us. According to a recent survey by the Kaiser Family
Foundation, nearly 60 percent of Black Americans knows
someone who is living with or has died of HIV/AIDS. And
we have been signifcantly and disproportionately affected by
this disease, accounting for half of the more than 1 million
Americans living with HIV/AIDS today, while representing
just 13 percent of the population.
This is unconscionable.
June 2011 will mark 30 years since the frst case of HIV
was diagnosed. The moment brings not only an opportunity for
refection, but also for a renewed commitment from each of us
to do our part to end the spread of this disease.
AIDS has been robbing us of our future for far too long,
but we are better positioned now than ever before to do
something about it. This July, President Obama released the
National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS), the nation’s frst-
ever coordinated response to the epidemic. In doing so, the
president put AIDS back on the public agenda. One of the
goals of the NHAS is to increase the quality of care being
given to Blacks who are HIV-positive, which should result
in better health outcomes for those infected, as well as fewer
new transmissions of HIV. The NHAS also seeks to lower the
number of annual new infections by 25 percent by 2015, from
56,300 to 42,225.
That’s why we’re proud to tell you about our new
partnership with Greater Than AIDS, a new, national
movement to unite and mobilize Americans in response to
the AIDS crisis in our country, in particular the devastating
epidemic facing Black Americans. As part of The National
Newspaper Publishers Association, a 70-year-old federation of
more than 200 Black community newspapers from across the
United States, we will be working with Greater Than AIDS on
a year-long effort to increase attention to HIV/AIDS on our
pages as well as in our communities, through special events
that use the occasion of the 30th anniversary to spark new
conversations about HIV/AIDS in Black America. We will also
be tracking implementation of the National HIV/AIDS strategy
in our communities.
This partnership is a continuation of our longtime
collaboration with the Black AIDS Institute. You can count
on us to keep you updated on the work being done by local,
state, and federal agencies as well as community-based
organizations to achieve these goals. We will let you know
what’s working – and what isn’t. And we’ll let you know what
you can do to help.
You also have an important role to play. Greater Than AIDS
recently launched the “Deciding Moments” campaign which
highlights everyday opportunities to take a stand against HIV/
AIDS – to be “greater than” the disease. With each of us doing
our part, together we can change the course of this epidemic.
Are you Greater Than AIDS? Get started by visiting www.
greaterthan.org to learn more. And, check back with us for
more information and resources throughout the year.
NNPA Foundation
Re: ‘First Lady Accused of Not Rubbing Elbows Often
Enough with DC’s Elite’
I am extremely disappointed by the article about Michelle
Obama written by Dorothy Rowley and published on Afro.
com. It is pretty much a reproduction of a very unfair and
PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED accusation by Richard Wolffe
who has written several articles attaching the frst lady. A
simple Google search will confrm this. Ms. Rowley had the
golden opportunity here to make clear that the frst lady has
been very effective in opening the White House to many
thousands such as military families and less represented, well
deserving groups in this country. Furthermore Michelle Obama
has done well networking among many infuential publics as is
clear by the broad-base of support for her initiatives within and
outside Washington. These were hard won partnerships and
alliances that the frst lady has forged with many individuals
and group.
Please, I beg of you, if you intend to represent AFRO issues
at any level, please do not promote this type of reporting! It is
fne for Ms. Rowley to reference the work of Mr. Wolffe, but
not to do so without clearly showing the alternative arguments
and evidence which are not hard to fnd. As just a member of
the public I could sit down and gather this.
Thank you for your attention.

Leo Douglas
New York, N.Y.
As a result, mistakes are being made,
both accidentally and intentionally.
Examples of banks and loan servicing
companies ignoring or contravening laws
governing the foreclosure process have
been found in every state.
Foreclosure paperwork is being signed
with no oversight nor inspection. In some
cases, critical documents have even been
created out of thin air after being lost in
the electronic system – and, then, illegally
notarized.
Some banks and loan servicers have
admitted to engaging in these defective
practices. They insist, however, that the
legal defects in their foreclosure claims
are merely technical.
I disagree. For any family falling
victim to these failures to follow the
law, the law’s foreclosure rules are not
mere technicalities; they are due process
protections designed to protect the
biggest investment of our lives.
As a nation, we must do better than this. Homeowners
who are current in their payments, those legitimately seeking
mortgage modifcations and those who paid cash for their
homes must not have their American dream turned into a
nightmare.
Every foreclosure should be closely scrutinized. Our
fundamental right to due process is at stake.
That is why I called upon Maryland’s governor and
attorney general in October to take immediate action to
ensure that no Maryland family is unjustifably evicted or
denied due process. We then joined with the entire Maryland
congressional delegation to urge Maryland’s highest court to
do its part in defending the integrity of our laws.
The Maryland Court of Appeals wasted no time enacting
emergency rules to address the faws plaguing our system.
As a result of these rules, attorneys fling questionable
paperwork must now appear personally before a court to fle
“corrective affdavits” admitting that the original affdavits
they submitted (declaring personal knowledge of the
underlying documents and facts) were not actually signed by
them.
In Washington, I have recommended to my congressional
colleagues that they, too, ask their state courts to intervene. I
have pointed out that the law should apply equally to banks
and homeowners.
This is not a question of Black or White, rich or poor. It is
an issue of what is right and what is clearly wrong.
As elected offcials, we are charged with doing all that we
can to protect those who placed their trust in us. That is why
I will remain vigilant, working with Gov. O’Malley, Attorney
General Gansler, our Court of Appeals and our Legislature
until we stop fraudulent foreclosure practices.
Together, we can do a better job of protecting our
neighbors’ homes – and our own.
Congressman Elijah Cummings represents Maryland’s
7th Congressional District in the United States House of
Representatives.
In the midst of our
holiday season, we must
not lose sight of the harsh
reality that far too many of
our neighbors continue to
lose their homes through
foreclosure – a challenge
that we all have a personal
stake in overcoming.
The foreclosure crisis
still gripping our nation is a
formidable obstacle to our
economic recovery. All told,
more than 2.5 million homes
have been lost to foreclosure
since the “Great Recession”
started in December 2007. Another 3.3 million homes could
be lost to foreclosure during the next four years.
In October, there were an estimated 25 percent more
foreclosures nationally than in October 2009.
This foreclosure crisis will not vanish on its own; and its
impact will not be limited to people who bought homes they
could not afford. We must continue to do all we can to stop
the tide.
Locally, I will be hosting my ffth Foreclosure Prevention
Seminar on Dec. 18 at Woodlawn Senior High School in
Gwynn Oak. Homeowners interested in attending can register
online at http://www.cummings.house.gov.
The purpose of these workshops is to help people who
are delinquent on their mortgages and facing potential
foreclosure get the information and resources they need to
hold onto their homes. Experts will provide assistance to
people who are seeking to re-fnance or who need reductions
in their current monthly mortgage payments or interest rates.
Even as we work to save our neighbors’ homes here in
Baltimore, the avalanche of foreclosures has revealed serious
legal issues, as well economic hardship, both nationally and
here in Maryland.
News reports suggest that some banks and mortgage
servicing companies have decided to handle foreclosures at
breakneck speed in order to reap as much proft as possible.
Opinion
Elijah Cummings
Protecting Our Homes
Rep. Charles Rangel
(D- N.Y.) is now in the
record books as the frst
member of Congress to be
censured in 30 years. While
the punishment was overkill,
somehow Black politicians
must know by now that
Blacks can’t get away with
the same misdeeds that can
be normal for their White
colleagues.
Despite talk of a
post-racial society Black
politicians still operate under
a double standard that means
they had better fy right or
not at all. History shows that if Black leaders are establishment
puppets like U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, the
White power system will protect them, but if they are strategic
to Black progress, they are watched, targeted and infrequently
destroyed. Slipups or mistakes that might be forgiven if only
the wrongdoers were White become virtually hanging offenses.
In the history of the Congress 31 members have been
censured – 22 in the House and nine in the Senate. Rangel’s
conduct does not measure up to the immoral and unethical
conduct of the White congressmen who preceded him in
infamy.
In 1983, U.S. Rep. Gerry Studds of Massachusetts was
censured for having sex with a male teenage page. In 1990
U.S. Sen. Daniel Durenberger of Minnesota was censured for
the unethical practice of converting campaign contributions to
personal use.
The Ethics Committee found that Rangel’s ethical
violations were the result of sloppy record-keeping and that
they did not result in personal fnancial gain and there was no
evidence of corruption. So if the House were not playing by
the rule of “different strokes for different folks,” either the case
would have been dismissed or a reprimand would have been in
order. Censure, the next step to expulsion, was much too harsh.
One of Rangel’s biggest violations was his failure to
pay some back taxes until the ethics committee got win of
it. Yet when it was disclosed during confrmation hearings
that Timothy Geithner did not pay $34,000 in taxes while
heading the International Monetary Fund, this misconduct was
dismissed as “an honest mistake,” and he went on to become
Treasury secretary whose job includes ensuring citizens pay
their taxes.
When are progressive Black leaders going to learn that they
can’t play by the same rules of their White colleagues and think
they will be treated fairly?
A larger question is why didn’t Rangel learn from the 1970
ethics quandary that brought down civil rights legend Adam
Clayton Powell Jr.? Rangel, who was then a young rising star
state legislator, used Powell’s ethical problems against him in
his campaign to successfully unseat Powell.
Powell was knee-deep in reported ethics violations, which
included taking trips abroad with public money and having his
third wife, Yvette Diago, on his congressional payroll with no
evidence she was earning her keep.
Tragically, Powell and Rangel share other bitter ironies.
Under pressure, Rangel recently stepped down from chair of
the powerful Ways and Means Committee, the chief tax-writing
committee of the House. It was the frst time a Black person
had risen to that level of power in the House.
In 1967, Powell was stripped of the chairmanship of the
powerful Education and Labor Committee, where he had soared
as one of the chief architects of social legislation in the nation.
He was also instrumental in passing legislation that made
lynching a federal crime, as well as bills that desegregated
public schools
Following a Judiciary Committee investigation, the full
House refused to seat Powell. Powell fought the exclusion
through the courts and in June 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court
ruled that Powell had to be seated because the House had
acted unconstitutionally, a move that was blocked because of
Rangel’s successful electon win.
As Rangel was being censured, heads were also spinning
in Prince George’s County, Md., where two Black elected
offcials, outgoing County Executive Jack Johnson and his
wife, Leslie, who was recently elected to the County Council,
were arrested on numerous federal corruption charges. When
arrested, Mrs. Johnson was reported to have nearly $80,000
hidden in her bra.
Johnson is another politician who had won respect for his
work in developing the county, which prides itself in being
the wealthiest predominately Black county in the nation. Yet,
the county also had a reputation that in order to get contracts,
people had to “pay to play.” That system may have worked
for Johnson’s White predecessors but it is proving to be his
undoing.
Maybe some day, progressive Black politicians can
take stock of their true value, which far exceeds personal
reputations. When they fall, opportunities for their constituents
decrease, as well as collective pride.
All politicians are not created equal.
Dr. Barbara Reynolds is a journalist, author, minister and
professor and lives in Prince George’s County, Md.
All Politicians Are Not Created Equal
Barbara A.
Reynolds
Letters to the Editor
A10 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010
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December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American B1
On Dec. 4, The Reginald F. Lewis Museum 2010 Awards Gala honored three outstanding
African- American members of the Maryland legal community who have made signifcant
contributions in the areas of service, achievement and philanthropy.
Dr. Leslie King- Hammond welcomed over 500 guests to the frst annual gala. Loida
Lewis, president, Reginald F. Lewis Foundation, and Dr. David Terry, executive director
of the museum, along with the Fugett family, unveiled the Reginald F. Lewis Bronze
Portrait. Gabriel Koren, an artist whose work concentrates on members of
the African diaspora whose lives and work have impacted contemporary
culture, sculpted the life-sized bronze portrait of Reginald F. Lewis.
The Hon. Robert M. Bell was the 2010 gala honorary chair and
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin gave the keynote address. The event
sponsors were Miles & Stockbridge P.C., the AFRO,
and PNC. Action Business Systems,
Boordy Vineyards, Carbon
Fibre Media, city of
Baltimore, the mayor’s
ofce, and Enterprises
Holdings were
among the silent
auction vendors.
For the second year, the Patapsco River chapter of The Links successfully hosted the Denim and Diamonds
Bull Roast to provide funds for Baltimore County students enrolled at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
(HBCUs).
Each year since 1993, the chapter has funded two students who are also mentored throughout
their four-year college tenure. Proceeds from the bull roast have also
allowed the chapter to fund additional initiatives throughout the
year, such as promoting national
organ donor awareness,
childhood obesity,
S.T.E.M.(science,
technology,
engineering and
math), education
and career readiness
causes.
More than 30 students
have been sponsored
since the scholarship
program began.
Photos by J.D. Howard
Photos by A. Lois De Laine
Danielle Hotten and mother,
the Hon. Michele D. Hotten,
honoree
Wanda Q. Draper,
mistress of
ceremony, WBAL
News 11
Larry S. Gibson, LLB, professor
of law; Victor March, newest
board member of RFLM and
Arnold Williams
Honoree,
Phoebe A.
Haddon, LLM,
dean, University
of Maryland
School of Law
Guests at
the auction
Sen. John Sarbanes, D-Md., Dawna
S. Baker, director of development for
RFLM; Dr. David Taft Terry, executive
director of RFLM and Sen. Benjamin L.
Cardin
Rev. Dr. Harold Carter Sr.,
pastor of New Shiloh Baptist
Church and Loida Lewis
Sculptor
Gabriel Koren
Music
provided by
Night Life
Honoree and
family table
Michele D. Hotten
Eddie Brown
and wife
Guests enjoyed the
festivities
Jean S. Fugett Jr., Mr. and Mrs.
Fugett Sr., Loida Lewis, Dr. David
T. Terry, and Gabriel Koren, artist
of Brooklyn, N.Y.
David
Bedingfeld and
Dawna Baker
The Hon. Andre
M. Davis, Judge,
U.S. Court of
Appeals for the
Fourth District
The Patapsco River Chapter
of The Links
Del. Adrienne Jones,
Baltimore County
Executive Kevin
Kamentz snd Dr.
Lavinia Fitzpatrick
Dr. Crystal Watkins
Johansson and Dr.
Roselyn Hammond
Dr. Alison Riddle-Fletcher, Kim De Laine, Donnice
Brown, Judge Vicki Ballou-Watts, Anita Hunter
and LaVerne Gaither
Dr. Brenda Bowe Johnson,
Donnice Brown, president,
and Peggy Brown
Rose Wiggins, Bill
Walker and Roland
Merritt, standing
Dr. Phillip and
Paula Byrd
Dr. Gina McKnight-
Smith, Llauryn
Iglehart-Howard and
Lisa Settles
Bill and
Doris Cooke
Judge Sylvester
Cox, Erin Cox,
Kathy Alexander
and Gerald Smith
Dr. Thelma
T. Daley and
Dr. Bishetta
Merritt,
Eastern Area
director
Pat Tunstall and
Gains Lansey
Mary Hester-Clifton
and Michelle Brown
Mosley
Carter Womack,vice president of
marketing, Who’s Who Publishing;
Cassandra Bozeman, CEO, Who’s
Who Publishing and Marvin “Doc”
Chetham, president, Baltimore City
NAACP
The Delandria
Mills Quartet
Natalie West-Makel, Beatrice
Payne, 101, the oldest living
Bowie State University alumnus
and Sheila Dews Johnson
Sharifa Gavins, Colleen Pleasant
Kline and Maria Smith
Event emcees Terry
Owens and Karen
Parks
Calvin Boston, Carter Womack,
Renee Starlynn Allen and Jerrod
Mustof
Chris Vaughn, Cynthia Moore,
Herman Williams and Pat
Roberts
Herman Williams,
former chief and Kevin
Cartwright, chief
information
ofcer, Baltimore
City Fire Department
Dr. Gary Burton, Karen Parks, Faith
Thomas and Randy Proctor
Photos by Bill
Tabron
Since the mid-1800s the term “Who’s Who”has connoted the crème de
la crème of a society. And in the frst ever Who’s Who in Black Baltimore
the city’s best and brightest in media, business, government, the arts
and other segments of the community were recognized. The inaugural
tome—and its honorees—were feted Nov. 30 in an
evening celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis
Museum in downtown
Baltimore.
B2 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
: Muse 1011074 2
K
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The Afro American (Baltimore)
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Free Business Financial Review You have a lot on your mind every day – meetings, inventory, delivery dates and, of course,
fnances. At Wachovia, we’re here to help. With our Free Business Financial Review, we’ll work with you to evaluate your
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www.afro.com
Book Review: President Obama’s ‘Of Thee I Sing’
By Rosa
Pryor
ENJOY THE
HOLIDAYS
Hello, my dear friends. I
hope you and your family are
enjoying this festive month.
By the time you read this,
my “Boo-Boo” and I will be
packing up our RV to hit the
road to LAS VEGAS! We will
be leaving on Dec. 17. We
are planning to make stops
in all the cities in between,
but our fnal destination will
be parked in Sam’s Town RV
Resort in the heart of Las
Vegas. We should be returning
on Jan. 8 if I don’t hit the big
jackpot.

My goal is to make sure
that you know what is going
on in Baltimore while I am
away. Believe me, there is a
lot going on.

First, I want to tell you
about this very nice restaurant
that just opened up in a
new location. I know you
remember I wrote about
this restaurant before in
another location, but that
didn’t happen for whatever
reason. This time, it is a
sure thing. The restaurant
is called Chef Mac’s & All
That Blues Restaurant. It is
located at 4709 Harford Road.
The hours of operation are
Monday-Thursday noon-8
p.m.; Friday and Saturday,
noon-9 p.m. and Sunday they
are closed. The menu will
included a seafood buffet
on Fridays, prime ribs and
barbecue buffet on Saturdays.
The resurant defnitely has a
bayou infuence with items
like blackened burgers Cajun
grilled chicken, crawfsh
and jambalaya. My favorite,
favorite thing is that they have
live blues entertainment on
the weekend. I think that is
awesome! It will be so nice
to have dinner while listening
to blues entertainment instead
of jazz. What a welcome
change. For more information
and reservation, call 310-319-
6227.

M&J Promotions presents
a “Winter Gospel Fest” on
Dec. 11, starting at 6 p.m.
You know on these programs,
they don’t give you a time
ending because you never
know what time a gospel
show going to end with all the
shouting, dancing, praising
the Lord. So be on time at the
Faith Community Church,
located at 1306 Marlboro
Road in Lothian, Md. This
program includes the Gospel
Pearls, Lil’ David & Bells of
Joy, Spiritual Voices, Voices
of Ministry and Pat Crawford
& One Spirit. I am sorry, I do
not have a contact number for
you, but you call always call
the church.

One more thing I must
mention is the Wesley
Memorial United Methodist
Church, which is presenting
their “Family Friends and
Guest Day Bazaar” at
5602 Johnnycake Road in
Baltimore on Dec. 11, 11 a.m.
until 7 p.m. You will taste
food from all over the world
from vendors prepared dish
and hear live music. For more
information, call Charlotte
Martin-Wade, at 443-278-
3211, or Wesley Memorial
Church at 410-744-5462.

I don’t have much space,
but I must tell you about
the Buffalo Soldiers MC of
Central Maryland Holiday
Celebration 10th Anniversary,
which is on Dec. 17, 8 p.m.
until 1 a.m. For a night of
dinning, laughter and dancing
while listening to one of the
baddest groups in Baltimore
named the Panama Band
along with Magic 95.9 radio
personality, Tim Watts and
comedian, “Alabama,” there
is no end to the fun you can
have. The event will be held
at Tall Cedars Hall; 2501
Putty Hill Ave. in Baltimore.
For ticket information, call
410-258-7005 or 410-367-
6270.

Well folks, I really have
to go now. I am out of space.
If you need me, call me at
410-833-9474 or e-mail me at
rosapryor@aol.com. UNTIL
THE NEXT TIME, I’M
MUSICALLY YOURS.
Big Daddy Stallings and the Bluez Evolution Band will be
live at the Grand Opening of Chef Mac’s & All that Blues
Restaurant at 4709 Harford Road on Friday and Saturday,
Dec. 17 and 18. For more information, call 410-319-6227.
$400
Baltimore Chapter Continental Societies Inc.
$300
Marion Seabrooks
National Coalition of 100 Black Women
Baltimore Metropolitan Chapter
$250
Barbara C. Motley
$125
The Emmanuel Church
$100
Henry Goode
The Baltimore Alpha Wives, Inc.
Theresa Barnett
Union Memorial United Methodist Church
Denise Simmons Graves
LaVerne Vance
United Ushers of Baltimore Inc.
$50
Brenda Jews
Public Safety Assistant Program
$25
Calvin L. Tolbert
Ellen Hill
Mike’s Bail Bonds Inc.
The Blake Family
Myra Richardson
Ellen Dutton
Rotha Freeman
$20
Amy Dunlap
Mary Hill
Audrey Mason
$11.50
An Anonymous Giver
$5
Delmar Davis
Barbara Johnson
Total:
2,411.50
Family Adoptions:
Loretta Bond and Family
The Gould Family
Bikes
OMEGAS
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American B3
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta
Recipients of the 2010 Kennedy Center Honors, including from left, dancer/
choreographer/director Bill T. Jones, Paul McCartney, and Oprah Winfrey, react to
President Barack Obama’s introduction to McCartney, during a reception in the East
Room of the White House, Dec. 5. The trio, along with country music icon Merle
Haggard and Broadway bigwig Jerry Herman, were later feted at the annual star-
studded award ceremony at the Kennedy Center. The show will be broadcast Dec. 28
on CBS.
By Kam Williams
Special to the AFRO
While best known as
the founder, producer, and
mastermind behind the
Wu-Tang Clan, RZA has
built an incredibly diverse
and successful career as a
musician, a composer of flm
scores, a producer, an actor,
a businessman, a player and
advocate of chess, and as the
author of the best-selling The
Tao of Wu and The Wu-Tang
Manual.
He was born Robert
Fitzgerald Diggs in
Brownsville, Brooklyn,
on July 5, 1969, and frst
surfaced on the hip-hop scene
during the early 1990s. After
brief stints as a member of
the group All in Together
Now and as a solo artist under
the name Prince Rakeem, he
formed the Wu-Tang Clan in
1992. Based in Staten Island
the band went on to become
one of the most successful
and infuential hip-hop groups
of all time.
Their debut
LP, 1993’s Enter
the Wu-Tang (36
Chambers), driven
by RZA’s unique,
groundbreaking
beats and
signature gritty
production style,
has become a
defnitive hip-
hop classic and is
revered as one of
the greatest hip-
hop albums ever.
Meanwhile, he has
released several
solo albums under
his own name,
under that of his hedonistic
alter ego, Bobby Digital, and
also as Digital Bullet, Birth of
a Prince, and, most recently,
Digi Snax.
An avid chess player,
RZA created WuChess.com,
the world’s frst online hip-
hop chess community. At the
website, hip-hop fans can learn
to play from chess masters,
compete for scholarships and
square-off against him and
other hip-hop celebrities.
RZA is a Grammy Award-
winning music producer,
with a distinguished body
of work scoring movies for
flmmakers such as Ridley
Scott, Jim Jarmusch and
Quentin Tarantino. His
acting credits include Due
Date, Repo Men, Ghost Dog,
The Killers, Funny People,
American Gangster, Life
is Hot in Crack Town and
Derailed.
Here, he talks about his
latest outing playing Mouss
in The Next Three Days, an
action-thriller directed by
Academy Award-winner Paul
Haggis and co-starring a
couple of other Oscar-winners
in Russell Crowe and Liam
Neeson.
KW: … I really enjoyed
“The Next Three Days,” an
edge-of-the-seat thriller that
takes you on an exciting roller
coaster ride.
RZA: I loved it, too.
Those last 40 minutes were
adrenaline-flled.
KW: What was it like to
work with a trio of Academy
Award-winners in Paul
Haggis, Russell Crowe and
Liam Neeson?
RZA: Oh, man, it was a
pleasure and a great learning
experience. When you’re
dealing with the cream of the
crop, all that does is make
me sharper. My having a
chance to work around those
gentlemen has helped me
become better at what I do.
I couldn’t have asked for a
better acting credit to add to
my resume.
KW: Harriet Pakula
Teweles asks: What’s it like to
play a drug dealer?
RZA: [LOL] It was cool,
because I played a cop in the
last flm I did with Russell
Crowe [American Gangster].
So, to be on the other side of
the law this time was a lot of
fun, and a nice challenge for
me.
KW: Harriet also
says: Some soundtracks
try to manipulate the
viewer’s feelings by having
a heavenly chorus suddenly
start singing when your
emotions are being played
upon. How do you use music
when scoring a flm? To
shape and frame the action?
To manipulate the viewer’s
emotions?
RZA: I do incorporate
those elements into my
scoring. When scoring,
empathy is the key. And it
is just as important to use
music to express the actors’
emotions as it is to move the
audience.
KW: Larry Greenberg
says: You’ve got a lot of aka
names. Do any of them come
with their own persona or
swag?
RZA: The answer to
that is “Yes!” Actually, most
people have many different
personalities. I’ve just learned
to identify them and to name
them.
KW: When is your next
album, “The Cure,” fnally
coming out?
RZA: That’s something I
haven’t been able to answer
for 10 years. [Laughs] I know
my fans who are interested in
this subject are getting tired of
hearing it, but all I can say is,
“I got it!”
KW: You’re a renaissance
man who does acting,
directing, producing,
performing, recording,
scoring movies, and more.
Which is your favorite?
RZA: I guess I feel more
inclined towards this or that
form of artistic expression at
different times. Right now, I
feel very hyped-up about the
work I’m doing in front of the
camera on the silver screen.
It brings me joy to hear that
people are laughing
at my scene in Due
Date. And I had
some buddies with
me at the premiere
of The Next Three
Days, and they were
happy to see me get
aggressive, because
they remember
me being like that
when I was younger.
However, I’d say
that directing is in
my heart. And that’s
where my focus is,
like a laser beam.
That’s what I’ve been
studying for a long
time, and I think that
everything that I’ve done
before has contributed to the
development of my craft as a
director.
KW: Who would you
like to act opposite as a
love interest in a romantic
comedy?
RZA: Hmm… Hollywood
is full of some of the most
beautiful people in the world.
‘The Next Three Days’ Interview
Renaissance RZA
BE ONE OF THE FIRST 50 PEOPLE TO
DOWNLOAD TWO (ADMIT ONE) PASSES TO
THE ADVANCE SCREENING.
TO DOWNLOAD PASSES, GO TO
WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP
AND TYPE IN THE CODE AAWNRE6 .
SCREENING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14TH AT A BALTIMORE-AREA THEATER.
IN THEATERS DECEMBER 17
WWW.THEFIGHTERMOVIE.COM
INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO A
SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING
No purchase necessary. Supplies are limited. Two passes per person. Each pass admits one. Seating is NOT guaranteed and on a
frst-come, frst-served basis. Employees of all promotional partners, Paramount Pictures, and The Afro American are not eligible. All
decisions are fnal. This flm is rated R. No one under 17 will be admitted without a parent or legal guardian.
Russell Crowe and
RZA star in The Next
Three Days
Courtesy Photo
I wouldn’t mind being in a
movie with any one of those
pretty girls. It would take me
an hour to answer that question,
but I would love to star in a
romantic comedy. [LOL]

KW: I know you love
movies, especially karate
movies. What is your favorite
movie of all time, and what
is your favorite martial arts
movie of all time?
RZA: You can’t ask a
movie buff like me that kind
of question. I’d like to ask
you that type of question and
see if you can answer it.
KW: No, I couldn’t either.
I have a hard time just picking
my favorite flm of the year.
Most critics put out an annual
Ten Best List, but I put out a
Hundred Best List because I
like so many movies.
RZA: See? I understand
exactly! I can say this,
though. The one kung fu flm
that has inspired me the most
is called The 36th Chamber
of Shaolin. It’s been a great
inspiration to me.
KW: Somebody told me
that you’re from a very large
family. Is that true?
RZA: That’s super-duper
true! [Chuckles]…At least a
1,000 in my extended family,
easily. My mother had 11
kids. ODB’s [The late Ol’
Dirty Bastard] father and my
grandmother are brother and
sister. His mother had eight
children, and they all had a
lot of babies. And all of these
people live right here in the
fve boroughs of New York.
KW: …What advice do
you have for anyone who
wants to follow in your
footsteps?
RZA: Do the knowledge,
meaning: look, listen,
observe, and also respect.
If you do that, you’ll have
a strong foundation to build
anything you want to do in
life upon. Know before you
do. Look before you leap.
And if you want to follow in
my footsteps, make sure you
step in the ones that went in
the right direction.
Oprah Among Kennedy Honorees
B4 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
REITA K. CARROLL
9/2/34 -11/17/10
Baltimore - Reita K. Carroll, a resident of the Owings
Mills area, passed away on November 17, 2010 at St. Agnes
Hospital.
Born in 1934 in Baltimore, MD, Reita was a graduate of
Frederick Douglass High School, and some years later, fur-
thered her education at Catonsville Community College and
The College of Notre Dame. Retia retired from the Social
Security Administration as a labor relations specialist.
She is survived by her husband, Ben Carroll; children,
Jay Carroll, Rita Carroll, Byran Carroll and Dawn Jiggetts;
six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, all of whom brought great
joy to her life.
A Memorial Service will be held on December 11, 2010 from 2-5 pm
at Diamondz Event Center, located at 9980 Liberty Road, Randallstown,
Maryland 21133.
michael eric dyson
THE
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NOW LEASING for March occupancy, call today!
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3430 Associated Way • Owings Mills, MD 21117
Faith Pulse
Dec. 11
Enjoy classical favorites and favorite classics at a free Christmas Concert with Ruby Weston
and Charles T. Hayes, 7 p.m. at the Eubie Black Cultural Arts Center, Fourth foor, 847 N.
Howard St.
The opportunity is extended to purchase a toy or item of clothing to help the National
Women’s Prison Project provide holiday cheer to children whose parent or parents are
incarcerated. Articles will be accepted at 1701 Madison Ave., Suite 505., for the Dec. 11 party
at the Maryland Correctional Facility for Women in Jessup and on Dec. 21 at Payne Memorial
AME Church. For more information call NWPP at 410-233-3385 or visit NWPP-INC.com.
Dec. 14
There’s still time to help the Dads of Christopher Place provide Christmas for their children.
Contact the Greater Baltimore Urban League to donate new toys and other articles and to
participate in the frst gift wrapping event, 6 p.m. at the League location, 512 Orchard St. For
more information, call 410-523-8150.
Dec. 18
Whitestone Baptist Church will observe its 18th Patsy Paige Memorial Fellowship Dinner,
a community outreach initiative, noon, at 3001 Baker St. For more information, call the church
at 410-947-1863 or visit whitestonebaptist.org. The Revs. Drs. Elmore E. Warren Jr. is pastor of
the church.
Dec. 19
Enjoy the Christmas Concert, with excerpts of The Messiah, with the Music Ministry of the
New Shiloh Baptist Church, 2100 N. Monroe St., 6 p.m. For more information, call the church
at 410-523-5306 or visit newshilohbaptist.org. The Revs. Drs. Harold A. Carter Sr. and Harold
A. Carter Jr. pastor the church.
Roland “Joe” Smith presents a Reunion Celebration with past choir members, 3:30 p.m.,
at Gillis Memorial Christian Community Church, 4016 Park Heights Ave. Liberty Grace’s
Adoration Choir is the special guest. For more information call the church at 410-466-2800 or
visit gillismemorial.org. The Revs. Dr. Theodore C. Jackson Jr. and Melvin Jackson share the
pastorate of the church.
Dec. 26
Overseer Herbert Crump II is the special guest for the 10 a.m. Praise Celebration to close
out the year at Greater Paradise Christian Center, 2900 E. Oliver St. The Rev. Shawn Bell is the
host pastor. For more information, call the church at 410-276-4193 or visit greaterparadise.org.
Faith Bytes
In late November the leadership of the nine largest historically Black denominations
announced the launch of The Conference of National Black Churches (CNBC). The
organization, representing a combined membership of more than 30 million people and 50,000
congregations throughout the United States and the African Diaspora, aims to fll the void
for a unifed voice of faith advocating on behalf of African Americans and other underserved
populations on health, education, social justice, and economic empowerment issues.
The CNBC held its frst annual consultation titled, “For the Healing of Our People,
from Dec. 7, at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C. The gathering of faith and
community leaders addressed targeted social and economic issues, provide clergy and lay
leaders training in public policy, and honor African American leaders from both the private and
public sectors.
“This holiday season’s heightened focus will be on the hardships and economic challenges
facing many in our churches and across the country,” said Dr. W. Franklyn Richardson,
chairman of CNBC’s Board of Directors. “For that reason we chose this time and season to
offcially launch the Conference of National Black Churches. We are focused on channeling
our unique voice of faith into advocacy to produce sustainable solutions to pressing
issues. The upcoming conference is the beginning of our long-term efforts of working together
using the power of the faith community, the private sector and legislators to resolve the
challenges we face.”
During the three-day gathering, where more than 300 were expected, guest participants
include: Dr. James A. Forbes Jr., president of Healing of the Nations Foundations; Marian
Wright Edelman, founder and President of the Children’s Defense Fund; Dr. Michael L.
Lomax, president and CEO of the UNCF; The Rt. Rev. Sarah Francis Davis, presiding bishop
from the 16th Episcopal District of the AME Church, which includes Haiti; the Rev. Dr.
Dwight D. Jones, mayor of Richmond, Va.; and Dr. Frederick D. Haynes III, senior pastor of
Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas, Texas.
On Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m., an ecumenical service with preaching by Bishop Charles E. Blake
Sr., presiding bishop of the Church of God in Christ (COGIC) was opened to the public and
held at Israel Baptist Church, 1251 Saratoga Ave., N.E. And on Dec. 9, a gala dinner was held
at 7:30 p.m. honoring The Honorable Andrew Young; Pernessa C. Seele, founder and CEO of
Balm in Gilead; and Black Enterprise magazine founder and publisher Earl G. Graves Sr.
The Conference of National Black Churches (CNBC) is comprised of the national
leadership of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME); African Methodist Episcopal
Zion Church (AMEZ); Christian Methodist Episcopal Church (CME); Church of God In Christ
(COGIC); Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International (FGBCFI); National Baptist
Convention of America Inc., International (NBCA); National Missionary Baptist Convention
of America (NMBCA); National Baptist Convention U.S.A., Inc.(NBC USA); and Progressive
National Baptist Convention, Inc (PNBC).
CNBC plans to use the infuence and power of the leadership of the historically Black
denominations to serve as a critical organizational base, voice, and infuence to advocate
for African Americans. Through CNBC, the member denominations work collectively to
become a permanent point of inter-denominational coordination for addressing systemic social
change that will ultimately result in improving the quality of life for African Americans and
other underserved populations as they seek to reach their full
potential in American society.
For more information about the Conference of National
Black Churches and annual consultation schedule of
activities, visit www.thecbnc.org.
Black Denominations Launch
Conference of National Black
Churches
afro.com
Your History • Your Community • Your News
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American B5
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B6 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
By Perry Green
AFRO Sports Editor
Baltimore’s Paul L. Dunbar High
School Poets successfully extended their
championship dynasty with a 22-12 win
over the Havre de Grace Warriors, of
Harford County, Md., in the 1A state
title game at M&T Bank Stadium on
Dec. 4.
Dunbar coach Lawrence Smith
said it’s the only goal his team set out
to accomplish on day one of summer
training camp.
“They wanted to sketch their names
in the rich history of Dunbar football,”
Smith said, “And now they have their
own special place in greatness.”
Dunbar (13-1) has now won fve state championships in six years, but this title didn’t come
any easier than the previous ones. Dunbar struggled offensively throughout the entire frst half
of the game, turning the ball over four times and recording just 23 yards of offense, giving
Havre de Grace a 12-0 lead at halftime.
It got so bad that Dunbar moved star junior receiver and safety DeonTay McManus—the
team’s best athlete—to quarterback to try to generate more offensive production, but he also
committed a fumble and tossed an interception.
“That frst half was the worst half of football we played all season long,” Smith said. “But
I’m proud of how we stuck together and kept fghting. We didn’t turn on each other, we kept at
it and that’s why we’re champions.”
Late in the second half, Dunbar managed to erase Havre de Grace’s 12-point lead with
22 unanswered points. Their late-game surge started with a trick play that featured Dunbar
running back Terrance Williams on what looked like a double reverse, tossing it back to fellow
running back Epe Henriques, who then launched an 81-yard touchdown pass to receiver Andre
Davis to cut the lead to 12-6.
Dunbar used a little trickery on special teams, too, as running back/punter Travon Garrett
ran a fake punt for 30 yards deep into the Warriors’ red zone. Dunbar freshman quarterback
Kevin Estep ran in a 1-yard touchdown just a couple plays later to tie the game.
Dunbar took their frst lead, 14-12, when Henriques converted the two-point conversion.
Henriques fnished with a team-high 115 yards and a victory-clinching touchdown late in the
fourth quarter.
Visit afro.com for exclusive video footage and a photo slide of the 1A state football
championship.
More Sports onafro.com
www.afro.com
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
NEW YORK – With bright
lights, a rowdy crowd and
a historic venue, Madison
Square Garden (MSG) offered
a premier showcase for a
selection of college basketball
stars at the ffth annual Big
Apple Classic on Dec. 4.
Opening its doors to
Virginia State, Virginia
Union, Hampton and Howard
universities, the “World’s
Most Famous Arena” treated
traveling alumni, casual fans
and passionate student bodies
to an entertaining afternoon.
Touted as the only Black
college basketball tournament
played at MSG, the tourney
certainly satisfed fans with
the full favor that historically
Black colleges and universities
give to higher education. From
unison drum lines to gyrating
cheerleaders and special guests
that included hip-hop legend
Doug E. Fresh, the tournament
electrifed the crowd on a
chilly day in New York City.
The Virginia Union
Panthers and Virginia State
Spartans tipped things off in
the early game, adding another
chapter to a storied rivalry.
Although it remains one of the
longest matchups in the history
of both schools, the series has
been anything but competitive
over the last few seasons as the
Panthers won its 20th straight
game against the Spartans in a
66-46 victory.
Virginia Union turned a
six-point halftime lead into
a 20-point route, running
Virginia State ragged as nerves
and poor shooting haunted the
Spartans throughout the game.
Virginia State shot 31 percent
from the feld and connected
on just 22 percent of their
three-point attempts.
Senior guard Braxton
Byerson, who led Virginia
Union with 26 points,
connected on fve three-
pointers and even toyed with
the crowd a little, smiling
after each basket. “He’s a
shooter,” said Virginia Union
coach William Coker. “I told
him after the game that I was
proud of him. The second
half he was great but it’s not
what we didn’t expect. We
expected him to play like that.
We practice every day and he
shoots the ball like that. I felt
like if we settle down and play
then that would happen.”
Following the game, there
was a three-way battle of the
bands between Virginia State,
Hampton and Bowie State—
who sent only its band. In a
consolation of sorts, Virginia
State’s band captured the
crown, flling in admirably
where its basketball team fell
short.
Basketball and band
battles weren’t the only focus
of the Big Apple Classic. A
concentration on improving
literacy programs, an essay
contest for high school
students and a college
fair featuring more
than a dozen Black
universities returned
the attention to
education for visitors.
The “Battle of
the Real HU,” the
annual clash between
Howard and Hampton
universities also
returned, this time in a
basketball brawl that
came down to the fnish. The
Hampton Pirates edged the
Howard Bison, 67-55, but not
before they received a scare
from the losing team. Howard
stayed close for much of the
night, but Hampton used a
9-3 run in the middle of the
second half to
break a 41-41 tie.
Hampton extended
their moniker of
the “Real HU” for
the seventh straight
year and also eased
in a little payback
to former coach,
and now Howard
head coach, Kevin
Nickelberry.
“It was
bittersweet,” an
upbeat Nickelberry said after
the game. “Most of those
players played for me so I
know how talented they are.
[Hampton head] coach Joyner
has done a great job and
they’re a good team.”
Stars Shine in Big Apple Classic Tournament
By Keith Henry
Special to the AFRO
The Morgan State
University Bears opened
their Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference season on Dec. 4
with a hard-fought 70-64 win
over cross-town rival Coppin
State University at MSU’s
Hill Field House in Baltimore.
The win improved Morgan
State’s record to 3-4 overall
and 1-0 in the MEAC. The win
also marked
the sixth
consecutive
victory for
Morgan State
against Coppin.
Coppin
State (2-3
overall, 0-1
MEAC)
entered the
game focused
on stopping
Morgan
State junior
star Kevin Thompson, one
of the top post players in
the country. But it was
sophomore forward DeWayne
Jackson who caused a ruckus
for Coppin, scoring a game-
high 24 points.
Thompson entered the
contest averaging 14 points
and 10 rebounds per game,
but was limited to a season-
low seven points and eight
rebounds. Fortunately for
Morgan State, Jackson came
up big, along with or junior
swingman Aric Brooks who
fnished with 13 points and
seven rebounds.
Brooks helped MSU hold
off a second-half surge from
Coppin State. Morgan held a
45-32 lead at halftime, but the
Morgan State Edges Coppin State in MEAC Basketball Season Opener
Courtesy Photo
Howard head
coach Kevin
Nickelberry
Dunbar Tops Havre de Grace in Maryland
1A Championship
By Perry Green
AFRO Sports Editor
It’s no secret that legendary linebacker Ray Lewis is one of
the most important player on the Baltimore Ravens team. But the
14-year veteran is just as important to the Baltimore community.
That’s why Lewis and his mother, Sunseria “Buffy” Smith, were
both honored with Visionary Awards by the Foundation Fighting
Blindness on Nov. 30 at M&T Bank Stadium for their leadership
and generosity in the Baltimore community. Lewis is founder
of The Ray Lewis Foundation, which, among other things, is
dedicated to enhancing the lives of at-risk youth.
“It’s an honor to be recognized by the Foundation Fighting
Blindness. I’m thrilled to be connected to such a great
organization whose main mission is restoring sight. I admire
the Foundation’s commitment and the progress they have made
in helping so many,” said Lewis. “I couldn’t be more proud to
receive a Visionary Award from an organization that itself is so
visionary, leading the way through funding retinal degenerative
research.”
Lewis has and always will credits his mother, vice president
of The Ray Lewis Foundation, for instilling his sense of civic
duty. Smith almost single-handedly organizes and oversees
programs that support children and families in need. One of the
programs that she oversees is an annual Thanksgiving Turkey
Give-Away to unfortunate families in Baltimore City.
“I had a vision when Ray was still in my womb that he was
going to carry a great purpose in life, so I know a little something
about being a visionary,” Smith said . “It’s truly an honor to be
celebrated for your contributions, but Ray knows how much he is
needed in the community and it will always be his vision to take
care of those who need him.”
A few other Baltimore Ravens players were also present in
support of Lewis, including Haloti Ngata and Jarette Johnson.
Besides Lewis and Smith, local businessman David Cordish was
also honored with a Visionary Award. Cordish, chairman of The
Cordish Companies, is known for revitalizing depressed areas,
such as Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, and has helped improve some
of the nation’s most worn down urban communities.
“It’s an absolute honor to receive a Visionary Award from
the Foundation Fighting Blindness. Hard work and focus are
integral to any signifcant endeavor, and the Foundation Fighting
Blindness embodies these qualities,” said Cordish. “I can’t think
of a better cause to support than giving the gift of vision.”
Ray Lewis and Mom Honored by Foundation Fighting Blindness
Courtesy Photo/MSU Media Relations
Bears’ sophomore forward DeWayne
Jackson led his team with 24 points as
Morgan State beat Coppin State, 70-64 on
Dec. 4.
AFRO Photo/John Moore
Down 12–6 to the Warriors of Harve De Grace
High, Senior Travon Garrett takes it to the house
for the Poets second touchdown. Dunbar High
put it all together in the fourth quarter to win
the State 1A title Championship 22–12.
NFL legend Ray Lewis
speaks to audience
after accepting
Visionary Award for
his community service
contributions.
Courtesy Photo/PhotographyBySharon.com
Eagles cut the score to 59-58
at one point in the second half.
“I’m happy about the
win,” Brooks said, “but
we should’ve fnished the
game off better. You got to
be able to keep your foot on
the opponent’s neck. We let
them get back into the game.
But we fnished the game by
hitting free throws, hitting key
shots and making key steals.”
Coppin State junior
forward Hakeem Ellis led his
team with 20 points in the
loss, while guard Tony Gallo
followed with 17 points and
six assists.
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American B7
Community Calendar
MORE THE MERRIER SALE PRICES INEFFECT 12/912/13/10. MERCHANDISE WILL BE ONSALE AT THESE ANDOTHER SALE PRICES NOW
THROUGH1/8/11, EXCEPT AS NOTED.
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EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS!
FRI, DEC. 10: 8AM-11PM & SAT, DEC. 11: 7AM-11PM
HOURS MAY VARY BY STORE. VISIT MACYS.COM AND CLICK ON STORES FOR LOCAL INFORMATION
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FINE & FASHION JEWELRY, WATCHES, SHOES, COATS,
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WOW! PASS
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(EXCEPT SPECIALS & SUPER BUYS)
VALID 12/9-12/13/2010
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses, floor coverings, rugs, electrics/electronics,
cosmetics/fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous purchases, special orders,
selected licensed depts., special purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with
any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer except opening a new Macy’s account.
EXTRA SAVINGS % APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES
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when you use your Macy’s Card or savings pass.
†Exclusions apply; see pass.
VALID 12/9-12/15/10.
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. CANNOT
BE USED ON SPECIALS OR SUPER BUYS
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses,
floor coverings, rugs, electrics/electronics, cosmetics/
fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous
purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special
purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with
any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer,
except opening a new Macy’s account. Dollar savings are
allocated as discounts off each eligible item, as shown on
receipt. When you return an item, you forfeit the savings
allocated to that item. This coupon has no cash value and
may not be redeemed for cash, used to purchase gift cards
or applied as payment or credit to your account. EXTRA
SAVINGS $ APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES. Purchase must be
$50 or more, exclusive of tax and delivery fees.
YOUR PURCHASE OF $50
OR MORE
ALL SALE &
CLEARANCE APPAREL
& SELECT
HOME ITEMS
$
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HOLIDAY DOLLARS
WOW! PASS
VALID 12/9-12/15/10.
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. CANNOT BE
USED ON SPECIALS OR SUPER BUYS
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses,
floor coverings, rugs, electrics/electronics, cosmetics/
fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous
purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special
purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with
any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer,
except opening a new Macy’s account. Dollar savings are
allocated as discounts off each eligible item, as shown on
receipt. When you return an item, you forfeit the savings
allocated to that item. This coupon has no cash value and
may not be redeemed for cash, used to purchase gift cards
or applied as payment or credit to your account. EXTRA
SAVINGS $ APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES. Purchase must be
$50 or more, exclusive of tax and delivery fees.
VALID 12/9-12/15/10.
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. CANNOT
BE USED ON SPECIALS OR SUPER BUYS
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses,
floor coverings, rugs, electrics/electronics, cosmetics/
fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous
purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special
purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with
any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer,
except opening a new Macy’s account. Dollar savings are
allocated as discounts off each eligible item, as shown on
receipt. When you return an item, you forfeit the savings
allocated to that item. This coupon has no cash value and
may not be redeemed for cash, used to purchase gift cards
or applied as payment or credit to your account. EXTRA
SAVINGS $ APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES. Purchase must be
$200 or more, exclusive of tax and delivery fees.
VALID 12/9-12/15/10.
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER. CANNOT
BE USED ON SPECIALS OR SUPER BUYS
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses,
floor coverings, rugs, electrics/electronics, cosmetics/
fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous
purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special
purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with
any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer,
except opening a new Macy’s account. Dollar savings are
allocated as discounts off each eligible item, as shown on
receipt. When you return an item, you forfeit the savings
allocated to that item. This coupon has no cash value and
may not be redeemed for cash, used to purchase gift cards
or applied as payment or credit to your account. EXTRA
SAVINGS $ APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES. Purchase must be
$100 or more, exclusive of tax and delivery fees.
YOUR PURCHASE OF $50
OR MORE
ALL SALE &
CLEARANCE APPAREL
& SELECT
HOME ITEMS
$
15 OFF
HOLIDAY DOLLARS
WOW! PASS
YOUR PURCHASE OF $100
OR MORE
ALL SALE &
CLEARANCE APPAREL
& SELECT
HOME ITEMS
$
25 OFF
HOLIDAY DOLLARS
WOW! PASS
YOUR PURCHASE OF $200
OR MORE
ALL SALE &
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& SELECT
HOME ITEMS
$
5OOFF
HOLIDAY DOLLARS
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$
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wwhheenn yyoouu uusse youurr MMaaccyy’ss CCardd oorr ssaavviinngs passs.
†Exclusions apply; see pass.
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in holiday dollars to make
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It’s the perfect time to get all your holiday
shopping done at Macy’s!
6110072A.indd 1 12/3/10 12:04:53 PM
Dec. 10
Boosting Your Business
with Hot Tips, Technology
The Boys and Girls Club
of Anne Arundel County, 121
S. Villa Ave., Annapolis, Md.
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Find out what
tools you need to grow your
business/organization and the
eighteen things that you must
do to increase your revenue
and level of success before
the end of the year. For more
information: www.60daymbs.
eventbrite.com.
The Friday Night Jazz Party
New Big Easy Lounge,
9820 Liberty Road,
Randallstown, Md. 8-11:30
p.m. Come enjoy great live
entertainment, drinks, food
and more. $5. For more
information: 410-922-1980.
Dec. 11
Heaven 600 Gospel Cruise
Spirit of Baltimore Ship,
Inner Harbor, Light Street,
Baltimore. 12-2 p.m. Come
down to the Inner Harbor
and enjoy lavish all-you-
can eat buffets and live
entertainment. $39-$52. For
more information: 1-866-312-
2469.
Travis Winkey Holiday
Fashion Extravaganza 2010
Lexington Market, 400 W.
Lexington St., Baltimore. 1
p.m. Watch in amazement as
chic models grace the runway
showcasing holiday, winter
and evening trends from local
fashion designers. For more
information: 410-685-6169.
Holiday with the Omegas
2010
BWI Airport Marriott,
1743 Nursery Road,
Baltimore. 8-11 p.m. The
Tau Pi Chapter of Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity will kick off
their centennial celebration
with this event featuring live
music, dancing, door prizes
and more. $75. For more
information: 301-740-3327.
Dec. 12
100 Black Men of Maryland
Holiday Brunch 2010
Martin’s West, 6819
Dogwood Road, Baltimore.
11 a.m.-3 p.m. Come out
and enjoy good food, fun
and music while investing
in the local youth. Support
the drive by bringing an
unwrapped toy. $60. For more
information: 410-664-6726.
Flywire’s Annual Holiday
Party
Mosaic, Power Plant
Live, 4 Market Place,
Baltimore. 6 p.m. Join the
area’s top network for urban
professionals for their annual
holiday party featuring a
cash bar, free hot buffet
and dancing. $25. For more
information: 410-365-1519.
Vattel Cherry’s Soulstation
Joe Squared Pizza &
Bar, 133 W. North Ave.,
Baltimore. 9 p.m. Witness
the sounds of this Baltimore-
based instrumental group. For
more information: 410-545-
0444.
Dec. 14
Making Uncle Sam Work
for You
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Central Branch, 400 Cathedral
St., Baltimore. 6 p.m.
Baltimore CASH will share
tips to show you how to take
advantage of your tax credits.
For more information: 410-
234-2830.
Dec. 15
Web 101: Women
Entrepreneurs of Baltimore
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Govans Branch, 5714 Bellona
Ave., Baltimore. 1 p.m.
Women Entrepreneurs of
Baltimore, a local nonproft
agency, will be holding
an informational session
highlighting their services in
assisting residents start their
own businesses. For more
information: 410-396-6098.
Dec. 16
Merci’ Beaucoup: A Joint
Customer Appreciation
Celebration
Hiram Grand, 1207
Eutaw St., Baltimore. 6:30-9
p.m. Bmorenews.Com will
host this mixer featuring
the area’s most well known
entertainers, personalities
and business professionals.
For more information: www.
bmorenews.eventbrite.com.
Dec. 17
Pieces of a Dream
Rams Head Tavern,
33 West St., Annapolis,
Md. 6:30-7:30 p.m. The
Philadelphia R&B jazz
group Pieces of a Dream will
bring their smooth sounds
to the area. $35. For more
information: 410-268-4545.
BUILDING MATE-
RIAL AUCTION
Howard County
Fairgrounds, December
11 & 12, 2010 Large
selection of build-
ing material. Visit our
website for details. Peak
Auctioneering, www.
peakauction.com
DONATE AUTOS,
TRUCKS, RV’S.
LUTHERAN MISSION
SOCIETY. Your dona-
tion helps local families
with food, clothing,
shelter. Tax deduct-
ible. MVA licensed.
LutheranMissionSoci-
ety.org 410-636-0123
or toll-free 1-877-737-
8567.
DONATE VEHICLE:
Receive $1000 GRO-
CERY COUPONS,
Your Choice, NOAH’S
ARC, NO KILL Animal
Shelters. Advanced
Veterinary Treatments.
Free Towing, IRS
TAX DEDUCTION.
Non-runners 1-866-912-
GIVE
DONATE YOUR
VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION
VOUCHER. UNITED
BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubcf.
info FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-
Runners Accepted,
1-888-468-5964
BUILDING MATE-
RIAL AUCTION
Howard County
Fairgrounds, December
11 & 12, 2010 Large
selection of build-
ing material. Visit our
website for details. Peak
Auctioneering, www.
peakauction.com
DOES YOUR BUSI-
NESS NEED MORE
FOOT TRAFFIC???
Advertise with us in
over 97 newspapers
across Maryland, Dela-
ware and DC. Reach 5.2
million readers weekly
for as little as $14.95 per
paper in our 2x2 Display
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information contact us
at 410-721-4000 x19 or
visit our website: www.
mddcpress.com
AAAA** Donation
DONATE YOUR CAR,
Free Pick-up/Tow,
Any Model or Condi-
tion,
IRS Tax Deductible.
Help Underprivileged
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Outreach Center
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LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET. In original
plastic, never used. Orig
price $3000, Sacrifce
$975. Can deliver. Call
Bill 301-841-7565
Cherry Bedroom Set.
Solid Wood, never used,
brand new in factory
boxes. English Dovetail.
Original cost $4500. Sell
for $895. Can deliver.
Call Tom 240-482-8721
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Financial aid if qualifed
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fast. Financial aid if
qualifed. A new career
is at your fngertips. Call
Centura College 877-
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FINAL..CLOSEOUT..
SALE! 20+ Acres
Mountain Estate with
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only $59,900. was
$155,900. Developer
closing out remaining
mountain parcels way
below cost for immedi-
ate sale. Beautifully
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access Potomac River,
short drive DC..Beltway.
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call 800-888-1262 land-
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For more information
contact us at 410-721-
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August 1, 2009 - August 7, 2009, The Washington Afro-American B7
AD NETWORK
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LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES
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B8 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case No.:
24D10003225
IN THE MATTER OF
BRUCE LEE
CROMARTIE
FOR CHANGE OF
NAME TO
BRUCE LEE
CROMARTIE-
MCPHERSON
ORDER FOR
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
The object of this suit
is to officially change
the name of the peti-
tioner from
Bruce Lee Cromartie
to
Bruce Lee Cromartie-
Mcpherson
It is this 16th day of
November, 2010 by
the Circuit Court for
Baltimore City,
ORDERED, that pub-
lication be given one
time in a newspaper of
general circulation in
Baltimore City on or
before the 16th day of
December, 2010,
which shall warn all
interested persons to
file an affidavit in op-
position to the relief
requested on or be-
fore the 16th day of
January, 2010.
Frank M. Conaway
Clerk
12/10
Archer Western Contractors, Ltd. Is seeking
participation from bona fide subcontractors
and DBE/SBE/MBE subcontractors to bid on
Ronald Reagan National Airport Runway
1-19 Safety Area Improvements and Runway
1 Hold Apron Modification. Solicitation 1-10-
C247. All Subcontractor/Supplier quotes are
due before Friday, December 17th, 2010.
Fax quotes to 404-495-8701. For plan
access, e-mail company name and contact
information to cdukes@walshgroup.com.
Quotes will be evaluated on scope, price,
experience, financial condition, and other
pertinent factors, EOE M/F.
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11037
Provide Electrical Service Replacement at
Franklin Square Elementary School #95
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11037.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website
at https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11037 will be available for
review commencing Friday, December 10,
2010.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, January 6,
2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will
be accepted after that time. Any questions
related to this solicitation should be directed
to the Buyer.
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11042
Provide Boiler Replacement Services at
Baltimore City College High School #480
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11042.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website
at https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11042 will be available for
review commencing Friday, December 10,
2010.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, January 6,
2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will
be accepted after that time. Any questions
related to this solicitation should be directed
to the Buyer.
City of Baltimore
Department of Finance
Bureau of Purchases
Sealed proposals addressed to the Board of
Estimates of Baltimore, will be received until,
but not later than 11:00 a.m. local time on
the following date(s) for the stated
requirements:
DECEMBER 15, 2010
SKI D STEER LOADER B50001739
DECEMBER 22, 2010
HAND AND POWER TOOLS AND RE-
LATED HARDWARE B50001746
THE ENTIRE SOLICITATION DOCUMENT
CAN BE VIEWED AND DOWN LOADED BY
VISITING THE CITYS WEB SITE:
www.baltimorecitibuy.org
AUCTION
AUTOMOBILE
DONATION
BUILDING
SUPPLIES
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
Furniture
MISC.
MISC./TRAINING
MOUNTAIN
PROPERTY
SALES - MISC.
SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids for construction of the Cambridge Wastewater Treatment
Plant ENR Upgrade will be received by the City of Cambridge (herein
called the ∫OWNER∫) at the Department of Public Works, 705 Leonard
Lane, Cambridge, Maryland 21613, until 2:00 p.m., (EST) on January
21, 2011. Said bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at 2:15
p.m. at the Council Chambers, 305 Gay Street, Cambridge, Maryland.
The ENR Upgrade to the City of Cambridge WWTP generally consists
of, but is not limited to, the construction/installation of the following: Filter
Lift Station, Denitrification Filter, Gravity Sludge Thickener, Waste Solids
Building Improvements, replacement of Primary Clarifier Nos. 3 & 5
internals, miscellaneous structures, water quality analyzing instrumenta-
tion, expansion of SCADA system to incorporate new system compo-
nents, methanol and coagulant storage and chemical feed systems, and
associated demolition, site work, and yard piping.
The work also includes all requirements to provide fully finished and
operable facilities including miscellaneous items and operations as shall
be indicated, shown, specified or required to complete the work in strict
conformity with the Contract Documents. The work also includes all
specified, indicated and shown mechanical and electrical equipment,
appliances, appurtenances, furnishings, instrumentation and controls,
accessories, tests and sundry parts and material as shall be necessary
and required for a completely operable installation satisfactory to the
Engineer. The Contractor shall provide all plant, labor, equipment, tools,
appliances, materials and incidentals and shall perform all operations
required to completely finish all of the work in the manner approved by
the Engineer.
A pre-bid meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m., (EST), December 15,
2010 at the City of Cambridge Council Chambers, 305 Gay Street,
Cambridge, Maryland to allow Contractors an opportunity to obtain
information on the project from the Engineer and the Owner. A SITE
VISIT will be held immediately following the meeting.Written questions
(fax @ 410-548-5790 or email: cderbyshire@gmbnet.com) will be
accepted and answered via Addenda if submitted to the Engineer by
5:00 p.m. local time on January 7, 2011. Questions shall include the
project name (Re: Cambridge WWTP ENR Upgrade) in subject heading.
Estimated construction cost: Range $7,500,000 to $9,500,000.
Contract Documents may be examined, at the following locations:
Department of Public Works Reed Construction Data
705 Leonard Lane 30 Technology Pkwy S.
Cambridge, Maryland 21613 Suite 100
Norcross, GA 30092
George, Miles & Buhr, LLC McGraw-Hill Dodge
206 West Main Street MHC Plan Room
Salisbury, Maryland 21801 8501 LaSalle Road
Suite 304
Towson, MD 21286
MD/Washington Minority
Contractor's Association
107 North Point Boulevard
Suite 220
Baltimore, MD 21215
Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained beginning on
Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at the office of GEORGE, MILES & BUHR,
LLC, 206 WEST MAIN STREET, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 21801, upon
the non-refundable payment of Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) for each
set. Checks should be made payable to George, Miles & Buhr, LLC.
Each bid must be accompanied by a Bid Bond payable to the Owner
for five percent (5%) of the total amount of the bid. No bidder may
withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after the actual date of the
opening thereof.
The City of Cambridge reserves the right to reject any and all bids,
and/or waive informalities or irregularities, and/or to accept or reject any
items of any bid, as it may deem best for its interest. The bids will be
evaluated and award will be made to the lowest responsive, responsible
bidder.
Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wage Rates and Regulations apply to this
project.
Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) firms, including Minority
Business Enterprises (MBE) and Women Business Enterprises (WBE)
are encouraged to respond. Contractors are required to provide a good
faith effort in seeking DBE, MBE, and WBE Subcontractors. Certified
Minority Business Enterprises are encouraged to respond to this solici-
tation notice. For additional information visit the MWQFA website:
www.mde.state.md.us/wqfa.
Any contract or contracts awarded under this Advertisement for Bids are
expected to be funded in part by a loan and/or grant from the United
States Environmental Protection Agency, or the Maryland Department of
the Environment.
CITY OF CAMBRIDGE
GEORGE W. HYDE, P.E.
City Engineer
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AFFORDABLE SENIOR HOUSING
If you or a loved one are looking for
affordable housing for seniors (62+)
St. Mary’s Roland View Towers
3838 Roland Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21211
offering effciency, 1-bedroom
and 2-bedroom apartments.
Terrifc Prices: from $433
to $728 - utilities included!
Convenient to Giant, Superfresh,
RiteAid and area shops.
“THE DIZZ” Restaurant on the roof.
Call 410-889-8255 for information.
AFFORDABLE SENIOR HOUSING
DONATIONS
MISC.
“OWNER”)
To Advertise call
410-554-8200
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LEGAL NOTICES
Strictly Personal
Pen Pals
VA area man in Colorado. 70’s, tall, neat, goal reached.
Home bound. Would like to meet lady. James Lincoln, 1380
Detroit, #209, Denver, Colo. 80206
---
Truthful man seeking spiritual pen pals. Womb my emana-
tion. Law is unifcation. Breath, knowledge and conscious-
ness! William Piggie, P.O. Box 565, Pittsboro, N.C. 27312
---
Lonesome Hearts - Pen Pals
To have a notice published in the Strictly Personal Section,
write the message you want printed in the space below.
Enclose ten dollars ($10.00), check or money order for 25
words. NO CASH PLEASE. Additional words will cost 50
cents each.
To answer a Lonesome Heart notice, enclose a check or mon-
ey order for $2.00 for each letter you wish to have forwarded.
NO CASH PLEASE. Be sure to include the fox number of
the person you wish to contact.
All letters, queries and notices should be sent to:
STRICTLY PERSONAL
2519 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
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SUBSCRIBE
TODAY
CAREER CORNER
December 11, 2010 - December 17, 2010, The Afro-American B9
SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids for construction of the Cambridge Wastewater Treatment
Plant ENR Upgrade will be received by the City of Cambridge (herein
called the ∫OWNER∫) at the Department of Public Works, 705 Leonard
Lane, Cambridge, Maryland 21613, until 2:00 p.m., (EST) on January
21, 2011. Said bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at 2:15
p.m. at the Council Chambers, 305 Gay Street, Cambridge, Maryland.
The ENR Upgrade to the City of Cambridge WWTP generally consists
of, but is not limited to, the construction/installation of the following: Filter
Lift Station, Denitrification Filter, Gravity Sludge Thickener, Waste Solids
Building Improvements, replacement of Primary Clarifier Nos. 3 & 5
internals, miscellaneous structures, water quality analyzing instrumenta-
tion, expansion of SCADA system to incorporate new system compo-
nents, methanol and coagulant storage and chemical feed systems, and
associated demolition, site work, and yard piping.
The work also includes all requirements to provide fully finished and
operable facilities including miscellaneous items and operations as shall
be indicated, shown, specified or required to complete the work in strict
conformity with the Contract Documents. The work also includes all
specified, indicated and shown mechanical and electrical equipment,
appliances, appurtenances, furnishings, instrumentation and controls,
accessories, tests and sundry parts and material as shall be necessary
and required for a completely operable installation satisfactory to the
Engineer. The Contractor shall provide all plant, labor, equipment, tools,
appliances, materials and incidentals and shall perform all operations
required to completely finish all of the work in the manner approved by
the Engineer.
A pre-bid meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m., (EST), December 15,
2010 at the City of Cambridge Council Chambers, 305 Gay Street,
Cambridge, Maryland to allow Contractors an opportunity to obtain
information on the project from the Engineer and the Owner. A SITE
VISIT will be held immediately following the meeting.Written questions
(fax @ 410-548-5790 or email: cderbyshire@gmbnet.com) will be
accepted and answered via Addenda if submitted to the Engineer by
5:00 p.m. local time on January 7, 2011. Questions shall include the
project name (Re: Cambridge WWTP ENR Upgrade) in subject heading.
Estimated construction cost: Range $7,500,000 to $9,500,000.
Contract Documents may be examined, at the following locations:
Department of Public Works Reed Construction Data
705 Leonard Lane 30 Technology Pkwy S.
Cambridge, Maryland 21613 Suite 100
Norcross, GA 30092
George, Miles & Buhr, LLC McGraw-Hill Dodge
206 West Main Street MHC Plan Room
Salisbury, Maryland 21801 8501 LaSalle Road
Suite 304
Towson, MD 21286
MD/Washington Minority
Contractor's Association
107 North Point Boulevard
Suite 220
Baltimore, MD 21215
Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained beginning on
Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at the office of GEORGE, MILES & BUHR,
LLC, 206 WEST MAIN STREET, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 21801, upon
the non-refundable payment of Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) for each
set. Checks should be made payable to George, Miles & Buhr, LLC.
Each bid must be accompanied by a Bid Bond payable to the Owner
for five percent (5%) of the total amount of the bid. No bidder may
withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after the actual date of the
opening thereof.
The City of Cambridge reserves the right to reject any and all bids,
and/or waive informalities or irregularities, and/or to accept or reject any
items of any bid, as it may deem best for its interest. The bids will be
evaluated and award will be made to the lowest responsive, responsible
bidder.
Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wage Rates and Regulations apply to this
project.
Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) firms, including Minority
Business Enterprises (MBE) and Women Business Enterprises (WBE)
are encouraged to respond. Contractors are required to provide a good
faith effort in seeking DBE, MBE, and WBE Subcontractors. Certified
Minority Business Enterprises are encouraged to respond to this solici-
tation notice. For additional information visit the MWQFA website:
www.mde.state.md.us/wqfa.
Any contract or contracts awarded under this Advertisement for Bids are
expected to be funded in part by a loan and/or grant from the United
States Environmental Protection Agency, or the Maryland Department of
the Environment.
CITY OF CAMBRIDGE
GEORGE W. HYDE, P.E.
City Engineer
BALTIMORE COUNTY, MARYLAND
INVITATION FOR BIDS
CONTRACT NO. 10197 PF0
FULLERTON FIRE STATION #8 ROOF, 4401 FITCH AVENUE, 21236
FULLERTON - DISTRICT 14 c 6
CONTRACT COST GROUP ∫B ($100,000 TO $500,000)∫
WORK CLASSIFICATION: I-6
BID DATE: FEBRUARY 17, 2011 AT 2:00 P.M. LOCAL TIME
On or after DECEMBER 6, 2010, the above contract documents may
be inspected and purchased from the Division of Construction
Contracts Administration, Department of Public Works, Room 300B,
County Office Building (COB), 111 W. Chesapeake Avenue, Towson,
MD 21204, upon receipt of payment of $15.00 (FIFTEEN DOLLARS)
per contract, and if sent by U.S. mail with an additional $10.00 (TEN
Dollars) postage and handling fee. All checks should be made payable
to BALTIMORE COUNTY MD. NO REFUNDS will be made to anyone.
Direct any questions to 410-887-3531. Bidders obtaining documents
from another source other than Baltimore County WILL NOT be allowed
to submit proposals to Baltimore County.
The proposed work consists of:
Remove all existing roofing systems down to gypsum and tectum deck
and provide a new SBS Modified Built-Up Roofing System.
A pre-bid meeting will be held on Friday, January 21, 2011 at 10:00 a.m.
at the site-4401 Fitch Avenue, Fullerton, MD 21236-3908.
THE PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO A MINORITY BUSINESS ENTER-
PRISE UTILIZATION GOAL AND FEMALE CONTRACTORS UTILIZA-
TION GOALS. THESE GOAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MORE FULLY
EXPLAINED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. THE MBE/WBE FORMS IN
THE PROPOSAL BOOKLET MUST BE COMPLETED AND SUBMIT-
TED AT THE TIME OF BID OPENING.
Sealed proposals (the entire book) addressed to Baltimore County,
Maryland for this contract will be received in the Baltimore County
Purchasing Division, Room 148, Old Courthouse, 400 Washington
Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, until the time specified on the contract at
which time they will be publicly opened and read.
ONLY CONTRACTORS WHO HAVE BEEN PREQUALIFIED BY BAL-
TIMORE COUNTY AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS PRIOR TO THE OPEN-
ING OF BIDS WILL BE ALLOWED TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS.
All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, on the approved
form provided, in the amount as set forth in the ∫Information for Bidders∫.
No other form of proposal guaranty is acceptable.
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to reject any or all proposals
or bids or parts of bids and to waive technicalities as may be deemed
best for the interest of the County.
Keith Dorsey, Director
Office of Budget & Finance
AIRPORT FIRE CAPTAIN
(FIRE TRAINING OPTION)
The Maryland Aviation Administration (MAA) is currently
accepting applications for the position of Airport Fire
Captain (Fire Training Option). Candidates must be a
graduate from a standard high school or possess a GED
and two years experience as a career officer, in the rank
of Lieutenant or above, at the Baltimore/Washington Inter-
national Thurgood Marshall Fire and Rescue Department
(BWI FRD) or comparable airport, or municipality, or
military fire department. Candidates are required to have
NFPA 1003 Airport Firefighter, NFPA 1021 Fire Officer II,
NFPA 1031 Inspector I, NFPA 1041 ES Instructor II, NFPA
472 Haz-Mat Incident Commander, NFPA 1521 Incident
Safety Officer certifications and must include a copy of
certifications with their applications. Certification as a Level
II Fire Instructor by the University of Maryland Instructor
Certification Review Board is required. Salary: $48,691 -
$75,286 with excellent health and leave benefits and
advanced education and training opportunities. Applica-
tions may be obtained by calling 410-859-7618, the MDOT
web site: https://jobs.mdot.state.md.us, or TTY (410)
859-7227. Submit application by December 27, 2010 to:
Ken Acker, Recruitment and Examinations, MD Aviation
Admin, Human Resources, PO Box 8766, BWI Airport MD
21240-0766.
EOE
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTYCAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Police Officer Entry Level
Police Officer Lateral Entry
Visit our website at www.aacounty.org for additional in-
formation and to apply on-line. You may use the Internet
at any Anne Arundel County library, or visit our office at
2660 Riva Road in Annapolis. Deadlines to apply on
website.
AEO/DF/SFE
Minister of Music & Organist
Union Baptist Church, is seeking committed persons for
the positions of Minister of Music and Organist, proficient
on the pipe organ, piano, voice training and choral direc-
tion. Applicants should have an undergraduate degree with
a major in music, and at least three years experience.
Salary negotiable. Application packet must include a letter
of interest, a resume and 3 professional references ,
emailed to willie.benson@comcast.net or mailed to G.K.
McKinney, Union Baptist Church, P.O. Box 2272, Baltimore,
MD 21203.
NUTRITION
GRANTS SPECIALIST
TRAINING SPECIALIST
MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (MSDE) - Ranked # 1 in Education nationally-
seeks 2 leaders to oversee diverse Nutrition Programs. Bring your passion for Child Nutrition to MSDE! In
these exciting roles you will manage, promote & oversee Grants and Training related to USDA Child
Nutrition Programs!
CHILD NUTRITION EDUCATION CTR # 114-11 (Contractual)
Leads the development & implementation of electronic based learning systems for the School Community
& Nutrition Branch
QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor¬s in Nutrition, Dietetics, Health Sci., Food Svce. Admin., Fam & Cons Sci.,
Public Health, Public/Bus Admin. or related area & 2 yrs prof training exp req¬d. Exp in instructional stem
design, and exp w/ child nutrition programs pref. Exp in conducting e-prof development courses desirable.
Annual Salary Range: $ 41,074-59,609
CHILD NUTRITION EDUCATION PROGRAM GRANTS SPECIALIST # 081612
Leads & Administers Maryland¬s USDA Team Nutrition Training Grants by developing and planning of
USDA Team Nutrition & other grants & activities & providing technical assistance and training to agencies
that participate in the USDA Child Nutrition Program!
QUALIFICATIONS: Master¬s or equiv 36 credit hrs post-baccalaureate course work in Nutrition, Dietetics,
Health Sci., Food Svce. Admin., Fam & Cons Sci., Public Health, Public/Bus Admin. or related area & 3
yrs prof exp in proposal writing, program eval & prof development is req¬d. Exp in training & child nutrition
pref. Note: 2 yrs add¬l exp. as defined may subst for Master¬s.
Annual Salary Range: $45,675-66,617
For more info. visit our website at www.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/aboutmsde/jobs
MSDE is a state agency that develops & administers education, library & rehabilitation programs, & is on
the forefront of standards-based reform of public education & is committed to promoting & maintaining a
diverse workforce.
To Apply: Reference Position # 081612 OR Contractual #114-11 &FAX (410-333-8950) or mail your MSDE
application and resume to Office of Human Resources, 200 W. Baltimore Street, Balto. MD. 21201.
Applications/resumes should be received by January 7, 2011.
AA/EEO
“B ($100,000 to $500,000)”
“Information for Bidders”.
Bachelor’s
req’d
Maryland’s
req’d.
add’l Master’s.
Master’s or
B10 The Afro-American, December 11, 2010 - December 11, 2010

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