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COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL

Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,


Present and Future

Laying The Groundwork

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Jan 13, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Jan 13, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Leadership: Past, Present, and Future

Introduction to Class
No reading assignment.

MATERIALS
Course Syllabus

ASSIGNMENT
1. John Kotter has defined leadership as the production of useful change. According to the definition, who do you see as
some of the most important leaders in the last two centuries? What relevance, if any, do the actions of these men and
women have for our time?
2. History is often described as the intersection of individual choice (or action) and larger social, economic, or other
forces. If this is true, what are the key forces shaping our moment in history? What does your answer imply about the
power of the individual person today?

[01] 10:05AM Thu, Jan 15, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Thu, Jan 15, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Josiah Wedgwood, 1730-1795

MATERIALS
Josiah Wedgwood, 1730-1795
Chapter from Brand New
EC Weeks 1 & 2 Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. A managerial scholar has defined entrepreneurship as the ?relentless pursuit of opportunity without regard to the
resources currently controlled.? With this definition in mind, was Wedgwood an entrepreneur? If so, what
opportunities did he pursue?
2. What were the key drivers of Josiah Wedgwood?s success?
3. What role did Wedgwood?s management of people play in his strategy, his brand, and his organization?
4. How would you evaluate Wedgwood as an institution builder? As a leader?
5. With which companies today would you compare Wedgwood & Bentley?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 1 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Jan 20, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Jan 20, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Alexander Hamilton, 1757-1804

MATERIALS
Alexander Hamilton, 1757-1804
Chapter from Management Past and Present
EC Weeks 1 & 2 Packet

Hamilton class card

Creating Capitalism (Optional)


David Brooks's review of "Alexander Hamilton" by Ron Chernow

ASSIGNMENT
1. It?s the year 1790. You?re a wealthy European looking for a place to invest some excess funds. What are the
arguments for and against investing in the United States? What form of investment would appeal most to
you?Government paper? Land? Anything else?
2. Alexander Hamilton turned 30 in 1787. At this age, he was a bit older than most of the members of the Harvard
Business School Class of 2009 when you filled out your class cards. Please fill out a rough class card for Alexander
Hamilton.
3. Compare Hamilton?s policies with Jefferson?s and Madison?s. What was at stake here?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 2 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Jan 21, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Jan 21, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
John Jacob Astor, 1763-1848; The Rise of New York Port

MATERIALS
Jacob Astor, 1763-1848
Chapter from Management Past and Present
EC Weeks 1 & 2 Packet

The Rise of New York Port


Chapter from Management Past and Present
EC Weeks 1 & 2 Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. When did New York gain its status as a leader in population and commerce? What were the most important factors in
the achievement of that leadership?
2. John Jacob Astor, an immigrant like Hamilton, was the wealthiest American of the first third of the nineteenth century.
What business was he involved in? What was he not involved in? What do the answers tell you about the nature of
the economy during this period?
3. What, exactly, did Astor manage? What kinds of decisions did he make?
4. How would you evaluate him as a leader?

End of Laying The Groundwork

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 3 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

The Relentless Pursuit of Opportunity

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Jan 26, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Jan 26, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
The Railroads and the Beginnings of Modern Management

MATERIALS
The Railroads and the Beginnings of Modern Management
Management Past and Present

Three Industrial Revolutions (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. Why did the railroads come when they did?
2. Judging from the McCallum report, what were the key issues in managing a large railroad during the 1850s?
3. Try to draw a rough organizational chart to illustrate the reporting relationships McCallum describes.
4. What are the basic contributions of Albert Fink to the understanding of the nature of costs on a railroad?
5. What solution does Charles Perkins propose for the problems presented by size in railroad management?

General Question:

Imagine that McCallum, Fink, and Perkins were enrolled today in the Harvard MBA program. Which one would you
most like to have in a study group with you? Why?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 4 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Jan 27, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Jan 27, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Jay Gould and the Coming of Railroad Consolidation

MATERIALS
Jay Gould and the Coming of Railroad Consolidation
Management Past and Present

The Golden Spike, by John Steele Gordon (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. Analyze closely the proposals in Appendix A (pages 2-50 and 2-51). The author is the same Albert Fink who
appeared in the preceding case. What difficulties stood in the way of success of his proposal for pooling?
2. What problem did Gould pose for conventional railroad managers? How did these managers respond to what Gould
was doing? What do their responses tell you about the nature of railroad competition?
3. The case states that ?the logic of railroad competition was bankruptcy for everyone? (a remark often made by
railroad leaders at the time and, incidentally, by present-day commentators on the telecommunications industry).
What was this inexorable ?logic??
4. What was the logic of system building?

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Feb 2, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Feb 2, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Marshall Field, 1834-1906

MATERIALS
Marshall Field, 1834-1906
Brand New

Distribution of Employment, 1860-1920 (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. In the 1850s and 1860s, how did Field view the possibilities for mass distribution? Where did he get his information?
2. How did he act on this information and his larger vision? Which business practices made Marshall Field so
successful?
3. How would you evaluate Field as an entrepreneur? As an institution builder?
4. What are the most important lessons of Field?s experience for branding in our own time?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 5 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Feb 3, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Feb 3, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
H.J. Heinz, 1844-1919; The Integration of Mass Production and Mass Distribution

MATERIALS
H. J. Heinz, 1844-1919
Brand New

The Integration of Mass Production and Mass Distribution


Management Past and Present
Please skim this case.

Good Luck with that Broken iPod (Optional)

Add-Ons Have Become a Billion-Dollar Bonanza (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. It is 1865, and you are analyzing new investment possibilities for J. P. Morgan. How would you evaluate the size and
potential profit opportunities of the market for mass-produced food?
2. How did Henry Heinz view this emerging market? What was his overall strategy? Given your analysis in question 1,
would you invest in Heinz?s venture in the early 1870s?
3. You have one vote for the Nineteenth-Century Business Hall of Fame. The ballot has three names:
1. Gould
2. Albert Fink
3. Heinz
Who gets your vote? What were your key criteria in casting your ballot?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 6 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Feb 4, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Feb 4, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Andrew Carnegie and the Rise of Big Business

MATERIALS
Andrew Carnegie and the Rise of Big Business
Please read the entire book.

ASSIGNMENT
1. In his long business career, Carnegie held a variety of jobs in several different industries. Make a list of the jobs,
starting with the first paying position he took as a boy.
2. What does your list tell you about the evolution of the American economy? About Carnegie as a manager of his own
career?
3. The Nineteenth-Century Business Hall of Fame now has four names on the ballot:
1. Gould
2. Field
3. Heinz
4. Carnegie
Who gets your vote? Given our readings thus far, what kinds of tradeoffs are involved in achieving the kind of
success that these individuals did?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 7 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Feb 9, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Feb 9, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
John D. Rockefeller and the Creation of Standard Oil

MATERIALS
John D. Rockefeller and the Creation of Standard Oil (807110)
Spangler distribution

Whatever Happened to Standard Oil (Optional)

Rockefeller Philanthropy Timeline (Optional)

Obituary for John D. Rockefeller (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. How did Rockefeller ?conquer? Cleveland? What was the basis of his power? Having conquered Cleveland, how did
Rockefeller go about conquering the industry nationwide?
2. Given Standard?s enormous power by the late 1870s, how might it have been attacked successfully?
3. Why did Standard keep changing in the 1880s even though it already had a market share of almost 90%? Was
oligopoly inevitable in the oil industry?
4. John Rockefeller is one of the most famous business people in history. He has been called a robber baron, a
philanthropist, a titan, and a thief. But he is rarely discussed or analyzed as an entrepreneur. How do you evaluate
him in this context? How do you evaluate him as an institution builder? How, if at all, does the path he
traveled?including his work and his larger life?help us understand entrepreneurial leadership?
5. What, if anything, will stick with you about Rockefeller, the man? Rockefeller, the husband? Rockefeller, the father?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 8 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Feb 10, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Feb 10, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan, and the Three Phases of Marketing

MATERIALS
Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan, and the Three Phases of Marketing (796169)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

Henry Ford, Alfred P. Sloan, Tom Watson Jr., Bill Gates: The Businessman of the Century
(Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. It's 1923. You're Edsel Ford, age 29. You see the handwriting on the wall for the Ford Motor Company. You decide
that, once and for all, you're going to lay it on the line to your father, whom you dearly love but who you see is doing
all the wrong things. How do you begin your argument? What data do you emphasize? What do you recommend that
he do? What do you yourself plan to do if you get nowhere with him?
2. Where does Alfred Sloan rank in your personal Business Hall of Fame? Why would earlier polls have placed him
below Ford and others?
3. J.C. Penney, the American retail entrepreneur, once said, ?My eyesight is getting poorer as I get older, but my vision
is improving.? Thinking about the issue of what leaders see, how do you evaluate the field of vision of Henry Ford? Of
Alfred Sloan?
4. Why do you think that much of the American public regard Henry Ford's billion-dollar fortune as "clean," unlike those
of financiers and even of other industrialists such as Rockefeller? What does this tell us about American culture? Are
there parallels today with individual American fortunes?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 9 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Feb 17, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Feb 17, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Prelude; America Rules; Schumpeter and the Essence of Capitalism

MATERIALS
Schumpeter and the Essence of Capitalism (794003)
Please skim pp. 1-14 and read pp. 15-18.
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

Prelude
The Tycoons: Chapter 1

America Rules
The Tycoons: Chapter 9

ASSIGNMENT
1. Based on our readings and discussions in this unit of the course, what do you think were the most important drivers
of the Second Industrial Revolution?
2. If Schumpeter were giving a guest lecture today, how would he explain the period of widespread economic and social
change that occurred in the United States between 1880 and 1920? What role would his concept of ?creative
destruction? play in explaining the Information Revolution unfolding today? In explaining the rise and fall of economic
superpowers?
3. In his view and in yours, what role did entrepreneurial agency play in this far-reaching transformation?
4. Do your responses to the first three questions help us explain the causes and consequences of the Information
Revolution unfolding in our own time? What role do you think entrepreneurship is playing and will play in the global
expansion of capitalism in the twenty-first century?
5. Do you agree with Morris?s argument about America?s uniqueness in the late nineteenth and early twentieth
centuries? Could a similar argument be made about China or India today?

End of The Relentless Pursuit of Opportunity

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 10 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

The Struggle for Power

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Feb 18, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Feb 18, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Work: Craft and Factory in Nineteeth-Century America

MATERIALS
Work: Craft and Factory in Nineteenth-Century America
Management Past and Present

The Richest Americans (Optional)

"Letters to a Young Poet," by Rainer Maria Rilke (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. Examine carefully the work of Clough (pronounced ?cluff?) from 1843 to 1849. What jobs did he hold during these
years? What was his pay? Why do you think he remembered these details so clearly? What is not in Clough?s
recollections?
2. Was Clough a typical American?
3. Why did the women who worked in the Lowell mills choose to do so? How did the actual experience stack up against
their expectations?
4. What complaints that one might have expected to encounter among workers were apparently not voiced (or at least
not reported in this document)?
5. Contrast the paths and perspectives of Samuel Clough and Josephine Baker. How do you explain the differences?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 11 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Mar 2, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Mar 2, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Mass Production and the Beginnings of Scientific Management

MATERIALS
Mass Production and the Beginnings of Scientific Management
Management Past and Present

Triumph and Tragedy


Andrew Carnegie and the Rise of Big Business
Please review Chapter 9 of the Carnegie biography which deals with the Homestead Strike of 1892.

"Scientific Management" by Robert Kent (Optional)

The Wrong Lessons (Optional)


The Tycoons: Chapter 10

ASSIGNMENT
1. What exactly is scientific management?
2. What were the strengths and weaknesses of Taylor?s proposals?
3. How did workers react to scientific management? How do you explain and evaluate these responses?
4. What kind of long-term impact, if any, has scientific management had on business? On managerial thinking? On our
collective thinking about the purpose and responsibilities of business?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 12 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Mar 3, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Mar 3, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Candy Land: The Utopian Vision of Milton Hershey

MATERIALS
Candy Land: The Utopian Vision of Milton Hershey (805066)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. Which factors contributed most to the success of the 5? Hershey bar? How did Milton Hershey create a market for his
product in the early twentieth century?
2. What do you think motivated Milton Hershey? What did he want to accomplish? With whom would you compare him
today?
3. What do you make of Milton Hershey?s repeated failures, both before and after he started the chocolate company?
4. What can we learn about leadership in the twenty-first century from the life and work of Milton Hershey? What is his
legacy for business leaders and entrepreneurs today?

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Mar 9, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Mar 9, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Organized Labor and the Worker

MATERIALS
Organized Labor and the Worker
Management Past and Present

ASSIGNMENT
1. Put yourself in the position of a labor leader in the United States in 1890. Drawing not only on the data the case
presents but on previous discussions in the course, what were the principal barriers to the unionization of working
men and women at this time?
2. Putting yourself once again into the position of the labor leader in 1890, what general aspects of American life would
assist you as a union organizer?
3. Why did the A. F. of L. succeed while the Knights of Labor and other antecedent organizations failed? What were the
limits of the A. F. of L.?s success?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 13 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Mar 10, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Mar 10, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
The Labor Movement Between the Wars

MATERIALS
The Labor Movement Between the Wars
Management Past and Present

Lifers, James Surowiecki on the Truth about Long-term Employment (Optional)

"More Companies Ending Promises for Retirement", by Mary Williams Walsh (Optional)

"G.M. Will Offer Buyouts to all its Union Workers", by Micheline Maynard (Optional)

"Love, Labor, Loss; A Child's Death Stirred Andrew Stern To Challenge Himself -- and
Unionism", by Lynne Duke (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. What did the UAW want in its strike against General Motors? Why? Were its aims reasonable?
2. What did General Motors want? Why? Were its aims reasonable? Why do you think a manager as talented as Alfred
Sloan took the position he did in 1936-37?
3. Would the United States be better off today if the UAW and CIO had met defeat and sunk into oblivion, as the Knights
of Labor did earlier?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 14 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Mar 16, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Mar 16, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Slavery; African Americans in Business

Instructor's Note: This case, like some others but even more so, raises issues that go well beyond the intellectual
objectives of this course. It addresses a deeply charged human subject that far transcends our analysis of slavery as
an economic and social system. We should feel free to discuss these other aspects in addition to the economic
dimensions of slavery as a system of labor.

MATERIALS
Slavery
Management Past and Present

African Americans in Business


American Business, 1920-2000: How it Worked

Frederick Douglass, ?Speech at Canandaigua, NY,? August 3, 1857 (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. In 1845, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass was published. On the advice of friends, who feared for
Douglass?s freedom and safety, he traveled to Britain, where he was widely respected and celebrated as a hero for
his abolitionism. In 1847, Douglass returned to the United States. Why do you imagine that Frederick Douglass came
back?
2. Slavery, like other institutions, was the outcome of a complex series of human choices and collective decisions over
many decades (many centuries, for that matter, since incidents of slavery are recorded in the Old Testament and
were common in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome). What, in your view, were the three or four most important of
those choices and collective decisions?
3. In the economy of a given plantation, what were the systems of incentives and organization that made the enterprise
profitable to its owner? Who were the key managers of the plantation?
4. Consider the last two readings by Thomas Dew and George Fitzhugh. In what ways, if any, do their arguments make
sense? What motives would drive them to make such arguments?
5. Recall our frequently expressed maxim, ?What is now in the past was once in the future.? Bearing it in mind, consider
the following pair of questions:
1. How could a system as brutal and inhumane as slavery persist as long as it did?
2. In view of the centuries-long history of slavery in both the eastern and western hemispheres, why was the system
overthrown in so many places in such a relatively brief period during the nineteenth century?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 15 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Mar 17, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Mar 17, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (Day 1)

Instructor?s Note: The case for today and tomorrow?s class is based on a selection of Abraham Lincoln?s writings. It
traces the sixteenth president?s life, evolving political views, and specific acts of leadership during the Civil War. It also
includes a time line and three other exhibits which you will find helpful in thinking about the context in which Lincoln
lived.

On day one of our ( two-day) discussion, we?ll concentrate on the life and times of Lincoln up until he is elected
president in November 1860. Pages 1-16 of the case deal with this period.

On day two, we?ll focus on Lincoln?s presidency and the perfect storm he found himself in after being elected. Pages
16-37 of the case deal with the four years of Lincoln?s presidency.

I strongly recommend reading the entire case before the first day. I think you?ll get more out of both classes from
having the larger picture in your mind.

MATERIALS
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (805115)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. Lincoln is the most popular (and most studied) president in U.S. history. Reading his earlier and less well-known
writings, what, if anything, do you learn about the man that you did not know before?
2. Lincoln?s ambition, said his long-time law partner William Herndon, ?was a little engine that knew no rest.? What
role did such ambition play in Lincoln?s early life? Were there costs to this drive? If so, what were they? How would
you compare his striving to that of other figures we have studied this term?
3. What, if anything, do you make of Lincoln?s melancholy, what today we would call chronic depression?
4. In his autobiography composed for the presidential campaign in 1860 (p. 15 of the case), Lincoln, writing in the third
person about himself, remembered: ?In 1854, his profession had almost superseded the thought of politics in his
mind, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused him as he had never been before.? What is Lincoln
talking about here? What does he do with this personal clarion call?
5. When Oprah Winfrey came to HBS in 2005, she told students taking a course like this one that she didn?t believe in
luck. ?Luck,? she said, ?is opportunity meeting preparation.? Does Winfrey?s perspective apply to Lincoln?s life
before he became president? If so, how?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 16 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Mar 18, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Mar 18, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (Day 2)

MATERIALS
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (805115)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. What light, if any, does Lincoln?s background shed on his actions as president?
2. If you had to create a short Power-Point outline of Lincoln?s views on slavery between 1854 and 1865, what would
your bullet points be?
3. In the last six month, crisis leadership has become a very popular subject for executives and the business press. In
this context, what were Lincoln?s key strengths and weaknesses?
4. Read the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural again carefully. What is the essence of each of these
speeches? What do you take away from them, as a prospective leader? As an individual human being trying to live a
full, decent life?

End of The Struggle for Power

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 17 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

Finding the Path

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Mar 30, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Mar 30, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Madam C. J. Walker: Entrepreneur, Leader, and Philanthropist

MATERIALS
Madam C. J. Walker: Entrepreneur, Leader, and Philanthropist (803140)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. How would you describe the context in which Madam C.J. Walker lived and worked before committing her time and
energy to the (young) cosmetics industry? How does this particular context?the place from which she started her
entrepreneurial journey?compare with that of the other individuals we have studied?
2. At 35, having raised her daughter and found a home in a supportive church community, what prompted Walker to
launch an entirely new career? What were the most important constraints she faced? What were her most important
enablers?
3. How did Walker regard her agents? What did she expect of them? How does this implicit social contract compare to
those we have seen between entrepreneurs like Astor, Field, and Heinz and their respective agents?
4. What was Walker?s philosophy of work, responsibility, and reward? Why was Booker T. Washington so important to
her?
5. What were Walker?s larger aims for her hair care company? How do you assess these objectives? With which
present-day entrepreneurs would you compare her?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 18 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Mar 31, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Mar 31, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Estee Lauder; Women in Business

MATERIALS
Estée Lauder
Brand New

Women in Business
American Business, 1920-2000: How it Worked

ASSIGNMENT
1. Why did Josephine Esther Mentzer decide to enter the cosmetics business? How did her own background and
experience affect her chances of success in the 1930s and 1940s?
2. Between 1946 and 1972, what were the critical inflection points in the evolution of her company?s strategy? What did
Lauder see that other cosmetics entrepreneurs and executives, such as Helena Rubinstein or Charles Revson, did
not? Can you apply Lauder?s insights to other industries? If so, which ones?
3. How did the Lauder family?s business vision evolve in the late 1970s and 1980s? How would you characterize the
relationship between strategy and structure for this company today?
4. With which individuals in this course would you compare Est?e Lauder?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 19 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Apr 6, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Apr 6, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Leadership in Crisis: Ernest Shackleton and the Epic Voyage of the "Endurance"

MATERIALS
Leadership in Crisis: Ernest Shackleton and the Epic Voyage of the Endurance (803127)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. In what context should the Endurance expedition be analyzed?
a. As a scientific endeavor?
b. As an entrepreneurial venture?
c. As an exercise in imperial opportunity?
d. In an altogether different context?
e. By what criteria should the expedition be evaluated? Given your answer to the preceding question, was it a
success or a failure?
2. With which modern entrepreneur would you compare Shackleton? What motivated him? What were his strengths and
weaknesses?
3. Why are people today so interested in Ernest Shackleton? Since the mid-to-late 1990s, why have there been
countless books (business/general interest), movies, exhibits, and other projects focused on him?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 20 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Apr 7, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Apr 7, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
1973-2000: Slower Economic Growth, Franchising, and the Case of McDonald's

MATERIALS
1973-2000: Slower Economic Growth, Franchising, and the Case of McDonalds
American Business, 1920-2000: How it Worked

McDonald's 24/7 (Optional)

As American as a McDonald's Hamburger on the Fourth of July (Optional)

Boss Talk: How Jim Skinner Flipped McDonald's --- Big Chain's CEO Focused On Getting
Better, Not Bigger; 'We Have to Provide Choices' (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. Evaluate the business career of Ray Kroc. As an innovator, was he on a par with Jay Gould, Henry Heinz, and Est?e
Lauder?
2. Why did franchising flourish first in the United States and later in many other countries? What, if any, are the natural
limits of this form of doing business?
3. What are the biggest challenges McDonald?s faces going forward? How should McDonald?s respond to these? What
are the most important lessons of this story for business strategy and leadership in the twenty-first century?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 21 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Apr 14, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Apr 14, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Michael Milken; The Financial System

MATERIALS
Michael Milken
Management Past and Present

The Financial System


American Business, 1920-2000: How it Worked

ASSIGNMENT
1. The ?supply side? journalist Jude Wanniski, one of the architects of ?Reaganomics,? once commented that Michael
Milken?s life and work have been in the tradition of John D. Rockefeller and other ?great men of our nation?s
business history, who each saw a different way of combining capital and labor to produce great leaps in human
productivity.? Do you agree with this comparison? With which figure(s) in our course, if any, would you compare
Milken?
2. What was the source of Milken?s power during the late 1970s and early 1980s? How is your answer related to the
evolution of managerial capitalism?
3. It?s April 2009, and Milken is interviewing MBAs for a possible job in his education and distance-learning venture. He
offers you a job at $150K with significant stock options. Do you accept?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 22 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Apr 15, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Apr 15, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Patricia Ostrander

MATERIALS
Patricia Ostrander
Management Past and Present

ASSIGNMENT
1. If you had to allocate some sort of percentage responsibility in the Ostrander case, in the way traffic accidents are
sometimes blamed on the participants 50-50, or 70-30, or 90-10, how would you divide the 100% between Ostrander
on the one hand and Milken on the other?
2. In general, is it a good idea for fund managers to trade at all in the securities they buy and sell for their funds, or in
related securities (warrants, derivatives, etc.)? Is it possible to formulate good internal (company) regulations on this
question? External (SEC) regulations?
3. What light, if any, does this case shed on the current debate about corporate governance, accounting irregularities,
and the integrity of Wall Street? Think back on our readings on the American capital markets during the time of Jay
Gould. Are periods of economic (and financial) innovation necessarily correlated with widespread doubt about the
integrity of the capital markets?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 23 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Apr 21, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Apr 21, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Starbucks

MATERIALS
Starbucks Coffee Company in the 21st Century (808019)
Spangler distribution

Starbucks Selected Highlights 2000-2006

Starbucks Key Statistics 2006

EL Key Takeaways (Optional)

ASSIGNMENT
1. What are the most important drivers of Starbucks? success? How are these related?
2. How would you evaluate Howard Schultz as an entrepreneur? As an organizational leader?
3. What are the greatest challenges Starbucks faces in the next five years? How well equipped is the company do deal
with these?
4. It is May of 2019, and you?re leading a panel discussion at your tenth HBS reunion on great companies of the
Information Revolution. In this context, what role, if any, do you ascribe to Starbucks?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 24 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Wed, Apr 22, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Wed, Apr 22, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
John Mackey and Whole Foods Market

MATERIALS
John Mackey and Whole Foods Market

Timeline of Organic Farming and Whole Foods Market

Whole Foods Exhibits

ASSIGNMENT
1. How would you evaluate the size and potential profit opportunities of the market for organic food in the 1960s? By the
late 1990s, how had this market changed? Why?
2. What are the most important attributes of the Whole Foods brand? What role has the brand played in the company?s
development?
3. How do you evaluate the organization that Mackey and his team have built at Whole Foods? How is the structure of
the company related to its strategy? How does this organization compare to others that we have studied this term?
4. What does Mackey mean when he says: ?to extend our love and care beyond our narrow self-interest is antithetical
to neither our human nature nor our financial success. Rather, it leads to the further fulfillment of both. Why do we not
encourage this in our theories of business and economics??

How, if at all, are this statement and its implications related to Mackey?s own motivation and his own journey?
5. How does Mackey compare to other entrepreneurs that you have studied in this course?

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 25 of 26
COURSE PLATFORM HARVARD | BUSINESS | SCHOOL
Syllabus for Entrepreneurial Leadership: Past,
Present and Future

[01] 10:05AM Mon, Apr 27, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Mon, Apr 27, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Oprah Winfrey

MATERIALS
Oprah Winfrey (803190)
EC Weeks 3 on Packet

ASSIGNMENT
1. With which other entrepreneurs in this course would you compare Winfrey? What was the ?pain? or hole in the
marketplace that she sought to address? What do your answers to these questions tell you about the evolution of
managerial capitalism?
2. How would you describe Harpo?s business model? How do you evaluate it? Is the model replicable?
3. Assess the Oprah Winfrey brand. What are its strengths and weaknesses? How is the brand related to the ?Oprah
Effect?? Do consumers want whatever Winfrey recommends, or is Winfrey extremely adept at understanding what
consumers will want?
4. Based on your reading of the case, what is Oprah Winfrey?s fondest wish? What motivates her?
5. If you were Winfrey?s ?career guru,? what would you advise her to do next?

[01] 10:05AM Tue, Apr 28, Hawes Hall 101


[02] 11:40AM Tue, Apr 28, Hawes Hall 101

TOPIC
Bono and U2

ASSIGNMENT
Questions to be distributed at a later date

End of Finding the Path

January 08, 2009 Copyright 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College Page 26 of 26