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The default setting for calculations in Microsoft Excel is to automatically recalculate cells
whenever a change is made to the spreadsheet. For most cases, this is a convenient
setting since it allows users to see the effect of changes as soon as they are made.

However, there are other times when it makes more sense to change this setting to
perform calculations manually. For instance, if you¶re working in a very large
spreadsheet with several complex formulas, updating all calculations in the sheet can
take some time. In this case, it¶s pretty frustrating to have to sit and wait for the whole
file to update simply because you¶ve made one little change. Even if your file isn¶t that
big in size, it may contain certain functions, like those that generate random numbers,
that you don¶t want recalculated with every modification.


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To change the method of cell calculation in Excel 2007, first go to the   tab on
the Excel ribbon. Click on the   
c
 button.

Here, you can choose one of three options.

O ?  ± Choosing this option will cause Excel to recalculate all dependent
cells whenever a change is made on the spreadsheet.

O ? cccc  ± As its name implies, this setting will


recalculate every dependent cell, except for the ones in data tables, each time a
change is made to the spreadsheet.

O —
 c± If you pick this option, cells will only be recalculated when you explicitly
choose to perform this action.

You can also choose to modify the default Excel settings for   
c
. To
do this, click on the  button and select  c
.

Select  . In the main window of this screen, under   
c
, you
have the same choices as above with one additional option. For the —
 csetting, you
can also decide if you want to   ccc
. Again,
depending on your file, you may want to uncheck this box and disable this option in
order to have complete control over formula calculations.

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1. Select the row or column that you want to move or copy.

2. Do one of the following:

 To move rows or columns, on the = tab, in the  group, click
 .

c   You can also press CTRL+X.

 To copy rows or columns, on the = tab, in the  group, click
 .

c   You can also press CTRL+C.

3. Right-click a row or column below or to the right of where you want to move or
copy your selection, and then do one of the following:

 When you are moving rows or columns, click 


c c  .

 When you are copying rows or columns, click 


c c  .


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1. Do one of the following:

 To insert a single row, select either the whole row or a cell in the row above
which you want to insert the new row. For example, to insert a new row
above row 5, click a cell in row 5.

 To insert multiple rows, select the rows above which you want to insert
rows. Select the same number of rows as you want to insert. For example,
to insert three new rows, you select three rows.
 To insert nonadjacent rows, hold down CTRL while you select nonadjacent
rows.

2. On the = tab, in the   group, click the arrow next to 


, and then
click 
c c.


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1. Do one of the following:

 To insert a single column, select the column or a cell in the column


immediately to the right of where you want to insert the new column. For
example, to insert a new column to the left of column B, click a cell in
column B.

 To insert multiple columns, select the columns immediately to the right of


where you want to insert columns. Select the same number of columns as
you want to insert. For example, to insert three new columns, you select
three columns.

 To insert nonadjacent columns, hold down CTRL while you select


nonadjacent columns.

2. On the = tab, in the   group, click the arrow next to 


, and then
click 
c c  
.

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1. Select the cells, rows, or columns that you want to delete.
2. On the = tab, in the   group, do one of the following:
 To delete selected cells, click the arrow next to  , and then
click  c  .
 To delete selected rows, click the arrow next to  , and then
click  c c.
 To delete selected columns, click the arrow next to  , and
then click  c c  
.

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Charts are used to display series of numeric data in a graphical format to make it easier

to understand large quantities of data and the relationship between different series of

data.To create a chart in Excel, you start by entering the numeric data for the chart on a

worksheet. Then you can plot that data into a chart by selecting the chart type that you
want to use on the Office Fluent Ribbon (
 tab,  group). c

Worksheet data

Chart created from worksheet data

Excel supports many types of charts to help you display data in ways that are
meaningful to your audience. When you create a chart or change an existing chart, you
can select from a variety of chart types (such as a column chart or a pie chart) and their
subtypes (such as a stacked column chart or a pie in 3-D chart). You can also create a
combination chart by using more than one chart type in your chart.

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A chart has many elements. Some of these elements are displayed by default; others
can be added as needed. You can change the display of the chart elements by moving
them to other locations in the chart, resizing them, or by changing the format. You can
also remove chart elements that you do not want to display.

The chart area of the chart.

The plot area of the chart.

The data points of the data series that are plotted in the chart.

The horizontal (category) and vertical (value) axis along which the data is plotted in
the chart.

The legend of the chart.

A chart and axis title that you can use in the chart.

A data label that you can use to identify the details of a data point in a data series.
wse the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

1. Click the —cc" 


, point to #, and then click
#.

2. In the  
c

c#
 , click the arrow next to  
c
# to select the set of properties that you want to view (for example,
?
c#).

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Microsoft Office Word 2007 makes it easy to benefit from styles without having to know
much about them. However, you may want to know how styles work behind the scenes,
or you may want to know what's new with styles in Office Word 2007.

This article explains how styles work to save you time and make your document look
good, and it discusses the relationship between styles and two new features in Word
2007: Quick Styles and themes.

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One of the great things about using a word processor is that you can create documents
that look professionally typeset.

Headings are in a font that contrasts with body text.

Paragraphs are separated with just enough white space.

Elements such as bulleted lists are indented.

Emphasized text is in a contrasting color.

The document may even include special elements such as a table of contents.
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You can format text in Microsoft Word by changing fonts, font size, and font style (bold,
italics, underline, etc.). Text formatting lets you add a professional look to your
documents. (Just be careful not to overdo it.)

 

  

Your Microsoft Office program provides tools that can help you correct mistakes. You
can check spelling and grammar in your files at the same time, or you can let the
Microsoft Office program suggest corrections automatically while you work.