You are on page 1of 25

Magnesium Resorbable Stents

MATSE 403 Final Project

Dan Cook Kevin Weikert
Dan Norris Deanna Jacoby
Background

• Need for Bioabsorbable magnesium stents as a 
treatment for coronary heart disease

– Device should have the same strength and 
ductility as a metal stent

– Ability to control the retention time of the 
device in the patient
Figure 1. Bioabsorbable magnesium stent after expansion 
– Ability to prevent thrombosis (blood clots)  (A) and before expansion (B,C)

over time
Coronary Heart Disease
Demographics Risk Factors and Causes

• Leading cause of death among  • Inheritance 
men and women in America • Gender 
• Age 
• Men are slightly more at risk than  • Lifestyle
women, while black males are 
• Diet
more at risk than white males
• Smoking vs. non‐smoking
• Drinking habits
• According to the American Heart 
Association more than 250,000 
deaths were caused by this disease 
in 2004
Symptoms

• Early in the condition there are little or no symptoms
• As the condition progresses:
– Chest Pain 
– Shortness of Breath
– Heart Attack
Current Treatments
• Adjusting diet and lifestyle
• Medicines:
– cholesterol lowering medicines 
– blood thinners 
– aspirin 
– blood pressure reducers, 
– calcium channel blockers
– beta blockers
• Stents‐ metal or bioabsorbable
• Bypass Surgery
Bioabsorbable Stents
mean (SD), n p

• Controlled retention time in the  After stenting

patient can be advantageous Reference diameter [mm] 2·74 (0·42), 59* 0·23871†

In‐segment minimal luminal diameter [mm ] 2·18 (0·38), 60 <0·0001†

In‐segment diameter stenosis [%] 20·50 (7·50), 60 <0·0001†
• In a study it was found that 
In‐segment acute gain [mm] 1·12 (0·42), 59* 
initially the stent is very successful
In‐stent minimal luminal diameter [mm] 2·47 (0·37), 60 

At 4‐month follow‐up
• One study showed over time the  Reference diameter [mm] 2·67 (0·46), 58* 0·21660‡

condition resurfaced after  In‐segment minimal luminal diameter [mm] 1·34 (0·49), 59*<0·00001‡

degradation, even though  In‐segment diameter stenosis [%] 49·66 (16·25), 59* <0·00001‡

thrombosis was avoided In‐segment late loss [mm] 0·83 (0·51), 59* 

In‐stent diameter stenosis [%] 48·37 (17·00), 59* 0·00001‡

In‐stent minimal luminal diameter [mm] 1·38 (0·51), 59* 

In‐stent late loss [mm] 1·08 (0·49), 59* 

Restenosis rate, % of patients

In segment [%] (n) 47·5 (59) 

In stent [%] (n) 47·5 (59) 
References
1. “Biodegradable Magnesium Based Metallic Material for Medical Use” PatentDocs. 
Wenderoth,Lind &Pollack L.L.P. Dec. 1, 2010. <http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20090131540>.

2.   Odle, Teresa  “Coronary Heart Disease.” Diet.com. Dec. 1 2010. <http://www.diet.com/g/coronary‐
heart‐disease>.
3. Raimund Erbel, Carlo Di Mario, Jozef Bartunek, Johann Bonnier, Bernard de Bruyne, Franz R Eberli, 
Paul Erne, Michael Haude, Bernd Heublein, Mark Horrigan, Charles Ilsley, Dirk Bose, Jacques 
Koolen, Thomas F Luscher, Neil Weissman, Ron Waksman and for the PROGRESS‐AMS (Clinical 
Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) 
Investigators, Temporary scaffolding of coronary arteries with bioabsorbable magnesium stents: a 
prospective, non‐randomised multicentre trial, The Lancet, Volume 369, Issue 9576, 2 June 2007‐
8 June 2007, Pages 1869‐1875, ISSN 0140‐6736, DOI: 10.1016/S0140‐6736(07)60853‐8.
<http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T1B‐4NVVDHV‐
13/2/30568148786e40483ed8805cc53745e7>.
Physiology of the Affliction
Arteries carry the oxygenated blood from the heart to the 
body. 
Atherosclerosis is the hardening of arteries caused by a 
buildup of plaque
Weak and damaged arteries can create arterial aneurysms
Larger aortic aneurysms can stem from the damage of the 
aorta
Advances in Magnesium as a 
Biomaterial
With a Focus on Cardiovascular Stent 
Applications
Use of Coatings to Slow Corrosion

Active Environment

Corrosion Resistant 
Coating
Standard Mg Thin 
Film (Stent)

Stented Arteries require ~6 weeks to fully recover
One Coating is Mg(OH)2

Mg(OH)2

Pure Mg Thin 
Film
Mg(OH)2 is formed through a simple chemical 
reaction

2 →

This coating is formed by soaking a standard Mg thin film in 1M NaOH for 24 Hours

Lorenz, Carla, and Johannes Brunner. "Effects of Surface Pre‐treatments on 
Biocompatibility of Magnesium." Acta Materialia 5 (2009): 2783‐789. Print.
Advantages of Mg(OH)2  Over Uncoated

This coating provides a 75% decrease in the Corrosion rate (100mpy to 25mpy)

Mg(OH)2 is beneficial to cell growth
MgF2 As An Alternative Coating

• Begin with Mg(OH)2
coating
• Treat this in 40% HF for 
96H

Hassel, Thomas, and Christian Krause. "Corrosion Protection and Repassivation after the Deformation of 
Magnesium Alloys Coated with a Protective Magnesium Fluoride Layer." Magnesium Technology (2005): 
485‐90. Web.
Advantages of MgF2 Coating

Break Down Voltage for MgF2 is 
significantly more positive than 
uncoated Mg (and Mg(OH)2)

Cracks caused by 
mechanical stress will 
repassivate naturally

Hassel, Thomas, and Christian Krause. "Corrosion Protection and Repassivation after the Deformation of 
Magnesium Alloys Coated with a Protective Magnesium Fluoride Layer." Magnesium Technology (2005): 
485‐90. Web.
References
• Hassel, Thomas, and Christian Krause. "Corrosion Protection and 
Repassivation after the Deformation of Magnesium Alloys Coated with a 
Protective Magnesium Fluoride Layer." Magnesium Technology (2005): 
485‐90. Web.
• Lorenz, Carla, and Johannes Brunner. "Effects of Surface Pre‐treatments on 
Biocompatibility of Magnesium." Acta Materialia 5 (2009): 2783‐789. 
Print.
• Staiger, M., A. Pietak, J. Huadmai, and G. Dias. "Magnesium and Its Alloys 
as Orthopedic Biomaterials: A Review." Biomaterials 27.9 (2006): 1728‐
734. Print.
Properties and Clinical Test: 
Magnesium Alloy Stents
Properties and Alloying Metals

Properties Alloying metals
• Biocompatible • Aluminum
• Magnesium is used in  • Manganese
processes in the body • Zinc
• Degrades in the body safely • Lithium
• Need to use an alloy  • Titanium
because Mg is very reactive  • Rare earth elements 
in body fluid (corrodes too 
fast)
Clinical Test: PROGRESS‐AMS 
• 63 patients with coronary artery disease
• Stents were place in their coronary artery
• Follow‐ups were conducted at 4, 6, and 12 
months
Outcome
• Magnesium based stents can be safely 
implanted and will degrade without blood 
clotting, dead tissue formation, or death at 
one year. 
• There was some re‐constriction of the stent.