Windows XP

Introduction

Windows XP

Introduction

Introduction
The Windows Desktop ................................................................................................................ 6
Desktop icons ...................................................................................................................................6

My Documents............................................................................................................................. 6
Targeting a Different Folder..............................................................................................................7

My Pictures .................................................................................................................................. 8
Viewing Images in Filmstrip View .....................................................................................................8

My Music .................................................................................................................................... 10 My Computer ............................................................................................................................. 10
My Computer Toolbar .....................................................................................................................12

My Network Places.................................................................................................................... 12 Recycle Bin................................................................................................................................ 13
Working with the Recycle Bin .........................................................................................................13

Internet Explorer ....................................................................................................................... 15 Window Controls....................................................................................................................... 15 View Options ............................................................................................................................. 16 Sorting and Grouping Icons..................................................................................................... 17
Grouping Files ................................................................................................................................18

Using Help ................................................................................................................................. 19
Searching for Topics.......................................................................................................................20

The Task Bar.............................................................................................................................. 21
Task Bar Options ............................................................................................................................21

Desktop Cleanup....................................................................................................................... 22 Changing your Password ......................................................................................................... 23 Locking your Computer............................................................................................................ 24 Logging Off................................................................................................................................ 25
Logging on ......................................................................................................................................26

Windows Explorer ..................................................................................................................... 26
The Explorer Toolbar......................................................................................................................27

Selecting Files & Folders.......................................................................................................... 28

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Common Tasks ......................................................................................................................... 29 Creating Folders........................................................................................................................ 31 Moving and Copying Files........................................................................................................ 32
Something Else to Try ....................................................................................................................33

Renaming Files & Folders ........................................................................................................ 33
Naming Multiple Files .....................................................................................................................34 Naming Conventions ......................................................................................................................34 Something to Consider ...................................................................................................................34

Deleting Files and Folders........................................................................................................ 35 The Recycle Bin ........................................................................................................................ 36
Working with the Recycle Bin .........................................................................................................36

Formatting Diskettes................................................................................................................. 38 Copying Diskettes ..................................................................................................................... 39 Using Send To ........................................................................................................................... 40 Searching for Files.................................................................................................................... 42
Found Files .....................................................................................................................................43

Setting File Properties .............................................................................................................. 44
Something Else to Try ....................................................................................................................44

Hidden Files............................................................................................................................... 45 Printing Files ............................................................................................................................. 47 The Print Queue ........................................................................................................................ 48 Sharing Printers ........................................................................................................................ 49 Mapping Network Drives .......................................................................................................... 50 Creating Shortcuts .................................................................................................................... 51
Shortcut Icons.................................................................................................................................51

The Quick Launch Bar .............................................................................................................. 53
Customising the Quick Launch Bar ................................................................................................53

Zipping Files .............................................................................................................................. 54
Unzipping Files ...............................................................................................................................54

Checking Disk Space ................................................................................................................ 56 Choosing Columns ................................................................................................................... 58 Start Menu Styles ...................................................................................................................... 59

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Customising the Start Menu..................................................................................................... 61
Customising the XP Start Menu .....................................................................................................61 Customising the Classic Start Menu ..............................................................................................62

Adding Items to the Start Menu ............................................................................................... 62 Setting the Date and Time ........................................................................................................ 63 Mouse Settings.......................................................................................................................... 65
Mouse Pointers...............................................................................................................................67

Regional Settings...................................................................................................................... 68
Keyboard Options ...........................................................................................................................69

Setting a Display Image ............................................................................................................ 70 Setting a Screen Saver ............................................................................................................. 72
Setting a Screen Saver Password..................................................................................................73 My Pictures Slideshow ...................................................................................................................73

Setting a Marquee Screen Saver.............................................................................................. 74
Setting a Marquee ..........................................................................................................................74

Windows Colours...................................................................................................................... 76 Themes....................................................................................................................................... 77
Creating a Theme ...........................................................................................................................78

Startup Programs...................................................................................................................... 79 Scheduled Tasks ....................................................................................................................... 79 Sounds ....................................................................................................................................... 81
Something Else to Try... .................................................................................................................82

Customising the Windows Toolbar ......................................................................................... 83 The Character Map .................................................................................................................... 85
Font Sets ........................................................................................................................................85

Multiple Applications ................................................................................................................ 86
Arranging Applications....................................................................................................................86

Tile Vertically ............................................................................................................................. 88 Tile Horizontally ........................................................................................................................ 89 Cascade Windows..................................................................................................................... 90 The Task Manager ..................................................................................................................... 91 Copying Between Applications................................................................................................ 92
Copying between Applications .......................................................................................................92

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Linking Between Applications ................................................................................................. 93
Linking Data....................................................................................................................................93

Maintaining Links...................................................................................................................... 95 Screen Shots ............................................................................................................................. 96
For Example ...................................................................................................................................96

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The Windows Desktop
The Windows XP screen is referred to as the desktop and displays the following standard icons:

The desktop is the area of Windows XP from which most tasks begin, including the following:

Launching applications Creating folders Adding and configuring printers Setting Windows options such as Screen savers Connecting to other resources on the network

Desktop icons
Click on the links below to learn more about the standard desktop icons:

Icon
My Documents My Computer My Network Places Recycle Bin Internet Explorer

Description Used to store files created in the various applications installed - can be accessed any time by double clicking on this icon on The Desktop. Used to display and work with the contents of your computer and manage the files stored on various drives of your computer. If your computer is attached to a network, this icon is used to work with available network resources such as shared folders and printers. Used as a temporary storage place for deleted files, this icon can be used to restore files deleted by mistake. Launches Internet Explorer to provide access to information on the World Wide Web.

My Documents
My Documents is the default folder in which applications will store any files you create. As this folder is accessible from the desktop, it is easy to open and edit documents stored here.

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Double click on the My Documents icon on the Windows Desktop to view all files and folders stored here. A default folder named My Pictures is created inside My Documents - this is where any images you create should be stored.

Targeting a Different Folder
My Documents can be accessed from the Windows Desktop and is always shown at the top of The Windows Explorer. As such, it can make finding and accessing your files much easier. However, you may not want to store your files on the C: drive in the default My Documents folder. Windows XP allows you to change the location of My Documents, pointing this folder to another folder on a local or network drive.

Right click on the My Documents icon of the Windows Desktop. Choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed. Ensure the Target tab is selected

Choose a new folder to become the My Documents target and click on OK Click on OK again when complete.

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My Pictures
A default folder named My Pictures is created inside My Documents - this is where any images you create should be stored. The reason this folder should be used is that it has a tool that allow you to view in detail any images stored here. When you double click on the My Pictures folder inside My Documents, a thumbnail of each image is displayed. When you position the mouse over a thumbnail, more information about the image is given.

Double-click on an image to preview the image in a new window:

Viewing Images in Filmstrip View
Folders containing only image files can be view in Filmstrip view. With this view, each image is shown as a thumbnail, with the selected image shown larger as a preview.

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The following buttons are displayed under the image: Button Description Show previous image in folder Show next image in folder Rotate image to the right Rotate image to the left

You can show the images in My Pictures as a slide show that fills your entire screen. To do this:

Open the My Pictures folder If the folder list or search pane is showing on the left of the screen, click on the Folders or Search button on the toolbar to hide these Click on the View as a Slide Show option in the common tasks pane Show the next image by pressing the right arrow key Show the previous image by pressing the left arrow key Press [Esc] to stop the show and return to Windows

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The following toolbar will display during a slide show:

My Music
A default folder named My Music is created inside My Documents - this is where any sounds you create should be stored. The reason this folder should be used is that it has a tool that allow you to view in detail any images stored here. When you double click on the My Music folder inside My Documents, an icon of each image is displayed, showing the name of the track, the artist and the album name. When you hover the mouse pointer over a thumbnail, more information about the music file will be displayed.

To play a music clip, double click on the file. Alternatively, right-click over the file and choose Play.

My Computer
My Computer is used to display and work with the contents of your computer, and to manage the files stored on various drives of your computer.

Files are stored on the various drives of your computer:

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Hard disk drives are stored permanently inside the system unit and are usually the main storage medium of a PC. Hard disks are large in capacity and as such are used to store the programs that you install on the computer, as well as any data you enter. Floppy disk drives are used to write data onto floppy disks - usually 3½ inches in size. Floppy disks can only hold a limited amount of information so are not used to store programs or large amounts of data. CD ROM drives are becoming increasingly popular, using laser technology to read from compact disks.

Each storage drive is assigned a letter by the operating system. The letters are usually as follows: Letter A B C D E-Z Drive Floppy disk drive Second floppy disk drive - if available Hard drive CD ROM drive Additional hard drives or network drives

To see the drives you have access to:

Double click on My Computer.
The resulting dialog box will display the drives you may access - the example below shows three hard drives, one DVD drive, one CD drive and one floppy disk drive:

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My Computer Toolbar
A toolbar can be displayed to offer shortcuts to commonly used features. Choose View, Toolbars and Standard Buttons to view the following toolbar:

My Network Places
My Network Places gives you access to the resources of the network your computer is connected to, including the following: File servers Print servers Other members of your workgroup Shared folders Web folders FTP Sites (see note below) Any other network resources such as scanners, plotters, etc.

When you double click on the My Network Places icon, you will be able to view resources on all computers of the network or only those computers in your workgroup. You can also add new network resources that you will be able to reconnect to at a later stage.

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Recycle Bin
The Recycle Bin is used as a temporary storage place for deleted files and can be used to restore files deleted in error. Only files deleted from local drives will be sent to the Recycle Bin, although it is possible to see if a file will be recycled by the confirmation message displayed when the file is deleted: The following message shows that the file will be sent to the Recycle Bin:

While the following message shows that the file will be deleted permanently:

Working with the Recycle Bin
It is possible to see whether the Recycle Bin contains files that can be restored. The following icons show a Recycle Bin containing files and an empty Recycle Bin respectively.

To view the contents of the Recycle Bin: Double click on the Recycle Bin icon on The Desktop. Right click on the file you wish to restore. Choose Restore.

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To empty the Recycle Bin, right click on the Recycle Bin icon and choose Empty Recycle Bin. Files cannot be restored once the Recycle Bin is empty.

It is also possible to delete all files when the Recycle Bin is open, or to restore all files back to their original locations.

Double click on the Recycle Bin icon on The Desktop. If the folder list is showing on the right, click on the Folder button on the toolbar to hide this and show
common tasks

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Internet Explorer
The Internet Explorer icon on The Desktop launches Internet Explorer - a web browser that allows you to access information from the computers that make up the World Wide Web, one of the many services offered on the Internet.

Once Internet Explorer is open, type the URL of the web page you wish to visit in the address bar, then click on Go to view the page.

Window Controls
A title bar is located along the top of each window, displaying the name of the window as well as the Minimise, Maximise and Close Buttons.

Click on Minimise to hide the window and place on the Task bar. Click on the Task bar button to restore the window. Click on Maximise to enlarge the window so that it fills the entire screen. Use the Restore button to return the window to its original size Click on the Close button to close the window Windows can also be resized manually by positioning the mouse pointer at the edge of the window and dragging as required. To change both the width and height of the window, position the mouse over the bottom right corner. A non-maximised window can be moved by positioning the mouse pointer anywhere on the Title Bar and dragging as required.

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View Options
The icons in Window Explorer or My Computer can be displayed in the following ways: View Thumbnail Description This will display a thumbnail of any images in the folder. A thumbnail is a small copy of the image itself. Documents such as Word and Excel files will show as large icons, while PowerPoint presentations will show the first slide in the presentation.

Tiles

Files are displayed as large icons with additional information such as the file type displayed:

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View Icons

Description Files appear as standard-sized icons with only the file name displayed.

List

Files are displayed as small icons in a single column list.

Details

File names are displayed as small icons with the file size, type and modification date and time.

To view files in a different way:

Choose View and the appropriate option or If the toolbar is displayed, click on the drop-down arrow of the View button and choose the appropriate option. If the toolbar is not displayed, choose View, Toolbars and Standard Buttons.
The View button

Sorting and Grouping Icons
Files can be sorted by choosing View, Arrange Icons and the appropriate option: Choose By Name to display files in alphabetical order of name Choose By Type to display files in alphabetical order of their extension Choose By Size to display files in descending order of their size Choose By Date to display files in order of the dates on which they were last modified

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In details view, you can sort files by clicking on the heading of the column you want to sort by e.g. click on Name to sort in ascending order of file name, then on Name again to sort in descending order.

Grouping Files
When any view except list is selected, you can group files by any information about that file e.g. by the letter that the file name starts with, or by the date on which the file was last modified.

Click on the heading you wish to group files by e.g. Name to group alphabetically Choose View, Arrange Icons By and Show in Groups
The following image shows files sorted by Type, then displayed in groups.

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Using Help
Help can be obtained in the following ways: Click on the Start Button and choose Help and Support or Press [F1]

Help is split into different categories to make searching easier:

The following toolbar displays in the help screen:

Button Back Forward Home Index

Description Display the previous help screen If Back has been used, this button will move forward to the page viewed before the current page. Go to the Help and Support home page Browse for help topics in the index

Favourites Quickly view help pages that you have saved History Support Options View pages that you've read in this help session Get online help Customise your help and support centre experience

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Searching for Topics
To use the Index to locate the required help topic:

Click on the Index button on the toolbar Click in the Type in the keyword to find box and begin typing the topic you wish to find help on. As soon as the topic is matched, a list of all related help pages will be displayed in the list below this box. Click once on the topic you wish to view. Click on Display. The following elements will show on help pages:

Help about a specific dialogue box option can be obtained by clicking on the question mark icon at the top-right of the dialogue box. Click on the option to display help as a screen tip.

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The Task Bar
The task bar is located along the bottom of the screen and is used to start and switch between applications.
A clock is displayed at the end of the taskbar:

Position the mouse over the clock to view the current date Double click over the clock to set the date and/or time.

The taskbar also displays all applications that are currently open. In the following example, both Word and PowerPoint are open.

Task Bar Options
Right click on a blank area of the task bar to view the following options: Option Toolbars Description This allows you to view multiple toolbars on the task bar. The Quick Launch toolbar is displayed by default - a toolbar containing all Desktop icons can also be viewed, as well as Address and Links bars for web browsing This allows you to set the date and time. This will restore all open applications and open them one behind the other on screen This will arrange all open applications vertically on screen, except those applications that have been minimised Page 21 of 97

Adjust Date and Time
Cascade Windows

Tile Windows Vertically

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Option
Tile Windows Horizontally

Description This will arrange open applications horizontally This will minimise all open application windows This displays the task manager which allows you to switch between active programs or close a program that is no longer running correctly This displays the current task bar and start menu settings and allows these to be customised as required

Minimise all Windows Task Manager Properties

Desktop Cleanup
The Desktop Cleanup wizard looks for shortcuts on your desktop that you haven't used for some time, asking if you want to hide these to avoid cluttering the desktop.

In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Change the Desktop Background link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon, then click on the Desktop tab.

To remove unused desktop icons: Click on the Customise Desktop button To automatically remove unused desktop icons every few months, check the box to Run Desktop Cleanup Wizard every 60 Days To manually remove unused desktop icons click Clean Desktop Now

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Click on the Next button to start the Wizard All shortcuts that haven't been used for some time will be checked. If you don't want to hide a shortcut, click its box to uncheck it Click on Next Click on Finish to confirm you wish to hide these shortcut icons
The shortcuts will be moved to a folder on your desktop named Unused Desktop Shortcuts. This folder can be removed if you no longer need these shortcuts.

Changing your Password
A password is used to secure your computer and to ensure no other user can access your files and directories. To be effective, a password should include at least three of the four following:

Upper case characters e.g. A B C Lower case characters e.g. a b c
Numeric characters e.g. 12 3

Special characters e.g. comma, period, /, [, -, =, +, !, #, $, etc.
In addition to this:

The password should be at least 8 characters in length The password must be different from your last 6 passwords The password should not contain your full first name or last name

You are responsible for ensuring that no one else knows your network password. Do not write down or store network passwords where others can find them.

To change your Windows XP login password: Press [Ctrl Alt Delete] to display the Security dialogue box. Click on Change Password.

Enter your current password. Click in the New Password box and type your new password. Retype the password in the Confirm New Password box. Choose OK. © Hewlett-Packard 2004 Page 23 of 97

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Locking your Computer
If you are leaving your desk for a short period, you can lock your computer without having to exit any applications or close the documents you are currently working with. When the computer is locked, the screen is blank except for a message giving the workstation's status. The correct password is needed to return to the applications and documents previously open. To lock your computer at any time: Press [Ctrl Alt Delete] to display the Security window
Click on Lock Computer.

When the computer is locked, a dialogue box will display, explaining that the computer is in use but locked.

To unlock the computer: Press [Ctrl Alt Delete] Ensure the correct user name is entered in the User Name box.
Click on the Password box and enter your login password. Click on OK.

All applications and files you were working on will still be available when you lock then unlock your computer.

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Logging Off
When you end your Windows XP session you have a number of choices:

You can logoff the system All applications will be closed but the computer will still be switched on - you can login again any time you need to. You can shut the system down. This will logoff and switch the computer off - it will need to be restarted if you wish to use it again.

It is common policy to logoff Windows XP when you will be away from your computer for some time e.g. at lunchtime or if you will be in a meeting for a few hours. Shut the system down at the end of each day. To logoff the system: Click on the Start menu and choose Log Off or Press [Ctrl Alt Delete] to display the Security window, then click on Log Off A message will display asking if you are sure you want to logoff. Click on Yes to do this or No to return to Windows XP.

To shut down the system: Click on the Start menu and choose Shut Down or Press [Ctrl Alt Delete] to display the Security window, then click on Shut Down A dialogue box will display asking what you want the computer to do. Click on the drop-down arrow and choose Shut Down. Click on OK.

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Logging on
To log on after you have switched off or logged off your machine: Type your user name - this will be provided by your system administrator Click the mouse pointer in the Password box and type your password - again, this will be provided Click on OK

Windows Explorer
Although it is possible to Manage files and folders through My Computer, Windows XP contains a separate application that can be used to manage your computer drives. This application is called the Explorer and can be accessed in the following way: Click on the Start Button. In the XP Start menu, choose All Programs or in the classic Start menu choose Programs Choose Accessories Choose Windows Explorer.

You can also open Windows Explorer by pressing the Windows key

and E.

The Windows XP Explorer screen is split into two sections: The left section shows the drives on your computer, the Windows XP settings folders and the Recycle Bin The right section shows the folders and files contained in the drive selected on the left.

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The Explorer Toolbar
A toolbar can be displayed to offer shortcuts to commonly used features. Choose View, Toolbars and Standard Buttons to view the following toolbar:

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Selecting Files & Folders
Files in The Windows Explorer or My Computer dialogue box can be selected in one of the following ways: To select a single file, click once on the file. To select multiple files in a continuous list, click once on the first file and hold [Shift] while clicking on the last file in the list:

To select multiple files that are not listed continuously, click once on the first file and hold [Ctrl] while clicking on each remaining file.

To select all files in the current folder, choose Edit, Select All or press [Ctrl A]. To select all files in the current folder except those currently selected, choose Edit, Invert Selection.

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Common Tasks
You can show common tasks for the selected file, so that you can perform common actions with the single click of the mouse. To ensure common tasks are enabled:

Open My Computer or Windows Explorer Choose Tools, Folder Options On the General tab, ensure Show Common Tasks in Folders is selected Click on OK

Common tasks will only show if the Folders and Search explorer bars are not displayed.

If the folder list is showing on the left of the screen, click on the Folders button on the toolbar to hide this If the search pane is showing on the left of the screen, click on the Search button on the toolbar to hide this

The tasks shown on the left will change depending on the type of folder that the file you have selected is in, for example: These tasks will show for documents e.g. Word or Excel files:

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These tasks will show for images:

These tasks will show for music files:

To change the folder type, to ensure the correct tasks are showing:

Right-click over the folder you wish to change Choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed Click on the Customise tab Click on the drop-down arrow of the Use this folder type as a template box and choose the type of files that are stored in the folder Click on OK

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Creating Folders
Instead of storing all files in one place, which would make it difficult for you or the computer to find them, files are stored in folders on the various drives. The following is a typical folder structure - the hard drive contains a folder named Data which in turn contains two sub-folders named Excel and Word.

Folders can be created in Windows Explorer or using My Computer. Select the drive and folder to contain the new folder. Choose File, New, Folder. Type a name for the new folder and press [Return].

If you common tasks pane is showing, you can create a new folder as follows:

Ensure no files are currently selected Click on the Create New Folder link on the task pane

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Moving and Copying Files
Files can be moved or copied using the standard Cut, Copy and Paste commands which are available in the Edit menu or the Toolbar. Select the files to be moved or copied Choose Edit, Copy to copy the file or Edit, Cut to move the file Double click on the folder to contain the moved or copied should appear Choose Edit, Paste to insert the file You can also move files using the Move to Folder or Copy to Folder option: Select the files to be moved or copied Choose Edit, then Move to Folder or Copy to Folder Choose the folder you wish to move or copy the selected files to and click on OK.

The following shortcut keys can be used to move and copy files: Keystroke Ctrl C Ctrl X Ctrl V Action Copy Cut Paste

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Something Else to Try
Files can also be moved or copied using drag and drop. This is especially useful in Windows Explorer where all folders are displayed: Ensure the target folder is currently visible on screen. Select the file you wish to move or copy. Drag the file to the target folder and release the mouse button. To copy the file(s), hold [Ctrl] while dragging and release the mouse button before releasing the [Ctrl] key.

It is also possible to drag files between folders using the right mouse button. When the mouse button is released, you will be given the choice to move or copy the file.

Choose Move Here to move the file from the original to the new location Choose Copy Here to leave the file in the original location while placing a copy in the new location. If either copy is updated in any way, the other will not be affected. Choose Create Shortcut(s) Here to leave the file in the original location while creating a pointer to that file in the new location. Regardless of which copy is accessed, all changes will be made to the original file.

Renaming Files & Folders
Files and folders can be renamed as follows: Click once on the file or folder you wish to rename. Choose File, Rename. Type a new name for the file and press [Return].

There are a number of shortcuts for renaming files:

Click once on the file you wish to rename, wait a second and click on the file again. Alternatively, press [F2]. A box will appear around the file name. Type a new name and press [Return].

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Naming Multiple Files
You can rename a number of files in a single step in Windows XP. The files will be named in sequence e.g. if you change the name of the first file to report.doc other files will be named report (1).doc, report (2).doc, etc.

Click on the first file you wish to rename, then hold [Shift] and click on the last file in the list. All files in between will be selected Right-click over the first file and choose Rename from the shortcut menu displayed Type a name for the series of files - remember to end this with a full stop and the file extension Press [Return]

Naming Conventions
Windows XP can accept filenames up to 215 characters in length, although this must include the drive letter and folder path. File names can include spaces, but cannot include the following characters:

\ * :

/ ? ;

> "

< |

Something to Consider
Always take care when using long filenames if you use applications that were created for Windows 3.1 or MS DOS. These programs will not accept long filenames and will rename the files. A file named Letter to Smith.doc would be renamed LETTER~1.DOC A second document named Letter to Jones.doc would be renamed LETTER~2.DOC There is no way to see which is which from the DOS file names.

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Deleting Files and Folders
Files and folders can be deleted in Windows Explorer, or via My Computer. Bear in mind that if a folder is deleted, all files contained within that folder will also be removed. A single file or folder can be deleted by simply clicking on the file or folder and choosing one of the following options. Multiple files must be selected before they can be deleted in a single step. Files and folders can be deleted in one of the following ways: Choose File, Delete. Press the right mouse button and choose Delete from the shortcut menu. Press [Delete]. Click on the Delete this File link on the common tasks pane if this is displayed

A confirmation dialogue box will be displayed. Click on Yes to delete the file(s) or No to leave the files as is. If the following message box is displayed, the file will not be deleted immediately. Instead, it will be placed in the Recycle Bin where it can be restored at a later stage if required.

The selected files can be deleted permanently without placing them in the Recycle Bin:

Press [Shift Delete]. Choose Yes from the confirmation dialogue box.

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The Recycle Bin
The Recycle Bin is used as a temporary storage place for deleted files and can be used to restore files deleted in error. Only files deleted from local drives will be sent to the Recycle Bin, although it is possible to see if a file will be recycled by the confirmation message displayed when the file is deleted: The following message shows that the file will be sent to the Recycle Bin:

While the following message shows that the file will be deleted permanently:

Working with the Recycle Bin
It is possible to see whether the Recycle Bin contains files that can be restored. The following icons show a Recycle Bin containing files and an empty Recycle Bin respectively.

To view the contents of the Recycle Bin: Double click on the Recycle Bin icon on The Desktop. Right click on the file you wish to restore. Choose Restore.

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To empty the Recycle Bin, right click on the Recycle Bin icon and choose Empty Recycle Bin. Files cannot be restored once the Recycle Bin is empty.

It is also possible to delete all files when the Recycle Bin is open, or to restore all files back to their original locations.

Double click on the Recycle Bin icon on The Desktop. If the folder list is showing on the right, click on the Folder button on the toolbar to hide this and show
common tasks

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Formatting Diskettes
Formatting prepares a new floppy disk so that data can be stored on it. Although most diskettes now come pre-formatted, you may sometimes want to reformat a disk to clear all data and ensure the disk is in proper working order before storing important documents on the disk. When a disk is formatted, any data already stored on the disk will be deleted and cannot be restored! Open My Computer or Windows Explorer. Insert the diskette into the disk drive. Right click over the disk drive icon - this will usually be A: Choose Format from the shortcut menu displayed. Ensure the correct disk size is shown and enter a volume label if required.

Click on Start to begin formatting. At the warning message, click on OK to continue with the format, removing all data from the diskette, or Cancel to leave the diskette as is. When the formatting is complete, click on OK then on Close.

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Copying Diskettes
This command allows you to duplicate disks to create an exact copy of all data stored on the disk.

Open My Computer or Windows Explorer. Insert the diskette into the disk drive. Right click over the disk drive icon - this will usually be A: Choose Copy Disk from the shortcut menu displayed.

Click on Start. Ensure the disk containing the data you wish to copy is in the disk drive and click on OK. The data will be copied to memory. When prompted, insert the disk you wish to copy the data to and click on OK. Click on Close when the dialogue box displays a message that the copy completed successfully.
Any data current stored on the destination diskette will be removed during the operation!

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Using Send To
The send to command allows you to copy files quickly to common locations e.g. floppy drives or email messages. Select the files you wish to copy. Press the right mouse button over any of the selected files to display the shortcut menu. Choose Send to and the appropriate location.

If you repeatedly copy files to the same location e.g. a specific folder, this can be set as a new item in the Send to menu. Open The Windows Explorer using Start, Programs, Accessories, Windows Explorer. Locate the folder you wish to add to the Send to list and ensure this folder is selected. Choose Edit, Copy. Locate and open the Documents and Settings folder, then double click on the folder showing your login name. If the Send to folder is not displayed by default, choose Tools, Folder Options and the View tab. In the Advanced Settings list, choose to show hidden files and folders.

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Double click on the Send to folder to open it. Choose Edit, Paste Shortcut. The location will now be added to the Send to list. The shortcut can be renamed by pressing [F2] and entering a new name. When the Send To command is used, the new location will be given as an option:

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Searching for Files
It is possible to find a file based on its name, type, modification date or content: Click on the Start button. Choose Search The following options are displayed:

If you're not sure of the type of file you're looking for, click on All files and folders

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Use the When was it modified? option to find a file that has been created, modified or last accessed between specific dates - or over any number of months or days. Use the What size is it? option to find files above or below a specific size. Use More advanced options to specify whether subfolders should be searched and whether the search text is case sensitive. Click on Search to begin searching. Any files located will be listed in the right pane of the Search window.

Found Files
All found files from a search are collected together in a temporary folder called Search Folders.

Click on the Folders button to show the folder list Click on the Folders button again to hide the folder list and show common tasks
You can now use the common tasks to rename, move, copy, email, print or delete a selected found file.

Wildcards allow you search for files by entering only some of the characters from the file name. The wildcards are used to indicate that other characters could be inserted at the wildcard position. The following wildcard characters can be used: Wildcard Can Substitute * ? Example

Any characters D*.doc would locate all Word documents starting with the letter D Any single character D??.doc would find all Word documents starting with the letter D that only have 3 characters in their filename

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Setting File Properties
The properties of a file can be viewed to see the following information about that file: The name and type of file The program that the file will be opened with The drive and folder in which the file is stored The size of the file The date on which the file was created, last modified and last accessed File attributes Properties for the selected file can be displayed in one of the following ways: Choose File, Properties. Press [Alt Enter]. Right click on the file and choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed. The following file attributes can also be set in the properties dialogue box:

Something Else to Try
It is also possible to set additional properties for the selected file, such as a rating or keywords associated with the file. Show the File properties in any of the ways described above. Click on the Summary tab. Enter all properties and click on OK when complete.

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You can turn the Read Only setting on or off for all files in a folder by right-clicking over the folder name and choosing Properties. When you click on OK, you'll be asked if you wish to apply the change to all files or the selected file only.

Hidden Files
System files needed to run Windows XP are hidden and don't automatically show in My Computer or Windows Explorer. You can hide your own files, to avoid selecting or editing them accidentally. To hide a file:

Right-click over the file you wish to hide Choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed On the General tab, check the Hidden box Click on OK

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To show all hidden files:

Open My Computer or Windows Explorer Choose Tools, Folder Options Click on the View tab Under Hidden Files and Folders, choose the Show hidden files and folders option Click on OK

The following file list shows the budget.xls file in a lighter colour, indicating that this is a hidden file that will not display unless hidden files are shown:

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Printing Files
Any file can be printed through My Computer or Windows Explorer - there is no need to first open the application in which the file was created.

Right click over the file you wish to print. Choose Print from the shortcut menu.

The application in which the file was created will be launched automatically and the document printed without any further options being displayed. When the document has been printed, the application will close automatically.

It is also possible to drag and drop files to print them - this is especially useful if you have shortcuts to commonly used printers on your desktop. Use My Computer or Windows Explorer to locate the file you wish to print. Ensure the printer you wish to print to is currently in view - either as a shortcut on the desktop, or through Start, Settings and Printers. Click once on the file and drag it over the icon for the printer you wish to use.

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The Print Queue
The Printers dialogue box can be used to view documents waiting to be printed. Click on the Start menu. Choose Printers and Faxes Double click on a printer to see the queue of documents:

When a document is printing, a printer icon will display at the end of the task bar. This can be double clicked to view the queue on the printer being used.

If there is an error with printing e.g. the printer is switched off, or out of paper, the print icon will show a question mark:

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Sharing Printers
If you have access to a local printer, you can set the printer as shared so that other network users can access this printer. Shared printers appear with a hand under then in the Printer dialogue box:

To set up a local printer as shared: Click on the Start menu In the XP Start menu, choose Printers and Faxes or in the classic Start menu choose Settings,
Printers and Faxes

Right click over the printer you wish to share and choose Sharing. Choose Share this Printer and enter a suitable name for the printer. Click on OK

To connect to a shared printer, double click on Add Printer and click on Next. Click on Next again, then enter the name of the shared printer in the Name box. Click on Next then on Finish.

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Mapping Network Drives
You may have been given access to a different shared network area that does not connect automatically when you log onto Windows. To connect to such a network drive, you will need to know the full path of that drive, and your password for that drive if this is different to your standard Windows network password.

Open Windows Explorer or My Computer Choose Tools, Map Network Drive From the Drive drop-down list, choose the letter you wish to associate with the network drive. This is the letter you will double click on at a later stage to access the files stored in this network area. Click in the Path box and enter the full path of the network drive. This will be in the format \\server\folder Click on Finish to connect to the drive

If you have a different password for this network drive, click on the Different User Name link before clicking on Finish. Type the user name and password used to access the drive, then click on OK.

You can disconnect the drive by right clicking on it and choosing Disconnect.

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Creating Shortcuts
Shortcuts can be created for commonly used applications, files, folders and printers. Shortcuts are placed directly on The Desktop and are accessed by double clicking the icon. A shortcut can be identified by the black curved arrow at the bottom-left of the icon. When the shortcut is deleted, the original file will remain in its original location.

To create a shortcut to an item and place this on the desktop:

Find the application, file, folder or printer you wish to create a shortcut to Click once on the object to select it Right click over the object and choose Send To Choose Desktop (create shortcut)

The Create Shortcut command in the menu will create a shortcut and place it in the same folder as the original file - this will not place the shortcut on the desktop.

Shortcut Icons
The icon that shows on the shortcut can be changed as follows:

Right click over the shortcut. Choose Properties from the shortcut menu.

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Click on Change Icon. Click in the File Name box and enter one of the names given below. Choose the required icon from the list displayed. Click on OK.
The following files contain general icons that can be assigned to any shortcut. Add the name to the end of the File Name box, after the last backslash (\).

File Name SHELL32.DLL

Example Icons

PIFMGR.DLL

A keystroke can be assigned to a shortcut. When the key is pressed with [Ctrl] and [Alt] held down, the shortcut will be launched. Right click over the shortcut. Choose Properties from the shortcut menu. Click in the Shortcut Key box and press the key you wish to assign to the shortcut - this can be a letter, number or symbol such as + or =. Click on OK.

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If you always want the shortcut to be launched as a minimised window, choose Minimized from the Run dropdown list in the shortcut's Properties dialogue box.

The Quick Launch Bar
The Quick Launch Bar is located on the task bar along the bottom of the screen and is used to launch applications and utilities that are used on a regular basis.
The Quick Launch Bar contains the following buttons by default:

The Quick Launch Bar can be customised to contain shortcuts to commonly used applications and files. As the task bar is always visible, these shortcuts will be available when any application is running.

If the quick launch bar does not show by default, right-click over a blank area of the task bar and choose Toolbars then Quick Launch.

Customising the Quick Launch Bar
To add a shortcut to the quick launch bar: Find the application, file, folder or printer you wish to create a shortcut to

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Click once on the object, then drag it to the quick launch bar - a black line will indicate the position of the object on the bar. Release the mouse button to create the shortcut.

When a shortcut is created in this way, the actual file stays in its original location while the shortcut acts as a pointer to this file. When you click on the shortcut, the original file is opened.

To remove a shortcut from the quick launch bar: Position the mouse pointer over the shortcut you wish to remove. Click the right mouse button to display a menu. Choose Delete.

Zipping Files
The zip option lets you compress your files - making them much smaller and therefore easier to copy or send via email.

Select the files you wish to compress Right-click over the selected files and choose Send To, then Compressed (zipped) folder A zip folder will be created with the same name as the last selected file, but with the .zip extension

To view the contents of the zipped file, double click on the zip file icon. The original files will be listed and can be opened, copied or deleted as normal.

Unzipping Files
If you are sent a zip file, you can extract the files so that they appear normally in your folder.

Double click on the zip file Click on the Extract all files task on the left-hand side

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Click on Next to start the Extraction Wizard Choose the folder you want to extract the files to - you can type this or use the Browse button to locate it

Click on Next Click on Finish to show the unzipped files in a new window

It's also possible to extract specific files from the zipped folder:

Double click on the zip file to open it Click on the file you wish to extract, then choose Edit, Copy Click on the Folders button on the toolbar to show the folder list Click on the folder you wish to extract the file into Choose Edit, Paste

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Checking Disk Space
It is useful to check your disk space regularly to ensure you have enough room to the files you will create on a day to day basis. If you find disk space is running low, follow our Get there Quicker tips and tricks to increase the space you have. To check the space available on a drive:

In Windows Explorer or My Computer, click once the My Computer icon On the right-hand side of the window, click once on the drive you wish to check. Ensure the Search and Folder icons on the toolbar are not pressed down so that common tasks for the
drive are displayed

To show a graphic representation of your disk space:

In Windows Explorer or My Computer, right-click over the drive you wish to check.
Choose Properties from the shortcut menu

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Keep the following in mind when trying to make the most of your disk space: Regularly delete files you no longer need! Empty your Recycle Bin. If you simply delete files, they are just being moved from their original location to the Recycle Bin and still taking up the same disk space. Only when you empty your Recycle Bin will you be freeing up space. Temp files are created by many programs and should be deleted regularly. Search for all files with the .TMP extension and delete all files that are found. Defragment your disk drives to ensure the minimum amount of space is being used for your files.

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Choosing Columns
If you are using the details view in the Explorer or My Computer, it is possible to choose the information that is displayed about each file and folder listed. By default, the following columns are displayed: The Name column shows the name of the file The Size column shows the size of the file in kilobytes The Type column shows the type of document or its filename extension The Modified column shows the date and time that the file was last changed

To display additional information about each file: Choose View, Choose Details. Choose the columns you wish to display and click on OK.

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You can show additional columns by right-clicking over the column headings currently displayed. Click on the column you wish to show from the list displayed.

Start Menu Styles
The Start menu of Windows XP can be shown in two ways: The Windows XP start menu shows options in two columns, with all recently accessed programs showing on the left. You can add programs to the top of this column so that they show here permanently, and can control which icons appear in the right column e.g. My Documents, BBC Computer, etc. The Classic start menu is similar to the start menu of Windows 98 and 2000, but can be customised by adding and removing programs

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XP Start menu

Classic Start menu

To change the start menu style:

Right-click over the Start menu Choose Properties To show the XP style, choose Start Menu. To show the classic style, choose Classic Start Menu Click on OK

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Customising the Start Menu
You can customise the Start menu by adding or removing options.

Right-click over the Start button and choose Properties Choose the style of Start menu you wish to show Click on the Customise button

Customising the XP Start Menu
if you are using the new XP style of Start Menu:

Choose Small Icons to fit more options on the start menu By default, the Start menu will show the last 12 programs you have accessed. You can increase or decrease this number if required Ensure the Internet and Email icons are checked to add these icons permanently to the left-hand side of the Start menu
Click on the Advanced tab for more options:

In the Start Menu Items list, check each item you wish to appear on the right of the start menu. To show your Internet Explorer favourites, for example, check the Favorites option Click on OK when all settings have been changed

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Customising the Classic Start Menu
Under Advanced Start Menu Options, choose each item you wish to display in the Start menu. Click on OK when complete.

Adding Items to the Start Menu
You can customise the Start menu by adding folders and shortcuts through Windows Explorer. This applies to both the XP and classic Start menu style.

Right-click over the Start button and choose Explore from the shortcut menu The Start Menu folder will open automatically, with a subfolder called Programs
To create a top-level folder on the Start menu:

Choose File, New and Folder Type a name for the folder and press [Return] Double click on the new folder or press [Return] again to open this folder
This new folder... Would show like this in the Classic Start menu

To place a shortcut to a file in this folder:

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Switch back to the window containing the new Start menu folder Choose Edit, Paste Shortcut

If you are using the XP-style Start menu, you can add any program to the top of the left-hand side of the menu as follows:

Click on the Start menu and choose All Programs Locate the program you want to add to the top level of the Start menu e.g. click on Accessories to locate the calculator Right-click over the program and choose Pin to Start menu

Right-click over a program on the top-left of the Start menu and choose Unpin from Start Menu to remove it from the top of the Start menu.

Setting the Date and Time
The date and time can be set as follows: In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Date, Time, Language and Regional Options category Click on the Change the Date and Time link

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If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Date and Time icon.

To change the date/time:

Change the date by choosing the required month, year and day:

Click on the hour, minute or second in the Time box and increase or decrease as required. Choose OK when complete.

You can also change the date and time by double clicking on the time display at the end of the task bar.

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Mouse Settings
The following mouse settings can be changed: The speed of double-clicks The speed at which the mouse moves across the screen Whether the mouse leaves a trail across the screen as it moves Whether the mouse is set for right or left-handed use The mouse pointer shape
To set these options:

In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Printers and Other Hardware option Click on the Mouse link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Mouse icon.

To change mouse settings:

To set the mouse for left-handed use, click on the Buttons tab and check the Switch Primary and Secondary Buttons check box Change the double-click speed by changing the slider on the Buttons tab.

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Click on the Pointer Options tab and set the speed of the mouse pointer. Test the new speed by moving the mouse around the screen. Show a trail as the mouse moves across the screen by checking the Display Pointer Trails option. If you wish the mouse to move to the main button of a dialogue box automatically, so you can click the button without any further mouse movement, check the Snap to box. Click on OK.
Pointer trails are useful if you are using a laptop computer with poor screen display as they help you to locate the mouse pointer on the screen.

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Mouse Pointers
Different mouse pointer shapes can be set to show completely different pointers or just larger or different coloured arrows. This is done using the Pointers tab of the Mouse properties dialog box: Show the Mouse dialog box as described above Click on the Pointers tab. Choose the pointer scheme you wish to use and change any of the individual pointers that make up that scheme. Click on OK when complete.

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Regional Settings
Regional settings control many options used by the applications installed on your PC. Settings such as the currency symbol used by Excel and the date format used by Access can be set as follows: In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Date, Time, Language and Regional Options category Click on the Change the format of numbers, dates and times link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Regional and Language Options icon.

Ensure the correct region is selected in the first drop-down list, then choose all other options as required:

Customise the country’s setting using the remaining tabs of the Region Settings dialogue box and choose OK when complete. Tab Numbers Currency Time Date Input Locales Description Used to set the decimal symbol, negative number format and measurement unit Used to set the currency symbol and format Used to set the format in which times will be displayed and inserted Used to set the format in which both long and short dates will be displayed and inserted Used to ensure the keyboard is set for the correct language (see below)

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Keyboard Options
If your keyboard is set for the wrong language and keys are not displaying the required characters, this can be rectified as follows:

In the Regional and Language Options dialog box, click on the Languages tab Click on the Details button If the correct language is not displayed, click on Add Choose the required language from the drop-down list and click on OK Choose the language you wish to use as the default from the Default Input Language drop-down list Choose OK when complete

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Setting a Display Image
The Desktop background pattern can be changed a picture - either a preset Windows image or any other picture you have stored on your computer. The following desktops are set with the Vortec Space and Soap Bubbles pictures respectively:

In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Change the Desktop Background link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon, then click on the Desktop tab.

To set a display image, choose from the standard Windows images in the Background list, or choose a custom image as follows:

Click on the Browse button Locate the image you wish to use, then click on Open Choose the Position for the image (see table below) Choose OK when complete.

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The following position settings are available: Setting Centre Tile Stretch Description The image will show in its original size, in the centre of the desktop. If the image is smaller than the desktop size, the selected desktop colour will show around the image. The image will show in its original size, but repeated from left to right and top to bottom across the screen The image will be resized to fit the entire desktop

Display properties can also be set pointing to a blank area of The Desktop and clicking the right mouse button. Choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed.

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Setting a Screen Saver
Screen savers are used to prevent burn-out of the screen if it is left switched on for too long. After a specified amount of time the screen saver will appear and, as it is constantly moving, will protect the screen from becoming damaged. To set the screen saver: In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Choose a Screen Saver link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon, then click on the Screen Saver tab.

Select the required Screen Saver from the list of choices and set the Wait box to the number of minutes that should pass before the screen saver is activated.

If you wish to assign a password to the screen saver, check the Password Protected box and click on Change. Type and confirm the new password and choose OK. If you wish to set further options such as the speed of the screen saver and text displayed in the 3D Text and Marquee Display options, click on Settings and choose the required settings. Choose OK when complete. © Hewlett-Packard 2004 Page 72 of 97

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Click on Preview to view the screen saver. Move the mouse to return to the dialogue box. Click on OK when complete.

Setting a Screen Saver Password
It's a good idea to password protect your screensaver. This means that if you are away from your computer and your screensaver is activated, you will need to enter your login password to clear it. This is a good security measure as it means no-one else can access your email and shared data drives while you away from your computer. To set a password on your screen saver

In the screen saver window, check the On resume, password protect box Click on OK
If you move the mouse or use the keyboard while your screensaver is showing, you will need to enter your password before continuing to use the computer.

The Locked Computer dialog box will show - press [Ctrl Alt Delete] Type your network password in the Password box Click on OK or press [Return]

My Pictures Slideshow
Choose the My Pictures Slideshow screen saver to show the images in any folder at random as a slide show when the screen saver is activated.

Click on the Settings button Set how often each image should change using the first slider Set the size of the images using the second slider If you don't want to use the standard My Pictures folder, click on the Browse button to choose the folder that holds your images. Click on OK to return to the screen saver window. Click on OK to set the screensaver

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Display properties can also be set pointing to a blank area of the desktop and clicking the right mouse button. Choose Properties from the shortcut menu displayed.

Setting a Marquee Screen Saver
Probably the most useful screen saver is the marquee display. This can be used to show a message on your computer screen when the screen saver is activated, for example: That you are at a meeting and will be back at a certain time That you are out but can be contacted on a mobile number That all enquiries should be made through the receptionist

Setting a Marquee
To set a scrolling message as a screen saver: In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Choose a Screen Saver link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon, then click on the Screen Saver tab.

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To set the marquee:

Select the Marquee Display option from the list of screen saver choices. Click in the Wait box and enter the number of minutes you wish to pass before the screen saver is activated. Click on Settings and enter the appropriate details:

Click on Format Text to change the appearance of the message text:

Click on OK to set the font and size of the message. Click on OK again to set the marquee options.

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Click on Preview to view the screen saver. Move the mouse to return to the dialogue box. Click on OK when complete.

Windows Colours
You can set the colours used in all Windows dialog boxes, menus, and other elements. In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Display icon

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon.

To set Windows colours: Click on the Appearance tab From the Windows and Buttons drop-down list, choose the style of window you want to show this can be the classic 98/2000 style or the new XP style with rounded corners. A sample will display when you choose either option From the Colour Scheme drop-down list, choose the colours you wish to use. Again, a sample will display From the Font Size list, choose the size you wish to use for text in menus, dialog boxes, etc. This can be normal, large or extra large

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If you want to change a single colour in your new scheme, you can click on the Advanced button.

Themes
Windows XP has a number of built-in themes that can be applied to your desktop. A theme controls the appearance of your desktop by setting a wallpaper image, screensaver, colour scheme and other options. The Windows XP theme is used by default, but you can switch to the classic Windows look if you prefer: To select a theme: In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Appearance and Themes option Click on the Change the Computer's Theme link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Display icon, then click on the Theme tab.

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To choose a new Windows theme: Click on the drop-down arrow of the Theme box and choose the theme you wish to use Click on Apply to apply the theme and keep the Display Properties window open, or on OK to
apply the theme and close the window

Creating a Theme
You can save all of your display settings in a single theme that you can apply in a single step if your settings change in the future. To create a new theme from the current display settings:

Show the Display Properties window as described above Ensure the Themes tab is selected Click on the Save As button Type a name for the theme in the File name box Click on Save to save the theme in the default folder
Your theme will now be available in the drop-down list and can be selected in the same way as described above.

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Startup Programs
If you always need to use the same programs or files when you first switch on your PC, you can save time by adding them to your startup folder so that they launch automatically when Windows XP is launched. To add a program or file to your startup folder:

Click on the Start menu to locate the program you want to create a shortcut to. To add a shortcut to an Office XP program, for example, choose All Programs then Microsoft Office Right-click over the program you want to create a shortcut to Choose Copy Right-click on the Startup option in the All Programs menu Choose Open Choose Edit, Paste Shortcut

If a program is added to your startup menu, it will be launched each time Windows XP starts. To start Windows XP without launching programs in your startup folder, enter your login name and password as normal but hold [Shift] while clicking on OK, releasing only when Windows XP has finished loading.

Scheduled Tasks
The task scheduler allows you to specify a time to complete certain tasks such as cleaning up your hard drive to delete unnecessary files. By scheduling these tasks, they can be carried out when you are not using your computer e.g. late at night or on a Saturday.

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Choose Scheduled Tasks. Double click on Add Scheduled Task.

The scheduled task wizard will begin: Read the introductory screen and click on Next. Choose the program you wish to run at the scheduled time e.g. Disk Cleanup to delete unnecessary files. Click on Next. Enter a name for the task and choose how often you wish to run the task:

Click on Next and enter the time you wish to task to begin. Enter other details specific to the chosen interval. If you have chosen to run the task each week, for example:

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Click on Next. Enter your Windows user name and password and click on Next. Click on Finish to complete the task.
To change the details of a schedule task e.g. the time it will run, right click over the task and choose Properties. Use the Schedule tab to change timing details.

Once you have set a scheduled task, it is enabled by default. This means that the task will run at the specified time without any further instructions. It is possible to disable a task to stop it from being run without the need to delete it. Right click over the scheduled task and choose Properties. Uncheck the Enabled box at the bottom of the Task tab. Choose OK.

Sounds
By default, certain sounds are played when Windows XP or your programs behave in certain ways. For example: A sound is played each time you launch Windows XP A sound is played when you get an error message in Word, Excel or PowerPoint

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Windows XP

Introduction

If you prefer, you can turn off all sounds so that these do not play automatically.

In the XP Start menu, choose Control Panel or in the classic Start menu choose Settings, Control Panel Click on the Sounds, Speech and Audio Devices option Click on the Change the sound scheme link

If your control panel is displayed in classic view, double-click on the Sounds and Audio Devices icon, then click on the Sounds tab.

To turn off all sounds:

Click on the drop-down arrow of the Sound Scheme box Choose No Sounds Click on OK

Something Else to Try...
If you often play music or other sounds on your computer, you can add the volume icon to your task bar tray so that you can change your volume quickly and easily.

In the Sounds and Audio devices window of the Control Panel, click on the Volume tab Check the Place volume icon in the taskbar option Click on OK

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Windows XP

Introduction

You can change your computer volume by clicking on the sound icon in the task bar tray:

Customising the Windows Toolbar
You can customise the Windows toolbar by adding and removing icons.

Open My Computer or Windows Explorer Choose View, Toolbars then Customise
All buttons currently on the toolbar will be listed on the right-hand side of the screen. To add a new button to the toolbar:

Scroll down the left-hand list to find the button you wish to add Click on the button you wish to add Click on the Add button Click on the new button on the right-hand side of the screen, then use the Move Up or Move Down button to move it to the correct place on the toolbar

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Windows XP

Introduction

You can change toolbar options as follows:

From the Text Options list, choose how you want text to appear on the toolbar - for all buttons, selected buttons or not at all From the Icon Options list, choose the size of icons - large or small Click on OK when complete

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Windows XP

Introduction

The Character Map
Many programs, such as Word and PowerPoint, provide the facility to include symbols that do not appear on the standard keyboard. If you are using a program that does not offer this facility, symbols can be obtained from the Windows XP Character map.

Choose Start, All Programs, Accessories and System Tools. Choose Character map. From the Font drop-down list, choose the font set that contains the symbol you wish to insert (see table below). Click on the symbol required, then on Select. Repeat the above step until you have all characters you wish to use. Click on Copy.

Close the character map by clicking on the close button in the top-right corner of the dialogue box. Activate the application you wish to paste the characters into. Choose Edit, Paste or press [Ctrl V].

It may be necessary to format the inserted characters to the same font under which they were found in the character map.

Font Sets
The following generic font sets are available in Windows XP: Font Set Arial Symbol Characters Generic text font that include fractions and international characters Additional characters not found above e.g. mathematical and scientific characters

Example

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Windows XP

Introduction

Font Set Wingdings Webdings

Characters Bullet symbols and other graphics Graphic symbols designed for use in web pages

Example

Multiple Applications
It is possible to run multiple applications under Windows XP, and to cut or copy data between these applications. The application from which you are copying is the source while the application to which you are copying is the target. To switch to another open application, click on the application's icon on the task bar along the bottom of the screen.

You can also switch between applications using the keyboard:

Hold [Alt] and press [Tab] – do not release the Alt key Press [Tab] to select the application you want to switch to Release [Alt] to show the selected application on screen

Arranging Applications
It is also possible to display multiple applications on-screen at the same time. Right click in a blank area of the task bar and choose one of the following options:

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Windows XP

Introduction

Option Tile Vertically Tile Horizontally Cascade Windows

Description

This will tile any open applications that are not minimised, arranging them vertically across the screen
This will tile any open applications that are not minimised, arranging them horizontally

This will arrange applications one behind the other on screen

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Windows XP

Introduction

Tile Vertically
The following screenshot shows two applications - Word and Excel - tiled vertically on screen.

To tile applications vertically: Ensure the applications you wish to tile are not minimised. Right click on a blank area of the taskbar and choose Tile Windows Vertically.

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Windows XP

Introduction

Tile Horizontally
The following screenshot shows two applications - Word and Excel - tiled horizontally on screen.

To tile applications horizontally: Ensure the applications you wish to tile are not minimised. Right click on a blank area of the taskbar and choose Tile Windows Horizontally.

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Windows XP

Introduction

Cascade Windows
The following screenshot shows two applications - Word and Excel - cascaded on screen.

To cascade applications: Ensure the applications you wish to tile are not minimised. Right click on a blank area of the taskbar and choose Cascade Windows.

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Windows XP

Introduction

The Task Manager
The task manager displays a list of all applications currently running: Right click in a blank area of the task bar and choose Task Manager. To activate an application, choose the application on the list and click on Switch To. If an application is not running correctly, it can be terminated by choosing the application and clicking on End Task. Close the dialogue box using the button in the top-right corner when complete.

You can also display the Task Manager by pressing [Ctrl Alt Delete] and clicking on the Task Manager button. This is particularly useful if your computer has "hung" and your mouse is not working.

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Windows XP

Introduction

Copying Between Applications
It is possible to run multiple applications under Windows XP, and to cut or copy data between these applications. The application from which you are copying is the source while the application to which you are copying is the target. To switch between open applications: Press [Alt] and [Tab] until the correct application is selected. Release [Alt] only when the correct application is highlighted or Click on the application's icon on the Task Bar along the bottom of the screen.

Copying between Applications
The Copy, Cut and Paste buttons on the Standard Toolbar can be used to copy data from one application to another.
The Copy button The Cut button The Paste button

In the source application, select the text or item you wish to move or copy. Choose Edit, Copy or click on the Copy button on the Standard Toolbar. Activate the target application and ensure the correct document position is selected. Choose Edit, Paste or click on the Paste button on the Standard Toolbar.
If the data does not paste in the correct format, choose Edit, Paste Special for more options e.g. Unformatted text or Picture.

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Windows XP

Introduction

The following shortcut keys can be used to move and copy text: Keystroke Ctrl C Ctrl X Ctrl V Action Copy Cut Paste

Linking Between Applications
It is possible to run multiple applications under Windows XP, and to cut or copy data between these applications. The application from which you are copying is the source while the application to which you are copying is the target. It is also possible to link data between applications. The data will be stored in the source application with a reference to the data stored in the target. The target will be updated each time the source is changed.
Linking keeps document sizes to a minimum as the original data is stored in the source file while only a representation of this is stored in the target document.

To switch between multiple open applications: Press [Alt] and [Tab] until the correct application is selected. Release [Alt] only when the correct application is highlighted or Click on the application's icon on the Task Bar along the bottom of the screen.

Linking Data
To link data between applications: In the source application, select the text or object you wish to copy. Choose Edit, Copy or click on the Copy button on the Standard Toolbar.
The Copy button

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Windows XP

Introduction

Activate the target application and ensure the correct document position is selected. Choose Edit, Paste Special and click on Paste Link. Ensure the correct paste format is selected and click on OK.

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Introduction

Maintaining Links
By default, links are updated automatically each time the target document is opened. This can be changed to manual updating if required - the linked data will only update when the user chooses. Open the document that contains the linked data and choose Edit, Links.

Change to Manual updating and click on Update Now each time you wish to update the links. Choose Open Source to open the source application and document. Choose Change Source if the source file has been moved or renamed. Choose Break Link to remove the link without deleting the data from the target document.

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Windows XP

Introduction

Screen Shots
It is sometimes necessary to take a snapshot of the screen in Windows XP. This can be for a number for a number of reasons, including:

Copying the current window to be included in a training guide Copying an error message to report to the help desk Copying a settings window to help another user The following keys are used to copy screens:
Shortcut [Print Scrn] [Alt] + [Print Scrn] Description Copies the entire screen to the clipboard - as marked in blue below Copies only the active window to the clipboard - as marked in red below

For Example
In this example, [Print Scrn] would result in the entire screen being copied (marked in green), while [Alt] + [Print Scrn] would result in only the top dialog box being copied (marked in red).

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Windows XP

Introduction

Activate the document that you wish to contain the screen shot and position the cursor where the screen shot should appear. Choose Edit, Paste or press [Ctrl V].
If the screen shot does not paste in the correct format, choose Edit, Paste Special for more options e.g. Picture or Bitmap.

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