Table of Contents

About Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc Message from the Chairman and the President Major Programs Ecological Enhancement Enterprise Development Special Projects ..................................6 ................................10 ................................14 ..................................3 ..................................4

Board of Trustees and Members of the Foundation Directory of Staff Partners, Networks and Accreditations

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Group Leaders as Partners in the Upliftment of Filipino Women, Baguio City

Organic Farming La Trinidad, Benguet►

Tree Planting, Sudipen, La Union

IEC Installation for Water, Trees and Life, La Trinidad, Benguet


Heifer Passing of Gifts Roxas, Isabela ◄

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About Us

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aime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc (JVOFI) was founded by Benguet Corporation, the Philippines’ oldest mining company, on December 17, 1980. Formerly known as BenguetCorp Foundation, Inc., its creation was inspired by the late Jaime V. Ongpin, the company’s first Filipino president, who envisioned the development of self-reliant communities. The Foundation adopts the Strategic Area Management approach with a well-defined geographic focus. As such, the Foundation currently supports projects in selected areas in Northern Luzon. Its core programs are Enterprise Development, Ecological Enhancement, Internal CapacityBuilding and Resource Generation. The Foundation works in partnership with local and foreign donors, business, government, other NGOs, and people’s organizations in pursuing development programs with target communities. It is a non-stock, non-profit organization registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Bureau of Internal Revenue. As a duly certified foundation by the Philippine Council for NGO Certification, it received in August 2006 the renewal of its 5-year tax-exempt donee institution status from the Bureau of Internal Revenue. JVOFI is a member of the Council on Foundations and the Microcredit Summit of Practitioners, both US-based; the Association of Foundations, the Microfinance Council of the Philippines, Inc., the Cordillera Network of Development NGOs and POs, the Baguio Regreening Movement, the Baguio City Solid Waste Management Council, and the Alay sa Kalinisan, Inc.

Vision Vision

Mission Mission

JVOFI as a leading institution in the formation of self-reliant communities capable of harnessing resources for equitable development.

Goals Goals

Guided by the principle of holistic development and with utmost concern for the environment, the foundation shall uplift the sense of dignity of the Filipino communities it serves.

On Program/Project Impact Enhance the capacity of client communities to plan, implement, manage and sustain projects. On Environment Enable communities to develop and conserve their ecological resources. On Productivity Assist impoverished families improve their incomes. On Organizational Effectiveness, Efficiency and Sustainability Enhance the capability of the Foundation to pursue its mandate.

Succesful Microfinance Client, Baguio City ◄

UPSURGE Sustainability Planning Workshop, San Fernando, La Union

Organic Awareness, La Trinidad, Benguet ▼

Partograph Training PRISM ◄

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Message from the Chairman and President

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he last fiscal year was marked by fears of a worldwide recession. This threatened to worsen the crises the country was already suffering from the oil and rice price increases. Prudence dictated that the Foundation had to prepare for the impacts of a recession. At the same time, since 2008 marked the end of the Foundation’s five-year strategic plan, it was opportune to take stock of what we achieved so far.

In the past five years (2004-08), the Foundation made significant strides in achieving its three goals which are, to enable communities to develop and preserve their ecological resources; enhance the capacity of client communities to plan, implement, manage & sustain projects; and, assist impoverished families improve their incomes. Relevant to these, JVOFI undertook several environmental projects funded by Texas Instruments (Philippines), Inc.; TeamEnergy Foundation (formerly Mirant Philippines Foundation); the Philippine Tropical Forest Conservation Foundation; and, the New Zealand Aid for International Development. The projects covered seven (7) barangays or villages: one (1) in Baguio City and six (6) in La Trinidad, Benguet. All projects intended to contribute to the protection of remaining watersheds largely through community participation. We are proud to report that capacity building activities, integrated with watershed protection and water systems installation, were strategies that remained effective in putting the communities at the forefront of environmental protection efforts. These led to a zero incidence of forest fires and minimized encroachment on watersheds. Ensuring project sustainability required close partnership with the local government unit being a key stakeholder. During the five-year period, JVOFI implemented the Localized Anti-Poverty Project funded by the World Bank through CODE-NGO. The project enlisted community participation in local development planning which was later institutionalized in the La Trinidad local government unit. This resulted in a rationale process of allocating budgets based on community needs and led to the conceptualization of a bigger project, the Water, Trees & Life for La Trinidad Communities, funded by NZAID. The NZAID project produced favorable results that encouraged the province of Benguet to consider environmental protection among its major programs. Another offshoot of the NZAID project was the identification of a growing sector of organic vegetable farmers in Benguet province who belonged to an organization called the La Top Multi-purpose Cooperative. Last year, the Foundation for a Sustainable Society, Inc. (FSSI) and the Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program began supporting the upscaling of organic farming through JVOFI and La Top. This was in response to the need for farmers to produce higher-value vegetables due to the stiff competition from cheap vegetable imports exacerbated by the rising prices of chemical farm inputs. The project capitalized on the increasing number of consumers who have become healthconscious and the acknowledged need to reverse the damage of inorganic inputs on the soil and the environment. It also opened up opportunities to earn more for farmers who owned small farm lots typically only 0.25 hectare. During the period, JVOFI continued to support the Baguio City local government unit in its solid waste management program. It entailed advocacy; monitoring of the operation of the City’s composting plant which JVOFI’s donors supported; and, assisting in the formulation of its 10-year solid waste

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management plan.

The FSSI played a crucial role in providing funds

and technical assistance.

In a related manner, the Foundation assisted the City of Baguio in formulating its Water Code as one of the major components of the City’s Sustainable Water Integrated Management project funded by the Asian Development Bank and the International Cities for Local Environment Initiatives. JVOFI’s microfinance project operated for the first time last year without any subsidies from donor grants. Following the completion of the five-year DISOP-funded project, both its Baguio and La Trinidad branches were able to sustain their operations and earn modest incomes. As of June 2008, the cumulative amount of loans released by the Foundation since the start of its microfinance program was P154,894,072 and its repayment rate was 99.69%. For the last fiscal year alone, total loans released was P34,972,875 and its repayment rate was 98.68%. Portfolio at risk comprising balances of loans overdue for at least one day was significantly reduced from 13.86% to 6.40% as of June 2009. Active clients totalled 1,640 as of the end of the fiscal year. A to highlight of other areas JVOFI’s which operations broadened in the past its presence five (5) as well years was as honed its its expansion expertise.

Following the Foundation’s experience in environmental and capacity building projects, it was ready to offer its expertise to Philip Morris Philippines Manufacturing Co., Inc. beginning in September 2008. The project entailed organizing and strengthening four (4) farmers’ organizations to establish and manage their fuelwood plantations in the provinces of La Union and Ilocos Sur. The Foundation also begun implementing the Integrated Livestock Production Project funded by Heifer in the town of Roxas, Isabela province. Anchored on the principles of PASSING-ON-THE-GIFTS, an initial batch of 55 partner families were able to pass on the benefits of the project to other needy families. As of June 2009, almost three years into its implementation, a total of 165 families benefited from the project. A new area that JVOFI explored during the past fiscal year was urban poor housing under the UPSURGE Project (Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance and Empowerment). Funded by the World Bank through PHILSSA (Partnership of Philippine Support Service Agencies), the project’s goal was to institutionalize in local government units a viable model of civil society-local government-community partnership in addressing shelter needs, improving the physical and environmental conditions, improving social well-being, and enhancing economic opportunities of urban poor communities. The target site was the Fisherman’s Village in the City of San Fernando, La Union. As of June 2009, the project completed the improvements on 43 core shelter units; re-activated the Fisherman’s Village Association; and, assisted in the operationalization of a local government structure catering to local housing needs. During the fiscal year, the Foundation’s engagement with the USAID-funded Private Sector Mobilization for Family Health project was completed. Among the key accomplishments were the training of midwives; provision of loans to enable them to engage in private practice; and, the orientation of JVOFI’s microfinance clients on family health by the trained midwives. Looking back, the Foundation has indeed gone far. Our more than 28 years in development work have enriched our knowledge and understanding and give us the confidence to continue pursuing our goals. While the Foundation has delved into new territories, we have remained true to our triple bottomlines: the social, the economic & environmental aspects of development. Partners who share our vision, communities who are willing to put in their stake and are committed to carrying the benefits forward always inspire us. As we close this fiscal year and embark on a new chapter, we are reminded of the late Jaime V. Ongpin who aptly said, “If we pull together as a nation…(our) dream of prosperity and dignity...(for) every Filipino can be fulfilled.” Thank you to our partners for being one with us in achieving this dream. Maria Isabel G. Ongpin Chairperson T o w a r d s a S u s t a i n a b l e Reynaldo C. Bautista, Sr. President F u t u r e

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Ecological Enhancement
Water, Trees & Life for La Trinidad Communities
nly 1% of the world’s water is usable for human consumption. That 1% of the world’s water supply is a necessary commodity for our survival. Water is an indispensable element because it cultivates life, nourishes growth and sustains existence.

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The people of La Trinidad need not worry anymore of water supply shortage because control over having sustainable water is now largely in their hands. The Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc., with the financial support from the New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID), implemented the “Water, Trees and Life for La Trinidad Rural Communities” to help the people of La Trinidad improve their environmental and socioeconomic conditions by implementing changes that will ensure the presence of trees, water and life for future generations. Five water systems were completed for La Trinidad. Initially, the project targeted a Level II water system but because of the demonstrated willingness of the community members to provide counterparts for distribution pipes and water meters, a level III water distribution system was installed instead. As of June 2009, out of the 617 households or 3,100 estimated individuals received water from the Level III water systems in the target communities. In addition, 750 school children from 3 elementary schools, 4 day care centers and 1 high school benefited from the water systems. Despite threats of encroachment, illegal logging and land conversion due to agricultural expansion and rapid population growth, the Communal Forests in La Trinidad, Benguet still hold ecosystem integrity and ecological sustainability because of the communities’ will to protect the forest. As of December 2008, a total of 37,397 seedlings were planted within barren areas of the communal

forests of the target barangays. The aggregate area covered was 22.43 hectares of bare and eroding portions of the 102 hectares watershed area. The trees planted contributed to an 11% increase in forest cover. Regular monitoring and replacement planting were conducted by the commissioned forest ranger and brigades. These brigades were legally authorized and deputized by the barangay captains through certification. A few incidents of forest fires were reported, but these were quickly taken care of by the forest guards and community residents. Forest cleaning and weeding conducted by the communities greatly helped in preventing forest fires during the dry season. With the high participation among the people of La Trinidad, the project was able to achieve increased availability of safe drinking water, savings in cost of water, improved sanitation practices and behavioral changes that spurred community action among village community members. The partners in the water and livelihood projects were mostly women whose families lived below or slightly above the poverty line. The savings gained from the lower cost of water were used for other household needs such as food and their children’s education. Moreover, the project had also indirect benefits, such as: improved gender equity with more women able to participate in livelihood and improved health profile in the communities.

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Upscaling Organic Vegetable Production in Metro Baguio & Benguet

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enguet’s vegetables faced intense competition from imported vegetables which threatened the local industry. Added to this was the fear of consumers that local vegetables were heavily laced with chemicals from pesticides and fertilizers; hence, steps were made to restore the trust of consumers and to make Benguet the organic capital of the country.

The project’s main goal was to contribute to poverty reduction by promoting organic farming as an alternative to conventional farming. Organic farming offers farmers opportunities to earn more since dependence on expensive chemical inputs is eliminated and produce can be sold at a premium. The project which aimed to provide green financing to farmers to expand their existing organic farms was able to help 38 farmers for the period. Loans were extended under the Green Financing component where La Top members availed of P25,000 each for the construction of greenhouses, compost sheds, nurseries and packing areas which are essential to organic farming. With the green financing, there was a remarkable increase in sales of La Top from P1,708,557 (January to June 2008) to P3,616,997 (October to March 2009). Meanwhile, individual farmer’s income increased from baseline of P4,500 per month to P7,183.52 per month. F o u n d a t i o n , I n c .

The project Upscaling Organic Vegetable Production in Metro Baguio and Benguet aimed to promote the economic viability of organic farming in order for farmers to adopt environment-friendly agricultural practices that would yield chemical free vegetables. The project, which targeted the municipalities of Buguias, La Trinidad, Atok, Sablan and Tublay started last June 2008. The Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program and Foundation for Sustainable Society Inc. funded grants for the Upscaling Organic Vegetable Production in Metro Baguio and Benguet program initiated by the Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation Inc. (JVOFI), with members of the La Top Multipurpose Cooperative as the main partners.

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Aside from equipping farmers with technical skills in organic farming, the project also aimed to register the La Top farmers with the Organic Certification Center of the Philippines, the country’s nationally accredited organic certification agency to ensure that harvested vegetables from Benguet are organically raised; hence, safe and healthy to eat. The project also conducted a sub-sector study on organic farming financing support, production, certification and marketing. The validation and

presentation of the sub-sector study data which was held last June 18, 2009 at the Kisad Hotel, Baguio City, revealed the areas where support is needed to further promote an organic farming movement in the province. The entry of the project to Benguet is undoubtedly important and timely as free trade dislocates the local market due to cheap imported vegetables. Organic produce has a growing market as more consumers become health conscious.

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Enterprise Development
he microfinance project of the Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc. aims to promote economic growth, reduce poverty, support human development and improve the status of women in Baguio City and La Trinidad through small loans microfinance and technical assistance which enables them to increase their financial stability.

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Enterprise development evolved as one of the core programs of the Foundation in mid-80’s when the Foundation received a grant from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to fund for community and livelihood development projects in the province of Benguet. Organizational and financial assistance (through capability building trainings and collateralized loans) were provided to farmer cooperatives and peoples organizations then. The implementation of the program was successful; however, the Foundation felt that the project did not have a strong impact on the community because the assistance was just limited to the members of the cooperatives and the bulk of the loan was given to the person who provided the collateral. Due to this, the Foundation adopted Bangladesh’s Association for Social Advancement (ASA) scheme and found a more effective means to finance small businesses of enterprising women. ASA provides an integrated package of services to clients consisting of savings, loans and mutual aid. The adapted ASA methodology enabled women secure loans with affordable interest to expand their small businesses. Under this new approach, there were notable improvements in terms of the number of active clients, particularly in the number of savers. Because of ASA’s simplified and standardized methodology, and delivery of services at the barangays the outreach had increased and operational and financial performance improved. As of June 2009, the project had 1,559 clients composed of 1,275 borrowers and 284 savers.

Loan guarantee fees or clients’ savings was P4.56 million while total loans outstanding was P8.44 million. The Microfinance Unit of the Foundation plays a great role in improving the small entrepreneurs in Benguet. Microfinance helps improve women’s self-employment and are provided access to savings services. For this year, the program had a total number of 102 microfinance groups composed of an average of 15 clients per group. Clients are mostly engaged in sari-sari stores, weaving, knitting, handicraft, cutflower and other small scale businesses. From interviews with JVOFI’s clients it was found out that the clients especially the women were satisfied with the Microfinance program because it enabled them a way to earn and help the family breadwinner. Although many clients did not finish their college or high school studies, through the loan program of the Foundation they were able to expand and sustain their business without worrying where to get their capital. Clients generally used their loans to improve or expand their business by buying more products to sell. Also, some of their additional income and savings were used to pay for the education of their children and daily basic needs. Their lives considerably changed, improved and became comfortable.

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Stories of Success

“life has become more comfortable, there is now always someone you can rely on in times of need.”

he Foundation provides an opportunity for women empowerment through its Microfinance program. Economic participation and empowerment are important in uplifting the status of women in the society.
The Microfinance program improved the status of poor families, specifically women in the municipalities of la Trinidad and Baguio by providing access to resources and facilities like micro-credit, savings and training. A good way to capture the effects of Microfinance to clients is to narrate their experiences. Mrs. Rosita Balanggi, a mother of five, make ways to provide for her family through her tailoring business. Even though her husband is a carpenter, they sometimes are unable to meet their needs. She joined the Microfinance program on February 2007, since then she used the loans she received as capital. Mrs. Rosita has

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expanded her tailoring shop by purchasing sewing machines. As of June 2009, she already had three sewing machines. Mrs. Rosita said that life was hard before she joined Microfinance, she was paying her debts daily to a local lender at 20% interest. However, today, she no longer worries where to get her payments. The income she gets from tailoring is even enough for her to send her children to school and pay their tuition fees. With these changes in her life, she said, “Life has become more comfortable, there is now always someone you can rely on in times you are in need.” Another life changing experience was that of Mrs. Luzbe Ordonio. As a member of the Foundation’s lending program for five years, she thoughtfully used her loans for her eatery. She used to rely on the income her family gained from renting a part of their house to fund her eatery. However, what they earned from renting their house was no longer enough due to the increasing prices of commodities and higher cost of living. She joined the Microfinance with the goal of helping her family meet their daily needs. From her daily capital of P1,500 she is now able to generate P3,000 of gross sales. Mrs. Luzbi said that what helped her succeed in her business was what she has learned from the Microfinance program that, “You have to continually invest in your business because this would result in profit.” Today, she is not only able to provide for her family’s needs but she is now also waiting for T o w a r d s a

her children to graduate due to Microfinance aid. Mrs. Luzbe said that she is very grateful for having the opportunity to be a part of JVOFI’s microfinance program. At age 57, Mrs. Nieves Sulitas sees to it that her family and even relatives are provided with food on their table. At first, she was hesitant to join the Microfinance program, but in the end joined due to the influence of members from a women’s organization. While Mr. and Mrs. Sulitas do not have any children, she narrated that she helps her relatives who were financially depending on her. She thought of expanding her sari-sari store by using the loans from the Microfinance program as another source of capital. According to Mrs. Sulitas, one of the benefits of the Foundation’s Microfinance program was it provided several training programs for improving both character and entrepreneurial skills. Today, she now successfully manages her sari-sari store and is able to generate a monthly profit of P8,000-P10,000. With the thought of helping her relatives, she is now even planning to open-up a gift shop in Baguio City. There are other more stories untold, but what is more important is that the program has steadily improved the quality of life experienced by clients. Through the program, it was noted that the clients of the Microfinance program earned higher income resulting in more food on the table. They are now capable of sending their children to school, pay their children’s tuition on time, and provide for their daily expenses and even that of their relatives. Also, they were able to improve their dwelling units. F u t u r e

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Special Projects
Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance and Empowerment

VOFI, in partnership with the City of San Fernando, La Union, the Philippine Support Service Agencies (PHILSSA) and the World Bank, undertook the project Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance and Empowerment (UPSURGE) at the Fisherman’s Village.
With the assistance from the Japan Social Development Fund of the World Bank,

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UPSURGE provided improvements to the housing, physical and environmental conditions of the urban poor. It was also geared towards providing better economic opportunities and enhancing their overall social well-being. Phase I of the project was implemented by the Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP) in 2004-2006. The Fisherman’s Village was established in Barangay Poro with the construction of core houses, a road network, water system, drainage system and embankments. Phase two of the project implemented by Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc. (JVOFI) completed the improvement and development of a total of 43 core houses to make them livable for the recipients and encourage them to relocate to the site immediately. A total of 86 families living in high risk areas along the coast of the City were targeted to benefit from the 86 houses built through the project. Each family was allotted a two-storey core house costing an estimated PhP145, 000.00 payable in 20 years. The costs recovered by the City will be used for other improvements at the Fisherman’s Village and similar projects in the City. The UPSURGE project provided the residents of the critical areas an opportunity to be relocated to a safer and more secure place not far from their livelihood.

As part of the project, a two-storey Multipurpose Center was constructed. The structure will serve as the venue for meetings and other organizational activities of the association. It is envisioned to house the planned cooperative store and lodging facility for visitors. It will also serve as a livelihood center for the residents. Integrated in the overall project was the phasing-out of JVOFI and sustainability of the project. In line with this, a sustainability planning workshop conducted last June 2-3, 2009 at La Union enabled the Fisherman’s Village Association, the City Renewal Implementing Team, and the Executive Committee to formulate their plans for sustaining the project. The Foundation prepared the FVA by helping them formulate organizational development plans; organizational policies, systems and procedures; strengthen their organizational structure; and put in place a monitoring and evaluation system for the organization’s future sustainability. Crucial to ensuring project sustainability was institutionalizing a structure in the local government unit to attend to housing concerns. The project paved the way for the LGU to consider housing as a major concern and to realize the need to update their Comprehensive Land Use Plan more so that the City of San Fernando is among the fast growing areas in the country. F u t u r e

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Gifts for a Better Life

Integrating Livestock Production, Environmental Protection and Enterprise Development for Poverty Reduction

he Passing of Gifts is a practice wherein the participating families become donors themselves by passing on the offspring of their original livestock and other supplies to another family. This process extends the benefits of the project to other families in the barangay and other neighboring barangays. This ceremony of passing embodies the spirit of sharing and caring.

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Heifer International Philippines and Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation in the project Integrating Livestock Production, Environment Protection, and Enterprise Development for Poverty Reduction (InLivesPro) helped a total of 165 families of Roxas, Isabela. The participating families were residents of barangays West Munoz, San Jose and San Pedro. The project had significantly resulted in improved health status; decreased malnutrition cases, increased income, contributed to environmental awareness; and developed the Cornerstone values. From the original 55 partner families, the passing of the gifts ceremony benefited another 110 families of the said barangays achieving the 165 target families for the three-year duration of the project. These families are also to rear the animals for livestock production and pass on the benefits again to other deserving families. The gifts consisted of cows, carabaos, goats, and chickens. In addition, the partner families were provided with livestock support, farm equipment and agricultural supplies. Several training programs were also conducted such as livestock production, animal management, bookkeeping, environmental awareness and organizational management which aims to foster leadership and bind the community as one. Community animal health workers were trained to provide technical

support to the participating families. The project aimed to strengthen the Filipino values among the participating families and enable them to work for their own sustainable and holistic development by helping one another through gifts in the form of animals, farm materials and livelihood inputs. The project allowed them to pass on the offspring along with resources, skills and knowledge to another family in need. It created a network of hope that would eventually touch a thousand lives and create a bond that would bridge communities. Heifer International seeks to instill the values of the Passing on the Gifts, which comprise the following: Passing on the gift, Accountability, Sharing and caring, Sustainability and selfreliance, Improved animal management, Nutrition and income, Gender and family focus, Genuine need and justice, Improving the environment, Full participation, Training and education and Spirituality. In addition, partner families also learned to practice environmental protection activities and sustainable agricultural production practices like use of livestock manure for agricultural production, agroforestry and proper waste disposal efforts to improve community health and sanitation. Simultaneous with these was the formation of Savings and Loans Groups among the participating families.

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Integrating Microfinance & Health Education to Empower Women & Reduce Poverty in Metro Baguio

he project titled “Integrating Microfinance & Health Education to Empower Women & Reduce Poverty in Metro Baguio” was implemented over a period of 20 months from December 2006 to August 31, 2008. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) provided the grant under the Private Sector Mobilization for Family Health Program (PRISM).
The project was anchored on the premise that microfinance services, coupled with business

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development training and family health interventions will contribute to the improved income earning potential of women ultimately leading to higher family income, better family welfare & quality of life. Fifty partner midwives in Metro Baguio were selected by PRISM and the Foundation at the beginning of the project. They were trained in Business Enhancement Support Training (BEST), the first of a series of training programs for the midwives. Training modules on Maternal and Child Health Care and Family Planning (MCH/ FP) followed to improve further the capability and confidence of the midwives to conduct the community Health orientation meetings that were planned under the project. Significantly, 17 out of the 50 trained midwives were convinced to put-up their family healthrelated small enterprises as a result of the project. They were supported by the Foundation through loans given by its Microfinance Program. With the different activities undertaken by the Foundation, the trained midwives particularly Mrs. Rebecca Dakiwas, who was the first private practice midwife to establish her own birthing clinic in Baguio City and the Cordillera region said that the program was a big help in helping her attain her dream of being able to practice her profession as a midwife. At the same time, she was able to meet the basic needs of her family. She also recounted that through the T o w a r d s a

project she was no longer known as the market lady but as a midwife, an ambition she hoped to fulfill by the time she reached her senior years. Although the results of the training in particular and the project in general did not specifically show increases in repayment rate of microfinance clients, actual indicators pointed to improved family health management among those who attended the trainings. One of these was the openness of clients in the discussion of FP/MCH services, another was the increase in health seeking behavior by availing of the midwives’ services. It is expected that this will be translated to better health for the families or reduction of diseases among members which will result in better repayment rates for the microfinance project of the Foundation in the long-term. The trained midwives did not only provide their services in the clinics. They offered their voluntary services in the communities and rural health centers and assisted the government-hired midwives in providing quality services to the community. In addition, the project gained headway in introducing private practice to midwives whose services were traditionally given by the government for free in the Cordilleras. Eventually, it is hoped that this option will be an opportunity for freeing up scarce government resources for other programs.

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Tobacco Farmers Adressing poverty and Cooperative environmental protection Organizing and Capability Building Program

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hilip Morris Philippines Manufacturing, Inc. (PMPMI) has been supporting reforestation efforts since 2001 in its tobacco growing regions and other parts of the country as well.

In 2008, the company went a step further by supporting the organizing of farmers for the establishment of fuelwood plantations in four target areas in the provinces of La Union and Ilocos Sur. The project was envisioned to address three (3) goals: to make fuelwood accessible thereby mitigating forest destruction;

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provide opportunities for organized farmers to earn additional income from other livelihood activities; and, to contribute to the protection of the environment. These goals focused on the three (3) pillars of sustainable development, i.e. the social, the environmental and the economic which are consistent with the Foundation’s mandate. The project was also considered as the company’s contribution to goals 1 and 7 of the Millennium Development Goals which aim to reduce poverty and protect the environment. In partnership with PMPMI’s suppliers, Universal Leaf Philippines, Inc. and Trans Manila, Inc., four target areas were identified: Santol and Sudipen, La Union and San Juan and San Emilio in Ilocos Sur. The project covered the following components: Coop/PO Organizing and Reforestation/ Fuelwood Plantation, the latter extended with the Cordillera Green Network, Inc. (CGNI), another partner NGO of PMPMI. As of June 2009, a total of three farmer’s T o w a r d s a

organizations were organized and legally registered while the fourth, the San Emilio Multi-Purpose Cooperative which was preexisting, was supported. By strengthening the local structures, the farmers shall be enabled to self-manage their fuelwood plantations and their organizations. The farmer’s organizations were able to successfully negotiate with private landowners for the conversion of their idle lands into fuelwood plantations. The contracts span at least 15 years and stipulated a mutually beneficial arrangement on the sharing of benefits. The San Emilio Multi-Purpose Cooperative, on the other hand, was assisted in following through their application for a Community Based Forest Management Agreement with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). From the training on nursery establishment by DENR, the farmers were able to produce 78,500 seedlings for the fuelwood plantations. An initial 15,005 seedlings were planted in the sites and weekly activities are scheduled until the target of 12,500 for each area is achieved. F u t u r e

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Board of Trustees

MA. ISABEL G. ONGPIN
Civic Leader, Columnist Businesswoman

Chairperson

NORBERTO A. VIERA
President & Managing Director, Texas Instruments (Phils.), Inc

Vice Chairman

REYNALDO C. BAUTISTA, SR.
Chairman and President, Rural Bank of Itogon President Sunstar

President

SALVADOR P. PABALAN
Senior VP-Finance & Treasurer, Benguet Corporation

Treasurer

DENNIS R. BELMONTE
Past President & CEO, Benguet Corporation Past President, National Resource Management Corporation

Trustee

CORAZON S. DE LA PAZ-BERNARDO
President & CEO, Social Security System

Trustee

NARCISA L. ESCALER
Former Philippine Ambassador to the United Nations

Trustee

RAY DEAN D. SALVOSA
Managing Director, Consuelo Foundation

Trustee

DANIEL Z. URQUICO
President & CEO, Child & Family Service Philippines

Trustee

OTHER MEMBERS OF THE FOUNDATION: Nene S. Bowman, Amado S. Lagdameo, Jr., Delfin L. Lazaro, Francisco A. Paraan (deceased), Emily P. Pimentel

Foundation Secretary

RENATO S. RONDEZ

Directory of Staff
Office of the Executive Director Finance and Administration
MA. ROSARIO R. LOPEZ Executive Director JESSY M. BALANAG Development Communications Assistant JANICE S. SERGIO Accounting Supervisor ROGELIO L. CARIASO Driver LEIZEL T. BULLOD Cashier MA. TERESA B. TENEDERO Finance and Administrative Manager EMILIA C. BARCARSE Bookkeeper ARVEE GAYE B. TRINIDAD Bookkeeper FIELD OPERATIONS

Ecological Enhancement
RHODA FE D. BUENAVISTA Program Manager JEFFREY H. JAVIER Project Officer CORAZON P. SAJONAS Community Organizer F o u n d a t i o n , I n c .

SHAYNE N. CARONONGAN Administrative Assistant MARK DENJO S. ALGAYAN Project Auditor EMILOU D. CACDAC Bookkeeper

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J a i m e
Since 1980

V .

O n g p i n

Partners

A. DONORS •Australian Agency for International Development - Philippine-Australian Community Assistance Program •Ayala Corp/GLOBE* •Baguio Country Club* •Benguet Corporation* •BMW Premier Cars Pampanga* •Bureau of Fisheries & Aquatic Resources •Canadian International Development Agency •Caucus of Development NGO Networks •Consolidated Industrial Gases, Inc.* •Crosslink Electric Co.* •DHL Global Forwarding* •DISOP-Belgium •Downunder Drilling •Edgeworth* •Fernando Rosa Bautista Foundation* •Foundation for a Sustainable Society, Inc. •INGASCO, Inc.* •Kintetsu World Express* •Lepanto Consolidated Mining Corporation* •New Zealand Agency for International Development •PACSPORTS* •Peace & Equity Foundation, Inc. •Philex Mining Corporation* •Philippine Airlines* •Rural Bank of Itogon* •SN Aboitiz Power* •Taikisha Philippines* •Team Energy* •Texas Instruments (Phils.), Inc. •University of Baguio* •PHILSSA/World Bank *Donors of the 4th Golf for a Cause Tournament

B.PEOPLE’S ORGANIZATION •Ambiong-La Trinidad Multi-Purpose Cooperative •Apugan-Loakan Multi-Purpose Cooperative •Atok Trail Spring Association, Inc. •Balukas Farmers Multi-Purpose Cooperative •Barangay Alno Water System Association •Beckel Neighborhood Multi-Purpose Cooperative •Happy Hallow Tribal Council, Inc. •Irisan Community Environmental Multi-Purpose Cooperative, Inc. •Lamtang Neighborhood MultiPurpose Cooperative •La Trinidad Strawberry MultiPurpose Cooperative •Wangal Community Multi-Purpose Cooperative •Water Consumers Association of Kias C. GOs/NGOs/BUSINESS/ACADEME •Baguio City Local Government Unit •Benguet Corporation •Benguet State University •Brent International School •Cordillera Network of Development NGOs and POs •Department of Environment and Natural Resources •La Trinidad, Benguet Local Government Unit •Texas Instruments (Philippines), Inc. •University of Baguio

D. ACCREDITATIONS AND MEMBERSHIP INTERNATIONAL •Council on Foundations •Microcredit Summit of Practitioners NATIONAL •Association of Foundations •International Training Network on Water and Sanitation •Microfinance Council of the Philippines, Inc. •Philippine Council on NGO Certification •Partnership of Philippine Support Service Agencies •Upland NGO Assistance Council LOCAL •Alay sa Kalinisan, Inc. •Baguio Solid Waste Management Board •Baguio Regreening Movement •Cordillera Network of Development NGOs and POs •Regional Cooperative Development Council •Regional Development Council •Sectoral Committee on Environment and Social Development

Enterprise Developement
NANCY B. DIZON Program Manager JOVILYN C. ALCEDO Baguio Branch Officer VINCENT T. PAMO Baguio Branch Loan Officer ABNER B. ABAD Baguio Branch Loan Officer ALVIN S. CHOCK Baguio Branch Loan Officer LORNA P. BAYANGAN Baguio Branch Loan Officer T o w a r d s a S u s t a i n a b l e GILBERT T. IMPERIAL Baguio Branch Loan Officer DANTE T. FRIAS La Trinidad Branch Officer CHERYL ANNE E. MABLI La Trinidad Branch Loan Officer MYLYNE P. PARAN La Trinidad Branch Loan Officer TERENCE JANGGO S. ESPIRITU La Trinidad Branch Loan Officer

Special Projects
ESTER C. LIBERATO Project Manager JORGIE Z. GUMIRAN Community Facilitator (Heifer International Project) ADELYN I. DUMNGALON Community Organizer (PHILSSA Project) BEHILDA V. MIANA, Community Organizer (PMPMI Project) SALLY D. VILLENA Community Organizer (PMPMI Project) F u t u r e

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ANNUAL REPORT FY 2008-2009

Jaime V. Ongpin Foundation, Inc.
27 Sofia de Veyra St. corner Road 2 Quezon Hill, Baguio City 2600 Philippines Phone: Fax: E-mail: Website:
Since 1980

+63 74 446 2807/ 2843 +63 74 446 2843 info@jvofi.org marichu_lopez@jvofi.org www.jvofi.org

ARTICLE WRITING, LAY-OUT AND DESIGN BY: JESSY M. BALANAG