Report No. 536(65/21.

1/1)


Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09


NSS 65
th
(July 2008 -June 2009)
Round





National Sample Survey Office
National Statistical Organisation
Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation
Government of India
October 2010
Preface

The National Sample Survey Office (NSSO) conducted an all- India survey of households in the
65
th
round of NSS during July 2008 - June 2009. The survey comprised enquiries on (i) domestic
tourism (ii) housing condition (iii) condition of urban slums. The subject of domestic tourism was
covered in the NSS household survey during the 65
th
Round on the request of Ministry of Tourism,
Govt. of India. This has not been covered in any earlier NSS round as comprehensively as in the 65
th

round. In the 54
th
round (January-June 1998) of NSS, one of the subjects covered was tours involving
overnight stay. The results of the 54
th
round enquiry on travel (which included commuting to work or
for education as well as tours involving overnight stay) were published in NSS Report No.450.
This report, based on data collected in the 65
th
round, inter alia, presents the magnitude of
domestic tourism activity as revealed by estimates of numbers of households and persons making
overnight and same-day trips during a year. It studies the numbers of overnight and same-day trips per
household and per person and provides key indicators on domestic tourism in cross classification of
household and individual characteristics such as economic level, occupation, religion, social group, sex,
age and activity status. It examines the pattern of trips undertaken in respect of trip features such as
leading purpose, duration, type of main destination, number of places visited, and the expenditure
related to trips by leading purpose of trip, by broad head of expenditure, etc. Estimates are provided
separately for overnight trip and same-day trip and for rural and urban sectors at all-India or
State/Union Territory level.
Chapter One of the report is introductory. Major definitions and concepts related to the survey
are given in Chapter Two. Chapter Three contains the survey findings on (a) incidence and
characteristics of trips (b) participation of various population groups in domestic tourism activity (c)
visitor-trip characteristics and (d) occurrence of domestic tourism activity among households and
persons in a one-year period. Findings on expenditure related to trips are presented in Chapter Four.
Detailed statistical tables are presented in Appendix A. The sampling design and estimation procedure
is explained in Appendix B, and a facsimile of the schedule of enquiry canvassed in the field is
provided as Appendix C.
The Survey Design and Research Division (SDRD) of the NSSO undertook the development of
the survey methodology and survey instruments, and the drafting and finalisation of the report. The
field work was carried out by the Field Operations Division (FOD) of NSSO and the data processing
and tabulation work by the Data Processing Division (DPD) of NSSO. The Coordination and
Publication Division (CPD) coordinated various activities pertaining to the survey.
I am indebted to the members of the then Steering Committee of National Sample Survey, the
Working Group for NSS 65
th
round and the National Statistical Commission for their valuable guidance
at various stages of survey activities from designing of the questionnaire to the preparation of this
report. I gratefully acknowledge the contribution of the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, for
publicity of the survey during field operations. I also express my thanks to various officers of different
divisions of the NSSO involved in the preparation of this report.
I hope the report will be found useful by policy makers, academicians and researchers.


New Delhi J. Dash
October 2010 Director General & Chief Executive Officer
National Sample Survey Office
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4 i< ^^ Jc f 2008 09

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
Highlights
The results on ‘Domestic Tourism in India’ are based on data collected during July 2008 - June
2009 from 1,53,308 surveyed households in 8,109 sample villages and 4,719 urban blocks
spread over all States and Union Territories of India. All estimates relate to a period of 365
days. The important indicators for studying domestic tourism in a demographic domain are
derived through the concept of ‘trip’, which is devised as a unit of movement of members of a
household as ‘domestic visitors’.

NUMBER OF TRIPS MADE IN A YEAR

In a one-year period, 418 overnight trips were made per 100 Indian households (on an
average, about 4 per household). The number of trips per 100 households was 440 for the
rural population, perceptibly higher than for the urban population, for which it was 365.
The incidence of same-day trips, at 753 per 100 households in a year, was substantially
higher than that of overnight trips. Rural households undertook same-day trips at the rate of
844 per 100 households, which was noticeably higher than 537 trips per 100 households,
the rate for urban households.
The number of overnight trips made per 100 persons in the population was 210 in rural
India and 207, that is, roughly the same level, in urban India.
The number of overnight trips per 100 persons was higher for males – 225 for the rural
population and 220 for the urban – than for females – 194, rural, and 192, urban.
The number of same-day trips per 100 of population was 330 in rural India and 263 in
urban India. In rural India it was 389 for males and 266 for females, and in urban India it
was 297 among males and 226 among females.
With increase in age, the number of overnight as well as same-day trips per person rose
gradually and then declined, being highest for the age-group 30-34 in rural India and
highest for the age-group 40-44 in urban India. Among children under 15, however, the
number of trips, both same day as well as overnight, per child was highest in the lowest age
group 0-4 for rural as well as urban India.
There was not much variation among persons of different occupations or industries in
number of overnight or same-day trips per 100 persons.

CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS

Overnight/ Same-day: For the rural population, slightly over one-third of all trips were
overnight trips and nearly two-thirds were same-day trips. For the urban population, the
proportion of overnight trips was a little higher – over 40%.
Trip size: For the rural population, every 100 overnight trips had 223 participating
members, and every 100 same-day trips had 183. For the urban population, every 100
overnight trips had 232 participants, and every 100 same-day trips had 200 participants.
Highlights
ii
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
Leading purpose (overnight trips): Trips whose purpose was ‘social’ (social visits)
accounted for 75% of overnight trips of the rural population and 71% of overnight trips of
the urban population. Trips with ‘religious and pilgrimage’ purposes accounted for about
9% of overnight trips for the rural population and 12% for the urban population. Trips for
‘health and medical’ purposes formed 7% of overnight trips of the rural population and
about 3½% for the urban population of India. Trips for ‘holidaying, leisure and recreation’
accounted for 5% of overnight trips of urban people but only 2% for rural people.
Leading purpose (same-day trips): About 55% of same-day trips of the urban population
and 38% for the rural population were made for ‘social’ visits. ‘Shopping’ was found to be
the next leading purpose for undertaking same-day trips in rural India, accounting for 23%
of such trips, but was less common in urban India, where its share was only about 7%.
‘Health and medical’ purposes, too, were much more common in rural India, accounting
for 17% of same-day trips, and less common in urban India, where their share was about
8%.
Duration: The average number of nights spent on overnight trips was about 3 for the rural
population and about 4 for the urban. However, the average duration of overnight trips
undertaken by the urban population varied from 3.5 nights in the months of February and
August to 5.6 in the month of July. In rural areas month-to-month variation was relatively
low, the average duration varying from 2.7 nights in February to 3.4 nights in June.
Destination location: Travel within one’s own district accounted for about 66% of
overnight visitor-trips of the rural population but only about 30% for the urban population.
For the urban population, 49% of overnight visitor-trips were to a place outside one’s
district but within one’s state; for the rural population, 28% of overnight visitor-trips were
of this kind. 21% of urban and 6% of rural overnight visitor-trips involved travel beyond
one’s state.
Number of places visited: For every 100 trips made to a destination outside one’s state,
about 150 places were visited. For every 100 trips made to a destination outside one’s
district but within one’s state, about 119 places were visited. For every 100 trips made to a
destination within one’s district, about 104 places were visited.

VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS AND VISITOR-SPECIFIC CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS

Gender profile: Among every 1000 overnight visitors, 537 were males and 463 were
females for the urban sector while 525 were males and 475 females for the rural sector.
Among same-day visitors the male-female break-up did not differ much across sectors and
was about 55:45.
Visitor purpose: The break-up of overnight or same-day visitor-trips by the purpose that
led the visitor to make the trip did not differ appreciably from the break-up of overnight/
same-day trips by leading purpose.


Highlights
iii
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
Mode of travel: Buses were the dominant mode of travel for overnight and same-day trips
alike, accounting for two-thirds (67%) of overnight visitor-trips of the rural population,
57% of overnight visitor-trips by the urban population, and 57-61% of same-day visitor-
trips of the rural and urban populations. About 21% of same-day visitor-trips, for both rural
and urban sectors, were by own transport.
Trains were used as the major mode of travel for 27% of overnight visitor-trips by urban
Indians; for rural Indians their share in overnight visitor-trips was 7%. Trains were also
used in 9% of same-day visitor-trips by urban Indians but their share was only 2% for rural
Indians.
Type of stay: In case of 85% of rural and 80% of urban overnight visitor-trips, the visitors
stayed with friends and relatives for the major part of their stay.

OCCURRENCE OF DOMESTIC TOURISM ACTIVITY IN A ONE-YEAR PERIOD

About 77% of the population of both rural and urban sectors took part in at least one
overnight trip during a one-year period. For same-day trips the proportion of population
making at least one trip was about 76% in rural India and 70% in urban India.
Households in which at least one member had made an overnight trip during the past one
year formed 92% of all households (about 93% in the rural sector and 90% in the urban
sector).
As many as 96% of rural households, but only 86% of urban households, had at least one
member who had taken part in a same-day trip during the past one year, the overall
percentage for India being 93%.
The percentage of households with at least one member making an overnight trip during
the past one year did not vary appreciably with household occupation, household social
group or household religion. Nor was there any clear pattern of variation with household
economic level.

EXPENDITURE ON TRIPS

At all-India level, average expenditure per overnight trip was Rs.821 for the rural
population and Rs.1,636 for the urban population.
Overnight trips with ‘social’ leading purpose had a per-trip expenditure of Rs.466 (43%
lower than the average trip considering all purposes) for the rural population and Rs.989
for the urban population (40% lower than average). Overnight trips for ‘health and
medical’ purposes were four times as expensive as the average trip for both rural and urban
populations. The urban population’s overnight trips for ‘holidaying, leisure and recreation’
were on the average more than three times as expensive, and its ‘business’ trips twice as
expensive as the average trip considering all purposes. In both sectors, religious trips had a
per-trip expenditure close to, but slightly higher than, the all-purposes average.

Highlights
iv
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip was Rs.369 in rural India and Rs.715 in
urban India.
Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip made for ‘social’ reasons was only Rs.202
in rural India and Rs.418 in urban India. In urban India ‘religious and pilgrimage’ trips had
an average expenditure per visitor-trip of Rs.699, lower than the all-purposes average.
In both rural and urban India, ‘social’ purpose trips accounted for about 43% of all
overnight trip expenditure. Trips for ‘health and medical’ purposes had a share of 30% in
overnight trip expenditure for the rural population and 15% for the urban. ‘Religious and
pilgrimage’ trips had a share of about 11% in the rural sector and about 14% in the urban.
The share of transport in overnight trip expenditure was 20% in rural India but as much as
33% in urban India. The share of shopping was 30% in rural India and 25% in urban India.
The share of recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related expenditure was as
high as 32% in rural India but only 15% in urban India.
The share of food and drink in overnight trip expenditure was about 9-10% for both rural
and urban India. The share of accommodation was 3% in rural India and about 6%
(excluding payments made as part of a ‘package’) in urban India.
For same-day trips, shopping was the largest component of expenditure, accounting for
60% of expenditure in case of the rural population and 44% in case of the urban.
For ‘social’ overnight trips, shopping expenditure formed 51% of the total in rural India
and about 38% in urban India. For the urban population, transport commanded the largest
share of expenditure (around 43%) for both ‘social’ and ‘religious and pilgrimage’ trips.
The share of recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related expenditure for the
rural population was over 78% in ‘health and medical’ trips but under 10% in ‘religious’
trips and lower still in trips for ‘social’ visits.
Of the total expenditure by households on domestic tourism, expenditure on overnight trips
accounted for 61% – 36% being incurred by rural and 25% by urban households. Same-day
trips had a share of 39% in total expenditure, 30% incurred by rural and 9% by urban
households. Thus, of the total domestic tourism expenditure, the share of the rural
households was about two-thirds (66%).

*******************

v
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

Contents
Chapter Title Page no.
Highlights i
Contents v
Chapter One Introduction
1.1 The report in perspective
1.2 Background
1.3 Scope of the present survey
1.4 Outline of the survey
1.5 Sampling design
1.6 Contents of the report
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
Chapter Two Concepts and Definitions
2.1 Households
2.2 Monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE)
2.3 Travel
2.4 Usual Place of Residence
2.5 Usual Environment
2.6 Trip
2.7 Visit
2.8 Tourism expenditure
2.9 Non-resident Indian (NRI)
2.10 Major states
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
10
12
12
12
Chapter Three Characteristics of Domestic Tourism
3.1 Incidence of trips per household
3.2 Trips: overnight and same-day
3.3 Leading purpose of trips
3.4 Month of visit
3.5 Trip duration
3.6 Package and non-package trips
3.7 Destination type
3.8 Number of places visited per overnight trip
3.9 Trip size and leading purpose
3.10 Overall incidence per person
3.11 The gender effect
3.12 The effect of age
3.13 Variation with occupation
3.14 Variation with industry
3.15 Distribution of visitors by activity status
3.16 Visitor purpose
3.17 Mode of travel
3.18 Major type of stay
3.19 Measures of occurrence
3.20 Occurrence among persons
3.21 Occurrence among households
3.22 Household occupation
3.23 Household social group
13
13
15
16
17
18
19
19
20
20
21
21
22
23
24
25
25
26
27
28
28
30
32
32
Contents
vi
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
Chapter Title Page no.
Chapter
Three..contd.
3.24 Household type
3.25 Household religion
3.26 Household economic level
3.27 Households visited by NRIs: impact of the NRI
visit(s)
32
33
33
34

Chapter Four Expenditure on Trips
4.1 Expenditure per overnight trip and leading purpose
4.2 Expenditure per overnight visitor- trip and leading
purpose
4.3 Break-up of overnight trip expenditure by leading
purpose
4.4 Break-up of trip expenditure by broad expenditure
head
4.5 Leading purpose and trip expenditure pattern for
overnight trips
4.6 Break-up of domestic tourism expenditure by kind
of trip and sector
35
35
36

37

38

40

42
Appendix A

Detailed Tables (list on pages A- i – A-vi)
A-1 – A-237
Appendix B
Sample Design and Estimation Procedure
B-1 – B-15

Appendix C
Schedule 21.1: Domestic Tourism in India
C-1 – C-13

Appendix D
Projected Population
D-1 – D-3





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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Chapter One
Introduction

1.1 The report in perspective
1.1.1 An all-India household survey on domestic tourism during the period July 2008 to June
2009 was carried out by the National Sample Survey Office (NSSO),National Statistical
Organisation,Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation,Government of India, as
part of the 65
th
round of National Sample Survey (NSS). The data were collected through a
schedule of enquiry (Schedule 21.1).The aim, inter alia, was to provide estimates of the
volume of domestic tourism in terms of number of visitors (i.e. persons performing trips),
number of households undertaking domestic tourism activity and number of trips that
contributed to domestic tourism in India. It was also intended to study domestic tourism
activity by different population categories such as age, economic level, activity status,
occupation and industry of work, etc.; characteristics of trips such as purpose, main
destination, etc. and the expenditure incurred by the households in domestic tourism activity.
Based on the data collected during the survey period (July 2008 - June 2009), estimates
pertaining to domestic tourism in India along with various characteristics associated with
these have been generated and presented in this report.


1.2 Background
1.2.1 Past Surveys: Domestic tourism has not been covered comprehensively in any earlier
NSS round. In the 54
th
round (January-June 1998) of NSS, one of the subjects covered was
tours involving overnight stay. The main household schedule of that round recorded details of
journeys on tours involving overnight stay undertaken by household members during a
specified period.
1.2.2 The results of the 54
th
round enquiry on travel (which included commuting to work or
for education as well as tours involving overnight stay) were published in NSS Report
No.450. The report, in its chapter on tours involving overnight stay, gave State-sector-wise
estimates of rate of occurrence of such journeys per 100 households and per 1000 population
in 60 days, distribution of journeys by mode of journey, distance travelled and purpose, and
average number of travellers, average duration of a journey and average expenditure on a
journey for each mode and purpose. Because of differences in the coverage of “tours
involving overnight stay” as studied in the 54
th
round survey from the “overnight trips” of the
65
th
round survey, it is not possible to compare the estimates from the two surveys in this
report.
1

1.2.3 The present survey: Considering the significant impact of domestic tourism in the
national economy, as per the proposal of the Ministry of Tourism , the then Steering
Committee of NSSO decided to conduct an annual household survey on domestic tourism
during NSS 65
th
round.
                                                           
1
 The two main differences between the 54
th
round concept of tour involving overnight stay and the concept of overnight trip
adopted in the survey under study (65
th
round ) are: (i) movements within the regular routine of a person’s life (which
included commuting) were excluded from the coverage of domestic tourism (that is, not considered trips) in the 65
th
round
and (ii) expenditure on tours in the 54
th
round included only expenditure on passenger transport, whereas in the 65
th
round all
expenditure related to the trip and made before, after, or during the trip were included.  

Chapter One: Introduction 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
1.3 Scope of the present survey
1.3.1 Items of enquiry: In the present survey on domestic tourism, a schedule of enquiry
(Schedule 21.1) was used for collection of data from the sample households. Data were
collected on household characteristics such as household size, principal industry, principal
occupation, household type, religion, social group, household consumption expenditure,
number of overnight trips and same-day trips undertaken by the household, visits, (if any) of
NRIs to the household and their impact, renting out of some portion of the house to tourists
during the last 365 days, and awareness, source of information, and impact of the “Incredible
India” campaign by the Government of India or other tourism promotional campaigns.
1.3.2 Data were also collected for each household member on age, sex, marital status,
educational level, usual principal activity status, industry (NIC) and occupation (NCO) of
employed members, number of overnight trips completed during (a) last 30 days and (b) last
365 days and number of same-day trips completed by the member during (a) last 30 days and
(b) last 365 days.
1.3.3 For each overnight trip and each same-day trip made during the last 30 days by one or
more household members, two kinds of data were collected. One was trip characteristics,
which included leading purpose of the trip, main destination, number of places visited,
number of household members going on the trip along with month(s) of visit for the trip. The
other was the characteristics corresponding to different trip members such as mode of travel,
type of stay, and number of nights spent outside usual place of residence (including journey),
the last item being collected for overnight trips only.
1.3.4 For the latest three overnight trips completed during the last 30 days, detailed data were
collected on particulars of expenditure on different items under the broad heads of
accommodation; food and drink; transport; shopping; recreation; religious, cultural, sporting
and health-related activities; and other expenditure, along with information on
reimbursement/direct payment by any institution for such trips. For same-day trips, instead of
separate break-ups of expenditure for the latest three different trips, the break-up of total
expenditure incurred on all same-day trips completed during last 30 days was recorded.
1.3.5 Choice of reference period: For a subject such as domestic tourism, the choice of the
length of the period for which data are to be sought is always a difficult one. Too short a
period makes the data vulnerable to sampling fluctuations. On the other hand, a long
reference period creates problems of recall lapse, especially when it is not only the number of
trips made during the period but also various details of each trip undertaken that have to be
studied. In this survey, a combination of reference periods was used in the sense that while
number of trips made by each household member was recorded with a reference period of
‘last 365 days’ (and used to build up various measures of the level of tourism activity), the
various characteristics of trips such as purpose, destination, mode of travel, etc., were, to
minimize recall lapse, recorded only for trips completed within the ‘last 30 days’ by the
members of the surveyed households. Details of expenditure relating to trips, as elaborated in
the last paragraph, were also recorded with reference to the trips completed within the ‘last 30
days’ only.
1.3.6 Geographical coverage: The survey covered the whole of the Indian Union except (i)
interior villages of Nagaland situated beyond five kilometres of the bus route and (ii) villages
in Andaman and Nicobar Islands which remain inaccessible throughout the year.



Chapter One: Introduction 
3
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
1.4 Outline of the survey
1.4.1 Period of survey and work programme: The fieldwork of the 65
th
round of NSSO
started from 1
st
July 2008 and continued till 30
th
June 2009. As usual, the survey period of
this round was divided into four sub-rounds, each with a duration of three months. An equal
number of sample villages/blocks (first-stage units or FSUs), as far as possible, was allotted
for survey in each of these four sub-rounds.
1.4.2 Method of data collection: The survey used the recall-based interview method using a
schedule for data collection from a sample of randomly selected households. The sample
design based on which selection of households was made is briefly stated in the following
sub-section.
1.4.3 Central and State samples: As is usual, the Governments of different States and UTs
participated in the survey by canvassing Schedule 21.1 in a separately drawn sample of
villages and blocks called the State sample, as distinct from the Central sample surveyed by
NSSO officials. For Leh (Ladakh) and Kargil districts of Jammu & Kashmir there were no
separate sample first-stage units for the ‘Central sample’. For these two districts, the villages
and blocks drawn as ‘State sample’ were themselves used for drawing the Central sample of
households.

1.5 Sampling design
1.5.1 A stratified multi-stage design was adopted for the 65
th
round survey. The first-stage
units (FSUs) were the 2001 census villages (panchayat wards in case of Kerala) in the rural
sector and Urban Frame Survey (UFS) blocks in the urban sector. For towns with no UFS
frame available, each town was treated as an FSU. The ultimate stage sampling units, in both
sectors, were the households. In case of large FSUs, one intermediate stage of sampling was
the division of the FSU into a number of parts and random selection of one part for survey.
As regards the sample size, 12952 first stage units (FSUs) – 8,188 villages and 4,764 urban
blocks – were allocated at all-India level for the Central sample. Of these, 8,109 villages and
4,719 urban blocks were actually surveyed.
1.5.2 For canvassing the detailed enquiry Schedule 21.1, a sample of 12 households ( second
stage units) was planned to be surveyed from each selected village and urban block. In the
Central sample, 1,53,308 households were actually surveyed – 97,074 in rural areas and
56,234 in urban areas. Statement 1.0 presents the number of villages and urban blocks
allotted and finally surveyed for NSS 65
th
round besides the numbers of sample households
and persons surveyed for Sch.21.1.
1.5.3 Details of sampling design and estimation procedure are given in Appendix B.

1.6 Contents of the Report
1.6.1 This report is based on central sample only. It presents and discusses estimates of
various aspects of domestic tourism, along with their correlates, as obtained from the data
collected on relevant items for the entire round. Estimates for overnight trips and same-day
trips are provided separately for rural and urban sectors at all-India or State/Union Territory
level. This report is based on the Central sample only.


Chapter One: Introduction 
4
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
 
Statement 1.0 : Number of villages/blocks allotted and surveyed for NSS 65
th
Round Central
sample), corresponding number of households and persons surveyed for Schedule 21.1
State/UT no. of villages
(rural)
no. of blocks
(urban)
no. of sample
households
no. of sample
persons
selected surveyed selected surveyed rural urban rural urban
Andhra Pradesh 488 487 272 272 5835 3261 23555 12635
Arunachal Pradesh 104 103 40 40 1212 480 5947 2109
Assam 376 375 88 88 4499 1056 22713 4231
Bihar 472 469 88 87 5621 1037 28674 4881
Chhattisgarh 152 149 64 64 1787 764 9258 3532
Delhi 16 16 272 269 189 3101 844 12215
Goa 16 16 24 24 192 288 880 1277
Gujarat 280 280 248 246 3343 2915 16666 13412
Haryana 144 144 96 96 1727 1142 8937 5378
Himachal Pradesh 160 160 32 32 1885 379 8488 1372
Jammu & Kashmir 176 127 88 63 1506 751 8596 3607
Jharkhand 184 184 88 88 2205 1041 11037 4824
Karnataka 304 303 240 240 3635 2870 16861 12121
Kerala 336 334 184 183 4000 2181 17084 8896
Madhya Pradesh 456 456 248 245 5454 2931 28424 13957
Maharashtra 520 519 520 516 6213 6134 29458 27552
Manipur 192 192 96 96 2304 1152 12339 5600
Meghalaya 128 127 48 48 1524 576 8019 2610
Mizoram 64 63 96 96 756 1152 3804 5719
Nagaland 80 79 32 32 948 384 4914 1721
Orissa 384 383 104 103 4590 1234 21007 4927
Punjab 160 158 128 128 1888 1535 9658 7102
Rajasthan 384 382 176 176 4571 2102 24463 10389
Sikkim 88 85 24 23 1016 276 4579 894
Tamil Nadu 400 399 392 392 4787 4702 18551 16998
Tripura 216 216 72 72 2592 864 11392 3094
Uttarakhand 72 72 40 40 864 479 4236 2339
Uttar Pradesh 1120 1119 448 445 13400 5308 76237 27214
West Bengal 632 631 376 376 7571 4489 33762 17423
A & N Islands 24 21 16 16 252 192 1140 776
Chandigarh 8 8 40 39 93 450 409 1691
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 16 16 16 16 191 192 1032 679
Daman & Diu 16 16 16 16 192 192 939 860
Lakshadweep 4 4 12 12 40 144 187 692
Puducherry 16 16 40 40 192 480 772 1902
all-India 8188 8109 4764 4719 97074 56234 474862 244629
Ref: Table 1 in Appendix A
1.6.2 The report contains four chapters, including the present introductory chapter. Chapter
Two states in detail the concepts and definitions of terms used in the survey. Chapter Three
discusses the various features of domestic tourism and Chapter Four, the expenditure related
to domestic tourism. The detailed tables on which the findings of this survey are based are
presented in Appendix A. The sample design and estimation procedure is explained in
Appendix B. Appendix C is a copy of the schedule of enquiry through which the data were
collected.

Chapter One: Introduction 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
1.6.3 The analysis has been done primarily at all-India level while the corresponding state
level estimates of a few key parameters have been summarised in the state-level statements.
By and large, ratios obtained from the survey are presented, while the aggregates of
population/household are given as marginal row/column totals in the detailed Appendix
tables.
1.6.4 The estimates, in this report, are generally presented as ratios. However, the estimates
of aggregates are also given in the margin of the detailed tables in Appendix A
2
. In order to
facilitate the users to derive aggregates corresponding to projections of population made by
the Office of the Registrar General of India (RGI) , projected population as on 1
st
March 2008
and 1
st
March 2009 supplied by the RGI Office is given in Appendix D, along with those
projected for 1
st
January 2009 using compound rate of growth. The projections have been
given separately for male and female population of rural and urban sectors.

                                                           
2
In the detailed tables, however, in some of the deeper classifications, some sample sizes may be small and this may have a
bearing on the precision of the corresponding estimates.
6
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Chapter Two
Concepts and Definitions

2.0 Important concepts and definitions used in this survey as given in the instructions to field
staff conducting the survey are stated below.

2.1 Household: A group of persons who normally lived together and took food from a
common kitchen constituted a household. The adverb “normally” meant that the temporary
visitors and guests (whose total period of stay in the household was expected to be less than 6
months) were excluded but the temporary stay-aways (whose total period of absence from the
household was expected to be less than 6 months) were included. Thus a child residing in a
hostel for studies was excluded from the household of his/her parents, but a resident domestic
servant or paying guest (but not just a tenant in the house) was included in the
employer’s/host’s household. “Living together” was given more importance than “sharing
food from a common kitchen” in drawing the boundaries of a household in case the two
criteria were in conflict. However, in the special case of a person taking food with his family
but sleeping elsewhere (say, in a shop or a different house) due to shortage of space, the
household formed by such a person’s family members was taken to include the person also.
Each inmate of a hotel, mess, boarding-lodging house, hostel, etc., was considered to be a
single-member household except that a family living in a hotel (say) was considered one
household only. The same principle was applicable for the residential staff of such
establishments. The size of a household is the total number of persons in the household.

2.2 Monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE): For a household, MPCE was the
total consumer expenditure over all items divided by the household size and expressed on a
per month (30 days) basis.

2.2.1 As it is difficult to collect reliable income data, the NSSO, collects data on consumption
expenditure in its surveys. In the present survey on Domestic Tourism (Schedule 21.1), data
on household consumer expenditure during the last 30 days was ascertained through five
questions (see Appendix C), to facilitate the ordering of households in respective level of
living for deeper synthesis of survey results. This helps in portraying the survey variables in
the hierarchy of levels of living of the households classified as quintile classes of MPCE.

2.2.2 Quintile classes of MPCE: The population of any region or domain can be divided
into five quintile classes of MPCE, where the 1
st
quintile of the distribution of MPCE means
the level of MPCE below 20 per cent of the population lie, the second quintile, the level
below which 40 per cent of the population lie, and so on. In this round quintiles were
estimated separately for the distribution of MPCE in the rural and urban sector of each
State/U.T and all-India. Some of the aspects of domestic tourism have been studied with
respect to the level of living of the households which was proxied by monthly per capita
consumer expenditure. This ordering of the households in respect of level of living has been
derived as the distribution of the households in the quintile classes corresponding to the
distribution of the population in the quintile classes.




Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
7
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
2.3 Travel: It is the movement of persons between different geographic boundaries, for any
purpose and any duration. Those who travel are referred to as travelers. Travel can occur
within a country (domestic travel) or involve more than one country (international travel).

2.4 Usual Place of Residence: The usual place of residence (UPR) of a person is the place
(village/town) where the person had been staying continuously for at least six months
immediately prior to the date of survey. Even if a person was not staying in the village/town
continuously for six months immediately prior to the date of survey but was then staying
there with intention to stay there continuously for six months then that place was taken as
his/her UPR.

2.5 Usual Environment: The usual environment (UE) of an individual referred to the
notional geographical space, extending beyond the UPR of an individual, within which he/she
moved in the course of his/her regular routine of life. By the term movement of a person
within his/her regular routine of life is meant the regular and frequent (nearly every day/
every week/every fortnight) movements of a person between his/her UPR and some place for
the purpose of work or study, visiting homes of friends or relatives, shopping centers,
religious places, centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a substantial
distance away but nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited. Such movements might
be within his/her UPR or beyond it.

2.6 Trip

2.6.1 With reference to domestic tourism, the term trip related to those household members
who were resident Indians. It refers to the movement - for a duration of not more than six
months - by one or more household members traveling to a place outside their usual
environment (which includes the usual place of residence(UPR)) and return to their UPR
(a round trip) for purposes other than those of migration or getting employed or setting up of
residence in that place and which is outside their regular routine of life.

2.6.2 Thus, all movements of persons commuting regularly and frequently (nearly every day/
every week/every fortnight) between their UPR and some fixed places for the purpose of
work or study, visiting homes of friends or relatives, shopping centers, religious places,
centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a substantial distance away but
nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited, were not considered as trips. Similarly, all
movements of persons, whose nature of activities within their regular routine of life involved
making movements outside their UPR to different places, like travelling salesmen, mobile
hawkers, medical representatives, on-board staff of airlines/railways or of buses, hired taxis,
etc were not considered as trips.

2.6.3 Exceptions for exclusion from the coverage of trip as mentioned above: All domestic
movements performed by air except for the purpose of migration or getting employed or
setting up of residence in that place were considered as trips even if such movements falls
within the regular routine of life of the visitor. However, domestic movements performed by
on-board aircraft crew as part of their duty were not considered as trips.

2.6.4 A trip might be made up of visits (i.e. stay for a purpose in a place visited during a trip –
details in sub-section 2.7) to different places. A trip might be single-member or multi-
member; in other words, a trip might be undertaken by one or more members of the sample
household with or without members of other households participating. Member(s) of sample

Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 

households participating in a trip were visitors (details in sub-section 2.7). A trip might be
same-day or overnight. An overnight trip was of duration at least one night outside the usual
environment. In case of a single night overnight trip, the night was spread over two
consecutive dates implying that it had started before and ended after twelve midnight.  A
same-day trip was a trip which did not cover even a single night i.e., the trip started and
ended on the same day (0000 hrs to 2359 hrs).

2.6.5 A trip was uniquely specified by its set of destinations, its leading purpose and its
starting and ending date (the last for overnight trips only).Some elaboration of various
features associated with a trip, be it single or multi-member, is in order .

2.6.5.1 In case of a multi-member trip for which the set of destinations differed slightly from
person to person (among those who undertook the trip) if the persons were together for most
of the time (duration of the trip), they were considered to be on the same trip. But if two
members of a household spent most of the time away from each other during the period since
leaving their residence to returning to their residence, then they were considered to have been
on two different trips even though their starting and returning dates were the same.

2.6.5.2 Main destination: The main destination of a trip was the place, visiting of which
was central to the decision to undertake the trip. However, if no such place could be
identified by the informant, the main destination was to be defined as the place where the
visitors spent most of their time during the trip. If the visitors spent the same amount of time
in two or more places during the trip, then the main destination is defined as the one among
these places that was the farthest from the usual place of residence of the visitors. The main
destination of a trip was same for all the members who undertook that trip.

2.6.5.3 Starting and ending dates: The starting (ending) month was the month of starting
(completing) of the trip. In case of a multi-member trip for which one (or more) member(s)
among those who went on a trip starting later - or returning earlier - than the others due to
other engagements, if both the starting date and the ending date for this member were
different from that of the rest of the members, then this member was considered to have
undertaken a different trip from the rest. However, if at least one of these two dates was the
same for this member as for the rest of the members, and the other date, too, did not differ
from that of the rest of the members by more than 3 days, then such a member was
considered to have gone on the same trip as the rest of the members. In these cases the
earliest starting date (latest ending date) was used to determine the starting month (ending
month).

2.6.5.4 Purpose of a trip: The purpose of a trip of a household member was that purpose
but for which he/she would not have undertaken the trip. In the survey, these purposes were
broadly categorized as: business; holidaying, leisure and recreation; social including visiting
friends and relatives, attending marriages, etc.; religious and pilgrimage; education and
training; health and medical ; shopping and others (e.g. volunteer work).

2.6.5.5 Leading purpose of a trip: The leading purpose of a trip as a whole was that
purpose without which none of the household members in that trip would have undertaken
the trip. There might be exceptional situations where no one purpose could be identified as
the leading purpose. For example, there could be two or more purposes, say, pilgrimage and
health, recorded for different trip members. In such a case, the leading purpose was identified

Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
9
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
as that purpose which the informant considered to be the most important for performing the
trip. The leading purpose of a trip was the same for all the members who undertook that
trip.

2.6.5.6 Type of a trip : a trip could be of two types – package or non-package. The term
package trip as used in the survey is detailed below.

2.6.5.6.1 Package Trip: A package was a combination of transport and any one or more
chargeable travel services (e.g., accommodation, meals/food, entertainment and/or
sightseeing, etc.) and sold by tour operators through travel agencies or directly to final
consumers as a single product for a single price. The components of a package tour might be
pre-established or tailor-made, in which case, the visitor chooses a combination of services
he/she wishes to acquire from a pre-established list of such services. If such a package was
availed of for a major part of time in a trip, such a trip was considered as a package trip.

2.6.5.6.2 For the purpose of the survey, if the expenditure on transport and one or more
chargeable travel services availed for some time during the trip did not cover the whole trip
but covered only a minor time of the duration of the trip then such a trip was not considered
as package trip although the trip has a package component. Therefore, a trip which was not a
package trip could have both package and non-package components. Similarly, a package trip
could also contain non-package component in addition to its package component, e.g., a
visitor could avail himself of accommodation and other services in the package through some
tour operator but made some special sight-seeing arrangements in some places of visit in the
trip on his own. Thus, a package trip must have had a package component but not vice versa.

2.6.5.7 Mode of travel: Mode of travel refers to means of transport used by visitor(s) to
travel in a trip. The travel relevant here was the travelling done to cover the distances to the
destinations and not joyrides or movement for adventure, as in skiing or boating for pleasure,
or walking inside a museum, fort or maze. One or more of the following means of transport
were possible in a trip,viz.: on foot, bus, train(railways), ship/boat, air, own transport:
bicycle, two-wheeler, rickshaw, auto rickshaw, car/jeep, tractor/truck, animal driven
transport, transport equipment rental (hired transport): bicycle, two-wheeler, rickshaw, auto
rickshaw, car/jeep, tractor/truck, animal driven transport and others .

2.6.5.7.1 Major mode of travel : The means of transport by which maximum distance was
traveled was treated as ‘major’ mode of travel for that trip. In case more than one such mode
was there (e.g. train, air) for which equal distance was traveled then that means which was
more expensive was treated as ‘major’ mode of travel for that trip.

2.6.5.7.2 Minor mode of travel : The means of transport by which second maximum
distance was traveled was treated as ‘minor’ mode of travel for that trip .

2.6.5.8 Type of stay: The type of stay refers to the accommodation used for stay by
visitor(s) in a trip. Accommodation refers to the space, usually for paid lodging, where the
visitor(s) spent some considerable time for spending night, taking rest, spending some leisure
time, refreshing oneself, etc. during the trip. It could be: hotel, private guest house,
Government guest house, dharamshala, rented house, friends and relatives or others including
carriages / coaches.


Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
2.6.5.8.1 Major type of stay: The category of accommodation where the highest number of
nights (for overnight trips) or maximum time (for same-day trips) was spent was treated as
‘major’ type of stay. In case more than one such category was there (e.g. hotel,
Dharmashala) where same no. of nights (equal length of time) was spent then that type which
was more expensive was treated as ‘major’ type of stay.

2.6.5.8.2 Minor type of stay: The category of accommodation where the second highest
number of nights for overnight trips - or second highest length of time for same-day trips-
was spent was treated as ‘minor’ type of stay.

2.6.5.7 No. of nights spent outside usual place of residence (including journey): This was
the number of nights spent by the visitor outside his/her usual place of residence from starting
of the trip to the completion of the trip, including the nights spent in transit.

2.6.5.9 No. of places visited during the trip: The ‘main destination’ was counted as a place
of visit. If two or more places were reported to have been visited which were in the same
town or in the same village, they were counted once only.

2.7 Visit: The term visit referred to the stay (overnight or same-day) for a purpose in a place
visited during a trip. The stay need not be overnight to qualify as a visit. Entering a
geographical boundary without stopping there for a purpose was considered as being in
transit and did not qualify as a visit to that area. It may be noted that a trip might consist
of visits to one or more places.

2.7.1 Visitor: A person performing a trip as elaborated above was termed a visitor in this
survey.

2.7.2 Domestic Visitor: A domestic visitor was a household member, who had completed a
‘trip’. In other words, a domestic visitor was a person (household member), residing in the
country, who traveled to a place within the country, outside his / her usual place of residence
and not as a part of his/her regular routine of life, for duration of not more than six
months at a time and completed the trip during the reference period and whose main purpose
of visit was other than (a) getting engaged in employment or taking up an occupation in that
place or (b) setting up of residence in that place or (c) migrating to that place.

2.7.3 Thus, from the purview of domestic visitors in the survey, the following were
excluded:

(i) persons commuting regularly and frequently (nearly every day, every week or every
fortnight) between their usual place of residence and place of work or study, visiting
frequently places within their current routine of life in the neighbouring areas(which might be
outside their UPR), for instance, visiting homes of friends or relatives, shopping centres,
religious places, centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a distance but
nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited

(ii) persons arriving at a place, with or without a contract, to take up an occupation or to
engage in employment in that place

(iii) persons arriving at a place for setting up of residence in that place


Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
11
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
(iv) persons who traveled to work temporarily (i.e. less than six months) in institutions within
the country

(v) foreigners resident in India

(vi) persons arriving at a place on migration or migrants. A migrant was a person whose place
of enumeration was different from his/her last usual place of residence (UPR)

(vii) persons, whose nature of activities within their regular routine of life involved making
movements outside their UPR to different places, like travelling salesmen, mobile hawkers,
medical representatives, on-board staff of airlines/ railways or buses, hired taxis etc.

2.7.4 On the other hand, the following were included in the purview of domestic visitors in
the survey:

(i) persons who completed a trip during the reference period and the duration of trip was not
more than six months

(ii) persons who were household members at the time of canvassing the schedule but were
not household members at the time of actually completing a trip within the reference period

(iii) persons on a trip for any of the following purposes: business; holidaying, leisure and
recreation; social including visiting friends and relatives, attending marriages, etc.); religious
and pilgrimage; education and training; health and medical; shopping; others (e.g. volunteer
work)

(iv) domestic component (not in transit) of the trip of a household member visiting a place
outside the country

2.7.5 Domestic visitors were classified into two categories: domestic overnight visitors and
domestic same-day visitors. In this survey, information was collected for both these
categories in respect of those visitors who belong to the sample households.

2.7.5.1 Domestic Overnight Visitor: A domestic overnight visitor was a domestic visitor
who spent at least one night in a trip during last 365 days. This means that the trip covered at
least two calendar days, wholly or partly.

2.7.5.2 Domestic Same-day Visitor: A domestic same-day visitor was a domestic visitor
who did not spend even a single night in any trip during last 365 days. This means that the
trip started and ended on the same day (0000 hrs to 2359 hrs).
2.7.6 Domestic Tourism: It covered trips of household members within the territory of India,
i.e of domestic visitors
1
, either as a domestic trip or as part of an international trip.

                                                           
1
 An important clarification regarding usage of the term ‘visitor’ as used in this survey : In this survey, a
household, say H-a, reporting a domestic visitor: overnight or same-day, was one whose at least one member
made a trip: overnight or same-day, during last 365 days. However, any non-member (of household H-a)
making a visit to household H-a is NOT a ‘visitor’ with respect to sample household H-a as per this
survey. Further, the survey being on domestic tourism in India, the term visitor and domestic visitor are one and
the same. Thus, throughout the remaining part of this report, the term visitor has been used.

Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions 
12
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 
 
2.8 Tourism Expenditure
2.8.1 For the purpose of this survey, tourism expenditure included expenditure made not just
during the trip but also the expenditure related to the trip even if made before or after the trip.
It included all expenses related to the trip paid or payable by the household. It also included
expenditure related to the trip, whether directly paid or reimbursed, by some institution like
Government or other agencies on behalf of the selected household. All expenditure in
connection with the trip except those used/intended to be used for productive
purposes/enterprises was included. All expenditure made by a sample household (whose
members were on a trip) on members of other households was included. But all expenditure
made by other households for any trip undertaken by a sample household was excluded.

2.8.2 Tourism expenditure was classified as (a) package component and (b) non-package
component, with the latter further sub-divided as: (i) accommodation (ii) food and drink (iii)
transport (iv) recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health related activities (v) shopping
and (vi) others.

2.8.3 Tourism expenditure included (i) monetary expenditure on goods and services paid or
payable by the visitor out of his/her own pocket (ii) direct expenditure by the visitor
reimbursed by some institution like Government or other agencies or expenses of the visitor
directly paid by such institutions (iii) expenditure incurred on items of high unit values like
cars, computers, etc. related to a trip if those are used for consumption purpose and not for
productive purpose.

2.8.4 Tourism expenditure excluded (i) payment of taxes and duties not levied on products
(goods and services) (ii) purchase of financial and non-financial assets, including land, real
estate (iii) all transfers of cash or used goods such as donations to charities or to members of
other households as these do not correspond to the purchase of consumption goods or
services from these charities or individuals. Alms are also excluded.

2.9 Non-Resident Indian (NRI): Indian citizens (including officials of Indian diplomatic
missions abroad ) who stay abroad for employment or for carrying on business or vocation or
any other purpose indicating a period of stay abroad exceeding 6 months were considered as
Non-Resident Indian (NRI) for the purpose of this survey.

2.10 Major states: This refers to the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or
more according to the 2001 Census. Together these States accounted for 94.7% of India’s
population in 2001. They are: Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat,
Haryana, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Punjab,
Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.
13
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Chapter Three
Characteristics of Domestic Tourism

3.0.1 The present chapter elucidates various aspects of domestic tourism based on the
information collected in the NSS 65
th
round, being confined to the framework of concepts
and definitions adopted in the survey. In this framework, the activity of domestic tourism
undertaken by the members of the households has two district features, viz. the trip and the
visitor. As elaborated in Chapter Two, the trip, either same-day or overnight, was the
ultimate unit to study the activity of domestic tourism and it related to the movement of one
or more members of the household to a main destination with a leading purpose. The
members of the households who happened to be the members of the trip are the visitors and
the information profiling the visitors was also collected in the survey. The salient
characteristics of domestic tourism activities presented in this chapter, accordingly, cover its
intensity and variations over different categories of households, visitors and trips.

3.0.2 The chapter presents the average number of trips made during a year by households
and persons in different States/UTs, and by persons of different ages, occupations and
industries. The break-up of trips (occasionally, of visitor-trips) by various trip characteristics
such as leading purpose, month of visit, and main destination type (within or outside
district/state) and the distribution of visitors by activity status, are also examined. Further, the
break-up of visitor-trips by important visitor-trip characteristics: purpose of visit, mode of
transport, and major place of stay, are studied. In other words, questions such as “Which were
the most common purposes for which people went on overnight trips?” “Which modes of
transport were most commonly used for same-day trips?” are answered. Estimates of
occurrence of domestic tourism activity are also presented in terms of percentages of persons
and households reporting at least one overnight/same-day trip during a one-year period – in
case of households, separately for different household occupations, social groups and
religions.

3.0.3 The findings presented in this chapter are grouped into four sections: (a) incidence and
characteristics of trips; (b) participation of various population groups; (c) visitor-trip
characteristics; and (d) occurrence of domestic tourism activity among households and
persons in a one-year period.

3.0.4 Two different reference periods – ‘last 30 days’ and ‘last 365 days’ preceding the date
of survey - were used for collecting information related to trips. However, the aggregate
estimates on trips and trip-related characteristics have been generated pertaining to a one-year
period unless otherwise specified and the procedure thereof is explained in the Appendix B
on ‘Sample Design and Estimation Procedure’.

SECTION A: INCIDENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS
3.1. Incidence of trips per household
3.1.1 As stated earlier, a trip was the basic unit to study the activity of domestic tourism and
it corresponded to movement of the members of the households outside their usual place of
residence (excluding the movements which were part of the usual routine of life) with
distinctive leading purposes, destinations and other trip characteristics. Thus one of the
important measures of intensity of domestic tourism is the number of trips during one year
per household. On an average, four overnight trips in a year were undertaken by an Indian

Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
household, with trips made by rural households marginally higher in number than their urban
counterpart (Statement 3.1). To be more precise, 418 overnight trips were undertaken per 100
households at all-India level – 440 trips per 100 households in rural areas and 365 in urban
areas.

Statement 3.1: Average number of overnight and same-day trips * per 100 households:
all-India
Kind of trip
Average number of trips per 100 households
rural urban rural+urban
Overnight 440 365 418
Same-day 844 537 753
Ref: Table 3, 53, 54 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.1.2 The incidence of same-day trips among Indian households, at eight in a year, was thus
almost double that of overnight trips. The average number of same-day trips per 100
households during a year was noticeably higher in rural India (844) than in urban India (537).
The all-India average was 753.

Statement 3.2: Average number of trips* per 100 households in different state /u.t.s

state/u.t.
overnight same-day
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
Andhra Pradesh 469 416 453 853 444 727
Arunachal Pradesh 332 171 297 576 259 508
Assam 223 258 227 504 510 505
Bihar 336 333 335 627 429 606
chhatisgarh 370 366 370 649 507 623
Delhi 166 237 232 546 645 638
Goa 295 322 308 665 804 734
Gujrat 422 370 402 794 557 700
Haryana 578 424 530 849 579 765
Himachal Pradesh 791 593 769 1569 925 1497
Jammu & Kashmir 904 601 836 1919 950 1700
Jharkhand 343 360 346 692 483 659
Karnataka 384 376 381 605 420 536
Kerala 444 446 445 1396 1021 1297
Madhya Pradesh 498 469 491 1099 684 996
Maharastra 453 269 371 781 364 596
Manipur 189 131 173 581 573 579
Meghalaya 279 178 260 505 318 469
Mizoram 232 188 212 238 144 196
Nagaland 317 293 310 649 565 625
Orissa 552 479 541 1394 895 1314
Punjab 504 417 470 1005 654 867
Rajasthan 541 447 516 823 490 734
sikkim 346 296 338 714 430 672
Tamil Nadu 334 328 331 765 556 668
Tripura 307 326 310 471 373 453
Uttarakhand 434 380 422 715 555 680
Uttar Pradesh 493 432 480 819 564 763
West Bengal 393 308 371 782 575 729
Andaman & N. Island 418 181 340 1014 582 872
Chandigarh 191 265 256 340 353 352
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 153 259 179 454 473 459
Daman & Diu 100 211 139 643 688 659
Lakshadeep 184 293 231 218 34 146
Puduchery 455 429 437 885 686 744
All-India 440 365 418 844 537 753
Ref: Tables 3,53,54 in Appendix-A *last 365 days

3.1.3 The intensity of domestic tourism activity was also compared over States and was
found to show considerable variation. The State-wise incidence of average number of
overnight as well as same trips per 100 households is presented above in Statement 3.2.
Average number of overnight trips during a year per urban household in Jammu & Kashmir
and Himachal Pradesh was almost double the all-India average. In these two States, this

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15
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
average was considerably higher in respect of rural households as well. As regards same-day
trips, the incidence was significantly higher in Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Kerala
and Orissa, in both rural and urban areas.

3.2 Trips: overnight and same-day
3.2.1 For the rural population of India, slightly over one-third (34.3%) of all trips were
overnight trips and nearly two-thirds (65.7%) were same-day trips (Statement 3.3). For the
urban population, the proportion of overnight trips was somewhat higher (40.5%), the
proportion of same-day trips being 59.5%.
Statement 3.3: Percentage of overnight and same-day trips* to total: all-
India
Sector
Percentage of trips
Overnight Same-day All
Rural 34.3 65.7 100.0
Urban 40.5 59.5 100.0
Combined 35.7 64.3 100.0
Ref: Table 49 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.2.2 Statement 3.4 shows inter-State and sectoral variation in the proportion of overnight
(and same-day) trips. The percentage of overnight trips for the rural population in every
major State
1
except Kerala (24%) and Orissa (28%) was at least 30%, the highest percentages
being those of Haryana and Rajasthan (around 40%). As for the urban population of the
major States, the proportion of overnight trips was again lowest in Kerala (30%), and was
also below 35% in three other States – Assam, West Bengal and Orissa – the highest
proportion of overnight trips being reported by Andhra Pradesh, Rajasthan and Karnataka
(47-48%).

3.2.3 The situation was almost reverse for same-day trips. Here, The percentage of same-day
trips for the rural population in every major State except Haryana and Rajasthan (both around
60%) was at least 61%, the highest percentages being those of Kerala (76%) and Orissa
(72%). As for the urban population of the major States, the proportion of same-day trips was
lowest in Andhra Pradesh and Rajasthan (about 52%), and above 65% in three other States –
Assam, West Bengal and Orissa – the highest proportion being reported by Kerala (70%).

                                                           
1
Major States are the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or more according to the 2001
Census. Together these States accounted for 94.7% of India’s population in 2001.

Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 

Statement 3.4: Percentage of overnight and same-day trips* to total: States/UTs
state/ut
percentage of trips
rural urban rural+ urban
overnight same-
day
all overnight same-
day
all overnight same-
day
all
Andhra Pradesh 35.5 64.5 100.0 48.4 51.6 100.0 38.4 61.6 100.0
Arunachal Pradesh 36.5 63.5 100.0 39.8 60.2 100.0 36.9 63.1 100.0
Assam 30.7 69.3 100.0 33.6 66.4 100.0 31.0 69.0 100.0
Bihar 34.9 65.1 100.0 43.7 56.3 100.0 35.6 64.4 100.0
Chhattisgarh 36.3 63.7 100.0 41.9 58.1 100.0 37.2 62.8 100.0
Delhi 23.3 76.7 100.0 26.9 73.1 100.0 26.7 73.3 100.0
Goa 30.7 69.3 100.0 28.6 71.4 100.0 29.6 70.4 100.0
Gujarat 34.7 65.3 100.0 39.9 60.1 100.0 36.5 63.5 100.0
Haryana 40.5 59.5 100.0 42.3 57.7 100.0 40.9 59.1 100.0
Himachal Pradesh 33.5 66.5 100.0 39.1 60.9 100.0 33.9 66.1 100.0
Jammu & Kashmir 32.0 68.0 100.0 38.8 61.2 100.0 33.0 67.0 100.0
Jharkhand 33.2 66.8 100.0 42.7 57.3 100.0 34.4 65.6 100.0
Karnataka 38.8 61.2 100.0 47.2 52.8 100.0 41.5 58.5 100.0
Kerala 24.1 75.9 100.0 30.4 69.6 100.0 25.5 74.5 100.0
Madhya Pradesh 31.2 68.8 100.0 40.7 59.3 100.0 33.0 67.0 100.0
Maharashtra 36.7 63.3 100.0 42.5 57.5 100.0 38.4 61.6 100.0
Manipur 24.6 75.4 100.0 18.6 81.4 100.0 23.0 77.0 100.0
Meghalaya 35.6 64.4 100.0 35.9 64.1 100.0 35.6 64.4 100.0
Mizoram 49.3 50.7 100.0 56.6 43.4 100.0 52.0 48.0 100.0
Nagaland 32.8 67.2 100.0 34.1 65.9 100.0 33.2 66.8 100.0
Orissa 28.4 71.6 100.0 34.9 65.1 100.0 29.1 70.9 100.0
Punjab 33.4 66.6 100.0 38.9 61.1 100.0 35.1 64.9 100.0
Rajasthan 39.7 60.3 100.0 47.7 52.3 100.0 41.3 58.7 100.0
Sikkim 32.6 67.4 100.0 40.7 59.3 100.0 33.5 66.5 100.0
Tamil Nadu 30.4 69.6 100.0 37.1 62.9 100.0 33.2 66.8 100.0
Tripura 39.4 60.6 100.0 46.6 53.4 100.0 40.6 59.4 100.0
Uttarakhand 37.8 62.2 100.0 40.6 59.4 100.0 38.3 61.7 100.0
Uttar Pradesh 37.6 62.4 100.0 43.3 56.7 100.0 38.6 61.4 100.0
West Bengal 33.5 66.5 100.0 34.8 65.2 100.0 33.7 66.3 100.0
A & N Islands 29.2 70.8 100.0 23.7 76.3 100.0 28.0 72.0 100.0
Chandigarh 35.9 64.1 100.0 42.9 57.1 100.0 42.1 57.9 100.0
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 25.2 74.8 100.0 35.4 64.6 100.0 28.1 71.9 100.0
Daman & Diu 13.5 86.5 100.0 23.4 76.6 100.0 17.4 82.6 100.0
Lakshadweep 45.7 54.3 100.0 89.6 10.4 100.0 61.3 38.7 100.0
Puducherry 33.9 66.1 100.0 38.5 61.5 100.0 37.0 63.0 100.0
all-India 34.3 65.7 100.0 40.5 59.5 100.0 35.7 64.3 100.0
Ref: Table 49 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.3 Leading purpose of trips
3.3.1 In the survey, for each reported trip, a distinct leading purpose was identified. The
leading purpose of a trip was understood as the purpose in the absence of which the trip
would not have been undertaken. It was recognized that if the individual purposes of different
participants differed, there might be trips without a leading purpose in the above sense. Thus
two members on a trip might have had different purposes each strong enough to make the trip
possible even if the other person dropped out of the trip. In such cases the most important
purpose among the purposes of the individual participants, as perceived by the informant,
was identified as the leading purpose of the trip. The all-India break-up of overnight and
same-day trips by leading purpose is shown in Statement 3.5.


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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Statement 3.5: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips *by leading purpose

leading purpose
percentage of trips with the purpose among
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural +urban rural urban rural +urban
business 2.3 3.4 2.7 5.2 7.6 5.5
holidaying, leisure and
recreation
1.9 5.0
2.8 2.4 5.4 2.8
social 75.0 71.3 74.0 37.9 54.6 40.3
religious & pilgrimage 8.8 12.4 9.8 5.9 11.0 6.7
education & training 0.9 1.3 1.0 0.9 1.5 1.0
health & medical 7.3 3.5 6.2 16.9 8.4 15.7
shopping 0.5 0.2 0.4 23.2 6.6 20.9
others 3.3 2.8 3.2 7.6 4.8 7.2
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 50 & 54 in Appendix A
*last 365 days

3.3.2 Leading purpose: overnight trips: By far the most common leading purpose of
overnight trips was social – this included visiting friends and relatives and attending
marriages. The social purpose accounted for 75% of overnight trips made by the rural
population and 71% of such trips made by the urban population. Religious trips and
pilgrimages accounted for 12% of urban and 9% of rural Indians’ overnight trips. Overnight
trips for health and medical purposes were more common in rural India, where they had a
share of 7.3% compared to 3.5% in urban India. 5% of the overnight trips of the urban
population and only 2% of those of rural population were reported to be for holidaying,
leisure and recreation.

3.3.3 Leading purpose: same-day trips: Social visits were the leading purpose of 38% of the
same-day trips of rural Indians and nearly 55% of those of urban Indians. Shopping – very
rarely the purpose of an overnight trip – was the leading purpose of 23% of same-day trips by
the rural population but less than 7% for the urban population. In both rural and urban India,
many more same-day trips were made for health and medical reasons (17% rural, 8% urban)
than overnight trips. Same-day trips were made for religious purposes slightly less often (6%
rural, 11% urban) than overnight trips were.

3.4 Month of visit
3.4.1 Taking the ‘month of visit’ as the ending month (in case the starting and ending months
are different), the percentage distribution of trips over months of the year is shown in
Statement 3.6. It may be noted that the estimates are based on information on trips made by
sample household members in the 30 days preceding the day the household was interviewed.
Since exactly equal numbers of households were not interviewed in every month of the
survey year, the numbers of trips recorded as made in January, February, etc. depend not only
on the real intensity of tourism activity during these months but also on the numbers of
households surveyed during these months and in the succeeding months (e.g. trips made in
January may be recorded by interviews taking place in January or in February). Under the
circumstances, it may not be appropriate to read too much into the month-to-month
differences in percentage of trips, which are not very large except that the figures for June for
both sectors, and the figures for July in the urban sector, are noticeably low compared to, say,
the figures for May or August.
2
By and large, it is seen that 7-10% of trips were made in most
                                                           
2
It was mentioned that January (2009) trips would be recorded by interviews made in January or February
(2009). The case of June is a little different. June trips would be recorded by interviews made in July 2008 (June
2008 trips) and by interviews made in June 2009 (June 2009 trips). Because of the logistics of launching of
surveys, however, it is often the case that the survey work is not in full swing before the second half of July.
This would affect the estimates of not only June but also July, as July trips have to be recorded by interviews in
July and August.

Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
18
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
months of the year. The low percentage shares of June (and also July for the urban sector) are
offset by above-average shares in the months immediately following.

Statement 3.6: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips by month of visit
month@
percentage of trips made in the month
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
January 7.7 8.6 7.9 8.1 8.7 8.2
February 8.0 6.6 7.6 8.0 7.8 8.0
March 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.5 7.8 7.5
April 8.9 8.5 8.8 8.4 9.4 8.5
May 11.8 10.0 11.3 8.8 9.5 8.9
June 5.5 2.6 4.7 5.8 3.6 5.5
July 10.0 3.5 8.1 11.2 2.5 10.0
August 9.7 14.3 11.0 9.5 12.7 9.9
September 6.2 10.5 7.5 7.0 11.9 7.7
October 9.4 10.9 9.8 9.3 8.8 9.2
November 8.5 8.2 8.4 9.1 8.8 9.1
December 6.9 9.1 7.6 7.3 8.4 7.5
All (incl. n.r.) 100.00 100.00 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 52 & 55 in Appendix A @ending month for overnight trip

3.5 Trip duration
3.5.1 Statement 3.7 gives the average duration of overnight trips in number of nights,
separately for trips ending in different months. The duration of each reported trip was
ascertained by the survey in terms of the number of nights spent. On an average, the duration
of a trip was 3.1 nights for rural households and 4.2 nights for urban households. The average
duration of trips is seen to have greater variability over months in the urban sector, where it
varied from 3.5 in February and August to 5.6 in July. In the rural sector it was highest in
June at 3.4 and within 2.7 to 3.3 in all other months.

Statement 3.7: Average duration of overnight trips* (no. of nights spent)
month@
Average duration of overnight trips (no. of nights spent)
rural urban rural+ urban
January 3.1 3.8 3.4
February 2.7 3.5 2.9
March 2.9 3.6 3.1
April 3.0 4.6 3.4
May 3.2 4.2 3.5
June 3.4 4.7 3.6
July 2.9 5.6 3.2
August 3.1 3.5 3.2
September 3.1 5.0 3.9
October 3.3 5.1 3.9
November 2.9 3.6 3.1
December 3.1 3.9 3.4
all 3.1 4.2 3.4
Ref: Tables 52 in Appendix A @ending month *last 365 days



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3.6 Package and non-package trips
3.6.1 Among the characteristics of trips identified was whether or not it was a package trip.
A package trip was one (see Chapter Two, paragraph 2.6.5.6.1) in which a package was
availed of for the major part of the duration of the trip. A package was a combination of
transport and any one or more chargeable travel services – e.g., accommodation, meals/food,
entertainment, sightseeing – and sold by tour operators through travel agencies or directly to
final consumers as a single product for a single price. (The components of a package tour
might be pre-established or tailor-made.) The survey revealed only a marginal presence of
package trips in domestic travel habits of Indian households.
3
Statement 3.8 shows that only
1.3% of overnight trips for the urban population and 0.8% for the rural were package trips.
Among same-day trips, only 0.7% of trips by the urban population and 0.3% of those by the
rural population were of the package type.

Statement 3.8: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips by type of trip

type of trip
percentage of trips of the type among
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural+ urban rural urban rural+ urban
package 0.8 1.3 0.9 0.3 0.7 0.4
non-package 99.2 98.7 99.1 99.7 99.3 99.6
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 50 & 54 in Appendix A

3.7 Destination type
3.7.1 For each trip, a main destination was identified and classified according to whether it
was within the district to which the household residence belonged, or outside the district but
within the same State, or outside the State. This would enable the study of the relative
frequencies of trips by these three destination types. One may also study the relative
frequencies of visitor-trips by destination type (counting each trip as many times as the
number of participating members) and so get an idea of the relative volumes of visitor
movements of these three kinds. This, in fact, has been done in Statement 3.9.

3.7.2 Destination type: overnight trips: About 21% of urban, but only 6% of rural overnight
visitor-trips involved travel to a different state from their place of residence. In the majority
(66%) of overnight visitor-trips of the rural population, the visitors remained within their
district, while in 28%, they travelled beyond their district to a place within their state. Among
overnight visitor-trips of the urban population, it was journeys beyond one’s district (within
the state) that were more common (49%), with only about 30% that were limited within the
boundaries of the visitors’ district.

3.7.3 Destination type: same-day trips: Travel within one’s state accounted for nearly 99%
of rural and about 96% of urban same-day visitor-trips. About 33% of urban but only 9% of
rural same-day visitor-trips involved travel beyond the boundaries of the visitors’ district,
remaining within their state. The majority of same-day visitor-trips – nearly 90% in rural and
63% in urban India – kept the visitors within the district of their residence.

                                                           
3
It should be noted, however, that many non-package trips might have had a package component.

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Statement 3.9: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips* by main
destination type
destination type
percentage to total no. of
overnight visitor-trips
percentage to total no. of same-
day visitor-trips
rural urban rural+ urban rural urban rural+ urban
within district 65.7 29.6 54.9 89.5 62.8 85.3
outside district but within state 28.2 49.3 34.5 9.1 32.8 12.9
outside state 6.0 20.9 10.5 1.1 4.4 1.6
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 41 & 46 in Appendix A *last 365 days


3.8 Number of places visited per overnight trip
3.8.1 Another parameter of interest in the activity of domestic tourism is the number of
places visited per trip. This indicator is more relevant for overnight trips. The estimated
average number of places (towns or villages) visited per overnight trip was studied by sector
of location of the visitor household and main destination type; the results are shown in
Statement 3.10. The estimates show negligible variation over sectors. It is seen that for every
100 trips made to a main destination outside the visitor household’s state, about 150 places
were visited. For every 100 trips to outside-district but within-state destinations, about 118
places were visited (about 6 places visited for every 5 trips), while trips within one’s district
rarely saw more than one place visited.

Statement 3.10: Average no. of places visited per 100 overnight trips* by main destination type
destination type
average no. of places visited per 100 overnight trip
rural urban rural+ urban
within district 104 105 104
outside district but within state 119 118 119
outside state 150 152 151
Ref: Table 53 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.9 Trip size and leading purpose
3.9.1 A trip would comprise one or a group of members of a household. Hence, in studying
the characteristics of trips, it is also worthwhile to look into the question of how many
persons travelled together on a trip. In other words, it is relevant to examine the average trip
size in terms of the average number of household members per trip. The number of household
members participating in a trip reported by a household could vary from 1 to the size of the
household. Statement 3.11 gives an idea of the average trip size by presenting the average
number of visitors per 100 trips, separately for same-day and overnight trips, and separately
for overnight trips with different leading purposes. In rural areas, every 100 overnight trips
had 223 participating members (2.2 per trip) and every 100 same-day trips had 183 members
(1.8 per trip). In urban areas, every 100 overnight trips had 232 participants (2.3 per trip) and
every 100 same-day trips had 200 participants (2.0 per trip).





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Statement 3.11: Average number of visitors per 100 trips*
trip category leading purpose rural urban rural+ urban





overnight
business 129 126 128
holidaying, leisure and recreation 208 216 213
social 230 236 232
religious & pilgrimage 228 275 245
education & training 130 134 132
health & medical 215 206 213
shopping 141 135 140
other 184 158 177
all (including n.r.) 223 232 225
same-day all 183 200
Note: Figures derived from Tables 56 & 58 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.9.2 As expected, average size of the group travelling on an overnight trip varied
noticeably with the leading purpose of the trip. Business trips and trips for education and
training had the smallest number of members travelling together (about 130 per 100 trips for
both rural and urban areas) and shopping trips, too, had only 135-140 members per 100 trips.
On the other hand, about 230 members (2.3 per trip) travelled in every 100 social or religious
trips of rural households and every 100 social trips of urban households, and as many as 275
members (2.75 per trip) travelled in every 100 religious trips of urban households.

SECTION B: PARTICIPATION OF VARIOUS POPULATION GROUPS
3.10.0 As stated earlier, the trips recorded for a sample household were movements in which
members of the household had participated. Various characteristics of each household
member such as age, occupation, etc. were also recorded as part of the survey. This
personwise information enables the study of participation in domestic tourism activity by
different population categories.

3.10 Overall incidence per person
3.10.1 A distinction evident in the incidence of trips undertaken in a year by persons in rural
and urban areas is that the incidence was appreciably higher for rural persons in case of same-
day trips but of the same order for both sectors in case of overnight trips. The average number
of overnight trips made by a person (Statement 3.12) was estimated as 2.10 for rural Indians
and 2.07 for urban Indians. The average number of same-day trips was considerably higher,
especially in rural India (3.30) and also in urban India (2.63).

3.11 The gender effect
3.11.1 Statement 3.12 also brings out male-female differences in number of trips per person.
For overnight trips the average for females, in both sectors, was below the average for males
by about 30 per 100 persons. Male-female differences were wider for same-day trips, with
rural females making 266 same-day trips per 100 persons while rural males made 389 (46%
more). Urban females made 226 same-day trips per 100 persons while urban males made 297
(31% more).


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Statement 3.12: Average number of same-day and overnight trips* per 100 persons of
each sex: all-India
Kind of trip
Average number of trips per 100 persons
Rural Urban
male female all male female all
Overnight 225 194 210 220 192 207
Same-day 389 266 330 297 226 263
Ref: Tables 30, 35, 40 & 45 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.11.2 Gender profile of visitors: As an overnight/ same-day visitor is understood as a person
who made at least one overnight/ same-day trip during the reference period of ‘last 365 days’,
the population of overnight or same-day visitors can be identified and various characteristics
studied. One matter of interest here would be the gender profile of visitors, shown by their
male-female break-up. This is given in Statement 3.13. Thus, among every 1000 overnight
urban visitors, 537 were males and 463, and the proportion of males was slightly lower
among rural overnight visitors, but higher for same-day visitors – both rural and urban –
among whom the male-female ratio was about 55 to 45 in the urban sector and slightly lower
in the rural sector.

Statement 3.13: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day
visitors by gender of visitor
Gender
Overnight visitors Same-day visitors
Rural Urban Rural Urban
male 52.5 53.7 54.5 55.1
female 47.5 46.3 45.5 44.9
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 30 and 35 in Appendix A

3.12 The effect of age
3.12.1 Statement 3.14 shows the variation with age in average number of trips made by a
person. In all,18 age-groups are considered, all of width 5 years except the last. For both
overnight and same-day trips, the average number of trips per person is seen to rise gradually
up to a certain age-group and then decline, the decline being steeper for overnight trips. The
average number of both overnight and same-day trips made by children was higher than the
average number of trips made by the aged. Younger children made more trips than older
ones, presumably because they could not be left alone by their parents; thus the average
number of trips falls instead of rising as one moves up the age range from 0-4 to 10-14. This
was true for rural as well as urban India. In rural India the average number of trips, both
overnight and same-day, was highest in the age-group 30-34; in urban India it was highest in
the age-group 40-44. An interesting phenomenon regarding trips made by the elderly was
revealed in this study. In case of overnight trips, persons of age 60 years and above had a
lower average per year than the all-ages average both in rural and urban sectors. However, in
case of same-day trips of the rural population, even elderly persons in the age group 65-69
made more trips per year than the rural all-ages average of 3.30 per person. In urban areas,
the age-group 60-64 was the oldest group to surpass the all-ages average of 2.63 same-day
trips per year.


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Statement 3.14: Average no. of trips per person* for different age-groups
age-group
average no. of trips
overnight same-day
rural urban
rural+ urban
rural urban
rural+ urban
0-4 1.99 1.94 1.98 2.22 1.96 2.16
5-9 1.83 1.90 1.85 2.03 1.91 2.01
10-14 1.64 1.78 1.67 2.05 1.93 2.02
15-19 1.74 1.78 1.75 2.70 2.09 2.53
20-24 2.22 2.03 2.16 3.50 2.56 3.22
25-29 2.52 2.28 2.45 4.16 2.98 3.81
30-34 2.66 2.31 2.55 4.75 3.21 4.28
35-39 2.56 2.34 2.50 4.57 3.35 4.22
40-44 2.55 2.46 2.52 4.66 3.52 4.33
45-49 2.43 2.37 2.41 4.54 3.39 4.21
50-54 2.28 2.25 2.27 4.16 3.23 3.90
55-59 2.12 2.13 2.13 3.91 3.03 3.66
60-64 1.96 1.89 1.94 3.54 2.65 3.31
65-69 1.76 1.81 1.78 3.38 2.48 3.14
70-74 1.45 1.44 1.45 2.89 2.05 2.67
75-79 1.27 1.45 1.33 2.66 1.89 2.43
80-84 1.16 1.19 1.16 2.06 1.26 1.85
above 84 0.84 0.80 0.83 1.40 0.89 1.25
all 2.10 2.07 2.09 3.30 2.63 3.12
Ref: Tables 30 & 35 in Appendix A *in last 365 days


3.13 Variation with occupation
3.13.1 Statement 3.15 shows variation with occupation in the average number of overnight
and same-day trips in a one-year period, with nine occupational categories of households
considered.
4
It is seen that for all the categories listed, the average number of trips, whether
overnight or same-day, was higher than the average (“all” row) for the population of the
sector (rural/urban) as a whole, implying that the persons with no occupation made fewer
trips on the average than the working or gainfully employed population. This is not surprising
in view of the fact that the aged, as well as children of the 5-14 age-group, who would form a
sizeable proportion of those without any occupation, made fewer trips on the average than the
rest of the population (see previous paragraph). Among the gainfully employed, the
professionals and associate professionals made trips more frequently than the rest, and so did
clerks. Skilled agricultural and fishery workers had the highest average number of same-day
trips (4.21) in urban India, but did not enjoy this distinction in case of overnight trips or the
rural sector.

                                                           
4
The “all” row of Statement 3.15 covers not only these nine categories but the entire population, including the
residual category “persons with blank occupation (NCO) code”. This includes persons too young or too old to
work, housewives, students, pensioners, rentiers, remittance receivers, beggars, prostitutes and other persons not
gainfully employed. No estimate of average number of trips was generated for this heterogeneous category. The
“all” estimate also takes into account those sample persons for whom the occupation code was not recorded.

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Statement 3.15: Average no. of trips per person* for different occupation groups
occupation
average no. of
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
legislators, senior officials and managers 2.74 2.56 2.62 5.29 3.65 4.23
professionals 3.10 2.69 2.85 6.69 4.04 5.10
associate professionals 3.16 2.64 2.88 6.76 3.87 5.20
clerks 2.87 2.55 2.64 5.82 3.71 4.36
service workers and shop & market sales
workers 2.50 2.35 2.42 5.24 3.46 4.31
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 2.57 2.59 2.57 4.57 4.21 4.56
craft and related trades workers 2.52 2.27 2.40 5.04 3.49 4.31
plant and machine operators and assemblers 2.73 2.55 2.64 5.67 3.50 4.58
elementary occupations 2.44 2.13 2.40 4.47 2.99 4.25
all 2.10 2.07 2.09 3.30 2.63 3.12
Ref: Tables 33 & 38 in Appendix A *in last 365 days

3.14 Variation with industry
3.14.1 Statement 3.16 shows variation with industry of employment (NIC industry group) in
average number of overnight and same-day trips during a one-year period. As in case of
occupation, “all” includes those with blank industry code, which applies to all those not
gainfully employed. Again it is clear, from a comparison of the “all” row figures with the
rows for specific industries, that, with the exception of persons employed by private
households
5
, persons not gainfully employed in any industry made fewer trips on an average
than the gainfully employed population. Variation over industry groups in number of trips per
person was relatively low for overnight trips and a little more prominent in case of same-day
trips, especially in the rural sector. Among the gainfully employed, there were no striking
inter-industry differences in case of overnight trips. In rural India, those employed in
“electricity, gas and water supply”, “financial intermediation”, “education”, “health and
social work”, and “real estate, renting and business activities” had higher averages than other
industry groups – 3 or more overnight trips in a year, and 6 or more same-day trips in a year.

Statement 3.16: Average no. of trips per person * for different industry groups
industry
average no. of
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural+ urban rural urban rural+ urban
agriculture, hunting and forestry 2.51 2.37 2.50 4.49 3.76 4.47
fishing 2.15 2.88 2.36 4.39 4.77 4.50
mining and quarrying 2.69 2.59 2.66 5.12 3.52 4.65
manufacturing 2.49 2.27 2.38 5.01 3.28 4.12
electricity, gas and water supply 3.69 2.86 3.27 6.87 4.16 5.49
construction 2.73 2.33 2.59 5.07 3.48 4.54
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 2.45 2.26 2.34 5.00 3.49 4.13
hotels and restaurants 2.59 2.58 2.58 5.60 3.36 4.27
transport, storage and communications 2.73 2.56 2.65 5.28 3.79 4.51
financial intermediation 3.43 2.76 2.93 10.00 3.92 5.43
real estate, renting and business activities 3.09 2.55 2.67 6.36 3.40 4.05
public administration and defence; compulsory social security 2.97 2.86 2.90 6.31 3.87 4.76
education 3.29 2.75 3.04 7.02 4.21 5.71
health and social work 3.10 2.60 2.81 6.24 3.61 4.73
other community, social and personal service activities 2.66 2.39 2.53 5.41 3.34 4.44
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private households 1.68 1.68 1.68 4.16 2.10 2.79
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 0.15 0.63 0.58 0.73 1.38 1.32
all 2.10 2.07 2.09 3.30 2.63 3.12
Ref: Tables 34 & 39 in Appendix A *in last 365 days

                                                           
5
The all-India sample included only 16 persons who were reported to be employed by extra-territorial
organizations.

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3.15 Distribution of visitors by broad activity status
3.15.1 A related point of interest is the percentage break-up of visitors by broad activity
status: that is, into the categories “employed”, “unemployed”, and “out of labour force”.
Statement 3.17 shows this break-up for both overnight and same-day trips, and, side by side,
the shares of these three categories in the entire population. It is seen that the percentage
share of the “out of labour force” category in the number of overnight visitors for rural and
urban India is about 2 to 3 percentage points lower than the share of this category in the entire
population, and the share of the same category in the number of same-day visitors is about 7
percentage points lower than its share in the entire population. The share of the other major
group, the employed, in overall population is, correspondingly, lower than its share in the
number of overnight and same-day visitors. This finding is not surprising in view of the
results presented above on number of trips by different age-groups and the fact that the “not
in labour force” category would include large numbers of the aged and children too young to
work.

Statement 3.17: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitors by broad activity status
broad activity status
rural urban rural+ urban
percentage of visitors
percentage
of
population
percentage of visitors
percentage
of
population
percentage of visitors percentage
of
population
overnight same-day overnight
same-
day
overnight
same-
day
employed 42.1 45.5 38.5 35.4 38.0 33.2 40.3 43.5 37.1
unemployed 0.7 0.8 0.7 1.2 1.4 1.4 0.8 0.9 0.9
out of labour force 57.2 53.7 60.7 63.4 60.6 65.4 58.8 55.5 62.0
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 31& 36 in Appendix A

SECTION C: VISITOR-TRIP CHARACTERISTICS
3.16.0 The classification of trips by characteristics of trips such as leading purpose of trip
and month of visit was studied in Section A of this chapter. Certain features of trips,
however, differ not only from trip to trip but, for the same trip, may vary from one participant
to another – and therefore were recorded separately by the survey for each trip for each
participant. These include (major) mode of travel, major place of stay, and even purpose of
the visitor (as distinct from leading purpose, which is fixed for a particular trip). These
characteristics are termed visitor-trip characteristics as they may vary with each visitor-trip
combination. It follows that the relative frequencies of reporting of each category of reported
purpose, or reported mode of travel, should be counted in terms of number of visitor-trips,
rather than in terms of number of trips or visitors. This is done in this section, where the
relative prevalence of different purposes, modes of travel, etc., is discussed.

3.16 Visitor purpose
3.16.1 Visitor purpose: overnight trips: The estimated break-up of trips by leading purpose
– the purpose in the absence of which the trip would not have been undertaken – has already
been discussed in Section 3.3. The reason prompting some of the participants to make the trip
may, however, differ from the leading purpose. Statement 3.18 shows the all-India percentage
break-up of rural/urban visitors-trips
6
by visitor purpose, separately for overnight and same-
                                                           
6
Sometimes words such as “percentage of visitors” have been used in this section for simplicity; it should be
remembered, however, that strictly speaking, it is “visitor-trips” that are being counted here, or, in other words,
that a visitor is counted as many times as the number of trips he or she made.

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day trips. By far the commonest purpose reported by persons who made overnight trips was
social. This purpose alone prompted 77% of rural and 73% of urban overnight visitors to
make their trips. Religious purposes, including pilgrimages, accounted for 9% of rural and
about 15% of urban visitors, health and medical purposes for 7% of rural and 3% of urban
visitors, and holidaying, leisure and recreation for about 2% of rural and 5% of urban
visitors.

Statement 3.18: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by purpose of visit
purpose
percentage to total no. of overnight visitor-
trips
percentage to total no. of same-day
visitor-trips
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
business 1.3 1.8 1.5 3.7 4.5 3.8
holidaying, leisure and recreation 1.7 4.7 2.6 2.6 5.6 3.1
social 77.3 72.8 76.0 39.8 55.6 42.3
religious & pilgrimage 9.0 14.8 10.7 8.4 14.8 9.4
education & training 0.5 0.8 0.6 0.7 1.1 0.8
health & medical 7.0 3.1 5.8 19.2 8.4 17.5
shopping 0.3 0.1 0.2 18.7 6.0 16.7
others 2.8 2.0 2.6 7.0 4.0 6.5
all 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Ref: Tables 40& 45 in Appendix A

3.16.2 Visitor purpose: same-day trips: Statement 3.18 shows that for same-day visitors, the
predominant purpose of trips was again social, but that the share of the social purpose was
smaller, especially for the rural population (about 40%) and also for the urban (about 56%).
For the rural population this was explained by the much larger shares of health and medical
and shopping (about 19% each). The same two purposes together accounted for about 14% of
the visitor-trips for the urban population.

3.16.3 Leading purpose and visitor purpose: Comparison of Statement 3.18 with Statement
3.5 does not reveal any striking differences in the break-up of trips by leading purpose from
the break-up of visitor-trips by visitor purpose. For both overnight and same-day trips, the
percentage of trips with leading purpose business is smaller than the percentage of visitor-
trips where the visitor’s purpose is business. This is not surprising as (a) the average number
of persons travelling together on a business trip is smaller (see paragraph 3.9.2) than the
average number of persons travelling together on a social trip, and (b) a business trip may
occasionally include one or more household members whose purpose of travel is health or
shopping, but the converse would be relatively rare.

3.17 Mode of travel
3.17.1 As a typical trip involves more than one mode of transport, it needs to be clarified
that it is the major mode reported for each visitor – in other words, the mode by which the
visitor covered the longest distance – that is being referred to here. Statement 3.19 gives the
percentage distribution of visitor-trips by mode of travel separately for overnight and same-
day trips made by rural and urban Indians.

3.17.2 Buses were the dominant mode of travel for overnight and same-day trips alike,
accounting for two-thirds (67%) of overnight trips
7
by the rural population, 57% of trips by
the urban population, and 57-61% of same-day trips by the rural and urban populations.
Trains were used for 27% of overnight trips by urban Indians; for rural Indians their share in
                                                           
7
Strictly, visitor-trips; the word “trips” is used here for simplicity. 

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overnight trips was 7%. Trains were also used in 9% of same-day trips by urban Indians but
their share was only 2% for rural Indians.

Statement 3.19: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by mode of transport
mode of transport
percentage to total no. of overnight visitor-
trips
percentage to total no. of same-day visitor-
trips
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
on foot 2.7 0.3 2.0 6.8 0.7 5.9
bus 67.4 57.0 64.3 57.5 60.8 58.0
train 7.4 27.3 13.4 1.7 8.7 2.8
ship/boat 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
air 0.0 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0
own transport 11.5 9.7 11.0 20.9 20.8 20.9
transport-equipment rental 10.2 5.0 8.6 12.4 8.5 11.8
others 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.6
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 43& 47 in Appendix A

3.17.3 Rented transport
8
had a larger share in rural areas than in urban: 10% for overnight
trips (5% in urban areas) and over 12% for same-day trips (8.5% in urban areas). Three types
of owned transport – bicycles, motorized two-wheelers and motor cars (including jeeps) –
together accounted for 19% of same-day trips in both rural and urban India, with the share of
the bicycle and the motor car, of course, differing substantially between the sectors. The
motorized two-wheeler (owned) accounted for 7% of same-day trips in rural areas and nearly
9% in urban areas. Urban people used their own motorcars or jeeps for about 5% of overnight
trips and about 9% of same-day trips. About 9% of same-day trips in rural India were made
on bicycles.

3.18 Major type of stay
3.18.1 For a visitor on a trip, this refers to the type of accommodation : hotel, guest house,
etc., where the visitor spent the greatest number of nights for overnight trips or maximum
time for same-day trips. For same-day trips, the estimates (Statement 3.20) are not of great
interest as the majority – 82% in rural areas and 74% in urban – did not stay anywhere on the
trip,
9
while most of those who did, stayed with friends and relatives. For overnight trips, an
overwhelmingly large number of visitors (strictly, visitor-trips) – 85% in rural areas and 80%
in urban areas – reported that their major type of stay was with friends and relatives. This is,
of course, not surprising in view of the fact that 77% of trips of urban visitors and 73% of
trips of rural visitors were for a social purpose (Section 3.16). It would appear from the
estimates that friends and relatives provided accommodation not only when trips were for
such purposes but, frequently, for other (for example, religious) purposes as well. Hotels
were the major type of stay for an estimated 1.3% of rural and less than 5% of urban
overnight visitors, and dharamshalas for about 3% of rural and 4% of urban overnight
visitors.

                                                           
8
Note that owned transport and transport rented for private use were classified separately in the schedule of
enquiry. In Tables 43 and 47 in Appendix A, estimates are given separately for different forms of owned
transport but not for different forms of rented transport. 
9
Same-day trips are those that started and ended on the same day (0000 hours to 2359 hours).

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Statement 3.20: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by major place of stay
mode of stay
percentage to total no. of overnight
visitor-trips
percentage to total no. of same-day
visitor-trips
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
hotel 1.3 4.7 2.3 0.1 0.2 0.1
private guest house 0.6 1.1 0.8 0.1 0.2 0.2
govt guest house 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1
dharamshala 3.3 4.4 3.6 0.1 0.4 0.2
rented house 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0
friends & relatives 85.1 79.9 83.6 14.8 22.2 15.9
did not stay at all - - - 82.2 74.0 80.9
others including carriages/coaches 8.8 9.3 8.9 2.6 2.8 2.6
all 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Ref: Tables 44 & 48 in Appendix A

SECTION D: OCCURRENCE OF DOMESTIC TOURISM ACTIVITY IN A ONE-
YEAR PERIOD
3.19 Measures of occurrence
3.19.1 Instead of measuring the level of tourism activity in terms of number of trips per
household or per person, an alternative way would be to measure the proportion of persons or
households participating (at least once) in trips during a period such as one year. We may call
this a measure of the occurrence of tourism activity among households or persons.
3.19.2 It may be observed that the choice of the period during which occurrence of tourism
activity is to be observed in households or persons will affect the quality of the measure that
is being proposed here. Too short a period will render the measure vulnerable to sampling
fluctuations. If, on the other hand, too long a period is chosen, near-100% occurrence rates
(nearly all households or persons reporting at least one trip) will be observed for every
category of households and persons, which means the measure will be insensitive, failing to
discriminate between states or between socio-economic categories in respect of level of
tourism activity. In this survey, a period of ‘last 365 days’ was used to observe the occurrence
of tourism activity, giving rise to estimates of occurrence during a one-year period.

3.20 Occurrence among persons
3.20.1 As explained above, one measure of the intensity of tourism activity is provided by
the percentage of persons who made at least one trip (overnight/ same-day) during the
last one year (or percentage of visitors). This percentage is occasionally referred to as T
P
(O)
for overnight trips and T
P
(S) for same-day trips.

3.20.2 Statement 3.21 shows all-India levels of T
P
(S) and T
P
(O) for rural and urban areas
separately and for the two sectors combined. It reveals that at the all-India level, the
percentage of persons reporting at least one overnight trip in the last one year was around
77% and roughly the same for rural and urban areas. Further, the percentage of persons
reporting at least one same-day trip during the last one year was 75.6% in rural areas but
appreciably less – about 70% – in urban areas. The overall percentage – rural and urban
considered together – was 74%.

Statement 3.21: Percentage of persons undertaking overnight and same-day trips*: all-
India
Kind of trip
Percentage of persons reporting trips
rural urban rural + urban
Overnight 77.4 77.3 77.4
Same-day 75.6 70.3 74.2
Ref: Table 1 & 2 in Appendix A *last 365 days


Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
29
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Statement 3.22: Percentage of persons undertaking overnight and same-day trips*: states/UTs
State/UT
Percentage of persons reporting trips
Overnight
Same-day
rural urban rural + urban rural urban rural + urban
Andhra Pradesh 87.93 84.04 86.78 88.19 68.37 82.31
Arunachal Pradesh 38.04 30.83 36.55 40.50 28.61 38.03
Assam 50.65 59.05 51.48 63.44 71.28 64.21
Bihar 59.85 61.33 60.00 54.73 49.28 54.20
Chhattisgarh 84.28 84.20 84.27 82.33 79.23 81.81
Delhi 62.79 73.09 72.23 69.81 83.68 82.52
Goa 82.49 68.54 75.78 84.94 87.24 86.04
Gujarat 79.36 76.83 78.42 81.83 73.25 78.65
Haryana 82.05 79.72 81.39 77.12 71.79 75.61
Himachal Pradesh 89.80 88.56 89.70 91.89 89.47 91.68
Jammu & Kashmir 76.71 68.64 75.06 84.13 65.99 80.44
Jharkhand 76.77 79.22 77.13 68.92 65.84 68.47
Karnataka 78.97 85.73 81.25 80.69 79.89 80.42
Kerala 70.68 65.85 69.45 92.37 85.82 90.71
Madhya Pradesh 84.73 82.18 84.14 75.06 65.77 72.91
Maharashtra 80.12 71.64 76.55 76.41 55.45 67.60
Manipur 20.92 18.57 20.28 41.11 45.81 42.40
Meghalaya 45.54 43.03 45.12 69.39 56.21 67.17
Mizoram 26.29 21.95 24.35 23.38 16.08 20.11
Nagaland 39.84 45.29 41.29 57.30 52.65 56.07
Orissa 80.50 83.57 80.95 82.20 80.99 82.02
Punjab 83.20 82.27 82.87 88.26 75.75 83.86
Rajasthan 85.69 80.95 84.53 77.26 58.43 72.67
Sikkim 68.46 88.65 70.67 79.44 87.99 80.37
Tamil Nadu 81.75 83.97 82.74 89.84 89.47 89.68
Tripura 71.30 76.88 72.22 69.70 67.22 69.29
Uttarakhand 78.62 79.21 78.75 78.33 75.95 77.82
Uttar Pradesh 77.53 78.44 77.72 66.07 65.56 65.97
West Bengal 79.30 70.26 77.22 84.93 74.83 82.61
A & N Islands 72.00 58.68 67.66 92.27 77.53 87.47
Chandigarh 88.78 59.84 62.73 67.66 48.49 50.40
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 38.55 82.02 46.44 64.57 77.34 66.89
Daman & Diu 39.68 60.19 45.99 81.88 87.27 83.52
Lakshadweep 82.00 44.30 63.86 42.40 2.11 22.79
Puducherry 81.41 79.02 79.71 90.33 86.29 87.47
all-India 77.41 77.31 77.38 75.64 70.30 74.21
Ref: Tables 1 & 2 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.20.3 The propensity to engage in the activity of domestic tourism has considerable inter-
State variation. This inter-State variation in T
P
(S) and T
P
(O) is shown in Statement 3.22 for
both rural and urban sectors as well as for the entire area of each State. The main features are
stated below.
 The percentage of population taking part in at least one overnight trip during the past one
year varied from 60% to 90% for all States and UTs except Assam (50%), five of the
North-Eastern States (20-45%), and two UTs (see column 3 of the statement). For 20
States and UTs, the T
P
(O) was between 70% and 85%.
 The percentage of population reporting at least one same-day trip varied between 64%
and 83% for 22 States and UTs, and between 64% and 92% for all States and UTs except
for 4 of the North-Eastern States, 2 UTs and Bihar (54%).
 The absolute difference between same-day and overnight figures T
P
(S) and T
P
(O) (rural
and urban sectors combined) was within 12 percentage points in nearly all major States,
the exceptions being Assam and Kerala, where T
P
(S) exceeded T
P
(O) by about 21 and 13
respectively.
 The absolute difference between rural and urban percentages of persons reporting at least
one overnight trip was within 9 percentage points in all the major States.
 The percentage of rural population reporting at least one same-day trip, which exceeded
the urban percentage at all-India level by 5 (rural T
P
(S)=75.6, urban T
P
(S)=70.3), also

Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
30
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
exceeded the urban percentage by 10 in West Bengal, 12.5 in Punjab, 19 in Rajasthan,
20 in Andhra Pradesh, and 21 in Maharashtra.
 In the North-Eastern region, with the exception of Sikkim and Tripura, all the T
P
(S) and
T
P
(O) values – rural and urban – were low, especially in Mizoram (26 or less), Manipur
and Arunachal Pradesh (below 46), and Nagaland (57 or less), suggesting that poor
communication facilities remained a significant barrier to domestic tourism.

3.21 Occurrence among households
3.21.1 Like percentage of persons reporting trips, the percentage of households where at
least one member made a trip (overnight/ same-day) during the last one year provides a
measure of the intensity of tourism activity. This percentage is occasionally referred to as
T
H
(O) for overnight trips and T
H
(S) for same-day trips.

Statement 3.23: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* : all-India
Kind of trip
Percentage of households reporting trips
rural urban rural+urban
Overnight 92.6 89.9 91.8
Same-day 96.0 85.7 92.9
Ref: Tables 2 & 4 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.21.2 Statement 3.23 shows all-India levels of T
H
(S) and T
H
(O) for rural and urban areas
separately and for the two sectors combined. It is seen from the statement that at all-India
level, the percentage of households reporting at least one trip in the last one year was 92.9%
for same-day trips (T
H
(S)=92.9) and only slightly less, 91.8%, for overnight trips
(T
H
(O)=91.8). In urban areas, the percentage of households reporting overnight trips (89.9%)
was larger than the percentage reporting same-day trips (85.7%), but the reverse was true for
rural areas, where same-day trips were reported by a larger number of households (as many
as 96%) than overnight trips (92.6%). Both overnight and same-day trips were reported by a
larger proportion of rural households than urban households. Compared with the figures of
percentages of households reporting trips, the estimates of percentages of persons making
trips (Statement 3.18) are lower, but not as low as they would have been if, in most
households, only one or two household members went on trips.

3.21.3 The values for T
H
(S) and T
H
(O) for both rural and urban sectors as well as for the
entire area of each State is shown in Statement 3.24. The main features are stated below.

 Apart from Assam (81%), Kerala (83%) and Bihar (85%), all major States
10
had 90% or
more households reporting at least one overnight trip (T
H
(O)≥90) during a one-year
period (see column 3 of the statement). There were only 6 States/UTs with T
H
(O)<80, of
which 4 were North-Eastern States and 2 were UTs.
 All major States had at least 84% households reporting at least one same-day trip in a
one-year period, and except for Maharashtra, Punjab and Bihar, all had T
H
(S)>90.
 The absolute difference between T
H
(S) and T
H
(O) (rural and urban sectors combined)
was less than 5 in all the major States except Assam and Tamil Nadu, where T
H
(S)
exceeded T
H
(O) by about 11 and 6 respectively.
                                                           
10
Major States are the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or more according to the 2001
Census. Together these States accounted for 94.7% of India’s population in 2001.

Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
31
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
 The absolute difference between rural and urban percentages of households reporting at
least one overnight trip did not exceed 6 in any major State except West Bengal and
Maharashtra, where the rural-urban difference was 12 and 9 respectively.
 The percentage of rural households reporting at least one same-day trip, which exceeded
the urban percentage at all-India level by 10 (rural T
H
(S)=96.0, urban T
H
(S)=85.7), also
exceeded the urban percentage by 23 in Maharashtra, 15-17 in Rajasthan, Andhra
Pradesh and Punjab, and 11-12 in Gujarat and West Bengal.

Statement 3.24: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips*: States/UTs
State/UT
Percentage of households reporting trips
Overnight Same-day
rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban
Andhra Pradesh 94.6 93.2 94.2 98.0 82.0 93.1
Arunachal Pradesh 70.3 61.5 68.5 71.8 55.3 68.2
Assam 79.8 88.6 80.8 91.3 93.8 91.6
Bihar 84.5 87.4 84.8 89.7 84.5 89.2
Chhattisgarh 92.5 91.9 92.4 94.0 90.7 93.4
Delhi 85.0 86.6 86.5 99.9 89.9 90.7
Goa 89.2 78.0 83.6 96.7 90.8 93.7
Gujarat 93.4 90.0 92.1 98.9 86.9 94.1
Haryana 95.7 89.7 93.8 94.3 86.6 91.9
Himachal Pradesh 99.8 86.0 98.3 96.6 98.1 96.8
Jammu & Kashmir 93.9 87.7 92.5 98.7 84.1 95.4
Jharkhand 92.6 92.5 92.6 92.8 83.2 91.2
Karnataka 88.6 94.9 90.9 96.9 90.2 94.4
Kerala 84.4 80.1 83.3 98.4 93.9 97.2
Madhya Pradesh 97.3 94.7 96.7 97.5 88.0 95.2
Maharashtra 94.5 85.1 90.3 94.5 71.2 84.1
Manipur 60.7 57.8 59.9 83.5 93.2 86.3
Meghalaya 77.1 70.3 75.8 93.0 78.9 90.3
Mizoram 65.1 59.3 62.5 62.5 46.9 55.5
Nagaland 82.2 89.8 84.4 96.8 97.1 96.9
Orissa 95.9 94.9 95.7 97.4 96.5 97.2
Punjab 90.5 90.0 90.3 94.7 79.6 88.8
Rajasthan 98.4 97.1 98.1 98.8 82.2 94.4
Sikkim 93.9 100.0 94.8 99.5 100.0 99.6
Tamil Nadu 90.6 91.6 91.1 97.8 96.5 97.2
Tripura 94.1 93.0 93.9 93.8 86.8 92.6
Uttarakhand 94.6 94.2 94.5 94.2 91.6 93.6
Uttar Pradesh 96.3 94.1 95.8 96.6 89.3 95.0
West Bengal 93.3 81.4 90.2 97.5 85.9 94.5
A & N Islands 86.9 75.7 83.2 97.4 87.1 94.1
Chandigarh 99.7 78.1 80.7 71.0 59.5 60.9
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 64.7 92.2 71.6 93.3 93.1 93.1
Daman & Diu 45.7 70.3 54.2 100.0 94.6 98.1
Lakshadweep 100.0 87.8 96.0 90.2 9.8 59.4
Puducherry 90.6 88.3 89.0 95.5 92.2 93.2
all-India 92.6 89.9 91.8 96.0 85.7 92.9
Ref: Tables 2 & 3 in Appendix A *last 365 days




Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
32
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
3.22 Household occupation
3.22.1 Statement 3.25 shows the variation in the all-India rural and urban percentages of
households reporting overnight and same-day trips over nine occupational categories of
households. Except for the fact that overnight trips were reported somewhat more frequently
by households that were “associate professionals” by occupation (in rural areas, 97.4% such
households reported at least one overnight trip in the last one year compared to 92.6% for all
rural households), deviations of more than 3 percentage points from the all-occupations
average were rare, for overnight as well as same-day trips.

Statement 3.25: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by household occupation
occupation
Percentage of households reporting trips
Rural Urban
Overnight Same-day Both Overnight Same-day Both
legislators, senior officials and managers 92.6 96.0 91.0 90.7 87.9 83.0
professionals 92.6 96.0 91.0 90.9 87.6 82.7
associate professionals 97.4 96.0 95.9 93.0 88.7 83.6
clerks 92.6 96.0 91.0 91.5 87.3 84.0
service workers and shop & market sales workers 90.7 94.0 89.2 89.9 85.7 80.8
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 94.3 97.0 93.3 89.9 93.5 88.6
craft and related trades workers 92.6 96.0 91.0 88.8 86.2 80.8
plant and machine operators and assemblers 95.9 99.4 94.3 91.1 86.8 81.9
elementary occupations 91.5 96.3 90.5 87.6 82.5 77.7
all 92.6 96.0 91.0 89.9 85.7 80.8
Ref: Table 3 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.23 Household social group
3.23.1 Statement 3.26 shows variation over social groups in the all-India rural and urban
percentages of households reporting overnight and same-day trips during a one-year period. It
is seen that the only notable variation is in the T
H
(S) values for urban India, which are: 90 for
OBC, 85 for SC, 83 for Others, and 77 for ST. In case of overnight trips, too, the highest
figure for urban India is reported by the OBC group, though the variation between groups is
much less. For rural India, in case of both overnight and same-day trips, the percentages for
the different social groups deviate only very slightly from the all-groups average.

Statement 3.26: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by social group
Social group
Percentage of households reporting
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural + urban rural urban rural + urban
ST 90.9 89.3 90.8 95.3 77.3 93.3
SC 92.8 89.6 92.2 95.8 85.2 93.6
OBC 92.8 91.3 92.4 96.3 90.1 94.6
Others 92.9 88.9 91.0 96.0 82.8 90.2
all 92.6 89.9 91.8 96.0 85.7 92.9
Ref: Table 5 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.24 Household type
3.24.1 Statement 3.27 shows variation over household (occupational) types in the all-India
rural and urban percentages of households reporting overnight and same-day trips during a
one-year period. There are no striking variations in the percentages. In case of same-day trips,
the percentages for the four household types in urban India range from 82 for “others” to 89
for the self-employed. For overnight trips, and also for same-day trips in rural India, the
variation among household types is still less pronounced.


Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
33
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 

Statement 3.27: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day
trips* by household type
Household type
Percentage of households
reporting
Overnight
trips
Same-day
trips
Rural
Self-employed in non-agriculture 92.4 96.2
Agricultural labour 90.8 95.8
Other labour 92.6 97.5
Self-employed in agriculture 94.5 96.9
others 91.0 92.3
all 92.6 96.0
Urban
Self-employed 90.7 89.3
Regular wage/salaried 89.7 83.1
Casual labour 87.9 87.0
others 90.0 82.4
all 89.9 85.7
Ref: Tables 15 (R&U) in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.25 Household religion
3.25.1 Statement 3.28 shows the variation in T
H
(O) and T
H
(S) among households of different
religions. The estimates for “Jains”, “others” and “Buddhists” are based on 418,1216 and
1753 sample households respectively at the all-India level. Estimated percentages of
households reporting trips, for all other religions, are above 80. Apart from the fact that only
about 82% of Christian households in rural areas reported overnight trips compared to the all-
religions average of 92.6%, there was little variation worthy of note among these religions.
The percentage for individual religions rarely differed by more than 3 percentage points from
the all-religions average, though divergences were somewhat greater in case of same-day
trips by urban households. In rural areas, the largest two religious groups, Hindus and
Muslims, had higher percentages reporting both overnight and same-day trips than other
religions.


Statement 3.28: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by religion
Religion
Percentage of households reporting
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural + urban rural urban rural + urban
Hinduism 93.2 90.6 92.5 96.2 85.6 93.2
Islam 90.3 86.8 89.1 95.4 85.8 92.1
Christianity 81.9 85.7 83.5 93.9 88.9 91.9
Sikhism 89.4 94.3 90.9 93.2 91.3 92.6
Jainism 85.6 94.1 92.1 93.0 92.5 92.6
Buddhism 88.4 84.3 86.9 89.7 68.2 81.6
Others (incl.
Zoroastrianism) 89.0 70.7 84.7 89.4 60.4 82.6
all 92.6 89.9 91.8 96.0 85.7 93.0
Ref: Table 10 in Appendix A *last 365 days


3.26 Household economic level
3.26.1 Statement 3.29 examines whether the all-India percentages of rural and urban
households reporting overnight and same-day trips vary with the MPCE level of the
households. For this purpose rural households are classified into five ranges (quintile classes)
of MPCE so that each range contains one-fifth of the rural population of India. A similar
classification is made of urban households. Some variation over MPCE levels is noticed in
the percentages of urban households reporting same-day trips, with the second quintile (20
th


Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 
34
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
to 40
th
percentiles) showing a figure of 90.8%, 5 percentage points higher than the all-classes
percentage, and the topmost quintile showing a figure of 81.7%, which is 4 percentage points
lower than the all-classes percentage. Apart from this, however, deviations of even 2
percentage points from the overall percentage are rare.

Statement 3.29: Percentage distribution of households reporting overnight and
same-day trips* over quintile classes of MPCE
Quintile class
of MPCE (%)
Percentage of households in the class among
hhs reporting overnight trips hhs reporting same-day trips
Rural Urban Rural Urban
0-20 91.0 88.1 94.5 88.2
20-40 93.2 89.6 95.3 90.8
40-60 92.7 89.0 96.3 86.8
60-80 92.5 90.2 96.3 83.7
80-100 93.0 91.6 97.0 81.7
all 92.6 89.9 96.0 85.7
Ref: Tables 20 in Appendix A *last 365 days

3.27 Households visited by NRIs
11
: impact of the NRI visit(s)
3.27.1 Statement 3.30 summarises the responses of households that had been visited by any
NRI during the past one year to the question: What was the impact of the NRI visit (that is,
on tourism activity of the household members)? The majority of households (nearly 60% in
rural areas and 53% in urban) visited by NRI(s) reported “no impact”. One in eight of the
rural households and about one in six of the urban households reported, however, that the
visit had resulted in their making at least one trip themselves. 11% of the rural households
and 13% of the urban households were willing but unable to make a trip due to other
constraints.

Statement 3.30: Households visited by NRIs: Percentage distribution by impact of NRI visit
Impact
Percentage of households
rural urban rural + urban
Resulted in one or more trip 12.5 15.9 13.7
Planning to make 5.5 12.4 7.9
Willing but unable to make a trip due to other constraints 11.1 13.3 11.9
No impact 59.7 53.2 57.5
Cannot say 11.1 5.2 9.1
total 100.0 100.0 100.0
% of households visited by NRIs 1.6 2.0 1.8
Ref: Table 4 in Appendix A
                                                           
11
Non-Resident Indians 
35
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Chapter Four
 
Expenditure on Trips

4.0.1 This chapter deals with expenditure incurred in connection with overnight and same-day
trips. As explained in Chapter Two, all expenditure incurred by the surveyed households on or in
connection with a trip made by any of their members, or members of other households, was
recorded as expenditure on the trip provided it was not incurred for productive purposes. Estimates
were generated for average expenditure per trip and per overnight visitor-trip by sector and
State/UT of the reporting households, as well as separately for each leading purpose; only all-India
estimates for a one-year period days are discussed here. The break-up of overnight and same-day
trip expenditure over broad expenditure heads is also examined. For overnight trips, it is further
investigated how the expenditure pattern varies with the leading purpose of a trip.

4.1 Expenditure per overnight trip and leading purpose
4.1.1 At all-India level, the average expenditure per overnight trip was estimated
1
as Rs.821 for
the rural population and Rs.1636 (very nearly double) for the urban population (Statement 4.1).
2


4.1.2 It may be recalled (Chapter Three, Section 3.3) that there was a preponderance of social
purposes among the factors giving rise to domestic tourism activity in the country with the leading
purpose of 75% of overnight trips for the rural sector and 71% for the urban being reported as
social. Next came religious trips and pilgrimages, with a share of 9% for the rural and over 12%
for the urban sector. The share of medical and health was small in the urban sector (3.5%)
compared to the rural (7%). In the urban sector, holidaying, leisure and recreation commanded a
share of 5% and business of over 3%. No other purpose had a share of 3% or more in either sector.

4.1.3 Statement 4.1 shows that for both the rural and the urban population, trips with social
leading purpose had a considerably lower-than-average expenditure per trip – 43% lower than the
overall (all-purposes) average for the rural population and 40% lower for the urban. Average
expenditure on such trips was only Rs.466 for the rural sector and Rs.989 for the urban sector and
was the lowest among all the purposes used for classification of trips by leading purpose. One may
recall, in this connection, that the major place of stay of the visitor in 85% of visitor-trips for the
rural population and 80% for the urban was with friends and relatives (Chapter Three, Section
3.18) – this suggests that visitors stayed with friends and relatives in the overwhelming majority of
social visits and helps to understand how expenditure on such visits remained low.

                                                           
1
Relative Standard Error(RSE) of the average expenditure per overnight trip was 4.15 for rural India and 8.58 for
urban India. The state-wise RSEs are presented in Statement 4.6 at the end of this Chapter.
2
For same-day trips, data on expenditure was not collected separately trip-wise, hence the expenditure per trip could
not be separated by leading purpose or any other trip characteristic.
Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
36
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 

Statement 4.1: Average expenditure per overnight trip by leading purpose
leading purpose
average expenditure per trip (Rs.)
rural urban rural+urban
business 1194 3586 2002
holidaying, leisure and recreation 1214 5287 3174
social 466 989 596
religious & pilgrimage 997 1919 1301
education & training 996 1995 1337
health & medical 3416 6956 3918
shopping 3086 5491 3365
others 1912 1676 1857
all 821 1636 1038
Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A

4.1.4 On the other hand, trips for health and medical purposes were the most expensive in both
rural and urban sectors – expenditure on such trips being, on the average, more than four times as
high as the all-purpose average for both rural and urban populations. The urban population’s trips
for holidaying, leisure and recreation were on the average more than three times as expensive, and
its business trips twice as expensive, as the overall average.

4.1.5 In both sectors, religious trips were only slightly more expensive than average, about 21%
more for the rural sector and 17% more for the urban.

4.2 Expenditure per overnight visitor-trip and leading purpose

Statement 4.2: Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip by leading purpose
leading purpose
average expenditure per visitor-trip (rs.)
rural urban rural+urban
business 923 2845 1561
holidaying, leisure and recreation 584 2444 1497
social 202 418 257
religious & pilgrimage 437 699 534
education & training 765 1485 1016
health & medical 1588 3375 1832
shopping 2185 4066 2395
others 1038 1061 1043
all 369 715 460
Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A

4.2.1 Statement 4.2 gives average trip expenditure per overnight visitor, separately for trips with
different leading purposes. The estimates of expenditure per visitor-trip are smaller than the
estimates of per-trip expenditure – the expenditure on a trip, in general, gets spread over more than
one participant. The estimates, in fact, differ from the corresponding estimates in Statement 4.1 by
factors equal to the average number of visitors per trip, for each purpose and each sector. At all-
India level, the average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip was estimated as Rs.369 for the rural
population and Rs.715 for the urban population.

Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
37
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
4.2.2 Had trips with different leading purposes had the same average number of visitors per trip,
the estimates in Statement 4.2 would, for each sector, be exactly proportional to those in Statement
4.1. But average number of persons per trip varies with leading purpose: a business trip is likely to
have fewer participants than a trip whose leading purpose is holidaying (Chapter Three, Statement
3.11). This explains why average expenditure per visitor-trip, for trips with leading purpose
“business”, was only 21-23% lower than average expenditure per trip, while for trips with leading
purpose “holidaying, leisure and recreation”, expenditure per visitor was less than half of average
expenditure per trip – the expenditure was shared by a larger number of visitors.

4.2.3 Expenditure on social trips was low compared to the overall average in terms of expenditure
per visitor-trip, just as it was low in terms of expenditure per trip. It was, in fact, on the average
45% lower than the overall average for the rural sector and 42% lower for the urban sector.
Finally, urban average expenditure per visitor-trip for religious trips (Rs.699) was substantially
lower than expenditure per trip (Rs.1919), indicating a large number of visitors per trip (see
Statement 3.11 for the exact average of trip size). Thus, for religious trips in urban sector,
expenditure per visitor-trip became lower than the overall average, whereas expenditure per
religious trip was, as seen in paragraph 4.1.5, 17% higher than the overall average.

4.3 Break-up of overnight trip expenditure by leading purpose
Statement 4.3: Percentage break-up of expenditure on overnight trips by
leading purpose
leading purpose
percentage share in total expenditure
on overnight trips
rural urban rural+urban
business 3.39 7.43 5.06
holidaying, leisure and recreation 2.77 15.98 8.21
social 42.47 42.58 42.51
religious & pilgrimage 10.64 14.40 12.19
education & training 1.09 1.62 1.31
health & medical 30.28 14.53 23.79
shopping 1.70 0.57 1.24
others 7.61 2.88 5.66
all 100.00 100.00 100.00
Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A

4.3.1 Statement 4.3 gives the break-up of estimated expenditure on overnight trips by leading
purpose of trip, separately for the rural and urban populations. It was seen above (paragraph 4.1.3)
that among trips with different leading purposes, expenditure per overnight trip, for both rural and
urban travellers, was the lowest for social (leading purpose) trips. As such, the share of social trips
was, in both sectors, only 42-43% (Statement 4.3), even though such trips accounted for 75% of
all overnight trips for the rural population and 71% for the urban.

4.3.2 Trips with health and medical purposes, which were seen earlier (paragraph 4.1.4) to be on
the average four times as expensive as the all-trips average, are seen to account for 30% of all
expenditure on overnight trips for the rural population and 15% for the urban. It may be recalled
(see Chapter Three, Statement 3.5) that such trips accounted for 7.3% of the rural population’s
overnight trips and 3.5% of those of the urban population.
Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
38
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 

4.3.3 Religious and pilgrimage trips, which accounted for about 9% of all overnight trips of the
rural population and about 12% in case of the urban population (Chapter Three, Statement 3.5),
had a share of about 11% in overnight trip expenditure for the rural sector and about 14% for the
urban sector.

4.4 Break-up of trip expenditure by broad expenditure head
4.4.1 Package component of trips: Trip expenditure in general has several components present in
varying combinations: transport, food, accommodation, shopping, sight-seeing, etc. As is the
practice in tourism activity, some of these components become commercially available in the form
of a package.
3
Visitors who avail themselves of such packages, for a whole trip or for part of it,
cannot report the exact break-up of their total trip expenditure over the heads transport, food,
accommodation, etc., but only the total expenditure incurred on the package component and the
break-up of the remainder (non-package component). This imposes a constraint on the generation
of estimates of the break-up of trip expenditure by its components.

4.4.2 Statement 4.4 gives the percentage break-up of overnight and same-day trip expenditure by
five broad heads – (1) accommodation, (2) food and drink, (3) transport, (4) shopping and (5)
recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related activities – and a residual category.
(See also Fig. 4.1.) Apart from these, expenditure incurred as a package – the “package”
component mentioned above – was made a separate category for the purpose of deriving the
percentage break-up. For overnight trips, the share of the package component was 7% for the
urban sector and about 1.5% for the rural sector. For same-day trips it was 0.9% for the urban
sector and less than 0.2% for the rural sector.

                                                           
3
A trip with a package component need, not, however, be a package trip (Chapter Three, Section 3.6). A package trip
is one in which a package is availed of for the major part of the trip. (See also Chapter Two, paragraph 2.6.5.6.1.)
R
c
c
Chapter Fou
 
 
Ref: Table 56


4.4.3 For
rural sector
25% in the
the largest
heads of ex
74% for th

4.4.4 In b
The share o

4.4.5 For
for 60% o
component
transport t
of food and

package 
component
2%
shop
30
recreation, 
religious,    
etc.
32%
others
4%
O
package 
component
0%
recreation, 
religious,    
etc.
5%
others
18%
S
ur: Expenditur
Fig 4.1
& 58 in Appe
r overnight t
r the share o
e urban sect
share in the
xpenditure a
he urban.
both sectors
of accommo
r same-day t
f trip expen
t for the ur
together acc
d drink was
pping
0%
Overnig
Same‐da
re on Trips
1: Pattern o
endix A
trips, transp
of transport
tor. Recreat
e rural secto
accounted f
s the share o
odation was
trips, shopp
nditure for
rban popula
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ht : Rur
s
ay : Rur
of expendit

port had the
t was 20%.
tion, religio
or – nearly
for 82% of
of food and
s about 3%
ping was by
the rural p
ation was t
73-74% of
in the urban
accommo‐
dation 
3%
food and
drink
9%
transport
20%
ral
accommo‐
dation 
0%
food a
drink
5%
transpo
13%
shopping
59%
al
39
NSS R
ture on ove
e largest sha
The share o
ous, cultural
32% – and
overnight tr
d drink in ov
in the rural
y far the lar
opulation a
transport, w
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n sector and

sho
2
recreat
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15%

nd 
k
ort
packa
compo
1%
recre
reli
e
6
Report No. 536
ernight and
are in the ur
of shopping
l, sporting a
a 15% shar
rip expendit
vernight trip
sector and
gest compo
and 44% fo
which had
trip expend
d less than 5
pping
5%
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ous,    
.
%
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Ove
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onent
%
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eation, 
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6%
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Sam
6: Domestic T
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Tourism in Ind
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n the urban
penditure, a
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29%. Shop
oth sectors.
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c
a
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Urban
a
Urban
dia, 2008-09

3%; in the
sector and
ivities had
hese three
lation and
ut 9-10%.
.
accounting
nd largest
pping and
The share
package 
omponent
7%
ccommo‐
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6%
food and 
drink
10%
ansport
33%
ccommo‐
dation 
1%
food and 
drink
8%
transport
28%
Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
40
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
4.5 Leading purpose and trip expenditure pattern for overnight trips
4.5.1 One may reasonably surmise that overnight trips with different leading purposes will not
exhibit a uniform pattern of expenditure. To examine this possibility, the break-up of total
expenditure has been shown separately in Statement 4.5 (R&U) for trips with different leading
purposes, for both the rural and the urban sector.

4.5.2 Rural: For social trips – the most common variety – shopping expenditure formed 51% of
total expenditure. It is notable that the share of shopping for social trips was higher than average;
for trips of all other purposes except business and, of course, shopping trips (trips with leading
purpose shopping), the share of shopping was lower than, or close to, the all-purposes average of
30%. The share of accommodation in expenditure on social trips was only 0.38% whereas for all
other purposes (except shopping and health and medical purpose trips), it was 5% or more. The
share of food and drink in social trips was also low (8%) compared to trips with other purposes
except for health and medical purpose. The share of transport, however, was 27%, noticeably
higher than the all-purposes average, which was 20%.

Statement 4.4: Percentage break-up of expenditure on overnight and same-day trips by
major group of items

group of items
percentage share of group in total expenditure on
overnight trips same-day trips
rural urban rural urban
package component 1.52 7.15 0.15 0.89
non-package component
accommodation 2.95 5.65 0.07 0.47
food and drink 9.15 9.66 4.57 7.77
transport 19.97 33.49 13.63 28.78
shopping 30.31 24.73 60.15 44.37
recreation, religious, cultural, sporting
and health-related activities 31.94 15.39 4.93 6.32
others 4.15 3.92 18.41 13.77
all 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Ref: Tables 56 & 58 in Appendix A

4.5.3 For religious and pilgrimage trips, the category transport commanded the largest share of
expenditure (34%). Shopping took up 22% of expenditure and food and drink, about 17%. For
health and medical purpose trips, expenditure on recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and
health-related activities accounted for more than three-quarters of total expenditure, and the shares
of the other categories are correspondingly low.




Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
41
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 

Statement 4.5 : Percentage break-up of expenditure on overnight trips separately for trips with different
leading purposes
category of
expenditure
business
holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social
religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health
&
medical
shopping other all
RURAL
package component 0.80 14.58 0.10 8.35 9.81 0.08 0.17 0.13 1.52
non-package component
accommodation 6.33 7.77 0.38 5.97 13.62 3.77 1.18 5.42 2.95
food and drink 16.34 14.60 8.32 16.73 14.74 6.27 2.18 10.15 9.15
transport 18.31 24.03 27.21 34.32 21.22 7.10 4.93 13.28 19.97
shopping 51.63 31.69 51.38 21.99 27.93 3.16 84.47 10.69 30.31
recreation,
religious, etc.* 2.59 4.82 5.59 9.75 2.02 78.61 6.15 57.52 31.94
others 4.00 2.51 7.02 2.89 10.66 1.02 0.92 2.81 4.15
total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
URBAN
package component 0.33 38.64 0.12 5.31 7.18 0.00 2.49 0.22 7.15
non-package component
accommodation 13.71 10.37 1.20 9.81 12.76 3.41 0.94 11.69 5.65
food and drink 13.75 10.41 8.49 15.64 14.16 3.56 2.88 12.16 9.66
transport 30.65 24.64 43.00 43.65 43.25 7.50 6.15 29.51 33.49
shopping 39.85 12.93 37.64 15.34 17.91 2.35 86.40 12.05 24.73
recreation,
religious, etc.* 0.63 1.78 2.69 7.22 1.81 82.24 0.30 30.99 15.39
others 1.08 1.21 6.87 3.03 2.93 0.94 0.82 3.38 3.92
total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A *recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related activities
4.5.4 Although food and drink had an overall share of only 9%, and a share of 8% for social
trips, its share in expenditure on trips made for business, holidaying and religious purposes was
around 15-17% in each case.

4.5.5 Urban: In many respects the variation in expenditure pattern with leading purpose was, for
the urban population, similar to that for the rural. In urban India, the package component of
expenditure, however, was nearly 39% in trips for holidaying, leisure and recreation (compared to
15% in rural India), and also 5% in trips for religious and pilgrimage purposes.
4.5.6 It has been noted above (paragraph 4.4.2) that transport expenses formed the largest
component of expenditure in urban India (33%) but only 20% in rural India. For social trips, and
also for religious and pilgrimage purpose trips, transport took up 43-44% of total expenditure and
was the largest component. For religious trips, the share of food and drink was 16% and that of
shopping was 15%. For business trips, shopping expenditure was the largest component (40%).

4.5.7 The share of accommodation was, as in rural India, noticeably low for social trips (1.2%)
but was 10-14% in business trips, trips for religious and pilgrimage, and trips for holidaying,
leisure, etc. (For the last-named kind of trip, the share of accommodation was likely to be
appreciably larger with part of the actual expenses on it getting subsumed in the package
Chapter Fou
 
 
component
and 10% (e

Ref
4.6 Break

4.6.1 Fig
expenditur
total of 61%
and 25% b
population
expenditur

ur: Expenditur
t.) The shar
excluding th
f: Table 56 & 5
k-up of dom
4.2 shows
re, broken u
% of the tot
by urban ho
n and 9%
re was thus
over
ur
2
s
F
re on Trips
re of food a
he package
58 in Append
mestic tour
s the share
up further b
tal expendit
useholds. T
by the urb
66% (slight

rnight-
rban
5%
same-day-
rural
30%
Fig 4.2: Sec
and drink w
component
ix A
rism expend
s of overn
by sector (r
ture on dom
The share of
ban. The to
tly less than
ctorwise sha
in domest
42
NSS R
was about 8
t) for holida


diture by k
night and s
rural/urban)
mestic touris
f same-day
otal share
n two-thirds
are of over
tic tourism
Report No. 536
8% for socia
aying, leisur
kind of trip
same-day tr
. Overnight
sm, 36% bei
trips was 3
of the rur
) and that o
rnight and s
expenditu
6: Domestic T
al trips, 14
re and recre
and sector
rips in tota
t trips are s
ing incurred
9% – 30%
ral sector i
of the urban
same-d
urban
9%
same-day t
re
Tourism in Ind
% for busin
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r
al domestic
seen to acco
d by rural h
incurred by
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overnight-
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dia, 2008-09
ness trips,

c tourism
ount for a
ouseholds
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c tourism
%.
Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips
 
43
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
 
Statement 4.6: RSE (%) of Average expenditure per overnight trip
for each State

State/UTs Rural Urban
Andhra Pradesh 5.45 28.13
Arunachal Pradesh 12.03 24.25
Assam 5.69 17.60
Bihar 3.63 14.15
Chhattisgarh 32.57 20.96
Delhi 26.12 8.53
Goa 25.15 13.98
Gujarat 44.00 15.48
Haryana 18.26 18.07
Himachal Pradesh 17.28 22.52
Jammu & Kashmir 16.85 19.64
Jharkhand 23.15 4.35
Karnataka 11.71 12.53
Kerala 10.84 28.46
Madhya Pradesh 17.00 8.04
Maharashtra 6.76 7.41
Manipur 8.19 8.99
Meghalaya 15.58 13.90
Mizoram 18.57 1.24
Nagaland 4.86 17.07
Orissa 8.12 16.89
Punjab 14.73 13.18
Rajasthan 18.24 56.57
Sikkim 15.06 25.62
Tamil Nadu 8.27 34.76
Tripura 10.24 19.33
Uttarakhand 18.02 8.81
Uttar Pradesh 19.92 12.56
West Bengal 11.43 6.52
Andaman & N. Island 12.00 18.45
Chandigarh 18.43 10.43
Dadra Nagar & Haveli 2.53 0.60
Daman & Diu 8.34 4.66
Lakshadweep 16.14 17.41
Puducherry 6.34 11.95
all-India 4.15 8.58

















Appendix A

Detailed Tables



List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-i

List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A
Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Control Table 1 Number of villages/blocks, households, total
no. of persons, both surveyed and estimated,
separately for each State/UT
A-1
Household
characteristics
 Overnight
visitor
 Same-day
visitor
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 Impact of NRI
visit
 MPCE class
 Social Group
 Religion

2 Number of households reporting overnight
visitor(s), number of overnight visitor(s),
number of households reporting same day
visitor(s) and number of same day visitor(s),
both surveyed and estimated, separately for
each State/UT
A-4
3 Per 1000 distribution of households reporting
overnight visitors and same day visitors by
household occupation
A-7
4 Per 1000 distribution of households which
were visited by NRIs by impact of the NRI
visit for each quintile class of MPCE
A-8
5 Number of households reporting overnight
visitors, same day visitors, both surveyed and
estimated, separately for each social group
A-9
6 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight visitors in the
household for each social group
A-10
7 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day visitors in the
household for each social group
A-11
8 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight trips for each social
group
A-12
9 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day trips for each social
group
A-13
10 Number of households reporting overnight
visitors, same day visitors, both surveyed and
estimated, separately for each religion
A-14

List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-ii

Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Household
characteristics
 Overnight
visitor
 Same-day
visitor
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 MPCE class
 Religion
 Household
type
11
Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight visitors in the
household for each religion
A-15
12 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day visitors in the household
for each religion
A-17
13 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight trips for each religion
A-19
14 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day trips for each religion
A-21
15 Number of households reporting overnight
visitors, same day visitors, both surveyed and
estimated, separately for each household type
A-23
16 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight visitors in the
household for each household type
A-24
17 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day visitors in the household
for each household type
A-25
18
Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight trips for each
household type
A-26
19 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day trips for each
household type
A-27
20 Number of households reporting overnight
visitors, same day visitors, both surveyed and
estimated, separately for each quintile class
of MPCE
A-28
21 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight visitors in the
household for each quintile class of MPCE
A-29
22 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day visitors in the household
for each quintile class of MPCE
A-30

List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-iii

Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Household
characteristics
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 MPCE class
 Aware of
‘Incredible
India’
campaign
 Aware of
Tourism
Promotional
campaign
 Renting out of
house to
tourists
 Occupation
category
23 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of overnight trips for each quintile
class of MPCE
A-31
24 Per 1000 distribution of household by
number of same day trips for each quintile
class of MPCE
A-32
25(I) Per 1000 distribution of households who are
aware of the Incredible India campaign by
quintile class of MPCE for each occupation
(NCO) group
A-33
25(O) Per 1000 distribution of households who are
aware of other tourism promotional
campaigns by quintile class of MPCE for
each occupation (NCO) group
A-35
26(I) Per 1000 distribution of households on
awareness of the ‘Incredible India’ campaign
by source separately for each State/UT
A-37
26(O) Per 1000 distribution of households on
awareness of other tourism promotional
campaigns by source separately for each
State/UT
A-43
27(I)

Per 1000 distribution of households who are
aware of the ‘Incredible India’ campaign by
impact of the campaign for each State/UT/
all India
A-49
27(O)

Per 1000 distribution of households who are
aware of other tourism promotional
campaigns by impact of the campaign for
each State/UT/ all India
A-55
28 Per 10000 distribution of households who
rented out some portion of the house to
tourists for at least one night during last 365
days by social group for each quintile class
of MPCE
A-61
29 Per 10000 distribution of households who
rented out some portion of the house to
tourists for at least one night during last 365
days by NCO(1-digit) for each quintile class
of MPCE
A-62
List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-iv

Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Visitor
characteristics
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 Age-group
 Activity status
 Industry
category
 Occupation
category
 Level of
education
 Main
destination
 Purpose of
trip
 Mode of
travel
 MPCE class
30 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of overnight trips for each age group
A-64
31 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of overnight trips for each broad activity
status
A-73
32 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of overnight trips for each level of education
A-82
33 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of overnight trips for each occupation (NCO)
A-91
34 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of overnight trips for each NIC section
A-100
35 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of same day trips for each age group
A-109
36 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of same day trips for each broad activity
status
A-118
37 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of same day trips for each level of education
A-127
38 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of same day trips for each occupation (NCO)
A-136
39 Per 1000 distribution of persons by number
of same day trips for each NIC section
A-145
40 Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-
trips by purpose for each broad principal
activity status
A-154
41 Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-
trips by main destination separately for each
State/UT of origin
A-163
42 Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-
trips by purpose of trip separately for each
State/UT of destination
A-172
43 Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-
trips by major mode of travel for each
quintile class of MPCE
A-181

List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-v

Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Visitor
characteristics
 Overnight
visitor
 Same-day
visitor
 Main
destination
 Activity status
 MPCE class
44 Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-
trips by major type of stay for each quintile
class of MPCE
A-183
45 Per 1000 distribution of same day visitor-
trips by purpose for each broad usual
principal activity status
A-185
46

Per 1000 distribution of same day visitor-
trips by main destination separately for each
State/UT of origin
A-194
47

Per 1000 distribution of same day visitor-
trips by major mode of travel for each
quintile class of MPCE
A-203
48 Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-
trips by type of stay for each quintile class of
MPCE
A-205
Trip
characteristics
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 Type of trip
 Leading
purpose of trip
 Duration
 Number of
places visited
 Main
destination

49 Number of overnight trips and number of
same day trips, both surveyed and estimated,
separately for each State/UT of origin
A-207
50 Per 1000 distribution of overnight trips by
type of trip for each leading purpose
A-210
51 Per 1000 distribution of trips by type of trip
for overnight trips and same day trips
A-213
52 Average duration (in terms of night spent)
per overnight trip by starting and ending
month
A-214
53 Average no. of places visited per overnight
trip by main destination for each State/UT of
destination
A-217
54 Per 1000 distribution of same-day trips by
type of trip for each leading purpose
A-220
55 Per 1000 distribution of same day trip by
leading purpose for each month
A-223




List of Detailed Tables in Appendix A

NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

A-vi

Subject Table
no.
Title Page no.
(1) (2) (3) (5)
Expenditure
related to Trips
 Categories of
expenditure
 Leading
purpose
 Overnight trip
 Same-day trip
 MPCE class
56 Estimated total expenditure(in Rs.‘000) by
categories of expenditure for each leading
purpose of overnight trips
A-226
57 Average expenditure(in Rs.) per overnight
trip by categories of expenditure for each
leading purpose
A-229
58 Estimated total expenditure(in Rs. ‘000) by
categories of expenditure for each quintile
class of MPCE of same-day trips
A-232
59 Average expenditure (in Rs.) per same-day
trip by categories of expenditure for each
quintile class of MPCE
A-234
60 Average expenditure(in Rs.) per overnight
trip by quintile class of MPCE and leading
purpose of trip
A-236


Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-1
State/UT sample estimated (’00)
villages / blocks households persons households persons
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 487 5835 23555 144212 546182
Arunachal Pradesh 103 1212 5947 1853 8241
Assam 375 4499 22713 48532 246384
Bihar 469 5621 28674 137147 680875
Chhattisgarh 149 1787 9258 36954 183863
Delhi 16 189 844 1962 9361
Goa 16 192 880 1465 6727
Gujarat 280 3343 16666 66610 319647
Haryana 144 1727 8937 31831 166574
Himachal Pradesh 160 1885 8488 13735 58532
Jammu & Kashmir 127 1506 8596 11331 61750
Jharkhand 184 2205 11037 40531 197872
Karnataka 303 3635 16861 76489 344735
Kerala 334 4000 17084 56478 228281
Madhya Pradesh 456 5454 28424 92671 464149
Maharashtra 519 6213 29458 123088 548708
Manipur 192 2304 12339 3052 15314
Meghalaya 127 1524 8019 3911 19533
Mizoram 63 756 3804 965 4671
Nagaland 79 948 4914 1553 7777
Orissa 383 4590 21007 69512 303785
Punjab 158 1888 9658 33247 162649
Rajasthan 382 4571 24463 85510 446125
Sikkim 85 1016 4579 1105 4918
Tamil Nadu 399 4787 18551 91995 343562
Tripura 216 2592 11392 6764 28361
Uttarakhand 72 864 4236 13938 71926
Uttar Pradesh 1119 13400 76237 247046 1333174
West Bengal 631 7571 33762 135748 585127
A & N Islands 21 252 1140 536 2211
Chandigarh 8 93 409 286 838
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 16 191 1032 360 1829
Daman & Diu 16 192 939 208 988
Lakshadweep 4 40 187 61 250
Puducherry 16 192 772 853 3259
T able 1: Number of vil lages/ blocks, households, t otal no. of persons, separately for each St ate/ UT
rural
all-I ndia 8109 97074 474862 1581536 7408178
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-2
State/UT sample estimated (’00)
villages / blocks households persons households persons
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 272 3261 12635 64188 230679
Arunachal Pradesh 40 480 2109 506 2167
Assam 88 1056 4231 6406 27124
Bihar 87 1037 4881 16758 73446
Chhattisgarh 64 764 3532 8462 36751
Delhi 269 3101 12215 25311 102562
Goa 24 288 1277 1451 6240
Gujarat 246 2915 13412 43650 187911
Haryana 96 1142 5378 14511 65699
Himachal Pradesh 32 379 1372 1727 5594
Jammu & Kashmir 63 751 3607 3301 15779
Jharkhand 88 1041 4824 7626 33746
Karnataka 240 2870 12121 45225 175336
Kerala 183 2181 8896 20323 77582
Madhya Pradesh 245 2931 13957 30333 139814
Maharashtra 516 6134 27552 98342 398089
Manipur 96 1152 5600 1239 5789
Meghalaya 48 576 2610 933 3944
Mizoram 96 1152 5719 774 3782
Nagaland 32 384 1721 620 2815
Orissa 103 1234 4927 13224 52369
Punjab 128 1535 7102 21369 88038
Rajasthan 176 2102 10389 31138 144006
Sikkim 23 276 894 195 608
Tamil Nadu 392 4702 16998 80690 274354
Tripura 72 864 3094 1519 5626
Uttarakhand 40 479 2339 3929 19699
Uttar Pradesh 445 5308 27214 69097 344883
West Bengal 376 4489 17423 47100 175028
A & N Islands 16 192 776 263 1077
Chandigarh 39 450 1691 2073 7595
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 16 192 679 116 406
Daman & Diu 16 192 860 111 432
Lakshadweep 12 144 692 41 237
Puducherry 40 480 1902 2048 7966
T able 1: Number of villages/ blocks, households, total . of per sons, separ ately for each State/UT
urban
all-I ndia 4719 56234 244629 664598 2717171
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-3
State/UT sample estimated (’00)
villages / blocks households persons households persons
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 759 9096 36190
208400
776860
Arunachal Pradesh 143 1692 8056
2359
10408
Assam 463 5555 26944
54938
273508
Bihar 556 6658 33555
153905
754320
Chhattisgarh 213 2551 12790
45415
220614
Delhi 285 3290 13059
27273
111923
Goa 40 480 2157
2917
12967
Gujarat 526 6258 30078
110260
507558
Haryana 240 2869 14315
46342
232273
Himachal Pradesh 192 2264 9860
15462
64126
Jammu & Kashmir 190 2257 12203
14632
77529
Jharkhand 272 3246 15861
48157
231618
Karnataka 543 6505 28982
121714
520071
Kerala 517 6181 25980
76801
305863
Madhya Pradesh 701 8385 42381
123004
603963
Maharashtra 1035 12347 57010
221430
946796
Manipur 288 3456 17939
4290
21103
Meghalaya 175 2100 10629
4844
23477
Mizoram 159 1908 9523
1739
8453
Nagaland 111 1332 6635
2173
10591
Orissa 486 5824 25934
82736
356154
Punjab 286 3423 16760
54615
250687
Rajasthan 558 6673 34852
116648
590131
Sikkim 108 1292 5473
1299
5527
Tamil Nadu 791 9489 35549
172686
617916
Tripura 288 3456 14486
8283
33987
Uttarakhand 112 1343 6575
17868
91624
Uttar Pradesh 1564 18708 103451
316142
1678058
West Bengal 1007 12060 51185
182848
760155
A & N Islands 37 444 1916
799
3287
Chandigarh 47 543 2100
2359
8433
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 32 383 1711
476
2235
Daman & Diu 32 384 1799
319
1420
Lakshadweep 16 184 879
101
487
Puducherry 56 672 2674
2901
11225
T able 1: N umber of vil lages/ blocks, households, total no. of per sons, s par ately for each State/UT
rural+urban
all-I ndia 12828 153308 719491 2246134 10125349
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-4
State/UT
sample estimated (’00)
number of
house-holds
reporting
over-night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
over-night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 5671 21022 5747 20710 136469 480270 141354 481677
Arunachal Pradesh 959 2142 943 2232 1303 3135 1330 3338
Assam 3975 13183 4255 15152 38729 124796 44288 156295
Bihar 5150 18374 5211 16260 115935 407519 123057 372619
Chhattisgarh 1715 7862 1702 7629 34182 154966 34748 151373
Delhi 178 573 188 623 1668 5878 1961 6535
Goa 182 691 175 668 1307 5549 1417 5714
Gujarat 3223 13588 3302 13536 62244 253677 65892 261564
Haryana 1666 7598 1605 6861 30464 136673 30022 128457
Himachal Pradesh 1877 7664 1873 7786 13709 52564 13271 53783
Jammu & Kashmir 1427 6524 1483 7120 10640 47367 11188 51949
Jharkhand 2114 8826 2111 7815 37539 151916 37595 136377
Karnataka 3415 13686 3529 13771 67742 272250 74126 278169
Kerala 3610 13055 3955 15846 47667 161345 55596 210859
Madhya Pradesh 5368 24297 5355 21636 90181 393252 90361 348402
Maharashtra 5990 23674 5976 22309 116258 439630 116282 419272
Manipur 1798 3303 1980 5045 1852 3204 2547 6296
Meghalaya 1281 3927 1457 5555 3015 8895 3639 13553
Mizoram 598 1057 537 960 628 1228 603 1092
Nagaland 869 2303 935 3044 1276 3098 1504 4456
Orissa 4479 17039 4521 17207 66636 244554 67685 249708
Punjab 1800 8341 1834 8576 30075 135329 31498 143549
Rajasthan 4529 20979 4535 18688 84164 382268 84466 344690
Sikkim 993 3279 1013 3688 1038 3367 1100 3907
Tamil Nadu 4530 15721 4713 16728 83324 280856 89937 308666
Tripura 2499 8344 2468 8108 6366 20221 6348 19769
Uttarakhand 846 3449 821 3323 13191 56551 13130 56343
Uttar Pradesh 13125 60167 13125 50608 237793 1033676 238749 880856
West Bengal 7229 27565 7421 28662 126588 463979 132354 496974
A & N Islands 235 916 247 1058 466 1592 522 2040
Chandigarh 91 313 71 248 285 744 203 567
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 150 533 173 648 233 705 336 1181
Daman & Diu 124 492 192 824 95 392 208 809
Lakshadweep 40 130 37 81 61 205 55 106
Puducherry 184 681 189 719 773 2653 815 2944
T able 2: Number of households report ing overnight visit or( s) , number of over night visitor( s) , number of
households report ing same day visitor ( s) and number of same day visit or(s) , both surveyed and
estimat ed, separ ately for each State/UT
rural
all-I ndia 91920 361298 93679 353724 1463898 5734306 1518187 5603889
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-5
State/UT
sample estimated (’00)
number of
house-
holds
reporting
over-
night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
over-night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 3152 11253 2812 9388 59820 193864 52610 157718
Arunachal Pradesh 350 714 291 601 311 668 280 620
Assam 978 2787 1004 3099 5676 16018 6011 19335
Bihar 954 3186 886 2524 14643 45044 14155 36196
Chhattisgarh 739 3088 721 2884 7780 30945 7672 29117
Delhi 2823 9380 2838 10308 21930 74965 22767 85824
Goa 263 1104 261 1092 1132 4277 1318 5444
Gujarat 2751 10998 2625 9888 39291 144370 37913 137645
Haryana 1072 4651 1007 4032 13010 52374 12567 47166
Himachal Pradesh 374 1290 366 1231 1486 4954 1694 5005
Jammu & Kashmir 717 2903 699 2873 2895 10830 2776 10413
Jharkhand 1002 3954 945 3233 7057 26734 6342 22218
Karnataka 2752 10500 2607 9738 42903 150311 40793 140077
Kerala 1933 6582 2112 7972 16282 51091 19092 66579
Madhya Pradesh 2854 12008 2689 9897 28713 114905 26690 91954
Maharashtra 5628 20749 4740 16043 83660 285188 69972 220747
Manipur 876 1427 1099 2678 716 1075 1155 2652
Meghalaya 468 1289 495 1489 656 1697 736 2217
Mizoram 904 1550 704 1117 459 830 363 608
Nagaland 363 845 378 1020 557 1275 602 1482
Orissa 1199 4144 1200 3992 12544 43764 12759 42414
Punjab 1449 6004 1366 5894 19224 72426 17011 66687
Rajasthan 2072 8633 1918 6890 30241 116570 25607 84142
Sikkim 276 800 276 763 195 539 195 535
Tamil Nadu 4456 14584 4556 15128 73917 230379 77862 245468
Tripura 840 2531 772 2277 1412 4325 1319 3782
Uttarakhand 462 1897 449 1768 3700 15604 3597 14962
Uttar Pradesh 5128 21548 4799 17621 65032 270536 61706 226089
West Bengal 4124 13679 4091 13745 38327 122979 40444 130971
A & N Islands 169 532 176 630 199 632 229 835
Chandigarh 409 1237 328 938 1618 4545 1233 3683
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 183 574 180 531 107 333 108 314
Daman & Diu 160 619 190 777 78 260 105 377
Lakshadweep 138 397 14 16 36 105 4 5
Puducherry 446 1541 450 1667 1808 6295 1889 6874
T able 2: Number of households repor ting overnight visit or( s) , number of over night visit or (s), number of
households report ing same day visitor(s) and number of same day visitor(s) , bot h sur veyed and
estimated, separately for each St ate/ UT
urban
all-I ndia 52464 188978 50044 173744 597415 2100711 569574 1910153
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-6
State/UT*
sample estimated (’00)
number of
house-
holds
reporting
over-
night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
number of
house-
holds
reporting
over-night
visitors
number of
over-night
visitors
number of
house-holds
reporting
same day
visitors
number of
same day
visitors
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 8823 32275 8559 30098 196289 674135 193963 639395
Arunachal Pradesh 1309 2856 1234 2833 1615 3804 1610 3958
Assam 4953 15970 5259 18251 44405 140814 50299 175630
Bihar 6104 21560 6097 18784 130578 452563 137212 408815
Chhattisgarh 2454 10950 2423 10513 41963 185911 42421 180490
Delhi 3001 9953 3026 10931 23598 80843 24728 92359
Goa 445 1795 436 1760 2439 9826 2734 11157
Gujarat 5974 24586 5927 23424 101535 398046 103805 399210
Haryana 2738 12249 2612 10893 43475 189047 42589 175624
Himachal Pradesh 2251 8954 2239 9017 15196 57518 14965 58788
Jammu & Kashmir 2144 9427 2182 9993 13535 58197 13964 62361
Jharkhand 3116 12780 3056 11048 44597 178650 43937 158594
Karnataka 6167 24186 6136 23509 110645 422561 114919 418246
Kerala 5543 19637 6067 23818 63949 212437 74688 277438
Madhya Pradesh 8222 36305 8044 31533 118894 508157 117051 440355
Maharashtra 11618 44423 10716 38352 199918 724818 186254 640019
Manipur 2674 4730 3079 7723 2568 4279 3702 8948
Meghalaya 1749 5216 1952 7044 3671 10592 4374 15769
Mizoram 1502 2607 1241 2077 1087 2058 965 1700
Nagaland 1232 3148 1313 4064 1833 4373 2106 5938
Orissa 5678 21183 5721 21199 79180 288319 80444 292122
Punjab 3249 14345 3200 14470 49299 207755 48509 210235
Rajasthan 6601 29612 6453 25578 114405 498838 110072 428833
Sikkim 1269 4079 1289 4451 1232 3906 1294 4442
Tamil Nadu 8986 30305 9269 31856 157241 511235 167799 554134
Tripura 3339 10875 3240 10385 7777 24545 7667 23551
Uttarakhand 1308 5346 1270 5091 16891 72155 16726 71305
Uttar Pradesh 18253 81715 17924 68229 302825 1304212 300455 1106944
West Bengal 11353 41244 11512 42407 164914 586958 172798 627945
A & N Islands 404 1448 423 1688 665 2224 752 2875
Chandigarh 500 1550 399 1186 1904 5290 1437 4250
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 333 1107 353 1179 341 1038 443 1495
Daman & Diu 284 1111 382 1601 173 653 313 1186
Lakshadweep 178 527 51 97 97 311 60 111
Puducherry 630 2222 639 2386 2581 8948 2704 9819
T able 2: N umber of households report ing overnight visit or( s), number of overnight visit or (s), number of
households report ing same day visit or (s) and number of same day visit or (s) , bot h surveyed and
estimat ed, separately for each State/U T
rural+urban
all-I ndia 144384 550276 143723 527468 2061312 7835017 2087761 7514043
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndia, 2008-09
A-7
NCO
households
reporting
overnight visitors
households
reporting
same day
visitors
households reporting
either overnight visitors
or same day visitors or
both
households
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
legislators, senior offic ials and managers 25 25 25 25
professionals 21 21 21 21
associate professionals 20 19 19 19
clerks 9 9 9 9
service workers and shop & market sales workers 48 48 48 49
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 376 373 371 369
craft and related trades workers 70 70 70 70
plant and machine operators and assemblers 29 29 29 28
elementary occupations 347 352 350 351
n.r. 55 53 57 58
estd.(’00) 1463898 1518187 1542768 1581536
sample 91920 93679 96041 97074
legislators, senior offic ials and managers 117 119 117 116
professionals 89 90 89 88
associate professionals 60 60 60 58
clerks 56 56 55 55
service workers and shop & market sales workers 130 130 130 130
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 33 36 33 33
craft and related trades workers 162 165 163 164
plant and machine operators and assemblers 77 77 77 76
elementary occupations 155 153 155 159
n.r. 120 114 119 120
estd.(’00) 597415 569574 629841 664598
sample 52464 50044 54979 56234
legislators, senior officials and managers 51 51 52 52
professionals 41 40 41 41
associate professionals 31 30 31 31
clerks 23 22 23 23
service workers and shop & market sales workers 72 71 72 73
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 276 281 273 270
craft and related trades workers 97 96 97 97
plant and machine operators and assemblers 43 42 43 43
elementary occupations 291 297 294 294
n.r. 74 70 75 76
estd.(’00) 2061312 2087761 2172609 2246134
sample 144384 143723 151020 153308
T able 3: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households repor t ing overnight visit or s and same day visit or s by household
occupat ion
all-I ndia
rural
all 1000 1000 1000 1000
urban
all 1000 1000 1000 1000
rural+urban
all 1000 1000 1000 1000
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 8
quintile-class in MPCE (%)
impact in influencing the visited household to make trips proportion
of
households
visited by
NRIs
no. of households visited by
NRIs
resulted into
one or more
trips
planning to
make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but
could not make it due to
other constraints
no
impact
cannot
say
total estimated
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
0-20 1 215 94 434 257 1000 0.01 1770 126
20-40 28 57 224 292 399 1000 0.01 2162 134
40-60 80 42 171 526 181 1000 0.01 2580 202
60-80 84 86 75 655 101 1000 0.01 3588 348
80-100 169 33 96 656 47 1000 0.04 15772 1160
no. of households
visited by NRIs
estd.(’00) 3230 1434 2881 15446 2881 25872 xxx xxx xxx
sample 260 122 198 1206 184 1970 xxx xxx xxx
0-20 140 54 64 588 155 1000 0.01 1037 86
20-40 105 36 123 613 122 1000 0.01 1229 141
40-60 39 130 90 706 35 1000 0.01 1838 202
60-80 54 166 177 589 13 1000 0.02 2712 345
80-100 250 132 138 436 44 1000 0.04 6512 748
no. of households
visited by NRIs
estd.(’00) 2122 1648 1766 7094 698 13328 xxx xxx xxx
sample 208 160 187 874 93 1522 xxx xxx xxx
T able 4: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households which were visited by NR I s by i mpact of the NRI visit for each quint i le class of MPCE( %)
all-I ndia
ru ral
all 125 55 111 597 111 1000 0.02 25872 1970
urban
all 159 124 133 532 52 1000 0.02 13328 1522
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 9
social
group
sample estimated(’00)
number of
households
number of
households
reporting
overnight visitors
number of
households
reporting same
day visitors
number of
households
reporting at least
one either overnight
or same day visitor
number of
households
number of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
number of
households
reporting same day
visitors
number of
households reporting
at least one either
overnight or same
day visitor
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
ST 15573 14135 14524 15193 177576 161477 169184 172491
SC 19257 18457 18700 19107 351180 326002 336402 342869
OBC 37331 35566 36332 37038 664820 617206 640292 648780
Others 24890 23739 24100 24680 387634 358888 371985 378303
n.r. 23 23 23 23 325 325 325 325
ST 3897 3391 3022 3716 21964 19622 16986 20673
SC 7821 7344 6923 7623 90242 80884 76896 85301
OBC 19528 18302 18034 19228 249860 228141 225240 241147
Others 24968 23411 22049 24394 302208 268549 250244 282471
n.r. 20 16 16 18 323 219 208 250
ST 19470 17526 17546 18909 199541 181099 186170 193164
SC 27078 25801 25623 26730 441422 406886 413298 428170
OBC 56859 53868 54366 56266 914681 845347 865531 889926
Others 49858 47150 46149 49074 689842 627436 622229 660774
n.r. 43 39 39 41 648 544 532 574
T able 5: Number of households report ing over night visitors, me day visitors, both sur veyed and estimated, separately for each social group
all-I ndia
rural
all 97074 91920 93679 96041 1581536 1463898 1518187 1542768
urban
all 56234 52464 50044 54979 664598 597415 569574 629841
ru ral+ urban
all 153308 144384 143723 151020 2246134 2061312 2087761 2172609
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 10
social group av. no. of
overnight
visitors per
household
number of overnight visitors no. of households
reporting overnight visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
ST 3 308 352 261 57 17 6 1000 161477 14135 611440 48630
SC 4 295 359 248 76 14 8 1000 326002 18457 1259899 73324
OBC 4 281 355 252 78 21 12 1000 617206 35566 2460962 144809
Others 4 280 387 237 64 19 12 1000 358888 23739 1400690 94453
n.r. 4 214 407 299 80 0 0 1000 325 23 1315 82
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 420039 532050 363824 105231 27577 15177 1463898 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
26657 33227 22235 6639 1960 1202 91920
xxx xxx xxx xxx
ST 2 558 262 146 22 10 2 1000 19622 3391 53359 9196
SC 3 312 352 246 63 20 7 1000 80884 7344 303977 27728
OBC 3 321 391 213 53 13 8 1000 228141 18302 823878 67125
Others 3 352 401 186 42 14 6 1000 268549 23411 918711 84871
n.r. 2 472 19 330 178 0 0 1000 219 16 785 58
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 204062 230507 121301 28928 8483 4133 597415 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
17579 19963 10866 2675 880 501 52464
xxx xxx xxx xxx
ST 3 335 342 249 53 16 5 1000 181099 17526 664799 57826
SC 4 298 357 248 74 16 8 1000 406886 25801 1563875 101052
OBC 4 292 365 242 71 19 11 1000 845347 53868 3284840 211934
Others 3 311 393 215 55 17 10 1000 627436 47150 2319402 179324
n.r. 3 318 251 312 119 0 0 1000 544 39 2100 140
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 624101 762557 485125 134159 36059 19310 2061312 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
44236 53190 33101 9314 2840 1703 144384
xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 6: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of households by number of over night visitors in t he household f or e h social group
all-I ndia
rural
all 4 287 363 249 72 19 10 1000 1463898 91920 5734306 361298
urban
all 3 342 386 203 48 14 7 1000 597415 52464 2100711 188978
rural+urban
all 3 303 370 235 65 17 9 1000 2061312 144384 7835017 550276
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 11
social group
average no. of
same day
visitors per
household
number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
no. of same day visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
ST 4 322 342 253 60 16 6 1000 169184 14524 632463 51671
SC 3 343 350 227 60 13 6 1000 336402 18700 1221371 70104
OBC 4 349 337 223 64 18 9 1000 640292 36332 2350083 139010
Others 4 313 374 224 61 18 11 1000 371985 24100 1398624 92862
n.r. 4 146 483 294 78 0 0 1000 325 23 1348 77
no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
estd(’00) 509664 530692 345584 94293 25197 12757 1518187 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
30064 33239 21470 6141 1765 1000 93679
xxx xxx xxx xxx
ST 2 509 306 153 23 7 2 1000 16986 3022 48242 8363
SC 3 356 347 221 52 18 5 1000 76896 6923 271241 24754
OBC 3 375 375 184 48 12 7 1000 225240 18034 766798 63495
Others 3 384 393 164 42 12 4 1000 250244 22049 823038 77071
n.r. 3 382 141 144 334 0 0 1000 208 16 834 61
no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
estd(’00) 216715 214725 102075 25752 7229 3079 569574 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
18241 18727 9618 2287 770 401 50044
xxx xxx xxx xxx
ST 3 339 339 244 57 15 5 1000 186170 17546 680705 60034
SC 3 345 349 226 59 14 6 1000 413298 25623 1492612 94858
OBC 3 356 347 213 60 16 8 1000 865531 54366 3116881 202505
Others 3 342 382 200 53 16 8 1000 622229 46149 2221662 169933
n.r. 3 238 349 235 177 0 0 1000 532 39 2182 138
no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
estd(’00) 726379 745417 447659 120046 32426 15835 2087761 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
48305 51966 31088 8428 2535 1401 143723
xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 7: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of households by number of same day visit ors in t he household for each social group
all-I ndia
ru ral
all 4 336 350 228 62 17 8 1000 1518187 93679 5603889 353724
urban
all 3 380 377 179 45 13 5 1000 569574 50044 1910153 173744
rural+urban
all 3 348 357 214 57 16 8 1000 2087761 143723 7514043 527468
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 12
social group average no. of
overnight trips per
household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
ST 4 91 271 320 184 80 54 1000 177576 15573
SC 4 72 247 308 194 104 74 1000 351180 19257
OBC 4 72 238 303 207 103 78 1000 664820 37331
Others 5 74 239 297 198 99 93 1000 387634 24890
n.r. 5 0 362 186 147 37 267 1000 325 23
no. of
households
estd(’00) 117638 385838 481861 315162 157604 123432 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 5154 21133 30110 20578 10887 9212 97074 xxx xxx
ST 4 107 343 265 158 43 85 1000 21964 3897
SC 3 104 344 294 138 71 49 1000 90242 7821
OBC 4 87 297 323 167 72 54 1000 249860 19528
Others 4 111 322 299 153 67 47 1000 302208 24968
n.r. 2 322 445 108 14 0 111 1000 323 20
no. of
households
estd(’00) 67183 210334 203409 104112 45636 33923 664598 xxx xxx
sample 3770 15887 17517 10186 4895 3979 56234 xxx xxx
ST 4 92 279 314 181 76 58 1000 199541 19470
SC 4 78 267 305 183 98 69 1000 441422 27078
OBC 4 76 254 308 196 95 71 1000 914681 56859
Others 4 90 276 298 178 85 73 1000 689842 49858
n.r. 4 161 404 147 81 19 189 1000 648 43
no. of
households
estd(’00) 184821 596173 685270 419274 203240 157355 2246134 xxx xxx
sample 8924 37020 47627 30764 15782 13191 153308 xxx xxx
T able 8: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of households by number of over night tr ips f or each social gr oup
all-I ndia
rural
all 4 74 244 305 199 100 78 1000 1581536 97074
urban
all 4 101 316 306 157 69 51 1000 664598 56234
rural+urban
all 4 82 265 305 187 90 70 1000 2246134 153308
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 13
social group average no. of
same day trips
per household
number of same day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
ST 8 47 88 180 224 173 287 1000 177576 15573
SC 8 42 84 193 203 163 315 1000 351180 19257
OBC 8 37 74 185 211 171 321 1000 664820 37331
Others 9 40 71 168 191 168 362 1000 387634 24890
n.r. 8 0 79 326 134 110 352 1000 325 23
no. of
households
estd(’00) 63349 122016 287845 325493 267047 515786 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 3395 6426 16261 19433 16882 34677 97074 xxx xxx
ST 5 227 175 229 138 93 138 1000 21964 3897
SC 5 148 170 218 181 124 158 1000 90242 7821
OBC 6 99 140 230 225 129 177 1000 249860 19528
Others 5 172 158 217 177 111 165 1000 302208 24968
n.r. 3 358 335 0 181 13 112 1000 323 20
no. of
households
estd(’00) 95024 102179 147851 129087 79007 111449 664598 xxx xxx
sample 6190 6938 11764 11233 7770 12339 56234 xxx xxx
ST 8 67 98 185 215 165 271 1000 199541 19470
SC 8 64 102 198 199 155 283 1000 441422 27078
OBC 8 54 92 197 215 160 282 1000 914681 56859
Others 7 98 109 190 185 143 276 1000 689842 49858
n.r. 5 179 207 163 158 62 232 1000 648 43
no. of
households
estd(’00) 158372 224196 435697 454580 346054 627235 2246134 xxx xxx
sample 9585 13364 28025 30666 24652 47016 153308 xxx xxx
T able 9: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of households by number of same day t rips for each social group
all-I ndia
rural
all 8 40 77 182 206 169 326 1000 1581536 97074
urban
all 5 143 154 222 194 119 168 1000 664598 56234
ru ral+ urban
all 8 71 100 194 202 154 279 1000 2246134 153308
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 14
religion sample estimated(’00)
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting
same-day
visitors
no. of
households
reporting at
least
overnighte
either
overnight or
same-day
visitor
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting
same-day
visitors
no. of
households
reporting at
least
overnighte
either
overnight or
same-day
visitor
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Hinduism 76598 73296 74498 76010 1338906 1248187 1288626 1308581
Islam 10829 10177 10414 10697 167873 151569 160143 162884
Christianity 5854 5010 5298 5675 34190 28014 32090 32957
Sikhism 1590 1507 1539 1573 26274 23494 24480 24778
Jainism 77 74 75 76 1209 1035 1124 1130
Buddhism 1179 1097 1077 1154 8529 7543 7650 8207
others ( incl.
Zoroastrianism)
946 758 777 855 4530 4030 4049 4205
n.r 1 1 1 1 25 25 25 25
Hinduism 43105 40607 38700 42326 534870 484323 457989 509058
Islam 7434 6865 6575 7198 86071 74700 73850 79640
Christianity 3502 2992 2860 3357 22554 19338 20047 21451
Sikhism 1003 932 924 973 10802 10190 9857 10537
Jainism 341 329 301 337 3773 3552 3490 3685
Buddhism 574 535 495 556 5133 4326 3499 4452
others ( incl.
Zoroastrianism)
270 200 185 228 1388 981 838 1013
n.r 5 4 4 4 7 4 4 4
Hinduism 119703 113903 113198 118336 1873776 1732510 1746615 1817639
Islam 18263 17042 16989 17895 253943 226269 233993 242524
Christianity 9356 8002 8158 9032 56744 47351 52138 54409
Sikhism 2593 2439 2463 2546 37076 33684 34337 35315
Jainism 418 403 376 413 4982 4588 4614 4816
Buddhism 1753 1632 1572 1710 13663 11869 11149 12659
others ( incl.
Zoroastrianism)
1216 958 962 1083 5918 5011 4887 5218
n.r 6 5 5 5 32 30 30 30
T able 10: Number of households reporting overnight visitors, ame day visitors, both surveyed and estimated, separately
for each religion
all-I ndia
rural
all 97074 91920 93679 96041 1581536 1463898 1518187 1542768
urban
all 56234 52464 50044 54979 664598 597415 569574 629841
rural + urban
all 153308 144384 143723 151020 2246134 2061312 2087761 2172609
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 15
religion
average no.
of overnight
visitors per
household
number of overnight visitors
no. of households
reporting overnight visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Hinduism 4 288 363 250 71 18 10 1000 1248187 73296 4879689 291615
Islam 4 273 364 232 91 25 14 1000 151569 10177 613230 42953
Christianity 3 402 371 188 31 5 3 1000 28014 5010 90198 14089
Sikhism 4 172 349 361 80 21 17 1000 23494 1507 105268 6907
Jainism 4 265 282 301 126 26 0 1000 1035 74 4617 300
Buddhism 3 303 401 272 22 2 0 1000 7543 1097 26269 3459
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 3 321 334 269 70 0 6 1000 4030 758 14958 1972
n.r 3 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 25 1 76 3
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 420039 532050 363824 105231 27577 15177 1463898 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 26657 33227 22235 6639 1960 1202 91920 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Hinduism 3 340 402 197 43 13 6 1000 484323 40607 1681537 145654
Islam 3 331 307 231 94 24 14 1000 74700 6865 289541 28000
Christianity 2 505 308 152 29 5 0 1000 19338 2992 54970 7753
Sikhism 4 227 418 285 43 24 2 1000 10190 932 40792 3840
Jainism 4 161 445 346 20 20 8 1000 3552 329 15038 1432
Buddhism 3 326 266 341 60 6 1 1000 4326 535 15762 1814
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 2 567 175 251 5 2 0 1000 981 200 3064 478
n.r 1 696 304 0 0 0 0 1000 4 4 8 7
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 204062 230507 121301 28928 8483 4133 597415 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 17579 19963 10866 2675 880 501 52464 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 11: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households by number of overnight visit or s in t he household for each religion
all-I ndia
rural
all 4 287 363 249 72 19 10 1000 1463898 91920 5734306 361298
urban
all 3 342 386 203 48 14 7 1000 597415 52464 2100711 188978
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 16
religion
average no.
of overnight
visitors per
household
number of overnight visitors
no. of households
reporting overnight visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Hinduism 4 303 374 235 63 17 9 1000 1732510 113903 6561225 437269
Islam 4 292 345 232 92 25 14 1000 226269 17042 902771 70953
Christianity 3 444 345 173 30 5 2 1000 47351 8002 145167 21842
Sikhism 4 189 370 338 69 22 13 1000 33684 2439 146060 10747
Jainism 4 184 408 336 44 21 6 1000 4588 403 19655 1732
Buddhism 3 311 352 297 36 3 0 1000 11869 1632 42031 5273
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 3 369 303 266 57 0 5 1000 5011 958 18022 2450
n.r 3 99 901 0 0 0 0 1000 30 5 84 10
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 624101 762557 485125 134159 36059 19310 2061312 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 44236 53190 33101 9314 2840 1703 144384 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 11: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households by number of overnight visit or s in t he household for each religion
all-I ndia
rural+urban
all 3 303 370 235 65 17 9 1000 2061312 144384 7835017 550276
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 17
religion
average
no. of
same-day
visitors per
household
number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
no. of same day visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Hinduism 4 341 349 226 60 16 8 1000 1288626 74498 4725960 280958
Islam 4 317 342 226 79 21 14 1000 160143 10414 615887 42529
Christianity 3 351 406 199 33 8 2 1000 32090 5298 108482 17277
Sikhism 4 154 377 354 78 21 15 1000 24480 1539 109697 7043
Jainism 3 468 181 144 183 24 0 1000 1124 75 4214 296
Buddhism 3 431 346 193 27 2 0 1000 7650 1077 23445 3512
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 4 261 349 296 88 2 4 1000 4049 777 16129 2106
n.r 3 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 25 1 76 3
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 509664 530692 345584 94293 25197 12757 1518187 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
30064 33239 21470 6141 1765 1000 93679
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Hinduism 3 379 390 176 40 11 5 1000 457989 38700 1517113 133024
Islam 3 374 314 191 86 26 10 1000 73850 6575 270930 25845
Christianity 2 527 319 121 28 6 0 1000 20047 2860 55477 7901
Sikhism 4 230 442 250 52 25 2 1000 9857 924 39106 3766
Jainism 3 341 391 227 11 23 8 1000 3490 301 12406 1197
Buddhism 2 376 217 378 24 4 0 1000 3499 495 12060 1572
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 2 458 148 387 5 1 0 1000 838 185 3054 433
n.r 1 696 304 0 0 0 0 1000 4 4 7 6
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 216715 214725 102075 25752 7229 3079 569574 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 18241 18727 9618 2287 770 401 50044 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 12: Per 1000 distr ibution of households by number of same day visitors in the household for each religion
all- I nd ia
rural
all 4 336 350 228 62 17 8 1000 1518187 93679 5603889 353724
urban
all 3 380 377 179 45 13 5 1000 569574 50044 1910153 173744
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 18
religion
average
no. of
same-day
visitors per
household
number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
no. of same day visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Hinduism 3 351 359 213 55 15 7 1000 1746615 113198 6243073 413982
Islam 3 335 334 215 81 23 12 1000 233993 16989 886817 68374
Christianity 3 419 373 169 31 7 1 1000 52138 8158 163960 25178
Sikhism 4 176 396 324 71 22 11 1000 34337 2463 148803 10809
Jainism 3 372 340 207 53 23 6 1000 4614 376 16620 1493
Buddhism 3 414 306 251 26 3 0 1000 11149 1572 35505 5084
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 3 295 314 312 74 2 3 1000 4887 962 19183 2539
n.r 3 99 901 0 0 0 0 1000 30 5 83 9
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 726379 745417 447659 120046 32426 15835 2087761 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
48305 51966 31088 8428 2535 1401 143723
xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 12: Per 1000 distr ibution of households by number of same day visitors in the household for each religion
all- I nd ia
ru ral + urban
all 3 348 357 214 57 16 8 1000 2087761 143723 7514043 527468
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 19
religion
average no. of
overnight trips
per household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more
than 8
Total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
Hinduism 4 68 241 308 203 102 78 1000 1338906 76598
Islam 4 97 277 289 177 83 76 1000 167873 10829
Christianity 4 181 264 282 145 62 66 1000 34190 5854
Sikhism 5 106 106 259 260 157 113 1000 26274 1590
Jainism 4 144 233 207 289 107 22 1000 1209 77
Buddhism 5 116 323 306 96 65 94 1000 8529 1179
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 4 110 253 204 218 158 56 1000 4530 946
n.r 1 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 25 1
no. of
households
estd(’00) 117638 385838 481861 315162 157604 123432 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 5154 21133 30110 20578 10887 9212 97074 xxx xxx
Hinduism 4 95 314 309 161 70 52 1000 534870 43105
Islam 3 132 319 305 141 62 41 1000 86071 7434
Christianity 3 143 349 279 113 54 62 1000 22554 3502
Sikhism 4 57 290 283 186 105 80 1000 10802 1003
Jainism 4 59 331 253 176 92 89 1000 3773 341
Buddhism 3 157 424 301 74 21 23 1000 5133 574
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 4 293 339 99 207 6 55 1000 1388 270
n.r 2 402 232 184 182 0 0 1000 7 5
no. of
households
estd(’00) 67183 210334 203409 104112 45636 33923 664598 xxx xxx
sample 3770 15887 17517 10186 4895 3979 56234 xxx xxx
Table 13: Per 1000 dist r ibut ion of households by number of over night tr i ps f or each religion
all-I ndia
rural
all 4 74 244 305 199 100 78 1000 1581536 97074
urban
all 4 101 316 306 157 69 51 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 20
religion
average no. of
overnight trips
per household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more
than 8
Total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
Hinduism 4 75 262 309 191 93 70 1000 1873776 119703
Islam 4 109 291 295 165 76 64 1000 253943 18263
Christianity 4 166 298 281 133 59 64 1000 56744 9356
Sikhism 5 91 159 266 238 142 103 1000 37076 2593
Jainism 4 79 307 241 203 96 73 1000 4982 418
Buddhism 4 131 360 304 88 49 67 1000 13663 1753
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 4 153 273 179 216 123 55 1000 5918 1216
n.r 1 88 832 40 40 0 0 1000 32 6
no. of
households
estd(’00) 184821 596173 685270 419274 203240 157355 2246134 xxx xxx
sample 8924 37020 47627 30764 15782 13191 153308 xxx xxx
Table 13: Per 1000 dist r ibut ion of households by number of over night tr i ps f or each religion
all-I ndia
ru ral+ urban
all 4 82 265 305 187 90 70 1000 2246134 153308
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 21
religion
average no. of
same-day trips
per household
number of same-day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
Hinduism 8 38 74 184 210 170 325 1000 1338906 76598
Islam 8 46 104 175 192 169 314 1000 167873 10829
Christianity 9 61 80 166 181 150 362 1000 34190 5854
Sikhism 10 68 37 108 148 171 469 1000 26274 1590
Jainism 6 70 221 215 32 175 288 1000 1209 77
Buddhism 8 103 148 273 138 78 259 1000 8529 1179
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 6 106 113 212 242 120 207 1000 4530 946
n.r 2 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 25 1
no. of
households
estd(’00) 63349 122016 287845 325493 267047 515786 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 3395 6426 16261 19433 16882 34677 97074 xxx xxx
Hinduism 5 144 151 222 195 124 165 1000 534870 43105
Islam 5 142 160 219 213 109 157 1000 86071 7434
Christianity 6 111 227 231 162 73 195 1000 22554 3502
Sikhism 8 87 90 211 152 111 347 1000 10802 1003
Jainism 8 75 203 194 146 114 268 1000 3773 341
Buddhism 4 318 145 323 115 44 54 1000 5133 574
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 4 397 33 262 23 52 233 1000 1388 270
n.r 3 402 232 0 184 182 0 1000 7 5
no. of
households
estd(’00) 95024 102179 147851 129087 79007 111449 664598 xxx xxx
sample 6190 6938 11764 11233 7770 12339 56234 xxx xxx
T able 14: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of same-day tr ips for each religion
all-I ndia
ru ral
all 8 40 77 182 206 169 326 1000 1581536 97074
urban
all 5 143 154 222 194 119 168 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 22
religion
average no. of
same-day trips
per household
number of same-day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
Hinduism 8 68 96 195 206 157 279 1000 1873776 119703
Islam 7 79 123 190 199 148 260 1000 253943 18263
Christianity 8 81 138 192 174 119 296 1000 56744 9356
Sikhism 10 74 52 138 149 154 433 1000 37076 2593
Jainism 8 74 207 199 118 129 273 1000 4982 418
Buddhism 6 184 147 292 129 66 182 1000 13663 1753
others ( incl. Zoroastrianism) 6 174 94 224 191 104 213 1000 5918 1216
n.r 2 88 832 0 40 40 0 1000 32 6
no. of
households
estd(’00) 158372 224196 435697 454580 346054 627235 2246134 xxx xxx
sample 9585 13364 28025 30666 24652 47016 153308 xxx xxx
T able 14: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of same-day tr ips for each religion
all-I ndia
rural +urban
all 8 71 100 194 202 154 279 1000 2246134 153308
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 23
household type sample estimated(’00)
number of
households
number of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
number of
households
reporting same
day visitors
number of households
reporting at least one
either overnight or same
day visitor
number of
households
number of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
number of
households
reporting same
day visitors
number of households
reporting at least one
either overnight or
same day visitor
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
self employed in non-agriculture 14931 14245 14524 14831 222655 205844 214143 217444
agricultural labour 19894 18722 19245 19671 426509 387323 408764 413587
other labour 10417 9831 10175 10341 173863 160917 169545 171354
self employed in agriculture 37820 35940 36492 37377 562615 531493 545076 551378
others 13988 13162 13222 13798 195383 177849 180248 188498
n.r 24 20 21 23 510 472 411 507
household type sample estimated(’00)
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting
same-day
visitors
no. of households reporting
atleast overnighte overnight
or same-day visitor
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting
same-day
visitors
no. of households
reporting atleast
overnighte overnight or
same-day visitor
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
self employed 21275 19913 19445 20862 229800 208508 205284 219602
regular wage /salary earning 22704 21324 19851 22203 262022 235163 217816 247240
casual labour 6650 6100 5976 6477 87012 76494 75728 81954
others 5580 5103 4749 5413 85526 77015 70512 80810
n.r 25 24 23 24 239 236 235 236
Table 15-R: Number of households reporting overnight visitor s, same day visitor s, both surveyed and estimated, separ ately for each household type
all-I ndia rural
all 97074 91920 93679 96041 1581536 1463898 1518187 1542768
T able 15-U: Number of households reporting overnight visitors, day visitors, both surveyed and estimated, separately for each household type
all-I ndia urban
all 56234 52464 50044 54979 664598 597415 569574 629841
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 24
household type number of overnight visitors no. of households
reporting overnight visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
self employed in novernight-agriculture 248 376 271 75 22 8 1000 205844 14245 838107 57726
agricultural labour 304 392 232 55 13 4 1000 387323 18722 1429542 70013
other labour 238 403 269 71 12 7 1000 160917 9831 639736 39591
self employed in agriculture 250 341 270 94 26 18 1000 531493 35940 2263299 150714
others 449 319 176 38 12 6 1000 177849 13162 562324 43179
n.r 532 246 205 0 4 12 1000 472 20 1299 75
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 420039 532050 363824 105231 27577 15177 1463898 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
26657 33227 22235 6639 1960 1202 91920 xxx xxx xxx xxx
household type number of overnight visitors no. of households
reporting overnight visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
self employed 229 403 265 66 25 12 1000 208508 19913 855635 81209
regular wage /salary earning 308 439 194 44 10 5 1000 235163 21324 822836 74195
casual labour 339 382 213 50 10 6 1000 76494 6100 272120 21980
others 754 180 52 11 1 1 1000 77015 5103 148852 11485
n.r 15 239 413 329 4 0 1000 236 24 1269 109
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 204062 230507 121301 28928 8483 4133 597415 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
17579 19963 10866 2675 880 501 52464 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 16-R: Per 1000 dist ri but iover night of households by number of over night visit or s in t he household for e ch household t ype
all-I ndia rural
all 287 363 249 72 19 10 1000 1463898 91920 5734306 361298
Table 16-U: Per 1000 dist ri but iover night of households by number of over night visit or s in t he household for e ch household t ype
all- I ndia ur ban
all 342 386 203 48 14 7 1000 597415 52464 2100711 188978
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 25
household type number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day visitors
no. of same day visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
self employed in non-agriculture 287 373 248 64 20 8 1000 214143 14524 827711 56667
agricultural labour 354 371 212 49 10 4 1000 408764 19245 1427000 68922
other labour 252 398 264 67 13 5 1000 169545 10175 661024 40344
self employed in agriculture 321 322 242 78 22 14 1000 545076 36492 2132693 144400
others 473 312 160 38 13 5 1000 180248 13222 554180 43311
n.r 535 156 286 4 5 14 1000 411 21 1282 80
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 509664 530692 345584 94293 25197 12757 1518187 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
30064 33239 21470 6141 1765 1000 93679
xxx xxx xxx xxx
household type number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day visitors
no. of same day visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) Sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
self employed 294 392 225 58 22 9 1000 205284 19445 780955 75249
regular wage /salary earning 343 434 168 42 9 3 1000 217816 19851 729258 66697
casual labour 373 355 212 48 6 6 1000 75728 5976 261167 20745
others 755 182 45 13 3 2 1000 70512 4749 137799 10969
n.r 305 231 139 291 34 0 1000 235 23 975 84
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 216715 214725 102075 25752 7229 3079 569574 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
18241 18727 9618 2287 770 401 50044
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 17-R: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households by number of same day visitor s in the household f or each househo type
all-I ndia rural
all 336 350 228 62 17 8 1000 1518187 93679 5603889 353724
Table 17-U: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of same day visitors in t he household f or each household t ype
all-I ndia urban
all 380 377 179 45 13 5 1000 569574 50044 1910153 173744
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 26
all-India rural
household type average no. of
overnight trips
per household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
self employed in non-agriculture 5 76 246 292 195 101 91 1000 222655 14931
agricultural labour 4 92 281 316 181 80 50 1000 426509 19894
other labour 4 74 236 308 208 105 69 1000 173863 10417
self employed in agriculture 5 55 202 311 220 119 93 1000 562615 37820
others 4 90 288 276 178 79 89 1000 195383 13988
n.r 3 75 498 350 65 0 11 1000 510 24
no. of households
estd(’00) 117638 385838 481861 315162 157604 123432 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 5154 21133 30110 20578 10887 9212 97074 xxx xxx
all-India urban
household type
average no. of
overnight trips
per household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
self employed 4 93 290 308 165 83 62 1000 229800 21275
regular wage /salary earning 4 103 327 312 151 61 45 1000 262022 22704
casual labour 3 121 374 279 140 48 37 1000 87012 6650
others 4 100 296 310 167 74 53 1000 85526 5580
n.r 4 12 320 426 22 36 184 1000 239 25
no. of households estd(’00) 67183 210334 203409 104112 45636 33923 664598 xxx xxx
sample 3770 15887 17517 10186 4895 3979 56234 xxx xxx
Table 18-R: Per 1000 distribution of householdsby number of overnight trips for each household type
all 4 74 244 305 199 100 78 1000 1581536 97074
T able 18-U: Per 1000 distribution of households by number of overnight trips for each household type
all 4 101 316 306 157 69 51 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 27
all-India rural
household type average no.
of same-day
trips per
household
number of same-day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more
than 8
total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
self employed in non-agriculture 9 38 70 173 199 163 357 1000 222655 14931
agricultural labour 7 42 97 219 220 164 259 1000 426509 19894
other labour 9 25 69 162 201 184 360 1000 173863 10417
self employed in agriculture 9 31 57 165 207 177 363 1000 562615 37820
others 8 77 107 179 183 149 304 1000 195383 13988
n.r. 5 194 137 229 175 236 30 1000 510 24
no. of households estd(’00) 63349 122016 287845 325493 267047 515786 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 3395 6426 16261 19433 16882 34677 97074 xxx xxx
all-India urban
household type average no.
of same-day
trips per
household
number of same-day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more
than 8
total estd
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
self employed 6 107 116 223 201 136 217 1000 229800 21275
regular wage /salary earning 5 169 154 213 194 114 157 1000 262022 22704
casual labour 5 130 165 250 200 119 136 1000 87012 6650
others 4 176 246 221 171 85 101 1000 85526 5580
n.r 6 15 16 595 138 18 220 1000 239 25
no. of households estd(’00) 95024 102179 147851 129087 79007 111449 664598 xxx xxx
sample 6190 6938 11764 11233 7770 12339 56234 xxx xxx
T able 19-R: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households by number of same-day tr ips for each household type
all 8 40 77 182 206 169 326 1000 1581536 97074
T able 19-U: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of same-day tr ips for each household type
all 5 143 154 222 194 119 168 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 28
quintile-class in
MPCE (%)
sample estimated(’00)
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting
same-day
visitors
no. of households
reporting at least one
overnight visitor or
same-day visitors
no. of
households
no. of
households
reporting
overnight
visitors
no. of
households
reporting same-
day visitors
no. of households
reporting at least one
overnight visitor or
same-day visitors
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
0-20 13078 12343 12561 12871 261373 237942 247014 251022
20-40 15382 14648 14839 15223 290057 270259 276549 282703
40-60 17625 16639 17067 17436 302385 280454 291153 295890
60-80 21711 20488 20921 21495 336113 310870 323682 328360
80-100 29278 27802 28291 29016 391607 364373 379789 384792
0-20 6921 6323 6236 6671 105083 92547 92732 97902
20-40 9170 8425 8438 8958 114066 102247 103523 109185
40-60 11249 10338 10170 10951 128192 114054 111314 120647
60-80 13357 12504 11799 13085 138436 124846 115837 131304
80-100 15537 14874 13401 15314 178821 163720 146169 170805
T able 20: Number of households repor ting over night visit ors, day visit or s, bot h surveyed and est imat ed, separ ately for each quintile class of MPCE(%)
all- I ndia
rur al
all 97074 91920 93679 96041 1581536 1463898 1518187 1542768
ur ban
all 56234 52464 50044 54979 664598 597415 569574 629841
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 29
quintile-class in MPCE
number of overnight visitors no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
no. of overnight visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
0-20 226 275 320 128 32 19 1000 237942 12343 1082334 57913
20-40 242 347 289 85 22 15 1000 270259 14648 1134843 64189
40-60 238 374 276 82 21 10 1000 280454 16639 1154954 69366
60-80 295 397 233 52 15 7 1000 310870 20488 1165519 77508
80-100 391 397 164 34 9 4 1000 364373 27802 1196657 92322
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 420039 532050 363824 105231 27577 15177 1463898 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
26657 33227 22235 6639 1960 1202 91920 xxx xxx xxx xxx
0-20 281 274 296 106 27 16 1000 92547 6323 390107 28387
20-40 243 392 265 68 22 10 1000 102247 8425 411935 34554
40-60 303 404 224 43 18 8 1000 114054 10338 416323 38664
60-80 330 432 186 39 8 5 1000 124846 12504 429522 43661
80-100 473 398 110 15 4 1 1000 163720 14874 452825 43712
no. of households
reporting overnight
visitors
estd(’00) 204062 230507 121301 28928 8483 4133 597415 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 17579 19963 10866 2675 880 501 52464 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample 44236 53190 33101 9314 2840 1703 144384 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 21: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of overnight visitors in t he household f or each quint ile class of MPCE( %)
all-I ndia
rural
all 287 363 249 72 19 10 1000 1463898 91920 5734306 361298
urban
all 342 386 203 48 14 7 1000 597415 52464 2100711 188978
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 30
quintile-class in MPCE (%) number of same day visitors no. of households
reporting same day
visitors
no. of same day
visitors
1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11+ total estd (’00) sample estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
0-20 311 257 284 106 27 15 1000 247014 12561 1015490 53689
20-40 314 327 255 74 19 11 1000 276549 14839 1071432 60266
40-60 298 357 245 70 20 9 1000 291153 17067 1124094 67728
60-80 336 378 221 46 13 7 1000 323682 20921 1160953 77669
80-100 396 396 163 33 8 3 1000 379789 28291 1231920 94372
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 509664 530692 345584 94293 25197 12757 1518187 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
30064 33239 21470 6141 1765 1000 93679 xxx xxx xxx xxx
0-20 368 269 244 85 22 13 1000 92732 6236 350110 25639
20-40 297 377 235 64 20 7 1000 103523 8438 391453 32810
40-60 346 401 187 43 18 5 1000 111314 10170 386728 36642
60-80 360 431 162 35 7 4 1000 115837 11799 383725 39750
80-100 489 385 106 17 2 1 1000 146169 13401 398137 38903
no. of households
reporting same-day
visitors
estd(’00) 216715 214725 102075 25752 7229 3079 569574 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample
18241 18727 9618 2287 770 401 50044 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 22: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households by number of same day visit or s in the household for each quint i le class of MPCE(%)
all- I ndia
r ural
all 336 350 228 62 17 8 1000 1518187 93679 5603889 353724
urban
all 380 377 179 45 13 5 1000 569574 50044 1910153 173744
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 31
quintile-class in
MPCE(%)
average no.
of overnight
trips per
household
number of overnight trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than 8 total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-20 4 90 264 295 180 98 73 1000 261373 13078
20-40 4 68 264 317 192 92 67 1000 290057 15382
40-60 4 73 232 304 215 112 65 1000 302385 17625
60-80 4 75 248 307 201 94 75 1000 336113 21711
80-100 5 70 222 301 204 102 102 1000 391607 29278
no. of
households
estd(’00) 117638 385838 481861 315162 157604 123432 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 5154 21133 30110 20578 10887 9212 97074 xxx xxx
0-20 4 119 302 307 143 73 57 1000 105083 6921
20-40 4 104 306 313 163 73 43 1000 114066 9170
40-60 4 110 327 298 149 67 48 1000 128192 11249
60-80 4 98 317 317 158 62 48 1000 138436 13357
80-100 4 84 324 298 166 71 57 1000 178821 15537
no. of
households
estd(’00) 67183 210334 203409 104112 45636 33923 664598 xxx xxx
sample 3770 15887 17517 10186 4895 3979 56234 xxx xxx
T able 23: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households by number of over night tr ips f or each quint i le class of M PCE ( %)
all- I ndia
r ur al
all 4 74 244 305 199 100 78 1000 1581536 97074
ur ban
all 4 101 316 306 157 69 51 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 32
quintile-class in MPCE(%) average no. of
same-day trips
per household
number of same-day trips no. of households
no trip 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 more than
8
total estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-20 8 55 90 193 201 169 293 1000 261373 13078
20-40 8 47 86 203 209 161 293 1000 290057 15382
40-60 8 37 71 173 209 184 325 1000 302385 17625
60-80 8 37 74 184 211 172 322 1000 336113 21711
80-100 9 30 69 164 200 160 377 1000 391607 29278
no. of
households
estd(’00) 63349 122016 287845 325493 267047 515786 1581536 xxx xxx
sample 3395 6426 16261 19433 16882 34677 97074 xxx xxx
0-20 5 118 177 232 204 120 150 1000 105083 6921
20-40 6 92 138 239 218 139 173 1000 114066 9170
40-60 6 132 139 219 213 132 165 1000 128192 11249
60-80 5 163 134 220 187 116 179 1000 138436 13357
80-100 5 183 175 211 166 98 168 1000 178821 15537
no. of
households
estd(’00) 95024 102179 147851 129087 79007 111449 664598 xxx xxx
sample 6190 6938 11764 11233 7770 12339 56234 xxx xxx
Table 24: Per 1000 distribution of households by number of same-day trips for each quintile class of M PC E(% )
all-I ndia
r ural
all 8 40 77 182 206 169 326 1000 1581536 97074
urban
all 5 143 154 222 194 119 168 1000 664598 56234
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 33
NCO
proportion (per
thousand) of
households who
are aware of
Incredible India
campaign
quintile class of MPCE no. of households, who are
aware of the ‘Incredible India’
campaign
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. total estd no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers
121 48 24 187 120 622 0 1000 4684 473
professionals
235 21 57 55 197 670 0 1000 7775 1143
associate professionals
327 24 51 118 200 606 0 1000 9846 1216
clerks
280 9 36 103 122 730 0 1000 4035 479
service workers and shop & market sales workers
97 28 116 109 173 574 0 1000 7484 806
skilled agricultural and fishery workers
60 105 120 158 247 369 0 1000 35286 3412
craft and related trades workers
39 22 157 249 140 432 0 1000 4272 418
plant and machine operators and assemblers
83 34 99 78 262 527 0 1000 3740 300
elementary occupations
17 154 153 201 222 271 0 1000 9191 867
n.r
65 20 39 52 151 737 0 1000 6012 571
estd no. of households who are aware (’00)
6336 9005 12796 19145 45187 0 92469
xxx xxx
sample no. of households who are aware 468 737 1219 2156 5188 0 9768 xxx xxx
Table 25(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by quintile classof M PC E for each occupation (N CO) group

all-I ndia rural
all
58 69 97 138 207 489 0 1000 92469 9768
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 34
NCO
proportion (per
thousand) of
households who
are aware of
Incredible India
campaign
quintile class of MPCE no. of households, who are
aware of the ‘Incredible India’
campaign
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. total estd no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers
286 18 43 115 202 623 0 1000 22113 2336
professionals
416 11 36 69 203 681 0 1000 24312 2703
associate professionals
369 11 64 155 281 488 0 1000 14324 1716
clerks
343 14 45 121 260 560 0 1000 12453 1335
service workers and shop & market sales workers
145 67 109 206 319 298 0 1000 12556 1640
skilled agricultural and fishery workers
111 106 133 284 211 265 0 1000 2470 366
craft and related trades workers
86 101 100 226 305 268 0 1000 9389 938
plant and machine operators and assemblers
148 66 253 201 169 312 0 1000 7486 720
elementary occupations
40 192 233 169 220 186 0 1000 4177 518
n.r
252 11 30 77 195 687 0 1000 20016 1492
estd no. of households who are aware (’00)
4599 9422 17112 30166 68141 0 129440
xxx xxx
sample no. of households who are aware
544 1150 1967 3382 6799 0 13842
xxx xxx
T able 25( I ) : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of households who are aware t he ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by qui nt ile classof MPCE for each occupation (NCO) gr oup

all-I ndia urban
all
195 36 73 132 233 526 0 1000 129440 13842
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 35
NCO
proportion (per
thousand) of
households who
are aware of
other tourism
promotional
campaigns
quintile class of MPCE no. of households, who are
aware of other tourism
promotional campaigns
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. total estd no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers
122 4 28 85 195 689 0 1000 4741 594
professionals
277 17 47 48 231 656 0 1000 9181 1219
associate professionals
352 21 45 94 178 661 0 1000 10594 1278
clerks
318 7 32 130 164 666 0 1000 4574 517
service workers and shop & market sales workers
143 51 107 140 187 516 0 1000 11015 1081
skilled agricultural and fishery workers
77 66 114 177 242 402 0 1000 45032 4254
craft and related trades workers
87 61 104 186 188 462 0 1000 9584 753
plant and machine operators and assemblers
144 31 153 91 248 476 0 1000 6471 472
elementary occupations
37 140 187 186 228 259 0 1000 20369 1637
n.r
84 18 31 66 128 757 0 1000 7745 731
estd no. of households who are aware (’00)
7756 13540 18607 27739 61857 0 129500
xxx xxx
sample no. of households who are aware
538 994 1663 2878 6545 0 12618
xxx xxx
Table 25(O): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaignsby quintile classof M PCE for each occupation (NCO ) group
all-I ndia rural
all
82 60 105 144 214 478 0 1000 129500 12618
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 36
NCO
proportion (per
thousand) of
households who
are aware of
other tourism
promotional
campaigns
quintile class of MPCE no. of households, who are
aware of other tourism
promotional campaigns
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. total estd no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers
231 24 48 126 203 599 0 1000 17815 1862
professionals
326 20 68 89 182 640 0 1000 19065 2105
associate professionals
306 17 54 158 274 496 0 1000 11879 1442
clerks
270 12 84 130 278 496 0 1000 9812 1058
service workers and shop & market sales workers
169 56 105 356 268 215 0 1000 14605 1518
skilled agricultural and fishery workers
150 66 190 310 278 156 0 1000 3317 403
craft and related trades workers
119 73 176 185 361 205 0 1000 12981 1060
plant and machine operators and assemblers
164 56 273 217 235 219 0 1000 8301 744
elementary occupations
55 204 394 137 155 110 0 1000 5840 640
n.r
203 13 44 75 242 626 0 1000 16122 1432
estd no. of households who are aware (’00)
5006 13356 19544 29375 52608 0 119889
xxx xxx
sample no. of households who are aware
537 1256 2026 3221 5306 0 12346
xxx xxx
Table 25(O): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaignsby quintile classof M PCE for each occupation (NCO ) group
all-I ndia urban
all
180 42 111 163 245 439 0 1000 119889 12346
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 37
State/UT proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
25 76 0 648 0 13 262 1 1000 3650 204
Arunachal Pradesh
176 17 94 698 0 78 62 51 1000 325 255
Assam
109 121 158 463 2 0 252 4 1000 5288 759
Bihar
42 278 302 225 0 0 138 57 1000 5723 265
Chhattisgarh
100 55 350 487 1 22 83 2 1000 3698 245
Delhi
232 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 454 30
Goa
192 32 0 553 1 0 414 0 1000 282 24
Gujarat
73 175 13 808 0 0 2 2 1000 4852 291
Haryana
20 122 3 875 0 0 0 1 1000 626 34
Himachal Pradesh
106 42 0 853 1 4 98 2 1000 1457 177
Jammu & Kashmir
134 42 76 472 0 0 390 20 1000 1520 227
Jharkhand
66 89 188 398 0 0 325 0 1000 2673 193
Karnataka
42 514 7 435 0 0 44 0 1000 3197 171
Kerala
133 155 18 527 0 3 258 38 1000 7539 506
Madhya Pradesh
50 94 51 705 0 1 119 31 1000 4662 322
Maharashtra
61 59 37 835 7 20 19 24 1000 7452 428
Manipur
145 48 228 356 0 45 320 3 1000 444 373
Meghalaya
178 207 52 294 0 89 312 46 1000 696 328
Mizoram
135 77 166 756 0 0 0 0 1000 130 114
Nagaland
408 109 30 599 0 30 213 19 1000 634 432
Orissa
52 38 63 694 0 3 191 12 1000 3611 387
Punjab
23 6 0 897 0 0 0 97 1000 749 54
Rajasthan
32 224 20 518 38 0 199 1 1000 2703 180
Sikkim
201 22 9 531 0 47 390 1 1000 222 278
Tamil Nadu
49 207 73 514 13 5 184 3 1000 4481 302
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
ru ral
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 38
State/UT proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Tripura
515 17 51 597 3 13 116 203 1000 3486 1543
Uttarakhand
65 22 0 958 0 0 20 0 1000 909 43
Uttar Pradesh
34 261 70 294 0 6 335 33 1000 8504 596
West Bengal
90 119 61 498 0 28 265 28 1000 12219 861
A & N Islands
177 76 0 509 0 53 362 0 1000 95 48
Chandigarh
12 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 3 5
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
94 0 6 994 0 0 0 0 1000 34 27
Daman & Diu
52 743 0 235 0 0 21 0 1000 11 24
Lakshadweep
95 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 6 3
Puducherry
159 60 0 277 0 0 664 0 1000 135 39
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
13420 7537 50620 238 932 17194 2528 92469 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
1130 710 5481 26 143 1835 443 9768 xxx xxx
.
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
ru ral
all-I ndia
58 145 82 547 3 10 186 27 1000 92469 9768
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 39
State/UT proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
72 203 2 474 15 10 275 20 1000 4631 347
Arunachal Pradesh
205 50 50 706 0 27 163 4 1000 104 119
Assam
318 181 34 617 13 3 131 22 1000 2039 438
Bihar
159 193 24 309 4 0 461 8 1000 2668 203
Chhattisgarh
205 12 123 736 8 1 106 13 1000 1733 227
Delhi
318 62 20 885 13 5 15 1 1000 8045 1007
Goa
421 100 0 893 3 0 4 0 1000 610 98
Gujarat
207 128 37 733 0 0 101 1 1000 9036 587
Haryana
116 88 0 887 0 0 24 1 1000 1684 142
Himachal Pradesh
175 76 0 761 4 0 159 0 1000 303 110
Jammu & Kashmir
158 18 132 637 8 0 156 49 1000 521 179
Jharkhand
272 156 15 488 1 15 322 2 1000 2074 305
Karnataka
212 349 4 462 22 0 160 1 1000 9603 549
Kerala
212 157 5 582 16 4 232 5 1000 4303 512
Madhya Pradesh
235 91 28 737 1 3 132 8 1000 7122 852
Maharashtra
208 61 28 804 31 2 64 9 1000 20438 1463
Manipur
223 17 155 391 0 29 404 5 1000 276 301
Meghalaya
577 41 20 467 0 2 470 0 1000 538 358
Mizoram
236 60 105 813 0 1 19 1 1000 183 311
Nagaland
610 106 32 541 13 21 261 26 1000 378 277
Orissa
292 145 19 660 14 1 158 2 1000 3859 307
Punjab
93 17 4 951 1 0 21 6 1000 1992 202
Rajasthan
164 136 4 632 15 13 199 0 1000 5118 340
Sikkim
482 47 0 265 0 2 686 0 1000 94 180
Tamil Nadu
191 206 30 507 78 16 161 3 1000 15373 934
Tripura
746 16 5 774 2 0 157 45 1000 1133 700
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 40
State/UT proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Uttarakhand
215 121 0 681 2 0 87 108 1000 844 90
Uttar Pradesh
177 120 26 715 3 5 127 4 1000 12264 961
West Bengal
237 155 5 617 5 5 197 16 1000 11156 1269
A & N Islands
162 0 0 510 0 10 480 0 1000 43 41
Chandigarh
276 61 0 824 4 0 21 90 1000 573 129
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
343 85 0 915 0 0 0 0 1000 40 60
Daman & Diu
194 13 0 900 78 0 10 0 1000 22 46
Lakshadweep
222 15 3 256 0 174 553 0 1000 9 57
Puducherry
307 165 53 202 0 0 557 23 1000 630 141
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
18006 2846 85619 2594 661 18706 1008 129440 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
1536 326 9258 108 107 2348 159 13842 xxx xxx
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
urban
all-I ndia
195 139 22 661 20 5 145 8 1000 129440 13842
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 41
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
40 147 1 551 8 11 269 12 1000 8281 551
Arunachal Pradesh
182 25 83 700 0 65 86 40 1000 429 374
Assam
133 137 123 506 5 1 218 9 1000 7326 1197
Bihar
55 251 213 252 1 0 241 42 1000 8390 468
Chhattisgarh
120 41 278 567 3 15 90 6 1000 5431 472
Delhi
312 59 19 891 12 5 14 0 1000 8500 1037
Goa
306 78 0 786 2 0 134 0 1000 892 122
Gujarat
126 144 28 759 0 0 66 1 1000 13888 878
Haryana
50 97 1 883 0 0 18 1 1000 2310 176
Himachal Pradesh
114 48 0 837 2 3 108 1 1000 1760 287
Jammu & Kashmir
139 36 90 514 2 0 331 27 1000 2041 406
Jharkhand
99 119 112 437 0 7 324 1 1000 4747 498
Karnataka
105 391 5 456 17 0 131 1 1000 12799 720
Kerala
154 156 13 547 6 3 249 26 1000 11842 1018
Madhya Pradesh
96 92 37 725 1 2 127 17 1000 11784 1174
Maharashtra
126 61 30 812 25 7 52 13 1000 27890 1891
Manipur
168 36 200 369 0 39 352 4 1000 720 674
Meghalaya
255 135 38 369 0 51 381 26 1000 1234 686
Mizoram
180 67 131 790 0 1 11 1 1000 313 425
Nagaland
466 108 31 578 5 27 231 21 1000 1012 709
Orissa
90 93 40 676 7 2 174 6 1000 7471 694
Punjab
50 14 3 936 1 0 15 31 1000 2742 256
Rajasthan
67 167 9 593 23 8 199 1 1000 7821 520
Sikkim
243 30 6 452 0 33 478 1 1000 316 458
Tamil Nadu
115 206 40 509 63 13 166 3 1000 19854 1236
Tripura
558 17 39 640 3 10 126 165 1000 4620 2243
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
rural+urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 42
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Uttarakhand
98 70 0 825 1 0 52 52 1000 1753 133
Uttar Pradesh
66 178 44 543 1 6 212 16 1000 20768 1557
West Bengal
128 136 34 555 3 17 233 22 1000 23375 2130
A & N Islands
172 52 0 509 0 40 399 0 1000 137 89
Chandigarh
244 60 0 825 4 0 21 90 1000 576 134
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
155 46 3 951 0 0 0 0 1000 74 87
Daman & Diu
101 258 0 677 52 0 14 0 1000 32 70
Lakshadweep
146 9 2 546 0 106 337 0 1000 15 60
Puducherry
264 146 43 215 0 0 576 19 1000 765 180
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
31425 10383 136239 2832 1593 35900 3536 221908 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
2666 1036 14739 134 250 4183 602 23610 xxx xxx
Table 26(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by source separately for each State/UT
rural+urban
all-I ndia
99 142 47 614 13 7 162 16 1000 221908 23610
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 43
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
85 138 4 309 0 98 261 190 1000 12305 550
Arunachal Pradesh
160 79 104 554 15 127 57 64 1000 297 214
Assam
161 76 284 184 0 26 422 8 1000 7805 869
Bihar
79 205 533 147 0 0 109 7 1000 10800 436
Chhattisgarh
63 16 435 200 0 150 198 1 1000 2334 207
Delhi
118 7 0 993 0 0 0 0 1000 232 14
Goa
254 178 0 444 0 79 299 0 1000 373 35
Gujarat
76 310 31 363 0 191 39 67 1000 5075 298
Haryana
16 614 0 326 0 9 50 0 1000 523 25
Himachal Pradesh
83 446 49 289 0 36 163 17 1000 1138 153
Jammu & Kashmir
279 21 304 319 0 31 282 42 1000 3165 403
Jharkhand
53 272 44 41 0 92 509 42 1000 2168 140
Karnataka
61 456 24 284 0 126 99 11 1000 4703 248
Kerala
368 169 17 367 0 51 365 32 1000 20765 1473
Madhya Pradesh
34 50 114 489 35 88 149 75 1000 3134 199
Maharashtra
63 209 50 344 0 3 384 9 1000 7780 405
Manipur
166 200 301 167 0 34 243 54 1000 507 453
Meghalaya
241 174 138 73 0 305 238 72 1000 944 444
Mizoram
128 48 72 878 0 0 0 2 1000 124 109
Nagaland
493 103 9 131 2 548 193 17 1000 766 522
Orissa
86 133 52 412 0 157 204 43 1000 5962 543
Punjab
7 18 0 982 0 0 0 0 1000 239 21
Rajasthan
32 456 2 323 0 8 209 2 1000 2774 180
Sikkim
495 56 35 31 0 237 558 82 1000 546 578
Tamil Nadu
91 222 105 478 7 8 159 22 1000 8391 544
Tripura
642 39 47 468 0 91 142 213 1000 4340 1888
T able 26(O): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separately for each State/UT
ru ral
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 44
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Uttarakhand
27 285 49 516 0 114 36 0 1000 374 28
Uttar Pradesh
12 200 201 279 1 21 258 40 1000 2861 217
West Bengal
138 106 40 302 0 57 352 143 1000 18696 1234
A & N Islands
297 60 2 100 0 69 765 5 1000 159 64
Chandigarh
12 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 3 5
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
183 288 3 709 0 0 0 0 1000 66 49
Daman & Diu
46 892 0 68 0 40 0 0 1000 10 14
Lakshadweep
565 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 1000 34 19
Puducherry
128 10 2 22 0 0 967 0 1000 109 37
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
22298 14601 41192 182 8528 34274 8424 129500 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
1892 1143 4227 16 1196 3266 878 12618 xxx xxx
T able 26(O): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separately for each State/UT
ru ral
all-I ndia
82 172 113 318 1 66 265 65 1000 129500 12618
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 45
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra
Pradesh
182 295 10 313 26 91 247 18 1000 11689 708
Arunachal
Pradesh
197 38 20 540 0 127 184 92 1000 100 111
Assam
319 201 127 409 14 35 200 14 1000 2047 381
Bihar
145 221 107 177 27 36 429 3 1000 2423 168
Chhattisgarh
177 40 117 448 9 54 322 10 1000 1496 218
Delhi
186 100 22 841 9 28 0 0 1000 4707 573
Goa
410 23 0 629 30 128 191 0 1000 596 121
Gujarat
177 525 14 366 3 23 65 4 1000 7714 486
Haryana
28 357 0 363 12 82 181 6 1000 413 46
Himachal
Pradesh
107 113 0 288 13 49 528 9 1000 184 81
Jammu &
Kashmir
253 68 115 417 0 10 257 134 1000 836 246
Jharkhand
174 155 23 159 0 312 349 2 1000 1329 212
Karnataka
220 473 52 232 20 15 203 4 1000 9965 549
Kerala
504 208 4 377 5 13 382 11 1000 10245 1165
Madhya
Pradesh
121 233 56 631 3 45 31 1 1000 3671 429
Maharashtra
139 123 20 324 2 16 473 42 1000 13634 767
Manipur
274 265 173 119 0 1 227 216 1000 339 354
Meghalaya
606 233 154 124 0 114 354 22 1000 565 369
Mizoram
145 295 100 598 4 1 1 0 1000 112 205
Nagaland
660 152 44 44 3 509 235 12 1000 409 291
Orissa
282 189 3 587 1 82 133 4 1000 3727 307
Punjab
35 182 15 718 25 3 50 7 1000 743 86
Table 26(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separately for each State/UT
urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 46
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Rajasthan
161 266 6 479 21 6 221 1 1000 5024 323
Sikkim
541 42 0 114 0 186 658 0 1000 105 192
Tamil Nadu
233 350 38 348 0 32 223 9 1000 18835 1107
Tripura
852 37 12 679 3 1 190 78 1000 1295 755
Uttarakhand
94 327 0 469 0 141 0 63 1000 371 39
Uttar Pradesh
63 325 59 462 4 44 93 13 1000 4375 366
West Bengal
251 254 11 359 2 34 304 36 1000 11838 1240
A & N Islands
337 245 30 41 45 137 503 0 1000 89 62
Chandigarh
164 205 0 673 7 0 112 4 1000 341 85
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
138 399 0 601 0 0 0 0 1000 16 44
Daman & Diu
137 123 0 788 0 90 0 0 1000 15 28
Lakshadweep
403 22 2 325 0 198 453 0 1000 16 79
Puducherry
305 80 53 236 0 72 554 5 1000 625 153
180 272 30 385 8 40 248 17 1000 119889 12346
estd. no. of
aware
households
(’00)
32643 3575 46117 976 4769 29768 2041 119889 xxx xxx
sample no. of
aware
households
2602 487 5060 93 701 3037 366 12346 xxx xxx
Table 26(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separately for each State/UT
urban
all-I ndia
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 47
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
115 215 7 311 13 95 254 106 1000 23994 1258
Arunachal Pradesh
168 68 83 550 12 127 89 71 1000 397 325
Assam
179 102 251 231 3 28 376 9 1000 9851 1250
Bihar
86 208 455 152 5 7 167 6 1000 13223 604
Chhattisgarh
84 26 311 297 3 112 247 5 1000 3830 425
Delhi
181 95 21 848 9 27 0 0 1000 4939 587
Goa
332 82 0 558 19 109 232 0 1000 968 156
Gujarat
116 440 21 365 2 90 54 29 1000 12789 784
Haryana
20 501 0 342 5 41 108 2 1000 936 71
Himachal Pradesh
86 399 42 289 2 38 214 16 1000 1322 234
Jammu & Kashmir
273 31 265 340 0 27 277 61 1000 4001 649
Jharkhand
73 228 36 86 0 176 448 27 1000 3497 352
Karnataka
121 468 43 249 13 51 169 7 1000 14668 797
Kerala
404 182 12 370 2 38 371 25 1000 31011 2638
Madhya Pradesh
55 149 83 566 18 65 85 35 1000 6804 628
Maharashtra
97 154 31 331 1 11 441 30 1000 21414 1172
Manipur
197 226 250 147 0 21 237 119 1000 846 807
Meghalaya
312 196 144 93 0 233 281 53 1000 1510 813
Mizoram
136 166 86 745 2 0 1 1 1000 236 314
Nagaland
541 120 21 101 2 534 207 15 1000 1175 813
Orissa
117 154 33 479 0 128 177 28 1000 9689 850
Punjab
18 142 11 782 19 2 38 6 1000 982 107
Rajasthan
67 334 4 424 14 7 217 2 1000 7798 503
Sikkim
501 54 29 44 0 229 574 69 1000 652 770
Tamil Nadu
158 311 59 388 2 24 203 13 1000 27226 1651
Tripura
680 39 39 516 1 70 153 182 1000 5634 2643
Table 26(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separ tely for each State/UT
rural+urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 48
State/UT* proportion (per
thousand) of
households
who are aware
source of awareness households who are
aware
newspaper/magazine radio TV internet billboard
/hoarding
more than one
of these
others any/some/ all of
these
estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Uttarakhand
42 306 25 493 0 127 18 31 1000 745 67
Uttar Pradesh
23 275 116 390 3 35 158 24 1000 7236 583
West Bengal
167 164 29 324 1 48 333 102 1000 30534 2474
A & N Islands
310 126 12 79 16 93 671 3 1000 247 126
Chandigarh
146 203 0 676 7 0 110 4 1000 344 90
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
172 309 2 688 0 0 0 0 1000 82 93
Daman & Diu
78 420 0 510 0 70 0 0 1000 25 42
Lakshadweep
500 7 1 782 0 64 146 0 1000 51 98
Puducherry
253 70 45 204 0 61 615 4 1000 734 190
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
54941 18176 87309 1158 13298 64042 10465 249389 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
4494 1630 9287 109 1897 6303 1244 24964 xxx xxx
Table 26(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by source separ tely for each State/UT
rural+urban
all-I ndia
111 220 73 350 5 53 257 42 1000 249389 24964
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 49
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 142 113 185 525 36 1000 3650 204
Arunachal Pradesh 177 66 155 494 107 1000 325 255
Assam 30 393 317 167 92 1000 5288 759
Bihar 23 264 227 273 213 1000 5723 265
Chhattisgarh 1 64 353 534 49 1000 3698 245
Delhi 0 6 838 156 0 1000 454 30
Goa 0 39 363 327 271 1000 282 24
Gujarat 64 178 304 443 12 1000 4852 291
Haryana 31 258 572 109 30 1000 626 34
Himachal Pradesh 12 113 241 262 372 1000 1457 177
Jammu & Kashmir 5 246 158 530 61 1000 1520 227
Jharkhand 1 52 379 425 144 1000 2673 193
Karnataka 6 26 438 507 24 1000 3197 171
Kerala 29 127 277 469 98 1000 7539 506
Madhya Pradesh 57 167 441 192 143 1000 4662 322
Maharashtra 12 131 431 381 44 1000 7452 428
Manipur 70 234 574 45 77 1000 444 373
Meghalaya 8 111 593 235 53 1000 696 328
Mizoram 0 229 407 283 80 1000 130 114
Nagaland 13 182 507 104 194 1000 634 432
Orissa 29 151 621 162 38 1000 3611 387
Punjab 0 4 164 695 137 1000 749 54
Rajasthan 58 180 332 366 64 1000 2703 180
Sikkim 0 122 331 463 85 1000 222 278
Tamil Nadu 19 238 411 324 9 1000 4481 302
T able 27(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible India’ campaign by impact of the campaign for each State/U T/
all I ndia
rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 50
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Tripura 23 34 857 13 72 1000 3486 1543
Uttarakhand 0 4 369 438 188 1000 909 43
Uttar Pradesh 35 80 385 416 84 1000 8504 596
West Bengal 29 97 561 285 28 1000 12219 861
A & N Islands 117 11 349 388 135 1000 95 48
Chandigarh 730 0 270 0 0 1000 3 5
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 0 253 695 30 22 1000 34 27
Daman & Diu 0 50 785 164 0 1000 11 24
Lakshadweep 0 0 0 1000 0 1000 6 3
Puducherry 0 5 813 183 0 1000 135 39
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
2954 13227 37528 31555 7205 92469 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
303 1423 4668 2595 779 9768 xxx xxx
T able 27(I ): Per 1000 distribution of households who are aware of the ‘ I ncredible India’ campaign by impact of the campaign for each State/U T/
all I ndia
rural
all-I ndia 32 143 406 341 78 1000 92469 9768
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 51
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into
one or more
trips
planning to make a trip
in near future
willing to make a trip but
could not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 78 207 181 503 31 1000 4631 347
Arunachal
Pradesh 50 259 426 136 129 1000 104 119
Assam 55 258 364 231 93 1000 2039 438
Bihar 29 138 255 490 88 1000 2668 203
Chhattisgarh 17 100 546 319 19 1000 1733 227
Delhi 9 49 589 262 91 1000 8045 1007
Goa 0 211 470 244 75 1000 610 98
Gujarat 85 134 427 268 87 1000 9036 587
Haryana 4 119 191 534 152 1000 1684 142
Himachal Pradesh 18 218 204 407 154 1000 303 110
Jammu &
Kashmir 6 303 260 333 97 1000 521 179
Jharkhand 32 263 233 422 49 1000 2074 305
Karnataka 28 90 468 359 55 1000 9603 549
Kerala 21 102 377 458 42 1000 4303 512
Madhya Pradesh 77 208 404 173 138 1000 7122 852
Maharashtra 46 189 465 259 41 1000 20438 1463
Manipur 169 27 599 135 70 1000 276 301
Meghalaya 28 166 425 237 144 1000 538 358
Mizoram 31 261 393 219 96 1000 183 311
Nagaland 35 129 363 233 240 1000 378 277
T able 27( I ) : Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households who are awar of t he ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by impact of t he campaign f or each State/UT /
all I ndia
ur ban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 52
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into
one or more
trips
planning to make a trip
in near future
willing to make a trip but
could not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Orissa 28 264 424 203 82 1000 3859 307
Punjab 24 113 375 445 44 1000 1992 202
Rajasthan 88 140 328 407 37 1000 5118 340
Sikkim 1 449 270 228 51 1000 94 180
Tamil Nadu 50 243 341 363 4 1000 15373 934
Tripura 119 40 827 2 13 1000 1133 700
Uttarakhand 0 94 166 448 292 1000 844 90
Uttar Pradesh 35 193 358 319 95 1000 12264 961
West Bengal 44 164 429 302 61 1000 11156 1269
A & N Islands 10 57 594 308 31 1000 43 41
Chandigarh 11 248 417 117 207 1000 573 129
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 12 911 20 57 1000 40 60
Daman & Diu 0 35 684 193 88 1000 22 46
Lakshadweep 5 196 66 723 10 1000 9 57
Puducherry 13 113 788 27 59 1000 630 141
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
5871 21870 52602 40799 8297 129440 xxx xxx
sample no. of
aware households
720 2420 5756 3890 1056 13842 xxx xxx
T able 27( I ) : Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households who are awar of t he ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by impact of t he campaign f or each State/UT /
all I ndia
ur ban
all- I ndia 45 169 406 315 64 1000 129440 13842
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 53
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into
one or more
trips
planning to make a trip
in near future
willing to make a trip but
could not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 106 165 183 513 33 1000 8281 551
Arunachal
Pradesh 147 113 220 408 113 1000 429 374
Assam 37 356 330 185 92 1000 7326 1197
Bihar 25 224 236 342 174 1000 8390 468
Chhattisgarh 6 75 414 465 39 1000 5431 472
Delhi 9 46 602 257 86 1000 8500 1037
Goa 0 157 436 270 137 1000 892 122
Gujarat 78 149 384 329 60 1000 13888 878
Haryana 12 157 294 419 119 1000 2310 176
Himachal Pradesh 13 131 235 287 334 1000 1760 287
Jammu &
Kashmir 5 261 184 480 70 1000 2041 406
Jharkhand 14 144 315 424 102 1000 4747 498
Karnataka 22 74 461 396 47 1000 12799 720
Kerala 26 118 313 465 78 1000 11842 1018
Madhya Pradesh 69 192 419 181 140 1000 11784 1174
Maharashtra 37 174 456 292 42 1000 27890 1891
Manipur 108 155 584 79 74 1000 720 674
Meghalaya 17 135 520 236 93 1000 1234 686
Mizoram 18 248 399 246 89 1000 313 425
T able 27( I ) : Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households who are awar of t he ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by impact of t he campaign f or each State/UT /
all I ndia
r ur al+ur ban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 54
State/UT* impact households who are aware
resulted into
one or more
trips
planning to make a trip
in near future
willing to make a trip but
could not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no.
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Nagaland 22 162 453 152 211 1000 1012 709
Orissa 28 209 519 183 61 1000 7471 694
Punjab 17 83 317 513 69 1000 2742 256
Rajasthan 77 154 330 393 46 1000 7821 520
Sikkim 0 219 313 393 75 1000 316 458
Tamil Nadu 43 242 356 354 5 1000 19854 1236
Tripura 47 36 850 10 57 1000 4620 2243
Uttarakhand 0 47 271 443 238 1000 1753 133
Uttar Pradesh 35 147 369 359 91 1000 20768 1557
West Bengal 36 129 498 293 44 1000 23375 2130
A & N Islands 84 25 425 363 103 1000 137 89
Chandigarh 15 246 416 116 206 1000 576 134
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 122 812 25 41 1000 74 87
Daman & Diu 0 40 718 184 59 1000 32 70
Lakshadweep 3 120 41 831 6 1000 15 60
Puducherry 11 94 792 55 48 1000 765 180
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
8825 35097 90130 72354 15502 221908 xxx xxx
sample no. of
aware households
1023 3843 10424 6485 1835 23610 xxx xxx
T able 27( I ) : Per 1000 dist ri but ion of households who are awar of t he ‘ I ncredible I ndia’ campaign by impact of t he campaign f or each State/UT /
all I ndia
r ur al+ur ban
all- I ndia 40 158 406 326 70 1000 221908 23610
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 55
State/UT* impact households who are
aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 58 119 241 556 27 1000 12305 550
Arunachal Pradesh 19 62 115 402 403 1000 297 214
Assam 34 329 525 91 21 1000 7805 869
Bihar 9 143 431 200 217 1000 10800 436
Chhattisgarh 87 15 597 226 76 1000 2334 207
Delhi 0 1 999 0 0 1000 232 14
Goa 0 5 167 604 224 1000 373 35
Gujarat 111 162 448 255 24 1000 5075 298
Haryana 0 180 662 90 69 1000 523 25
Himachal Pradesh 45 59 252 288 356 1000 1138 153
Jammu & Kashmir 5 306 283 337 70 1000 3165 403
Jharkhand 1 117 449 416 18 1000 2168 140
Karnataka 2 48 563 361 26 1000 4703 248
Kerala 28 61 300 570 41 1000 20765 1473
Madhya Pradesh 61 216 403 158 161 1000 3134 199
Maharashtra 37 185 566 152 59 1000 7780 405
Manipur 123 154 518 129 76 1000 507 453
Meghalaya 35 212 217 419 117 1000 944 444
Mizoram 0 171 148 436 244 1000 124 109
Nagaland 21 145 525 106 203 1000 766 522
Orissa 26 101 565 211 97 1000 5962 543
Punjab 0 0 164 775 61 1000 239 21
Rajasthan 78 81 342 460 39 1000 2774 180
Sikkim 11 49 380 468 91 1000 546 578
Tamil Nadu 23 262 449 265 2 1000 8391 544
Tripura 181 52 696 3 69 1000 4340 1888
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
all-I ndia rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 56
State/UT* impact households who are
aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Uttarakhand 7 17 277 625 74 1000 374 28
Uttar Pradesh 81 93 306 434 86 1000 2861 217
West Bengal 48 82 592 258 19 1000 18696 1234
A & N Islands 89 15 645 93 158 1000 159 64
Chandigarh 730 0 270 0 0 1000 3 5
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli
37 0 682 0 281 1000 66 49
Daman & Diu 0 57 128 814 0 1000 10 14
Lakshadweep 0 0 0 1000 0 1000 34 19
Puducherry 2 4 691 298 6 1000 109 37
estd. no. of aware
households (’00)
5594 16960 57263 41632 8050 129500 xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households
779 1722 5913 3293 911 12618 xxx xxx
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are aware of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
all-I ndia rural
all-I ndia 43 131 442 321 62 1000 129500 12618
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 57
urban
State/UT* impact households who are
aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 111 135 212 522 20 1000 11689 708
Arunachal Pradesh 26 281 379 39 275 1000 100 111
Assam 92 285 370 146 108 1000 2047 381
Bihar 2 119 274 377 228 1000 2423 168
Chhattisgarh 63 213 412 277 35 1000 1496 218
Delhi 12 11 794 133 49 1000 4707 573
Goa 8 157 475 300 60 1000 596 121
Gujarat 138 133 323 171 234 1000 7714 486
Haryana 12 127 352 329 181 1000 413 46
Himachal Pradesh 15 102 242 470 171 1000 184 81
Jammu & Kashmir 50 191 322 273 164 1000 836 246
Jharkhand 75 423 126 338 37 1000 1329 212
Karnataka 32 92 458 368 50 1000 9965 549
Kerala 24 52 332 572 19 1000 10245 1165
Madhya Pradesh 97 309 349 167 78 1000 3671 429
Maharashtra 54 148 614 140 43 1000 13634 767
Manipur 130 105 534 165 66 1000 339 354
Meghalaya 63 290 224 273 150 1000 565 369
Mizoram 122 173 74 473 159 1000 112 205
Nagaland 61 137 339 278 184 1000 409 291
Orissa 43 212 530 147 67 1000 3727 307
Punjab 66 237 565 123 10 1000 743 86
Rajasthan 95 147 270 416 72 1000 5024 323
Sikkim 60 375 265 295 4 1000 105 192
Tamil Nadu 51 238 408 232 71 1000 18835 1107
Tripura 363 49 575 2 11 1000 1295 755
Uttarakhand 15 150 319 504 13 1000 371 39
Uttar Pradesh 53 244 345 270 89 1000 4375 366
West Bengal 66 119 533 255 28 1000 11838 1240
A & N Islands 138 227 488 106 41 1000 89 62
Chandigarh 8 138 448 162 245 1000 341 85
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 130 126 564 0 180 1000 16 44
Daman & Diu 20 39 877 64 0 1000 15 28
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are awar of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 58
urban
State/UT* impact households who are
aware
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Lakshadweep 9 248 225 513 5 1000 16 79
Puducherry 13 93 790 34 69 1000 625 153
estd. no. of aware
households (’00) 7803 18600 50632 34798 8056 119889
xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households 1096 2089 4973 3341 847 12346
xxx xxx
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are awar of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
all-I ndia 65 155 422 290 67 1000 119889 12346
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 59
rural+urban
State/UT* impact households who are
aware( with code’1’ in
item12.1,block 3)
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Andhra Pradesh 84 127 227 540 23 1000 23994 1258
Arunachal Pradesh 20 117 181 311 371 1000 397 325
Assam 46 320 493 102 39 1000 9851 1250
Bihar 8 138 403 232 219 1000 13223 604
Chhattisgarh 77 92 525 246 60 1000 3830 425
Delhi 11 11 804 127 47 1000 4939 587
Goa 5 99 356 417 123 1000 968 156
Gujarat 128 144 373 204 151 1000 12789 784
Haryana 5 156 525 196 118 1000 936 71
Himachal Pradesh 40 65 251 313 330 1000 1322 234
Jammu & Kashmir 14 282 291 324 89 1000 4001 649
Jharkhand 29 233 326 386 25 1000 3497 352
Karnataka 22 78 492 366 42 1000 14668 797
Kerala 27 58 310 571 34 1000 31011 2638
Madhya Pradesh 80 266 374 163 117 1000 6804 628
Maharashtra 48 162 597 144 49 1000 21414 1172
Manipur 126 134 524 143 72 1000 846 807
Meghalaya 46 241 220 364 129 1000 1510 813
Mizoram 58 172 113 454 204 1000 236 314
Nagaland 35 142 460 166 197 1000 1175 813
Orissa 33 144 552 186 85 1000 9689 850
Punjab 50 179 467 282 22 1000 982 107
Rajasthan 89 124 296 432 60 1000 7798 503
Sikkim 19 102 361 440 77 1000 652 770
Tamil Nadu 42 245 421 242 50 1000 27226 1651
Tripura 222 51 668 3 56 1000 5634 2643
Uttarakhand 11 83 298 564 43 1000 745 67
Uttar Pradesh 64 184 329 335 88 1000 7236 583
West Bengal 55 97 569 257 22 1000 30534 2474
A & N Islands 107 91 589 98 116 1000 247 126
Chandigarh 15 137 446 160 242 1000 344 90
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 55 25 659 0 261 1000 82 93
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are awar of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 60
rural+urban
State/UT* impact households who are
aware( with code’1’ in
item12.1,block 3)
resulted into one
or more trips
planning to make a trip in
near future
willing to make a trip but could
not make it due to other
constraints
no impact cannot say total estd. no. (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Daman & Diu 12 46 588 353 0 1000 25 42
Lakshadweep 3 80 72 843 2 1000 51 98
Puducherry 12 80 776 73 60 1000 734 190
estd. no. of aware
households (’00) 13397 35560 107895 76431 16106 249389
xxx xxx
sample no. of aware
households 1875 3811 10886 6634 1758 24964
xxx xxx
Table 27(O): Per 1000 dist ribution of households who are awar of other tourism promotional campaigns by impact of the campaign for each
all-I ndia 54 143 433 306 65 1000 249389 24964
Appendi x A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n Indi a, 2008-09
A- 61
all-India
quintile-class in MPCE
(%)
proportion (per
ten thousand)
of households
who rented out
some portion of
the house to
tourists for at
least one night
social group
no. of households, who
rented out some portion
of the house to tourists
for at least one night
during last 365 days
ST SC OBC others total
estd (’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
0-20 4 0 0 388 9612 10000 111 7
20-40 2 0 7769 2231 0 10000 57 3
40-60 9 78 9748 112 62 10000 275 9
60-80 5 238 0 9762 0 10000 176 6
80-100 6 592 3731 4051 1626 10000 216 25
all 5 229 4707 3344 1719 10000 834 50
no. of
households
who rented
out
estd(’00) 19 393 279 143 834 xxx xxx
sample
15 6 17 12 50 xxx xxx
0-20 0 1149 0 0 8851 10000 1 2
20-40 2 0 1540 4040 4420 10000 26 5
40-60 24 8 5 9758 229 10000 310 12
60-80 16 3 89 3433 6474 10000 225 20
80-100 28 1069 1116 277 7538 10000 503 24
all 16 509 585 3795 5112 10000 1065 63
no. of
households
who rented
out
estd(’00) 54 62 404 544 1065 xxx xxx
sample
6 5 21 31 63 xxx xxx
Table 28: Per 10000 distribution of households who rented out some portion of the house to tourists for at least one night
during last 365 daysby social group for each quintile lass of M PCE (%)
ru ral
urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 62
quintile-class in MPCE (%)
proportion
(per ten
thousand) of
households
who rented
out some
portion of
the house to
tourists for
at least one
night
no. of households,
who rented out
some portion of
the house to
tourists for at
least one night
during last 365
days
legislators,
senior
offic ials
and
managers
Profe-
ssionals
associate
professionals
clerks service
workers
and shop
&
market
sales
workers
skilled
agricultural
and fishery
workers
craft and
related
trades
workers
plant and
machine
operators
and
assemblers
elementary
occupations
n.r. total estd
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15)
0-20 4 0 0 0 0 0 1081 0 0 8212 706 10000 111 7
20-40
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1240 8760 0 10000 57 3
40-60
9 8276 103 60 0 0 1449 21 0 91 0 10000 275 9
60-80 5 0 0 0 87 0 9913 0 0 0 0 10000 176 6
80-100 6 0 44 482 1697 138 5184 239 0 2131 85 10000 216 25
no. of
households who
rented out
estd(’00) 227 4 12 38 3 338 6 7 190 10 834 xxx xxx
sample
1 4 3 7 2 20 4 1 6 2 50
xxx xxx
Table 29: Per 10000 distribution of households who rented out some portion of the house to tourists for at least one night during last 365 days by NCO(1-digit) for each quintile classof M PCE (%)
all-I ndia rural
NCO(1-digit)
all 5 2724 45 145 457 36 4048 69 85 2275 116 10000 834 50
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 63
all-India urban
quintile-class in MPCE (%)
proportion
(per ten
thousand) of
household
who rented
out some
portion of
the house to
tourists for
at least one
night
no. of households,
who rented out
some portion of
the house to
tourists for at
least one night
during last 365
days
legislators,
senior
offic ials
and
managers
Profe-
ssionals
associate
professionals
clerks service
workers
and shop
&
market
sales
workers
skilled
agricultural
and fishery
workers
craft and
related
trades
workers
plant and
machine
operators
and
assemblers
elementary
occupations
n.r. total estd
(’00)
sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15)
0-20 0 8851 0 0 0 0 0 0 1149 0 0 10000 1 2
20-40
2 0 0 0 4040 475 0 1540 3519 426 0 10000 26 5
40-60
24 0 10 64 35 175 141 0 7 0 9567 10000 310 12
60-80 16 437 2416 5129 1508 217 55 163 48 0 26 10000 225 20
80-100 28 1932 165 200 199 1 1 5 283 0 7214 10000 503 24
no. of
households who
rented out
estd(’00) 108 63 127 56 12 6 8 25 1 660 1065 xxx xxx
sample
10 6 5 9 6 3 4 5 1 14 63
xxx xxx
Table 29: Per 10000 distribution of households who rented out some portion of the house to tourists for at least one night during last 365 days by NCO(1-digit) for each quintile classof M PCE (% )
NCO(1-digit)
all 16 1015 591 1196 522 109 53 75 234 10 6195 10000 1065 63
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 64
all-India male rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1994 228 177 300 295 1000 280198 17373 362871 22691
5-9 1841 254 189 290 267 1000 339691 19982 455535 27707
10-14 1635 298 200 281 221 1000 344552 20345 491029 30137
15-19 1838 278 200 258 264 1000 284026 17816 393374 25717
20-24 2235 203 178 274 345 1000 247034 16381 310008 20972
25-29 2747 132 144 282 442 1000 246657 16164 284283 18909
30-34 3040 109 116 257 518 1000 125737 8463 141047 9530
35-39 2856 114 125 275 485 1000 236423 15173 266902 16918
40-44 2920 112 119 272 497 1000 199997 13122 225263 14643
45-49 2785 131 139 266 464 1000 175301 11692 201753 13333
50-54 2661 157 142 273 428 1000 133769 8792 158653 10320
55-59 2423 179 160 273 388 1000 100783 6661 122821 8126
60-64 2297 219 180 244 356 1000 85301 5576 109273 7096
65-69 2008 266 160 274 301 1000 60102 3890 81884 5232
70-74 1739 350 183 210 257 1000 34446 2161 52997 3275
75-79 1461 442 168 208 182 1000 11496 833 20613 1403
80-84 1601 456 121 187 236 1000 6444 386 11854 803
Above 84 1039 552 186 153 109 1000 3696 188 8247 446
all 2251 209 166 274 351 1000 3012542 190997 3810021 244105
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 797479 633120 1042732 1336691 3810021
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 53108 41657 62209 87131 244105
× × × ×
Table 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 65
all-India female rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1989 232 181 285 302 1000 262803 15815 342235 21046
5-9 1813 262 191 283 264 1000 293250 17291 397469 24223
10-14 1638 309 204 274 213 1000 279438 16844 404667 25621
15-19 1618 303 213 267 216 1000 232587 14870 333925 22426
20-24 2201 192 174 302 332 1000 260836 17122 322849 21690
25-29 2297 161 172 305 362 1000 251313 16111 299479 19647
30-34 2327 156 168 308 367 1000 137784 8730 163322 10510
35-39 2259 173 163 304 360 1000 222201 14096 268728 17176
40-44 2155 189 181 295 335 1000 173341 10922 213720 13796
45-49 2051 214 197 287 301 1000 148808 9588 189349 12477
50-54 1875 239 220 273 269 1000 113631 7151 149262 9644
55-59 1815 284 195 272 249 1000 86102 5678 120217 7950
60-64 1635 337 188 251 223 1000 76355 4604 115148 6999
65-69 1484 377 219 221 183 1000 45078 2999 72360 4736
70-74 1130 491 206 171 132 1000 23677 1567 46491 2970
75-79 1083 521 173 170 135 1000 9935 613 20747 1310
80-84 732 659 134 121 85 1000 4251 320 12481 839
Above 84 628 671 140 134 55 1000 2630 207 7993 568
all 1941 244 188 283 286 1000 2721763 170301 3598138 230756
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 876374 675744 1017111 1028909 3598138
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 60455 44043 60597 65661 230756
× × × ×
Table 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 66
all-India persons rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1992 230 179 293 298 1000 543001 33188 705125 43738
5-9 1828 258 190 287 265 1000 632940 37273 853004 51930
10-14 1636 303 202 278 217 1000 623990 37189 895697 55758
15-19 1737 290 206 263 242 1000 516613 32686 727299 48143
20-24 2218 197 176 288 338 1000 507870 33503 632856 42662
25-29 2516 147 158 294 401 1000 497970 32275 583762 38556
30-34 2657 134 144 285 437 1000 263521 17193 304370 20040
35-39 2557 144 144 290 422 1000 458624 29269 535630 34094
40-44 2548 150 149 284 418 1000 373337 24044 438983 28439
45-49 2430 171 167 277 385 1000 324109 21280 391102 25810
50-54 2280 197 180 273 351 1000 247400 15943 307915 19964
55-59 2122 231 177 272 320 1000 186885 12339 243038 16076
60-64 1957 280 184 248 288 1000 161655 10180 224421 14095
65-69 1762 318 187 249 246 1000 105180 6889 154244 9968
70-74 1454 416 194 192 198 1000 58124 3728 99488 6245
75-79 1271 482 170 189 159 1000 21431 1446 41360 2713
80-84 1155 561 128 153 159 1000 10694 706 24335 1642
Above 84 837 610 163 144 83 1000 6326 395 16241 1014
all 2100 226 177 278 319 1000 5734306 361298 7408178 474862
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 1673872 1308863 2059843 2365599 7408178
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 113564 85700 122806 152792 474862
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 67
all-India male urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1942 228 183 298 290 1000 87541 7181 113446 9402
5-9 1939 217 207 292 284 1000 102264 8576 130640 11286
10-14 1834 256 225 254 264 1000 113957 9388 153187 13284
15-19 1837 271 211 248 269 1000 109237 9742 149944 13550
20-24 2083 237 199 245 320 1000 112150 9948 146890 13048
25-29 2409 186 159 266 390 1000 105981 9333 130120 11389
30-34 2493 165 167 267 402 1000 57730 5399 69102 6203
35-39 2554 144 164 291 401 1000 92671 8466 108200 9671
40-44 2738 141 154 271 434 1000 78832 7445 91757 8489
45-49 2635 144 167 274 415 1000 72932 6888 85227 7897
50-54 2512 176 154 262 408 1000 50407 5148 61155 6012
55-59 2385 184 163 256 396 1000 38559 3857 47280 4567
60-64 2148 245 199 234 321 1000 29084 2880 38544 3596
65-69 1980 278 157 262 302 1000 20217 1981 28004 2584
70-74 1790 361 207 194 238 1000 12058 1070 18867 1550
75-79 1699 353 194 202 251 1000 6072 477 9381 783
80-84 1431 495 195 153 157 1000 2115 175 4186 354
Above 84 1021 552 107 241 101 1000 1274 116 2840 248
all 2201 210 185 265 340 1000 1127707 101113 1428380 127545
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 300674 264183 378015 485508 1428380
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 26432 23797 32496 44820 127545
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 68
all-India female urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1939 222 207 281 289 1000 76352 6396 98140 8503
5-9 1865 238 206 280 276 1000 86807 7279 113888 9862
10-14 1714 295 203 242 260 1000 91047 7915 129149 11304
15-19 1714 289 215 249 247 1000 87535 7922 123182 11517
20-24 1969 221 211 283 285 1000 99799 9059 128093 11982
25-29 2136 184 191 293 331 1000 95476 8832 117059 11062
30-34 2114 193 188 276 343 1000 53481 4785 66241 5906
35-39 2123 205 183 294 318 1000 84521 7699 106377 9522
40-44 2161 206 167 279 348 1000 68235 6570 85988 8136
45-49 2052 218 189 286 307 1000 56755 5483 72569 6970
50-54 1960 238 167 290 305 1000 43773 4091 57431 5296
55-59 1880 278 204 238 281 1000 34323 3219 47537 4298
60-64 1635 336 204 249 211 1000 26627 2512 40085 3517
65-69 1635 359 220 206 216 1000 16961 1587 26452 2431
70-74 1058 472 227 194 106 1000 9106 894 17259 1520
75-79 1177 500 192 184 124 1000 4302 402 8601 783
80-84 958 567 169 136 129 1000 1864 212 4304 488
Above 84 638 680 122 104 93 1000 1236 128 3868 357
all 1919 245 198 269 287 1000 973004 87865 1288791 117084
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 315786 255613 347285 370107 1288791
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 29219 23512 30632 33721 117084
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each age gr oup
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 69
all-India persons urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1941 225 194 291 290 1000 163893 13577 211586 17905
5-9 1904 227 207 286 281 1000 189071 15855 244528 21148
10-14 1779 274 215 249 262 1000 205004 17303 282336 24588
15-19 1781 280 213 249 259 1000 196772 17664 273126 25067
20-24 2030 229 205 263 304 1000 211949 19007 274983 25030
25-29 2280 185 174 279 362 1000 201457 18165 247179 22451
30-34 2308 178 177 271 373 1000 111212 10184 135343 12109
35-39 2340 174 173 293 360 1000 177192 16165 214577 19193
40-44 2458 173 160 275 392 1000 147067 14015 177745 16625
45-49 2367 178 178 279 365 1000 129686 12371 157796 14867
50-54 2245 206 161 276 358 1000 94181 9239 118587 11308
55-59 2132 231 183 247 338 1000 72882 7076 94817 8865
60-64 1887 291 202 242 265 1000 55711 5392 78629 7113
65-69 1812 317 187 235 260 1000 37178 3568 54456 5015
70-74 1440 414 217 194 175 1000 21164 1964 36126 3070
75-79 1450 423 193 193 190 1000 10374 879 17981 1566
80-84 1191 531 182 144 143 1000 3979 387 8490 842
Above 84 800 626 116 162 96 1000 2510 244 6709 605
all 2067 227 191 267 315 1000 2100711 188978 2717171 244629
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 616460 519796 725300 855615 2717171
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 55651 47309 63128 78541 244629
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 70
all-India male rural+urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1982 228 179 300 294 1000 367740 24554 476317 32093
5-9 1863 246 193 290 271 1000 441955 28558 586175 38993
10-14 1683 288 206 274 231 1000 458508 29733 644216 43421
15-19 1837 276 203 256 265 1000 393264 27558 543318 39267
20-24 2186 214 185 265 337 1000 359184 26329 456898 34020
25-29 2641 149 148 277 425 1000 352638 25497 414403 30298
30-34 2860 127 133 260 480 1000 183467 13862 210150 15733
35-39 2769 123 137 280 461 1000 329093 23639 375102 26589
40-44 2867 120 129 272 479 1000 278829 20567 317021 23132
45-49 2741 135 147 269 449 1000 248233 18580 286980 21230
50-54 2620 162 146 270 423 1000 184176 13940 219808 16332
55-59 2412 181 161 268 390 1000 139342 10518 170100 12693
60-64 2258 226 185 242 347 1000 114384 8456 147817 10692
65-69 2001 269 159 271 301 1000 80319 5871 109888 7816
70-74 1752 353 189 206 252 1000 46504 3231 71864 4825
75-79 1535 414 176 206 203 1000 17568 1310 29993 2186
80-84 1557 466 140 178 215 1000 8559 561 16040 1157
Above 84 1035 552 166 176 107 1000 4970 304 11087 694
all 2237 210 171 271 348 1000 4140249 292110 5238402 371650
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 1098153 897303 1420747 1822199 5238402
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 79540 65454 94705 131951 371650
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 71
all-India female rural+urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1978 230 187 284 299 1000 339155 22211 440375 29549
5-9 1824 257 195 282 267 1000 380056 24570 511357 34085
10-14 1656 306 203 266 224 1000 370485 24759 533817 36925
15-19 1644 300 214 263 224 1000 320122 22792 457107 33943
20-24 2135 200 185 297 318 1000 360635 26181 450942 33672
25-29 2252 167 177 302 353 1000 346789 24943 416538 30709
30-34 2266 167 174 299 360 1000 191266 13515 229563 16416
35-39 2220 182 168 301 348 1000 306723 21795 375105 26698
40-44 2157 194 177 291 339 1000 241576 17492 299708 21932
45-49 2052 215 195 287 303 1000 205563 15071 261918 19447
50-54 1898 238 205 278 279 1000 157404 11242 206693 14940
55-59 1834 282 197 262 258 1000 120425 8897 167754 12248
60-64 1635 337 193 251 220 1000 102982 7116 155233 10516
65-69 1525 372 219 217 192 1000 62039 4586 98811 7167
70-74 1110 486 212 178 125 1000 32784 2461 63750 4490
75-79 1110 515 179 174 132 1000 14237 1015 29348 2093
80-84 790 636 143 125 97 1000 6115 532 16785 1327
Above 84 631 674 134 124 68 1000 3866 335 11862 925
all 1935 244 191 279 286 1000 3694768 258166 4886928 347840
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 1192161 931356 1364396 1399016 4886928
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 89674 67555 91229 99382 347840
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 72
all-India persons rural+urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1980 229 183 292 296 1000 706895 46765 916711 61643
5-9 1845 251 194 286 269 1000 822011 53128 1097533 73078
10-14 1671 296 205 271 228 1000 828994 54492 1178033 80346
15-19 1749 287 208 259 247 1000 713386 50350 1000425 73210
20-24 2161 207 185 280 328 1000 719819 52510 907839 67692
25-29 2446 158 163 289 389 1000 699427 50440 830941 61007
30-34 2550 148 154 280 418 1000 374733 27377 439713 32149
35-39 2495 152 152 291 404 1000 635816 45434 750206 53287
40-44 2522 156 152 281 410 1000 520405 38059 616728 45064
45-49 2412 173 170 277 379 1000 453796 33651 548898 40677
50-54 2270 199 174 274 353 1000 341580 25182 426501 31272
55-59 2125 231 179 265 325 1000 259767 19415 337855 24941
60-64 1939 283 189 246 282 1000 217366 15572 303050 21208
65-69 1775 318 187 245 249 1000 142359 10457 208700 14983
70-74 1450 415 200 193 192 1000 79288 5692 135614 9315
75-79 1325 464 177 190 168 1000 31805 2325 59342 4279
80-84 1164 553 142 151 155 1000 14673 1093 32824 2484
Above 84 826 615 149 149 87 1000 8837 639 22949 1619
all 2091 226 181 275 318 1000 7835017 550276 10125349 719491
estd. no. of
persons (’00) 2290332 1828659 2785143 3221214 10125349
× × × ×
sample no. of
persons 169215 133009 185934 231333 719491
× × × ×
T able 30: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each age group
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 73
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2833 133 132 265 470 1000 702593 48229 810551 55818
12 2924 140 126 260 474 1000 17775 1344 20668 1537
21 2284 186 189 272 353 1000 246054 17017 302381 21197
31 2915 137 149 248 466 1000 143565 11920 166435 13755
41 2426 130 85 431 354 1000 5125 371 5893 488
51 2505 162 144 277 417 1000 621986 32827 742385 38423
11-51 2640 152 146 269 433 1000 1737097 111708 2048315 131218
81 1867 260 211 258 270 1000 31960 2778 43197 3786
91 1798 270 192 284 254 1000 795947 49246 1089622 70865
92 1667 280 243 233 244 1000 15906 777 22088 1253
93 1391 367 220 225 188 1000 6901 491 10906 784
94 1999 269 184 251 296 1000 28924 2061 39588 2709
95 1378 466 150 207 177 1000 18460 1119 34582 2111
97 1821 276 183 280 261 1000 376925 22779 520832 31259
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1797 276 189 280 255 1000 1243063 76473 1717618 108981
all (including n.r.) 2251 209 166 274 351 1000 3012542 190997 3810021 244105
estd. no. of persons (’00) 797479 633120 1042732 1336691 3810021 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 53108 41657 62209 87131 244105 × × × ×
T able 31: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of per sons by number of overnight t r ips for each br oad activity status
all-I ndia male rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 74
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2409 179 169 278 375 1000 77293 5614 94143 7396
12 2296 215 162 244 380 1000 3564 197 4539 253
21 2285 151 176 305 368 1000 275154 17038 324188 21049
31 2668 167 176 261 396 1000 28763 2387 34534 2915
41 2324 129 232 275 364 1000 3523 207 4047 282
51 2278 159 166 308 366 1000 288199 13855 342781 16330
11-51 2313 159 171 301 369 1000 676495 39298 804233 48225
81 2745 152 138 328 381 1000 8519 935 10051 1227
91 1753 283 195 277 244 1000 600652 37766 837708 55878
92 1891 261 184 279 276 1000 646017 43547 874581 58536
93 1949 220 206 297 277 1000 409699 25747 525566 33493
94 2158 235 189 261 314 1000 23599 1464 30860 1882
95 928 538 243 118 101 1000 9141 631 19786 1347
97 1746 298 188 261 253 1000 346643 20859 493699 30032
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1831 268 193 277 262 1000 2035752 130014 2782200 181168
all (including n.r.) 1941 244 188 283 286 1000 2721763 170301 3598138 230756
estd. no. of persons (’00) 876374 675744 1017111 1028909 3598138 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 60455 44043 60597 65661 230756 × × × ×
T able 31: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of per sons by number of overni ht t r ips f or each br oad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia female rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 75
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2789 138 136 266 460 1000 779886 53843 904695 63214
12 2811 154 132 257 457 1000 21338 1541 25208 1790
21 2284 168 182 289 360 1000 521208 34055 626569 42246
31 2873 143 153 250 454 1000 172327 14307 200969 16670
41 2384 130 145 367 358 1000 8648 578 9940 770
51 2434 161 151 287 401 1000 910185 46682 1085166 54753
11-51 2548 154 153 278 415 1000 2413592 151006 2852548 179443
81 2032 240 198 271 291 1000 40479 3713 53248 5013
91 1778 275 193 281 250 1000 1396600 87012 1927330 126743
92 1886 262 186 277 275 1000 661923 44324 896669 59789
93 1937 223 206 296 275 1000 416600 26238 536472 34277
94 2069 254 186 255 304 1000 52523 3525 70448 4591
95 1214 492 183 175 150 1000 27601 1750 54368 3458
97 1785 287 185 271 257 1000 723568 43638 1014530 61291
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1818 271 191 278 259 1000 3278815 206487 4499818 290149
all (including n.r.) 2100 226 177 278 319 1000 5734306 361298 7408178 474862
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1673872 1308863 2059843 2365599 7408178 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 113564 85700 122806 152792 474862 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
all-I ndia persons rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 76
all-India male urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2550 164 157 262 417 1000 206428 20000 246798 23454
12 2552 137 290 222 351 1000 13194 1274 15296 1478
21 2036 211 195 287 307 1000 45788 4549 58046 5825
31 2519 162 174 266 398 1000 263192 23847 314135 27578
41 1590 383 144 267 205 1000 1520 193 2465 260
51 2185 191 182 285 342 1000 96097 8165 118784 9914
11-51 2437 171 174 268 387 1000 626219 58028 755525 68509
81 1702 327 200 213 260 1000 21085 2241 31346 3134
91 1996 236 205 260 299 1000 316495 27241 414262 37265
92 1551 414 198 186 202 1000 6046 550 10319 893
93 1825 149 181 468 202 1000 1262 86 1483 137
94 2301 230 195 234 340 1000 36138 3172 46957 3992
95 1166 525 149 162 164 1000 6283 560 13221 1023
97 1801 264 184 291 261 1000 114151 9227 155176 12560
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1947 251 198 263 288 1000 480376 40836 641417 55870
all (including n.r.) 2201 210 185 265 340 1000 1127707 101113 1428380 127545
estd. no. of persons (’00) 300674 264183 378015 485508 1428380 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 26432 23797 32496 44820 127545 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 77
all-India female urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2266 195 174 254 377 1000 21708 2104 26965 2850
12 3061 85 68 390 457 1000 449 79 491 94
21 2226 228 140 294 338 1000 20541 1821 26599 2504
31 2338 193 197 254 356 1000 50829 4353 62967 5511
41 1104 376 423 146 55 1000 123 24 197 35
51 1946 234 187 271 308 1000 22897 1906 29895 2335
11-51 2226 208 180 265 347 1000 116548 10287 147114 13329
81 1954 266 163 320 251 1000 4993 732 6798 1072
91 1844 256 212 254 278 1000 250677 22055 336970 30938
92 1926 239 197 274 290 1000 424595 38749 557890 49828
93 2024 203 188 318 291 1000 65077 6413 81630 8120
94 1995 305 160 226 310 1000 11053 1158 15904 1563
95 818 574 190 139 96 1000 2742 297 6443 607
97 1721 285 201 273 241 1000 97233 8161 135914 11598
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1879 250 201 270 280 1000 851377 76833 1134752 102654
all (including n.r.) 1919 245 198 269 287 1000 973004 87865 1288791 117084
estd. no. of persons (’00) 315786 255613 347285 370107 1288791 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 29219 23512 30632 33721 117084 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 78
all-India persons urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2522 167 159 261 413 1000 228137 22104 273763 26304
12 2568 136 283 227 354 1000 13643 1353 15787 1572
21 2096 216 178 289 317 1000 66329 6370 84645 8329
31 2489 167 177 264 391 1000 314021 28200 377102 33089
41 1554 383 165 258 194 1000 1643 217 2662 295
51 2137 200 183 282 335 1000 118994 10071 148679 12249
11-51 2403 177 175 268 380 1000 742767 68315 902639 81838
81 1747 316 193 232 258 1000 26078 2973 38144 4206
91 1928 245 208 257 290 1000 567172 49296 751232 68203
92 1919 242 197 272 288 1000 430640 39299 568209 50721
93 2021 202 188 321 289 1000 66340 6499 83113 8257
94 2224 249 186 232 333 1000 47191 4330 62861 5555
95 1052 541 163 155 142 1000 9025 857 19664 1630
97 1764 274 192 283 252 1000 211384 17388 291090 24158
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1904 250 200 267 283 1000 1331753 117669 1776169 158524
all (including n.r.) 2067 227 191 267 315 1000 2100711 188978 2717171 244629
estd. no. of persons (’00) 616460 519796 725300 855615 2717171 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 55651 47309 63128 78541 244629 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 79
all-India male rural+urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2767 140 138 264 458 1000 909021 68229 1057350 79272
12 2766 139 196 244 422 1000 30969 2618 35965 3015
21 2244 190 190 274 345 1000 291842 21566 360427 27022
31 2656 154 165 260 422 1000 406756 35767 480570 41333
41 2179 205 102 382 310 1000 6645 564 8359 748
51 2461 166 150 278 406 1000 718083 40992 861169 48337
11-51 2585 157 153 269 420 1000 2363316 169736 2803840 199727
81 1797 288 207 239 266 1000 53045 5019 74543 6920
91 1853 260 196 277 267 1000 1112442 76487 1503884 108130
92 1630 323 229 218 231 1000 21952 1327 32406 2146
93 1443 341 216 254 189 1000 8163 577 12389 921
94 2163 248 190 242 320 1000 65062 5233 86545 6701
95 1319 482 149 194 174 1000 24743 1679 47803 3134
97 1816 274 183 283 261 1000 491076 32006 676007 43819
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1838 269 191 275 264 1000 1723439 117309 2359035 164851
all (including n.r.) 2237 210 171 271 348 1000 4140249 292110 5238402 371650
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1098153 897303 1420747 1822199 5238402 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 79540 65454 94705 131951 371650 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 80
all-India female rural+urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2377 183 170 272 375 1000 99001 7718 121109 10246
12 2370 202 153 258 387 1000 4013 276 5030 347
21 2280 157 173 304 365 1000 295695 18859 350787 23553
31 2455 184 189 257 370 1000 79592 6740 97501 8426
41 2267 141 241 269 350 1000 3646 231 4244 317
51 2252 165 168 305 361 1000 311096 15761 372676 18665
11-51 2300 166 173 295 366 1000 793043 49585 951347 61554
81 2426 198 148 325 329 1000 13513 1667 16849 2299
91 1779 275 200 271 254 1000 851329 59821 1174678 86816
92 1905 253 189 277 281 1000 1070612 82296 1432472 108364
93 1959 218 203 300 278 1000 474777 32160 607196 41613
94 2103 259 179 249 313 1000 34652 2622 46764 3445
95 901 547 230 123 100 1000 11883 928 26229 1954
97 1741 295 191 264 251 1000 443876 29020 629613 41630
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1845 263 195 275 267 1000 2887129 206847 3916952 283822
all (including n.r.) 1935 244 191 279 286 1000 3694768 258166 4886928 347840
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1192161 931356 1364396 1399016 4886928 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 89674 67555 91229 99382 347840 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 81
all-India persons rural+urban
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 2727 145 141 265 449 1000 1008022 75947 1178458 89518
12 2717 147 190 245 418 1000 34981 2894 40995 3362
21 2262 174 182 289 355 1000 587537 40425 711214 50575
31 2622 159 169 259 413 1000 486348 42507 578072 49759
41 2209 183 149 344 324 1000 10291 795 12603 1065
51 2398 166 155 286 393 1000 1029179 56753 1233845 67002
11-51 2513 159 158 276 407 1000 3156359 219321 3755186 261281
81 1913 272 196 255 278 1000 66557 6686 91392 9219
91 1820 267 198 274 261 1000 1963771 136308 2678562 194946
92 1899 254 190 276 280 1000 1092564 83623 1464878 110510
93 1949 221 203 299 277 1000 482940 32737 619586 42534
94 2142 252 186 244 318 1000 99714 7855 133309 10146
95 1171 505 178 169 148 1000 36626 2607 74032 5088
97 1780 284 187 273 256 1000 934952 61026 1305620 85449
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 1842 265 194 275 266 1000 4610568 324156 6275987 448673
all (including n.r.) 2091 226 181 275 318 1000 7835017 550276 10125349 719491
estd. no. of persons (’00) 2290332 1828659 2785143 3221214 10125349 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 169215 133009 185934 231333 719491 × × × ×
Table 31: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each broad activity status
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 82
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2179 217 164 279 340 1000 892521 49739 1139929 63477
literate without any schooling
2397 171 137 271 421 1000 15569 1012 18780 1256
literate without formal schooling
2310 190 168 267 375 1000 25563 1434 31541 1864
below primary
1973 238 183 286 293 1000 556267 34311 730045 45743
primary
2187 214 175 273 338 1000 497773 31415 632997 40840
middle
2319 205 163 259 373 1000 495269 33219 623169 42384
secondary
2525 178 154 272 396 1000 280216 19835 340712 24621
higher secondary
2701 165 143 268 424 1000 139789 10755 167372 13202
diploma courses
2879 172 144 235 449 1000 18990 1453 22936 1733
graduate
3100 116 142 244 499 1000 74752 6441 84535 7425
post-graduate and above
3596 92 66 246 596 1000 15742 1357 17335 1509
n.r.
536 864 14 45 78 1000 91 26 672 51
all 2251 209 166 274 351 1000 3012542 190997 3810021 244105
estd. no. of persons (’00) 797479 633120 1042732 1336691 3810021 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 53108 41657 62209 87131 244105 × × × ×
Table 32 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia male rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 83
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1883 249 191 285 275 1000 1268907 72122 1689685 96521
literate without any schooling
1755 263 196 293 248 1000 11822 717 16030 1062
literate without formal schooling
2185 228 184 223 364 1000 20097 1197 26033 1581
below primary
1881 247 193 283 277 1000 475847 29369 631538 40468
primary
1942 243 190 287 280 1000 377645 25126 498693 34397
middle
2016 238 180 283 299 1000 313561 21945 411320 30336
secondary
2158 221 167 273 339 1000 149095 11245 191468 15216
higher secondary
2253 230 155 265 350 1000 65085 5333 84538 7028
diploma courses
2287 232 162 266 339 1000 7281 580 9485 757
graduate
2645 184 183 233 399 1000 26014 2174 31896 2787
post-graduate and above
2786 117 144 302 436 1000 6219 469 7046 550
n.r.
3481 533 86 88 293 1000 189 24 405 53
all 1941 244 188 283 286 1000 2721763 170301 3598138 230756
estd. no. of persons (’00) 876374 675744 1017111 1028909 3598138 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 60455 44043 60597 65661 230756 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia female rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 84
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2002 236 180 283 301 1000 2161428 121861 2829614 159998
literate without any schooling
2102 213 164 281 342 1000 27391 1729 34810 2318
literate without formal schooling
2253 207 176 247 370 1000 45660 2631 57574 3445
below primary
1930 242 188 285 286 1000 1032114 63680 1361583 86211
primary
2079 226 182 279 313 1000 875418 56541 1131690 75237
middle
2198 218 170 269 343 1000 808830 55164 1034488 72720
secondary
2393 193 159 272 376 1000 429311 31080 532179 39837
higher secondary
2551 187 147 267 399 1000 204874 16088 251910 20230
diploma courses
2706 190 149 244 417 1000 26271 2033 32422 2490
graduate
2975 135 153 241 471 1000 100766 8615 116431 10212
post-graduate and above
3362 99 89 262 550 1000 21961 1826 24381 2059
n.r.
1615 744 40 60 156 1000 281 50 1096 105
all 2100 226 177 278 319 1000 5734306 361298 7408178 474862
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1673872 1308863 2059843 2365599 7408178 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 113564 85700 122806 152792 474862 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia persons rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 85
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1920 242 186 285 287 1000 180286 14460 237697 18807
literate without any schooling
1869 292 173 319 216 1000 3232 333 4565 440
literate without formal schooling
2212 233 183 244 340 1000 7921 605 10325 822
below primary
2002 230 191 277 302 1000 150457 13216 195370 17273
primary
2010 227 203 266 304 1000 153234 12991 198147 16946
middle
2124 229 179 261 331 1000 184671 16789 239625 21728
secondary
2228 206 200 252 342 1000 151041 14383 190183 17912
higher secondary
2430 183 178 253 387 1000 111185 10591 136017 13041
diploma courses
2648 148 163 233 455 1000 25687 2221 30153 2611
graduate
2675 150 168 261 421 1000 123155 11985 144909 14028
post-graduate and above
3283 108 133 234 525 1000 36769 3525 41227 3910
n.r.
1745 572 33 189 205 1000 69 14 162 27
all 2201 210 185 265 340 1000 1127707 101113 1428380 127545
estd. no. of persons (’00) 300674 264183 378015 485508 1428380 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 26432 23797 32496 44820 127545 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia male urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 86
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1780 273 202 267 259 1000 247717 20770 340516 28018
literate without any schooling
1657 354 176 240 230 1000 2817 363 4358 535
literate without formal schooling
1845 264 286 168 282 1000 6098 560 8287 759
below primary
1855 250 193 276 281 1000 137917 11929 184011 16239
primary
1820 263 201 266 270 1000 128938 11852 174980 15967
middle
1968 252 175 263 310 1000 140432 13293 187868 18233
secondary
2033 212 207 281 301 1000 119792 10890 151926 14476
higher secondary
2011 223 209 264 304 1000 78503 7559 101058 9856
diploma courses
2154 238 179 267 317 1000 9079 936 11911 1162
graduate
2197 186 209 276 329 1000 76462 7284 93962 8977
post-graduate and above
2384 151 195 300 353 1000 25167 2416 29659 2840
n.r.
733 679 38 251 32 1000 82 13 255 22
all 1919 245 198 269 287 1000 973004 87865 1288791 117084
estd. no. of persons (’00) 315786 255613 347285 370107 1288791 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 29219 23512 30632 33721 117084 × × × ×
Table 32 : Per 1000 distr ibution of personsby number of overnight trips for each level of education
all-I ndia female urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 87
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1837 260 195 274 270 1000 428003 35230 578213 46825
literate without any schooling
1765 322 175 281 223 1000 6049 696 8923 975
literate without formal schooling
2049 247 229 210 314 1000 14019 1165 18612 1581
below primary
1931 240 192 277 292 1000 288374 25145 379380 33512
primary
1921 244 202 266 288 1000 282173 24843 373127 32913
middle
2055 240 177 262 322 1000 325103 30082 427493 39961
secondary
2141 208 203 265 324 1000 270833 25273 342109 32388
higher secondary
2251 200 191 258 351 1000 189687 18150 237074 22897
diploma courses
2508 174 168 243 416 1000 34765 3157 42064 3773
graduate
2487 164 184 267 385 1000 199617 19269 238872 23005
post-graduate and above
2907 126 159 261 453 1000 61937 5941 70887 6750
n.r.
1127 637 36 227 100 1000 151 27 417 49
all 2067 227 191 267 315 1000 2100711 188978 2717171 244629
estd. no. of persons (’00) 616460 519796 725300 855615 2717171 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 55651 47309 63128 78541 244629 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia persons urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 88
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2134 221 167 280 331 1000 1072807 64199 1377626 82284
literate without any schooling
2294 195 144 280 381 1000 18801 1345 23344 1696
literate without formal schooling
2286 200 172 261 367 1000 33484 2039 41866 2686
below primary
1980 236 184 284 295 1000 706723 47527 925414 63016
primary
2145 217 182 271 330 1000 651008 44406 831144 57786
middle
2264 212 167 260 361 1000 679940 50008 862794 64112
secondary
2418 188 171 265 377 1000 431257 34218 530895 42533
higher secondary
2579 173 159 261 407 1000 250974 21346 303388 26243
diploma courses
2748 158 155 234 453 1000 44676 3674 53090 4344
graduate
2831 137 158 255 450 1000 197907 18426 229444 21453
post-graduate and above
3376 103 113 237 546 1000 52511 4882 58563 5419
n.r.
771 807 18 73 102 1000 161 40 834 78
all 2237 210 171 271 348 1000 4140249 292110 5238402 371650
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1098153 897303 1420747 1822199 5238402 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 79540 65454 94705 131951 371650 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of over night tr ips for each l of education
all-I ndia male rural+urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 89
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1866 253 193 282 272 1000 1516624 92892 2030201 124539
literate without any schooling
1734 282 192 282 244 1000 14639 1080 20388 1597
literate without formal schooling
2103 237 209 210 344 1000 26195 1757 34320 2340
below primary
1875 247 193 282 278 1000 613764 41298 815549 56707
primary
1910 248 193 281 278 1000 506583 36978 673673 50364
middle
2001 242 178 277 303 1000 453992 35238 599187 48569
secondary
2103 217 185 276 322 1000 268887 22135 343394 29692
higher secondary
2121 226 185 264 325 1000 143588 12892 185596 16884
diploma courses
2213 235 172 267 326 1000 16360 1516 21396 1919
graduate
2311 186 203 265 347 1000 102477 9458 125859 11764
post-graduate and above
2461 145 185 300 369 1000 31386 2885 36705 3390
n.r.
2420 589 68 151 193 1000 271 37 660 75
all 1935 244 191 279 286 1000 3694768 258166 4886928 347840
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1192161 931356 1364396 1399016 4886928 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 89674 67555 91229 99382 347840 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia female rural+ urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 90
educational level
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1974 240 183 281 296 1000 2589431 157091 3407827 206823
literate without any schooling
2033 235 166 281 317 1000 33440 2425 43732 3293
literate without formal schooling
2203 217 189 238 357 1000 59679 3796 76186 5026
below primary
1930 242 189 283 287 1000 1320488 88825 1740963 119723
primary
2040 231 187 276 307 1000 1157591 81384 1504817 108150
middle
2156 224 172 267 337 1000 1133933 85246 1461981 112681
secondary
2295 199 176 269 355 1000 700144 56353 874289 72225
higher secondary
2406 193 168 262 376 1000 394562 34238 488984 43127
diploma courses
2594 181 160 243 416 1000 61036 5190 74486 6263
graduate
2647 155 174 258 413 1000 300383 27884 355303 33217
post-graduate and above
3023 119 141 262 478 1000 83897 7767 95268 8809
n.r.
1481 715 39 106 140 1000 432 77 1512 154
all 2091 226 181 275 318 1000 7835017 550276 10125349 719491
estd. no. of persons (’00) 2290332 1828659 2785143 3221214 10125349 × × × ×
sample no. of persons 169215 133009 185934 231333 719491 × × × ×
T able 32 : Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each level of education
all-I ndia persons rural+urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 91
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2866 135 130 277 458 1000 44416 3387 51359 3853
professionals (2)
3167 128 156 285 431 1000 40335 3822 46245 4399
associate professionals (3)
3303 103 142 220 535 1000 30458 2907 33969 3290
clerks (4)
2840 123 125 237 515 1000 16993 1539 19372 1762
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2554 173 165 254 407 1000 94804 6684 114692 7875
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2684 148 145 263 444 1000 748735 50803 879147 60388
craft and related trades workers (7)
2581 162 147 262 429 1000 120455 7998 143799 9345
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2785 166 119 245 470 1000 52831 3534 63320 4093
elementary occupations (9)
2509 155 147 286 412 1000 584560 30739 691979 35764
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2641 152 146 269 433 1000 1733586 111413 2043881 130769
n.r.
1799 276 190 279 256 1000 1278956 79584 1766140 113336
estd. no. of persons (’00)
797479 633120 1042732 1336691 3810021
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
53108 41657 62209 87131 244105
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia male rural
all
2251 209 166 274 351 1000 3012542 190997 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 92
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2097 227 219 223 331 1000 7896 599 10216 727
professionals (2)
2730 140 165 285 410 1000 7586 698 8822 843
associate professionals (3)
2809 133 191 250 425 1000 12192 1002 14068 1186
clerks (4)
3124 191 174 208 426 1000 2012 190 2487 260
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2164 216 197 225 361 1000 14801 1076 18885 1406
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2314 153 173 304 370 1000 318907 20106 376526 25059
craft and related trades workers (7)
2281 183 173 284 361 1000 33292 1844 40741 2389
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
1746 306 203 264 228 1000 2637 207 3798 289
elementary occupations (9)
2300 157 165 310 369 1000 276633 13505 328067 15949
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2314 159 171 301 369 1000 675955 39227 803611 48108
n.r.
1834 268 193 277 262 1000 2045808 131074 2794526 182648
estd. no. of persons (’00)
876374 675744 1017111 1028909 3598138
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
60455 44043 60597 65661 230756
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each ccupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia female rural
all
1941 244 188 283 286 1000 2721763 170301 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 93
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2738 150 145 268 437 1000 52312 3986 61575 4580
professionals (2)
3097 130 158 285 428 1000 47921 4520 55067 5242
associate professionals (3)
3158 112 156 229 503 1000 42650 3909 48036 4476
clerks (4)
2872 131 131 234 504 1000 19005 1729 21860 2022
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2499 179 170 250 401 1000 109605 7760 133577 9281
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2573 150 153 275 422 1000 1067641 70909 1255674 85447
craft and related trades workers (7)
2515 167 153 267 414 1000 153747 9842 184541 11734
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2726 174 124 246 456 1000 55469 3741 67118 4382
elementary occupations (9)
2442 156 153 294 398 1000 861192 44244 1020045 51713
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2549 154 153 278 415 1000 2409542 150640 2847492 178877
n.r.
1820 271 192 278 260 1000 3324764 210658 4560685 295985
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1673872 1308863 2059843 2365599 7408178
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
113564 85700 122806 152792 474862
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia persons rural
all
2100 226 177 278 319 1000 5734306 361298 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 94
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2596 161 159 261 419 1000 84427 8020 100592 9307
professionals (2)
2717 143 182 238 438 1000 58246 6270 67982 7140
associate professionals (3)
2754 130 163 290 416 1000 35601 3729 40933 4304
clerks (4)
2548 145 188 269 398 1000 36396 3448 42574 4016
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2389 189 175 248 388 1000 104799 10072 129169 12094
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2632 177 153 274 396 1000 26198 2867 31835 3662
craft and related trades workers (7)
2273 190 163 289 358 1000 114204 9163 141010 10879
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2563 153 152 268 428 1000 54942 4882 64897 5642
elementary occupations (9)
2161 183 203 280 334 1000 110948 9474 135874 11301
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2437 171 173 269 387 1000 625761 57925 754867 68345
n.r.
1935 255 198 260 287 1000 501946 43188 673514 59200
estd. no. of persons (’00)
300674 264183 378015 485508 1428380
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
26432 23797 32496 44820 127545
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each occupation (NCO)
all-I ndia male urban
all
2201 210 185 265 340 1000 1127707 101113 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 95
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2257 247 152 213 388 1000 8760 836 11630 1053
professionals (2)
2537 158 219 243 380 1000 12142 1301 14428 1589
associate professionals (3)
2337 167 176 289 368 1000 12986 1210 15585 1514
clerks (4)
2528 169 207 288 336 1000 6225 572 7494 801
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2067 271 173 254 302 1000 12212 1202 16744 1694
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2469 180 141 298 382 1000 8219 735 10019 1061
craft and related trades workers (7)
2222 179 179 295 346 1000 19870 1532 24214 2034
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2276 148 197 221 434 1000 2549 167 2992 210
elementary occupations (9)
2029 237 182 259 323 1000 33264 2707 43600 3324
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2226 208 180 266 347 1000 116226 10262 146705 13280
n.r.
1880 250 201 270 280 1000 856778 77603 1142086 103804
estd. no. of persons (’00)
315786 255613 347285 370107 1288791
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
29219 23512 30632 33721 117084
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia female urban
all
1919 245 198 269 287 1000 973004 87865 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 96
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2561 170 158 256 416 1000 93186 8856 112222 10360
professionals (2)
2686 146 188 239 427 1000 70388 7571 82409 8729
associate professionals (3)
2639 140 167 290 403 1000 48587 4939 56518 5818
clerks (4)
2545 149 190 272 389 1000 42621 4020 50068 4817
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2352 198 175 249 378 1000 117011 11274 145913 13788
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2593 178 150 280 392 1000 34417 3602 41854 4723
craft and related trades workers (7)
2265 189 166 290 356 1000 134073 10695 165224 12913
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2550 153 154 265 428 1000 57491 5049 67889 5852
elementary occupations (9)
2129 196 197 275 331 1000 144212 12181 179474 14625
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2403 177 174 268 380 1000 741987 68187 901572 81625
n.r.
1900 252 200 266 282 1000 1358724 120791 1815600 163004
estd. no. of persons (’00)
616460 519796 725300 855615 2717171
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
55651 47309 63128 78541 244629
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips f r each occupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia persons urban
all
2067 227 191 267 315 1000 2100711 188978 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 97
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2687 152 149 266 432 1000 128842 11407 151951 13160
professionals (2)
2899 137 171 257 435 1000 98581 10092 114226 11539
associate professionals (3)
3003 118 154 258 470 1000 66059 6636 74901 7594
clerks (4)
2639 138 168 259 435 1000 53389 4987 61946 5778
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2466 181 171 251 397 1000 199603 16756 243861 19969
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2683 149 145 263 443 1000 774933 53670 910983 64050
craft and related trades workers (7)
2428 176 155 275 393 1000 234659 17161 284809 20224
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2673 159 136 256 449 1000 107774 8416 128217 9735
elementary occupations (9)
2452 160 156 285 399 1000 695507 40213 827853 47065
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2586 157 153 269 421 1000 2359347 169338 2798748 199114
n.r.
1836 270 192 274 264 1000 1780902 122772 2439654 172536
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1098153 897303 1420747 1822199 5238402
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
79540 65454 94705 131951 371650
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupation (NCO)
all-I ndia male rural+urban
all
2237 210 171 271 348 1000 4140249 292110 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 98
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2182 238 184 218 361 1000 16656 1435 21846 1780
professionals (2)
2610 151 198 259 391 1000 19728 1999 23250 2432
associate professionals (3)
2561 151 183 271 395 1000 25178 2212 29653 2700
clerks (4)
2676 175 199 268 359 1000 8237 762 9981 1061
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2118 242 186 239 333 1000 27013 2278 35629 3100
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2318 154 172 304 370 1000 327125 20841 386545 26120
craft and related trades workers (7)
2259 182 175 288 356 1000 53161 3376 64956 4423
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
1979 236 200 245 319 1000 5186 374 6790 499
elementary occupations (9)
2268 166 167 304 363 1000 309897 16212 371666 19273
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2300 166 172 295 366 1000 792181 49489 950316 61388
n.r.
1847 263 195 275 267 1000 2902586 208677 3936612 286452
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1192161 931356 1364396 1399016 4886928
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
89674 67555 91229 99382 347840
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupat ion ( NCO)
all-I ndia female rural+urban
all
1935 244 191 279 286 1000 3694768 258166 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 99
NCO-1digit
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and
managers(1)
2623 163 154 260 424 1000 145498 12842 173797 14940
professionals (2)
2850 139 176 257 428 1000 118309 12091 137476 13971
associate professionals (3)
2878 127 162 262 449 1000 91237 8848 104554 10294
clerks (4)
2644 143 172 260 424 1000 61625 5749 71928 6839
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2422 189 172 249 389 1000 226616 19034 279490 23069
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers(6)
2574 151 153 275 421 1000 1102058 74511 1297528 90170
craft and related trades workers (7)
2397 177 159 278 386 1000 287821 20537 349765 24647
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2638 163 139 256 442 1000 112960 8790 135007 10234
elementary occupations (9)
2395 162 159 291 388 1000 1005405 56425 1199519 66338
One digit NCO (1) –(9)
2514 159 158 276 407 1000 3151528 218827 3749064 260502
n.r.
1843 265 194 275 266 1000 4683488 331449 6376285 458989
estd. no. of persons (’00)
2290332 1828659 2785143 3221214 10125349
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
169215 133009 185934 231333 719491
× × × ×
T able 33: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each occupat ion ( NCO)
all- I ndia persons r ural+ur ban
all
2091 226 181 275 318 1000 7835017 550276 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 100
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2601 152 147 272 429 1000 1172047 71584 1382649 84611
fishing
2194 354 113 237 296 1000 6551 475 10147 657
mining and quarrying
2729 174 125 260 442 1000 12291 803 14871 954
manufacturing
2601 155 153 269 423 1000 115226 7133 136337 8350
electricity, gas and water supply
3614 98 78 169 655 1000 4139 385 4588 422
construction
2778 130 129 273 468 1000 139323 9167 160121 10517
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2479 169 165 272 393 1000 110291 8020 132711 9406
hotels and restaurants
2654 140 150 235 475 1000 15372 943 17873 1131
transport, storage and communications
2739 145 140 279 437 1000 66117 4359 77309 5014
financial intermediation
3533 133 85 228 553 1000 5460 414 6298 461
real estate, renting and business activities
3077 223 91 157 529 1000 7154 465 9209 571
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2970 144 135 239 482 1000 19685 2454 23006 2909
education
3455 95 128 242 535 1000 30016 3053 33178 3350
health and social work
3141 96 139 312 454 1000 6806 546 7527 611
other community, social and personal service activities
2833 162 156 255 428 1000 23050 1586 27492 1786
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1663 293 263 121 323 1000 2591 207 3665 258
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
0 1000 0 0 0 1000 0 0 5 1
n.r.
1798 276 190 279 256 1000 1276422 79403 1763036 113096
estd. no. of persons (’00)
797479 633120 1042732 1336691 3810021
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
53108 41657 62209 87131 244105
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia male rural
all
2251 209 166 274 351 1000 3012542 190997 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 101

all-India female rural
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2306 154 170 306 370 1000 561512 31839 663754 38846
fishing
1416 368 163 212 256 1000 418 33 661 46
mining and quarrying
2457 146 116 345 393 1000 2020 123 2365 154
manufacturing
2233 200 173 283 343 1000 45321 2560 56678 3357
electricity, gas and water supply
5655 23 63 213 701 1000 171 18 175 22
construction
2368 143 164 326 367 1000 19849 1047 23153 1227
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2174 212 172 240 377 1000 12781 948 16213 1230
hotels and restaurants
2262 151 156 314 379 1000 3007 209 3540 266
transport, storage and communications
2260 32 312 411 244 1000 1172 55 1211 66
financial intermediation
2576 73 323 182 422 1000 732 56 789 62
real estate, renting and business activities
3227 179 439 119 262 1000 692 30 843 39
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2957 220 97 248 435 1000 2059 318 2640 422
education
2931 135 141 270 455 1000 13831 1178 15981 1380
health and social work
3034 59 267 203 472 1000 4299 322 4566 371
other community, social and personal service activities
1926 299 198 185 318 1000 4709 313 6716 381
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1697 217 303 241 238 1000 3599 208 4597 281
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
1000 0 1000 0 0 1000 1 1 1 1
n.r.
1834 268 193 277 262 1000 2045592 131043 2794255 182605
estd. no. of persons (’00)
876374 675744 1017111 1028909 3598138
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
60455 44043 60597 65661 230756
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each N IC section
all
1941 244 188 283 286 1000 2721763 170301 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 102

all-India persons rural
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of
overnight visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2505 153 155 283 410 1000 1733559 103423 2046403 123457
fishing
2146 355 116 236 293 1000 6969 508 10808 703
mining and quarrying
2692 170 124 272 435 1000 14311 926 17236 1108
manufacturing
2493 168 159 273 400 1000 160547 9693 193015 11707
electricity, gas and water supply
3689 95 77 170 657 1000 4310 403 4763 444
construction
2726 132 133 280 455 1000 159172 10214 183274 11744
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods
2446 174 166 269 392 1000 123072 8968 148923 10636
hotels and restaurants
2589 142 151 248 459 1000 18379 1152 21413 1397
transport, storage and communications
2732 143 142 281 434 1000 67289 4414 78520 5080
financial intermediation
3426 126 112 223 539 1000 6193 470 7087 523
real estate, renting and business activities
3089 219 120 154 507 1000 7846 495 10051 610
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security
2968 152 131 240 477 1000 21744 2772 25646 3331
education 3285 108 132 251 509 1000 43847 4231 49159 4730
health and social work
3101 82 187 271 461 1000 11105 868 12093 982
other communi ty, social and personal service activitie
2655 189 164 241 406 1000 27759 1899 34208 2167
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private hous olds
1682 251 286 188 276 1000 6190 415 8262 539
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
145 855 145 0 0 1000 1 1 6 2
n.r.
1820 271 191 278 260 1000 3322014 210446 4557309 295702
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1673872 1308863 2059843 2365599 7408178
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
113564 85700 122806 152792 474862
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 dist ri but ion of persons by number of over night tr ips for each NI C section
all
2100 226 177 278 319 1000 5734306 361298 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 103

all-India male urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2480 173 152 276 399 1000 35819 3447 43292 4319
fishing
2497 390 186 128 295 1000 2420 273 3967 396
mining and quarrying
2650 139 118 242 500 1000 5286 642 6143 685
manufacturing
2281 190 171 284 355 1000 138206 11492 170680 13496
electricity, gas and water supply
2895 131 154 200 515 1000 3824 488 4403 540
construction
2332 158 189 279 374 1000 71857 5843 85353 7017
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2278 190 188 251 370 1000 148799 14514 183795 17319
hotels and restaurants
2630 134 171 245 449 1000 23610 1865 27277 2141
transport, storage and communications
2584 152 160 281 407 1000 68778 6053 81072 7046
financial intermediation
2766 125 185 295 395 1000 16779 1369 19175 1544
real estate, renting and business activities
2567 149 190 262 399 1000 26258 2295 30844 2641
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2851 130 181 242 447 1000 34581 4345 39736 5118
education
3001 119 132 266 483 1000 21620 2397 24548 2710
health and social work
2691 218 62 231 489 1000 7889 943 10089 1071
other community, social and personal service activities
2494 170 165 330 335 1000 16885 1626 20331 1904
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
2005 250 211 235 304 1000 3302 363 4402 442
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
1147 580 17 282 121 1000 13 11 32 13
n.r.
1935 255 198 260 287 1000 501781 43147 673240 59143
estd. no. of persons (’00)
300674 264183 378015 485508 1428380
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
26432 23797 32496 44820 127545
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each N IC section
all
2201 210 185 265 340 1000 1127707 101113 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 104

all-India female urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2129 228 156 273 343 1000 15483 1307 20055 1732
fishing
7148 62 79 96 764 1000 331 24 353 29
mining and quarrying
2271 6 286 222 486 1000 1123 42 1129 45
manufacturing
2237 182 186 279 353 1000 28314 2243 34627 2943
electricity, gas and water supply
2618 107 16 514 363 1000 534 39 598 53
construction
2335 148 173 237 441 1000 6678 590 7840 698
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2076 288 158 239 315 1000 12136 1244 17045 1739
hotels and restaurants
2176 212 257 226 305 1000 2961 258 3759 319
transport, storage and communications
2055 243 137 276 343 1000 2509 198 3315 235
financial intermediation
2733 89 260 184 467 1000 2102 183 2308 220
real estate, renting and business activities
2439 199 167 267 367 1000 3627 312 4530 375
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2903 199 144 233 424 1000 4118 593 5138 866
education
2418 139 206 282 372 1000 15586 1499 18109 1820
health and social work
2449 163 172 317 348 1000 5111 504 6103 614
other community, social and personal service activities
2186 166 211 291 332 1000 8245 612 9888 754
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1565 377 172 234 218 1000 7564 627 12138 854
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
0 1000 0 0 0 1000 0 0 26 1
n.r.
1880 250 201 270 279 1000 856582 77590 1141827 103787
estd. no. of persons (’00)
315786 255613 347285 370107 1288791
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
29219 23512 30632 33721 117084
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each N IC section
all
1919 245 198 269 287 1000 973004 87865 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 105

all-India persons urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2369 190 153 275 381 1000 51302 4754 63347 6051
fishing
2878 363 178 126 333 1000 2751 297 4321 425
mining and quarrying
2591 119 144 239 498 1000 6409 684 7272 730
manufacturing
2273 189 173 283 355 1000 166520 13735 205307 16439
electricity, gas and water supply
2862 128 137 237 497 1000 4359 527 5001 593
construction
2332 157 188 276 380 1000 78534 6433 93194 7715
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2261 199 186 250 366 1000 160935 15758 200841 19058
hotels and restaurants
2575 144 182 243 432 1000 26571 2123 31036 2460
transport, storage and communications
2563 155 159 281 405 1000 71287 6251 84387 7281
financial intermediation
2763 121 193 284 402 1000 18881 1552 21484 1764
real estate, renting and business activities
2551 155 187 263 395 1000 29885 2607 35375 3016
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2857 138 177 241 445 1000 38699 4938 44874 5984
education
2753 128 163 273 436 1000 37206 3896 42657 4530
health and social work
2600 197 103 264 436 1000 12999 1447 16192 1685
other community, social and personal service activities
2393 168 180 317 334 1000 25130 2238 30219 2658
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1682 343 182 234 241 1000 10866 990 16540 1296
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
628 770 9 154 66 1000 13 11 58 14
n.r.
1900 252 200 266 282 1000 1358363 120737 1815067 162930
estd. no. of persons (’00)
616460 519796 725300 855615 2717171
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
55651 47309 63128 78541 244629
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each N IC section
all
2067 227 191 267 315 1000 2100711 188978 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 106

all-India male rural+urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2597 153 147 272 428 1000 1207866 75031 1425941 88930
fishing
2279 364 133 207 296 1000 8971 748 14115 1053
mining and quarrying
2706 164 123 255 459 1000 17577 1445 21014 1639
manufacturing
2423 175 163 277 385 1000 253433 18625 307017 21846
electricity, gas and water supply
3262 114 115 184 587 1000 7963 873 8991 962
construction
2623 140 150 275 435 1000 211180 15010 245474 17534
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2362 181 179 260 380 1000 259090 22534 316506 26725
hotels and restaurants
2640 137 163 241 459 1000 38982 2808 45150 3272
transport, storage and communications
2660 148 150 280 422 1000 134895 10412 158381 12060
financial intermediation
2956 127 160 279 434 1000 22239 1783 25473 2005
real estate, renting and business activities
2685 166 167 238 429 1000 33412 2760 40053 3212
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2894 135 164 241 460 1000 54266 6799 62742 8027
education
3262 105 129 252 513 1000 51636 5450 57726 6060
health and social work
2883 166 95 266 474 1000 14695 1489 17616 1682
other community, social and personal service activities
2689 165 160 287 389 1000 39935 3212 47823 3690
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1849 269 235 183 313 1000 5893 570 8067 700
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
991 637 15 243 105 1000 13 11 37 14
n.r.
1836 270 192 274 264 1000 1778203 122550 2436276 172239
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1098153 897303 1420747 1822199 5238402
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
79540 65454 94705 131951 371650
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each N IC section
all
2237 210 171 271 348 1000 4140249 292110 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 107

all-India female rural+urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2301 156 170 305 369 1000 576995 33146 683809 40578
fishing
3412 262 134 172 433 1000 749 57 1014 75
mining and quarrying
2397 101 171 305 423 1000 3143 165 3494 199
manufacturing
2235 194 178 282 347 1000 73635 4803 91305 6300
electricity, gas and water supply
3306 88 27 445 440 1000 705 57 773 75
construction
2360 144 166 303 386 1000 26526 1637 30994 1925
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2124 251 165 239 345 1000 24917 2192 33258 2969
hotels and restaurants
2218 182 208 269 341 1000 5968 467 7299 585
transport, storage and communications
2110 187 184 312 317 1000 3681 253 4526 301
financial intermediation
2693 85 276 184 455 1000 2834 239 3098 282
real estate, renting and business activities
2563 196 210 244 350 1000 4319 342 5373 414
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2921 206 128 238 428 1000 6177 911 7778 1288
education
2659 137 176 276 411 1000 29417 2677 34090 3200
health and social work
2700 118 213 268 401 1000 9409 826 10669 985
other community, social and personal service activities
2081 220 206 248 326 1000 12954 925 16604 1135
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1601 333 208 236 223 1000 11163 835 16735 1135
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
31 969 31 0 0 1000 1 1 27 2
n.r.
1847 263 195 275 267 1000 2902174 208633 3936081 286392
estd. no. of persons (’00)
1192161 931356 1364396 1399016 4886928
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
89674 67555 91229 99382 347840
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each NI C section
all
1935 244 191 279 286 1000 3694768 258166 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 108

all-India persons rural+urban
NIC average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of overnight trips number of overnight
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry
2501 154 155 283 409 1000 1784861 108177 2109750 129508
fishing
2355 358 133 204 305 1000 9720 805 15129 1128
mining and quarrying
2662 155 130 262 454 1000 20720 1610 24508 1838
manufacturing
2380 179 166 278 377 1000 327067 23428 398322 28146
electricity, gas and water supply
3265 112 108 205 575 1000 8669 930 9765 1037
construction
2593 140 151 279 430 1000 237706 16647 276468 19459
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles
and personal and household goods
2340 188 177 258 377 1000 284007 24726 349764 29694
hotels and restaurants
2581 143 169 245 443 1000 44950 3275 52449 3857
transport, storage and communications
2645 149 151 281 419 1000 138576 10665 162907 12361
financial intermediation
2927 122 173 269 436 1000 25073 2022 28571 2287
real estate, renting and business activities
2670 169 172 239 420 1000 37731 3102 45426 3626
public administration and defence; compulsory social security
2897 143 160 241 456 1000 60443 7710 70521 9315
education
3038 117 147 261 475 1000 81053 8127 91816 9260
health and social work
2814 148 139 267 446 1000 24104 2315 28285 2667
other community, social and personal service activities
2532 179 172 277 372 1000 52889 4137 64427 4825
activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated
production activities of private households
1682 312 217 219 252 1000 17056 1405 24802 1835
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
584 778 22 140 60 1000 14 12 64 16
n.r.
1843 266 194 275 266 1000 4680378 331183 6372376 458632
estd. no. of persons (’00)
2290332 1828659 2785143 3221214 10125349
× × × ×
sample no. of persons
169215 133009 185934 231333 719491
× × × ×
T able 34: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of overnight trips for each NI C section
all
2091 226 181 275 318 1000 7835017 550276 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 109
all-India male rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2204 353 114 204 329 1000 234605 14457 362871 22691
5-9 2047 372 115 201 312 1000 286170 17021 455535 27707
10-14 2142 353 116 208 323 1000 317803 19006 491029 30137
15-19 3102 239 108 204 449 1000 299355 18848 393374 25717
20-24 4177 133 88 190 589 1000 268745 17626 310008 20972
25-29 5239 78 58 158 706 1000 261968 17081 284283 18909
30-34 6219 42 36 114 808 1000 135102 8897 141047 9530
35-39 5740 52 35 112 801 1000 253067 15916 266902 16918
40-44 5896 54 31 112 803 1000 213059 13844 225263 14643
45-49 5659 50 42 130 778 1000 191629 12536 201753 13333
50-54 5222 61 50 159 730 1000 148963 9567 158653 10320
55-59 4926 79 57 162 703 1000 113116 7378 122821 8126
60-64 4501 123 70 165 642 1000 95801 6227 109273 7096
65-69 4118 166 75 170 589 1000 68291 4337 81884 5232
70-74 3597 248 72 176 504 1000 39851 2434 52997 3275
75-79 3299 352 73 170 405 1000 13353 948 20613 1403
80-84 2831 381 69 172 378 1000 7335 463 11854 803
Above 84 1716 512 133 82 273 1000 4026 218 8247 446
estd. no. of
persons
(’00) 755280 307673 657589 2089479 3810021
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons 51014 20448 41240 131403 244105
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 3891 198 81 173 548 1000 3054741 193091 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 110
all-India female rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2242 358 110 204 328 1000 219674 13074 342235 21046
5-9 2019 374 116 210 300 1000 248832 14612 397469 24223
10-14 1941 385 125 205 285 1000 248874 15334 404667 25621
15-19 2221 320 136 223 321 1000 227078 14498 333925 22426
20-24 2854 256 113 218 413 1000 240090 15935 322849 21690
25-29 3127 228 99 215 458 1000 231272 15127 299479 19647
30-34 3484 184 90 200 526 1000 133295 8511 163322 10510
35-39 3406 207 81 199 513 1000 212995 13733 268728 17176
40-44 3350 204 100 204 493 1000 170225 10767 213720 13796
45-49 3341 212 104 211 473 1000 149234 9671 189349 12477
50-54 3030 243 91 216 450 1000 113041 7281 149262 9644
55-59 2868 265 117 204 413 1000 88309 5822 120217 7950
60-64 2628 308 101 208 383 1000 79729 4761 115148 6999
65-69 2536 330 102 206 362 1000 48462 3110 72360 4736
70-74 2093 411 136 182 272 1000 27400 1664 46491 2970
75-79 2030 436 118 160 287 1000 11708 722 20747 1310
80-84 1324 583 116 116 186 1000 5209 370 12481 839
Above 84 1064 644 92 138 125 1000 2845 230 7993 568
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
1048989 392295 749019 1407834 3598138 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
70123 25781 45732 89120 230756 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 2666 292 109 208 391 1000 2549149 160633 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 111
all-India persons rural
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2222 356 112 204 328 1000 454279 27531 705125 43738
5-9 2034 373 116 205 306 1000 535001 31633 853004 51930
10-14 2051 367 120 207 306 1000 566677 34340 895697 55758
15-19 2698 276 121 213 390 1000 526432 33346 727299 48143
20-24 3502 196 101 205 499 1000 508836 33561 632856 42662
25-29 4155 155 79 187 579 1000 493239 32208 583762 38556
30-34 4751 118 65 160 657 1000 268398 17408 304370 20040
35-39 4569 130 58 156 656 1000 466063 29649 535630 34094
40-44 4657 127 64 157 652 1000 383283 24611 438983 28439
45-49 4537 128 72 169 630 1000 340863 22207 391102 25810
50-54 4159 149 70 187 594 1000 262004 16848 307915 19964
55-59 3908 171 86 183 560 1000 201425 13200 243038 16076
60-64 3540 218 86 187 509 1000 175531 10988 224421 14095
65-69 3376 243 87 187 483 1000 116753 7447 154244 9968
70-74 2894 324 102 179 395 1000 67251 4098 99488 6245
75-79 2662 394 95 165 346 1000 25061 1670 41360 2713
80-84 2058 484 93 143 279 1000 12545 833 24335 1642
Above 84 1395 577 113 110 201 1000 6872 448 16241 1014
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
1804288 699968 1406608 3497314 7408178 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
121138 46229 86972 220523 474862 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 3296 244 94 190 472 1000 5603889 353724 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 112
all-India male urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2007 385 125 175 315 1000 69801 5778 113446 9402
5-9 1945 383 111 206 299 1000 80606 6947 130640 11286
10-14 1988 366 118 209 306 1000 97061 8149 153187 13284
15-19 2247 335 108 214 343 1000 99730 9063 149944 13550
20-24 2827 250 90 210 450 1000 110235 9719 146890 13048
25-29 3410 199 73 192 536 1000 104167 9120 130120 11389
30-34 3685 191 75 157 577 1000 55923 5274 69102 6203
35-39 3958 160 58 165 617 1000 90890 8316 108200 9671
40-44 4228 136 47 169 647 1000 79241 7404 91757 8489
45-49 3994 162 52 201 585 1000 71415 6799 85227 7897
50-54 3846 170 60 180 590 1000 50775 5061 61155 6012
55-59 3591 187 81 176 556 1000 38419 3846 47280 4567
60-64 3264 238 58 187 517 1000 29376 2893 38544 3596
65-69 2938 259 107 178 455 1000 20738 1965 28004 2584
70-74 2456 359 65 229 347 1000 12100 1073 18867 1550
75-79 2190 376 96 212 316 1000 5856 510 9381 783
80-84 1558 502 102 198 198 1000 2085 192 4186 354
Above 84 1209 591 40 178 191 1000 1161 110 2840 248
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
375823 123491 274042 655024 1428380 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
32326 11355 23082 60782 127545 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 2967 263 86 192 459 1000 1052557 95219 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 113
all-India female urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1915 391 112 205 292 1000 59773 5175 98140 8503
5-9 1872 401 122 197 280 1000 68170 5881 113888 9862
10-14 1866 388 126 204 282 1000 78997 6809 129149 11304
15-19 1896 367 127 212 294 1000 77975 6961 123182 11517
20-24 2243 316 117 214 353 1000 87642 7985 128093 11982
25-29 2508 292 97 215 395 1000 82873 7873 117059 11062
30-34 2719 255 85 212 447 1000 49321 4471 66241 5906
35-39 2724 262 89 215 434 1000 78497 7202 106377 9522
40-44 2770 267 90 217 426 1000 63006 6124 85988 8136
45-49 2678 278 92 218 412 1000 52402 5150 72569 6970
50-54 2564 297 87 197 419 1000 40383 3811 57431 5296
55-59 2462 313 91 224 372 1000 32659 3084 47537 4298
60-64 2055 379 104 200 317 1000 24876 2392 40085 3517
65-69 2002 397 92 219 292 1000 15945 1496 26452 2431
70-74 1598 499 82 206 213 1000 8647 824 17259 1520
75-79 1568 534 89 160 217 1000 4008 416 8601 783
80-84 972 620 131 121 128 1000 1638 199 4304 488
Above 84 662 702 105 132 61 1000 1152 115 3868 357
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
431195 135911 270792 450893 1288791 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
38559 12662 23395 42468 117084 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 2258 335 105 210 350 1000 857596 78525 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 114
all-India persons urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 1964 388 119 189 304 1000 129574 10953 211586 17905
5-9 1911 392 116 202 290 1000 148776 12828 244528 21148
10-14 1932 376 122 207 295 1000 176058 14958 282336 24588
15-19 2089 349 117 213 321 1000 177705 16024 273126 25067
20-24 2555 280 103 212 405 1000 197877 17704 274983 25030
25-29 2983 243 85 203 469 1000 187040 16993 247179 22451
30-34 3212 222 80 184 513 1000 105244 9745 135343 12109
35-39 3346 211 73 190 526 1000 169386 15518 214577 19193
40-44 3523 200 68 192 540 1000 142247 13528 177745 16625
45-49 3389 215 70 209 506 1000 123817 11949 157796 14867
50-54 3225 231 73 188 507 1000 91158 8872 118587 11308
55-59 3025 250 86 200 464 1000 71078 6930 94817 8865
60-64 2648 310 81 194 415 1000 54253 5285 78629 7113
65-69 2484 326 100 198 376 1000 36682 3461 54456 5015
70-74 2046 426 73 218 283 1000 20747 1897 36126 3070
75-79 1892 451 93 187 268 1000 9864 926 17981 1566
80-84 1261 562 117 159 163 1000 3722 391 8490 842
Above 84 894 655 77 151 116 1000 2313 225 6709 605
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
807018 259402 544834 1105917 2717171 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
70885 24017 46477 103250 244629 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 2631 297 95 201 407 1000 1910153 173744 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 115
all-India male rural+ urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2157 361 116 197 325 1000 304406 20235 476317 32093
5-9 2025 374 114 202 309 1000 366776 23968 586175 38993
10-14 2105 356 117 208 319 1000 414864 27155 644216 43421
15-19 2866 265 108 207 420 1000 399084 27911 543318 39267
20-24 3743 171 89 197 544 1000 378980 27345 456898 34020
25-29 4665 116 63 168 653 1000 366135 26201 414403 30298
30-34 5385 91 49 128 732 1000 191025 14171 210150 15733
35-39 5226 83 42 127 748 1000 343957 24232 375102 26589
40-44 5414 78 35 129 758 1000 292300 21248 317021 23132
45-49 5165 83 45 151 721 1000 263044 19335 286980 21230
50-54 4839 91 53 165 691 1000 199738 14628 219808 16332
55-59 4555 109 63 166 662 1000 151535 11224 170100 12693
60-64 4179 153 66 171 609 1000 125178 9120 147817 10692
65-69 3817 190 83 172 555 1000 89029 6302 109888 7816
70-74 3297 277 70 190 462 1000 51951 3507 71864 4825
75-79 2952 360 80 183 377 1000 19208 1458 29993 2186
80-84 2499 413 78 179 331 1000 9420 655 16040 1157
Above 84 1586 532 109 106 252 1000 5187 328 11087 694
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
1131104 431164 931631 2744503 5238402 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
83340 31803 64322 192185 371650 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 3639 216 82 178 524 1000 4107298 288310 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 116
all-India female rural+ urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2169 365 111 204 320 1000 279447 18249 440375 29549
5-9 1986 380 118 207 295 1000 317002 20493 511357 34085
10-14 1923 386 125 205 284 1000 327871 22143 533817 36925
15-19 2134 333 134 220 313 1000 305053 21459 457107 33943
20-24 2680 273 114 217 396 1000 327732 23920 450942 33672
25-29 2953 246 99 215 441 1000 314144 23000 416538 30709
30-34 3263 205 89 203 503 1000 182616 12982 229563 16416
35-39 3213 223 83 203 490 1000 291492 20935 375105 26698
40-44 3183 222 97 207 474 1000 233231 16891 299708 21932
45-49 3157 230 101 213 456 1000 201636 14821 261918 19447
50-54 2900 258 90 211 442 1000 153424 11092 206693 14940
55-59 2753 279 110 210 402 1000 120968 8906 167754 12248
60-64 2480 326 102 206 366 1000 104606 7153 155233 10516
65-69 2393 348 99 209 343 1000 64407 4606 98811 7167
70-74 1959 435 121 189 256 1000 36048 2488 63750 4490
75-79 1894 464 109 160 266 1000 15716 1138 29348 2093
80-84 1234 592 120 117 171 1000 6847 569 16785 1327
Above 84 933 663 96 136 104 1000 3997 345 11862 925
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
1480184 528205 1019812 1858727 4886928 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
108682 38443 69127 131588 347840 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 2559 303 108 209 380 1000 3406745 239158 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 117
all-India persons rural+ urban
age group average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two trips total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
0-4 2163 363 114 201 323 1000 583853 38484 916711 61643
5-9 2007 377 116 205 303 1000 683777 44461 1097533 73078
10-14 2023 370 121 207 303 1000 742735 49298 1178033 80346
15-19 2532 296 120 213 371 1000 704137 49370 1000425 73210
20-24 3215 222 101 207 470 1000 706713 51265 907839 67692
25-29 3807 181 81 192 546 1000 680279 49201 830941 61007
30-34 4278 150 70 167 613 1000 373642 27153 439713 32149
35-39 4219 153 62 165 619 1000 635449 45167 750206 53287
40-44 4330 148 65 167 620 1000 525530 38139 616728 45064
45-49 4207 153 72 181 594 1000 464680 34156 548898 40677
50-54 3900 172 71 187 570 1000 353162 25720 426501 31272
55-59 3660 193 86 188 533 1000 272503 20130 337855 24941
60-64 3308 242 85 189 485 1000 229784 16273 303050 21208
65-69 3143 265 91 190 455 1000 153435 10908 208700 14983
70-74 2668 351 94 189 365 1000 87999 5995 135614 9315
75-79 2429 411 95 172 322 1000 34924 2596 59342 4279
80-84 1852 504 99 147 249 1000 16267 1224 32824 2484
Above 84 1249 600 103 122 176 1000 9184 673 22949 1619
estd. no. of
persons
(’00)
2611306 959369 1951443 4603231 10125349 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no.
of persons
192023 70246 133449 323773 719491 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 35: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each age group
all 3118 258 95 193 455 1000 7514043 527468 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 118
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 5588 63 44 130 762 1000 759216 51481 810551 55818
12 7688 42 43 74 841 1000 19806 1453 20668 1537
21 4145 137 92 184 588 1000 261084 18197 302381 21197
31 5807 71 46 149 734 1000 154701 12581 166435 13755
41 4743 64 82 132 722 1000 5518 411 5893 488
51 4966 78 57 155 709 1000 684362 35274 742385 38423
11-51 5186 80 56 148 716 1000 1884687 119397 2048315 131218
81 3555 183 99 212 506 1000 35284 3034 43197 3786
91 2376 325 111 206 358 1000 734979 46313 1089622 70865
92 2540 298 107 227 368 1000 15512 812 22088 1253
93 2285 358 101 151 389 1000 6997 491 10906 784
94 4748 150 84 138 627 1000 33630 2290 39588 2709
95 2566 407 77 157 360 1000 20523 1270 34582 2111
97 2109 381 111 198 310 1000 322557 19423 520832 31259
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2355 340 109 201 350 1000 1134198 70599 1717618 108981
n.r. 1395 359 301 185 155 1000 572 61 892 120
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
755280 307673 657589 2089479 3810021 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
51014 20448 41240 131403 244105 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same day t rips f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia male rural
all 3891 198 81 173 548 1000 3054741 193091 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 119
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 4234 144 81 180 595 1000 80546 6127 94143 7396
12 6293 172 19 102 707 1000 3758 228 4539 253
21 3031 206 104 221 469 1000 257253 16321 324188 21049
31 5804 109 73 137 681 1000 30785 2553 34534 2915
41 3387 173 86 240 501 1000 3348 220 4047 282
51 3580 164 85 212 539 1000 286684 13591 342781 16330
11-51 3545 176 91 208 524 1000 662373 39040 804233 48225
81 5131 140 63 145 652 1000 8645 959 10051 1227
91 2117 353 122 210 315 1000 542072 34574 837708 55878
92 2685 289 103 210 399 1000 621998 41783 874581 58536
93 2726 271 123 218 388 1000 383112 24398 525566 33493
94 3833 176 93 176 556 1000 25443 1523 30860 1882
95 1645 489 119 180 212 1000 10111 668 19786 1347
97 1994 404 114 196 286 1000 294398 17633 493699 30032
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2404 325 114 208 352 1000 1877133 120579 2782200 181168
n.r. 1624 397 53 411 140 1000 997 55 1654 136
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
1048989 392295 749019 1407834 3598138 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
70123 25781 45732 89120 230756 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia female rural
all 2666 292 109 208 391 1000 2549149 160633 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 120
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 5448 72 48 135 745 1000 839762 57608 904695 63214
12 7437 65 39 79 817 1000 23563 1681 25208 1790
21 3569 173 98 203 526 1000 518337 34518 626569 42246
31 5806 77 51 147 725 1000 185486 15134 200969 16670
41 4191 108 84 176 632 1000 8865 631 9940 770
51 4529 105 66 173 656 1000 971047 48865 1085166 54753
11-51 4724 107 66 165 662 1000 2547060 158437 2852548 179443
81 3853 175 92 199 533 1000 43928 3993 53248 5013
91 2263 337 116 208 339 1000 1277051 80887 1927330 126743
92 2681 289 103 210 398 1000 637510 42595 896669 59789
93 2717 273 122 217 388 1000 390109 24889 536472 34277
94 4347 161 88 155 596 1000 59073 3813 70448 4591
95 2231 437 92 166 306 1000 30634 1938 54368 3458
97 2053 392 113 197 299 1000 616955 37056 1014530 61291
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2385 331 112 205 351 1000 3011331 191178 4499818 290149
n.r. 1532 388 139 329 144 1000 1569 116 2565 257
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
1804288 699968 1406608 3497314 7408178 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
121138 46229 86972 220523 474862 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia persons rural
all 3296 244 94 190 472 1000 5603889 353724 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 121
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 4119 141 66 171 622 1000 212002 20215 246798 23454
12 4040 213 42 199 546 1000 12033 1241 15296 1478
21 3050 217 91 229 463 1000 45455 4620 58046 5825
31 3442 212 68 177 543 1000 247424 22599 314135 27578
41 2358 332 15 288 364 1000 1647 179 2465 260
51 3528 171 64 200 565 1000 98468 8241 118784 9914
11-51 3655 183 68 183 566 1000 617029 57095 755525 68509
81 2634 319 76 202 403 1000 21334 2238 31346 3134
91 2181 345 110 209 337 1000 271501 23915 414262 37265
92 1744 439 124 157 279 1000 5788 523 10319 893
93 2251 327 147 87 439 1000 998 80 1483 137
94 3039 245 79 223 453 1000 35471 3143 46957 3992
95 1842 445 82 171 302 1000 7335 548 13221 1023
97 1947 400 116 182 301 1000 93055 7667 155176 12560
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2173 354 109 201 335 1000 414147 35876 641417 55870
n.r. 1224 487 90 344 78 1000 47 10 92 32
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
375823 123491 274042 655024 1428380 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
32326 11355 23082 60782 127545 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same day t rips f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia male urban
all 2967 263 86 192 459 1000 1052557 95219 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 122
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 3063 231 92 191 486 1000 20724 2114 26965 2850
12 5084 74 18 164 744 1000 454 77 491 94
21 2753 293 68 174 465 1000 18797 1673 26599 2504
31 2886 272 87 218 424 1000 45859 4071 62967 5511
41 1892 222 260 87 431 1000 153 24 197 35
51 2696 259 93 207 441 1000 22155 1808 29895 2335
11-51 2862 265 86 202 447 1000 108142 9767 147114 13329
81 3285 218 106 210 466 1000 5314 723 6798 1072
91 1983 367 123 211 299 1000 213273 18960 336970 30938
92 2341 319 97 211 373 1000 379971 35167 557890 49828
93 2458 283 114 236 367 1000 58543 5742 81630 8120
94 2799 262 83 203 453 1000 11743 1170 15904 1563
95 1050 608 66 194 132 1000 2528 303 6443 607
97 1766 426 119 198 256 1000 77998 6679 135914 11598
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2173 344 108 211 337 1000 744056 68021 1134752 102654
n.r. 1733 335 33 262 371 1000 85 14 127 29
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
431195 135911 270792 450893 1288791 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
38559 12662 23395 42468 117084 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia female urban
all 2258 335 105 210 350 1000 857596 78525 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 123
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 4015 150 68 173 609 1000 232726 22329 273763 26304
12 4073 209 41 198 552 1000 12487 1318 15787 1572
21 2957 241 84 212 463 1000 64252 6293 84645 8329
31 3350 222 71 183 523 1000 293283 26670 377102 33089
41 2323 324 33 273 369 1000 1800 203 2662 295
51 3361 189 70 201 540 1000 120623 10049 148679 12249
11-51 3526 197 71 186 546 1000 725171 66862 902639 81838
81 2750 301 81 204 414 1000 26648 2961 38144 4206
91 2092 355 116 210 320 1000 484774 42875 751232 68203
92 2330 321 97 210 371 1000 385759 35690 568209 50721
93 2454 284 115 234 368 1000 59541 5822 83113 8257
94 2978 249 80 218 453 1000 47214 4313 62861 5555
95 1583 498 77 179 246 1000 9863 851 19664 1630
97 1862 412 118 190 280 1000 171052 14346 291090 24158
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2173 348 108 208 336 1000 1158203 103897 1776169 158524
n.r. 1519 399 57 297 248 1000 132 24 219 61
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
807018 259402 544834 1105917 2717171 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
70885 24017 46477 103250 244629 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same day t rips f or each br oad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia persons urban
all 2631 297 95 201 407 1000 1910153 173744 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 124
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 5245 81 49 140 730 1000 971218 71696 1057350 79272
12 6136 115 43 127 716 1000 31839 2694 35965 3015
21 3969 150 92 191 568 1000 306540 22817 360427 27022
31 4261 163 60 167 609 1000 402125 35180 480570 41333
41 4039 143 62 178 617 1000 7164 590 8359 748
51 4768 91 58 161 689 1000 782831 43515 861169 48337
11-51 4774 108 59 158 675 1000 2501716 176492 2803840 199727
81 3168 240 89 208 462 1000 56618 5272 74543 6920
91 2323 331 111 206 352 1000 1006480 70228 1503884 108130
92 2287 343 113 205 340 1000 21300 1335 32406 2146
93 2281 355 106 144 395 1000 7995 571 12389 921
94 3821 202 81 184 533 1000 69101 5433 86545 6701
95 2366 417 78 161 344 1000 27857 1818 47803 3134
97 2072 385 112 195 308 1000 415611 27090 676007 43819
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2306 344 109 201 346 1000 1548345 106475 2359035 164851
n.r. 1379 371 282 200 148 1000 619 71 984 152
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
1131104 431164 931631 2744503 5238402 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
83340 31803 64322 192185 371650 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia male rural+urban
all 3639 216 82 178 524 1000 4107298 288310 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 125
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 3974 164 83 182 571 1000 101269 8241 121109 10246
12 6175 163 19 108 711 1000 4212 305 5030 347
21 3010 213 101 217 469 1000 276049 17994 350787 23553
31 3920 214 82 189 515 1000 76644 6624 97501 8426
41 3318 175 94 233 497 1000 3501 244 4244 317
51 3509 171 86 212 531 1000 308839 15399 372676 18665
11-51 3440 190 90 207 512 1000 770515 48807 951347 61554
81 4386 172 81 171 577 1000 13959 1682 16849 2299
91 2078 357 122 210 310 1000 755344 53534 1174678 86816
92 2551 301 100 210 389 1000 1001969 76950 1432472 108364
93 2690 273 122 220 385 1000 441655 30140 607196 41613
94 3481 205 89 185 521 1000 37186 2693 46764 3445
95 1498 518 106 184 192 1000 12639 971 26229 1954
97 1944 409 115 196 280 1000 372396 24312 629613 41630
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2337 331 113 209 348 1000 2621189 188600 3916952 283822
n.r. 1631 393 51 400 156 1000 1082 69 1781 165
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
1480184 528205 1019812 1858727 4886928 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
108682 38443 69127 131588 347840 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia female rural+ urban
all 2559 303 108 209 380 1000 3406745 239158 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 126
activity status
average no. of
trips per 1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11 5115 90 53 144 713 1000 1072488 79937 1178458 89518
12 6141 121 40 125 715 1000 36051 2999 40995 3362
21 3496 181 96 204 519 1000 582589 40811 711214 50575
31 4204 172 64 171 593 1000 478769 41804 578072 49759
41 3796 154 73 197 577 1000 10665 834 12603 1065
51 4388 115 67 177 642 1000 1091670 58914 1233845 67002
11-51 4436 129 67 170 634 1000 3272231 225299 3755186 261281
81 3392 228 88 201 484 1000 70576 6954 91392 9219
91 2215 342 116 208 334 1000 1761825 123762 2678562 194946
92 2545 301 101 210 388 1000 1023268 78285 1464878 110510
93 2682 274 121 219 385 1000 449650 30711 619586 42534
94 3702 203 84 185 529 1000 106287 8126 133309 10146
95 2059 453 88 169 290 1000 40496 2789 74032 5088
97 2010 396 114 195 294 1000 788007 51402 1305620 85449
99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
91-99 2325 336 111 206 347 1000 4169534 295075 6275987 448673
n.r. 1531 389 132 326 152 1000 1701 140 2784 318
estd. no. of
persons (’00)
2611306 959369 1951443 4603231 10125349 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of
persons
192023 70246 133449 323773 719491 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 36: Per 1000 distr i but ion of per sons by number of same d f or each broad act ivit y stat us
all-I ndia persons ru ral+ urban
all 3118 258 95 193 455 1000 7514043 527468 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 127
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
3570 227 82 176 515 1000 881484 48303 1139929 63477
literate without any schooling
5010 58 77 127 739 1000 17696 1107 18780 1256
literate without formal schooling
3208 250 93 141 516 1000 23661 1289 31541 1864
below primary
2967 280 102 187 430 1000 525594 32718 730045 45743
primary
3834 188 87 174 552 1000 514206 32421 632997 40840
middle
4438 149 68 168 615 1000 530441 35178 623169 42384
secondary
4674 124 60 159 657 1000 298317 21073 340712 24621
higher secondary
4725 119 64 165 651 1000 147460 11336 167372 13202
diploma courses
6652 89 70 127 714 1000 20889 1524 22936 1733
graduate
6386 70 50 150 730 1000 78613 6726 84535 7425
post-graduate and above
7151 61 38 91 811 1000 16284 1391 17335 1509
n..r.
934 858 46 9 88 1000 95 25 672 51
estd. no. of persons (’00) 755280 307673 657589 2089479 3810021 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 51014 20448 41240 131403 244105 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia male rural
all
3891 198 81 173 548 1000 3054741 193091 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 128
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2521 310 108 208 374 1000 1166045 65913 1689685 96521
literate without any schooling
2199 331 107 200 363 1000 10730 699 16030 1062
literate without formal schooling
2572 345 79 174 402 1000 17041 1020 26033 1581
below primary
2379 317 117 214 352 1000 431267 26974 631538 40468
primary
2720 271 116 205 408 1000 363769 24331 498693 34397
middle
3024 251 105 215 430 1000 308237 21830 411320 30336
secondary
3240 223 104 207 466 1000 148737 11352 191468 15216
higher secondary
3365 240 89 192 479 1000 64272 5281 84538 7028
diploma courses
4848 139 93 130 639 1000 8170 629 9485 757
graduate
4483 226 55 180 540 1000 24700 2136 31896 2787
post-graduate and above
4950 150 59 139 652 1000 5989 451 7046 550
n..r.
1560 526 268 24 182 1000 192 17 405 53
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1048989 392295 749019 1407834 3598138 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 70123 25781 45732 89120 230756 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia female rural
all
2666 292 109 208 391 1000 2549149 160633 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 129
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than two
trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2944 276 98 195 431 1000 2047529 114216 2829614 159998
literate without any schooling
3715 183 91 160 566 1000 28426 1806 34810 2318
literate without formal schooling
2920 293 87 156 465 1000 40702 2309 57574 3445
below primary
2695 297 109 200 394 1000 956861 59692 1361583 86211
primary
3343 224 100 188 488 1000 877975 56752 1131690 75237
middle
3876 189 82 187 542 1000 838679 57008 1034488 72720
secondary
4158 160 76 176 588 1000 447054 32425 532179 39837
higher secondary
4269 159 73 174 593 1000 211731 16617 251910 20230
diploma courses
6124 104 76 128 692 1000 29059 2153 32422 2490
graduate
5865 113 51 158 678 1000 103313 8862 116431 10212
post-graduate and above
6515 86 44 105 765 1000 22273 1842 24381 2059
n..r.
1149 738 127 14 121 1000 287 42 1096 105
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1804288 699968 1406608 3497314 7408178 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 121138 46229 86972 220523 474862 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia persons rural
all
3296 244 94 190 472 1000 5603889 353724 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 130
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2394 329 100 189 382 1000 159447 12838 237697 18807
literate without any schooling
2198 360 142 142 356 1000 2921 298 4565 440
literate without formal schooling
2475 339 109 160 393 1000 6828 529 10325 822
below primary
2361 337 101 198 365 1000 129603 11489 195370 17273
primary
2732 277 94 209 420 1000 143329 12245 198147 16946
middle
3020 247 86 188 479 1000 180557 16208 239625 21728
secondary
3193 236 80 189 494 1000 145246 14089 190183 17912
higher secondary
3214 219 80 208 494 1000 106290 10271 136017 13041
diploma courses
3894 152 54 223 570 1000 25567 2202 30153 2611
graduate
3862 182 64 166 588 1000 118522 11703 144909 14028
post-graduate and above
4492 173 48 157 622 1000 34090 3331 41227 3910
n..r.
3188 34 204 12 750 1000 157 16 162 27
estd. no. of persons (’00) 375823 123491 274042 655024 1428380 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 32326 11355 23082 60782 127545 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day ips for each level of education
all-I ndia male urban
all
2967 263 86 192 459 1000 1052557 95219 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 131
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
1927 393 101 207 299 1000 206649 17756 340516 28018
literate without any schooling
1438 454 197 160 189 1000 2379 294 4358 535
literate without formal schooling
2070 432 91 192 285 1000 4705 458 8287 759
below primary
2080 361 117 204 318 1000 117607 10168 184011 16239
primary
2162 339 114 209 338 1000 115617 10754 174980 15967
middle
2456 309 99 210 381 1000 129744 12242 187868 18233
secondary
2511 275 108 216 401 1000 110132 10208 151926 14476
higher secondary
2427 305 105 204 386 1000 70256 6898 101058 9856
diploma courses
2770 271 91 235 403 1000 8685 892 11911 1162
graduate
2732 274 100 215 411 1000 68226 6671 93962 8977
post-graduate and above
3067 209 77 269 445 1000 23457 2172 29659 2840
n..r.
1015 450 202 290 58 1000 140 12 255 22
estd. no. of persons (’00) 431195 135911 270792 450893 1288791 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 38559 12662 23395 42468 117084 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia female urban
all
2258 335 105 210 350 1000 857596 78525 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 132
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2119 367 101 199 333 1000 366097 30594 578213 46825
literate without any schooling
1827 406 169 151 274 1000 5300 592 8923 975
literate without formal schooling
2295 380 101 174 345 1000 11533 987 18612 1581
below primary
2224 348 109 201 342 1000 247210 21657 379380 33512
primary
2465 306 103 209 382 1000 258946 22999 373127 32913
middle
2772 274 92 198 436 1000 310300 28450 427493 39961
secondary
2890 254 93 201 453 1000 255378 24297 342109 32388
higher secondary
2878 255 91 206 448 1000 176546 17169 237074 22897
diploma courses
3576 186 65 226 523 1000 34252 3094 42064 3773
graduate
3418 218 78 185 518 1000 186748 18374 238872 23005
post-graduate and above
3896 188 60 204 548 1000 57546 5503 70887 6750
n..r.
1860 288 203 182 327 1000 297 28 417 49
estd. no. of persons (’00) 807018 259402 544834 1105917 2717171 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 70885 24017 46477 103250 244629 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia personsurban
all
2631 297 95 201 407 1000 1910153 173744 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 133
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
3367 244 85 178 492 1000 1040931 61141 1377626 82284
literate without any schooling
4460 117 90 130 664 1000 20618 1405 23344 1696
literate without formal schooling
3027 272 97 145 486 1000 30489 1818 41866 2686
below primary
2839 292 102 189 416 1000 655197 44207 925414 63016
primary
3571 209 89 182 520 1000 657535 44666 831144 57786
middle
4044 176 73 174 578 1000 710998 51386 862794 64112
secondary
4143 165 67 170 599 1000 443563 35162 530895 42533
higher secondary
4048 164 71 184 581 1000 253749 21607 303388 26243
diploma courses
5085 125 61 182 632 1000 46456 3726 53090 4344
graduate
4792 141 59 160 640 1000 197135 18429 229444 21453
post-graduate and above
5279 140 45 137 678 1000 50373 4722 58563 5419
n..r.
1372 698 76 9 216 1000 252 41 834 78
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1131104 431164 931631 2744503 5238402 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 83340 31803 64322 192185 371650 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia male rural+urban
all
3639 216 82 178 524 1000 4107298 288310 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 134
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2422 324 107 208 361 1000 1372694 83669 2030201 124539
literate without any schooling
2036 357 126 191 326 1000 13109 993 20388 1597
literate without formal schooling
2451 366 82 178 374 1000 21746 1478 34320 2340
below primary
2312 327 117 212 344 1000 548873 37142 815549 56707
primary
2575 288 115 206 390 1000 479386 35085 673673 50364
middle
2846 269 103 213 414 1000 437981 34072 599187 48569
secondary
2917 246 106 211 437 1000 258869 21560 343394 29692
higher secondary
2854 275 98 198 428 1000 134528 12179 185596 16884
diploma courses
3691 212 92 188 508 1000 16854 1521 21396 1919
graduate
3176 262 88 206 444 1000 92926 8807 125859 11764
post-graduate and above
3429 198 73 244 485 1000 29446 2623 36705 3390
n..r.
1349 497 243 127 134 1000 332 29 660 75
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1480184 528205 1019812 1858727 4886928 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 108682 38443 69127 131588 347840 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia female rural+urban
all
2559 303 108 209 380 1000 3406745 239158 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 135
educational level
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
not literate
2804 292 98 196 414 1000 2413626 144810 3407827 206823
literate without any schooling
3330 229 107 158 506 1000 33726 2398 43732 3293
literate without formal schooling
2767 314 90 160 435 1000 52235 3296 76186 5026
below primary
2592 308 109 200 383 1000 1204071 81349 1740963 119723
primary
3125 244 101 193 462 1000 1136922 79751 1504817 108150
middle
3553 214 85 190 511 1000 1148979 85458 1461981 112681
secondary
3662 197 82 186 535 1000 702432 56722 874289 72225
higher secondary
3595 206 81 190 523 1000 388277 33786 488984 43127
diploma courses
4685 150 70 184 596 1000 63311 5247 74486 6263
graduate
4220 184 69 177 571 1000 290061 27236 355303 33217
post-graduate and above
4566 162 56 178 603 1000 79819 7345 95268 8809
n..r.
1345 614 148 60 178 1000 584 70 1512 154
estd. no. of persons (’00) 2611306 959369 1951443 4603231 10125349 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 192023 70246 133449 323773 719491 xxx xxx xxx xxx
T able 37 : Per 1000 distr ibution of persons by number of same day trips for each level of education
all-I ndia persons rural+urban
all
3118 258 95 193 455 1000 7514043 527468 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 136
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
5615 49 32 137 782 1000 48839 3615 51359 3853
professionals (2)
6939 57 60 154 729 1000 43624 4073 46245 4399
associate professionals (3)
7080 52 38 106 804 1000 32194 3028 33969 3290
clerks (4)
5940 68 22 150 760 1000 18063 1622 19372 1762
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
5337 96 61 137 706 1000 103635 7164 114692 7875
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
5141 84 58 144 714 1000 805327 54325 879147 60388
craft and related trades workers (7)
5362 79 50 146 725 1000 132440 8678 143799 9345
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
5580 92 35 140 733 1000 57504 3784 63320 4093
elementary occupations (9)
4889 76 60 158 706 1000 639182 32775 691979 35764
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
5188 80 56 148 716 1000 1880810 119064 2043881 130769
others
2389 335 109 201 354 1000 1173931 74027 1766140 113336
estd. no. of persons (’00) 755280 307673 657589 2089479 3810021 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 51014 20448 41240 131403 244105 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO)
all-I ndia male rural
all
3891 198 81 173 548 1000 3054741 193091 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 137
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
3669 153 130 160 557 1000 8649 626 10216 727
professionals (2)
5398 119 110 114 656 1000 7770 734 8822 843
associate professionals (3)
6003 109 78 143 669 1000 12530 1042 14068 1186
clerks (4)
4902 68 79 226 626 1000 2318 225 2487 260
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
4646 92 51 219 638 1000 17147 1213 18885 1406
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
3230 202 101 207 491 1000 300610 19590 376526 25059
craft and related trades workers (7)
3889 162 76 208 554 1000 34158 2009 40741 2389
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
7239 240 17 243 500 1000 2886 235 3798 289
elementary occupations (9)
3592 159 84 215 542 1000 275865 13293 328067 15949
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
3547 176 91 208 524 1000 661934 38967 803611 48108
others
2413 325 114 208 353 1000 1887215 121666 2794526 182648
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1048989 392295 749019 1407834 3598138 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 70123 25781 45732 89120 230756 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia female rural
all
2666 292 109 208 391 1000 2549149 160633 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 138
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
5292 66 48 141 745 1000 57488 4241 61575 4580
professionals (2)
6692 67 68 148 718 1000 51394 4807 55067 5242
associate professionals (3)
6764 69 50 117 765 1000 44724 4070 48036 4476
clerks (4)
5822 68 29 159 745 1000 20381 1847 21860 2022
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
5239 96 60 148 696 1000 120783 8377 133577 9281
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
4568 119 71 163 647 1000 1105937 73915 1255674 85447
craft and related trades workers (7)
5037 97 56 160 687 1000 166599 10687 184541 11734
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
5674 100 34 146 720 1000 60390 4019 67118 4382
elementary occupations (9)
4472 103 68 176 653 1000 915047 46068 1020045 51713
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
4725 107 66 165 662 1000 2542744 158031 2847492 178877
others
2404 329 112 206 353 1000 3061146 195693 4560685 295985
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1804288 699968 1406608 3497314 7408178 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 121138 46229 86972 220523 474862 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia persons rural
all
3296 244 94 190 472 1000 5603889 353724 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 139
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
3772 168 71 187 574 1000 83676 8015 100592 9307
professionals (2)
4115 171 66 164 599 1000 56370 6013 67982 7140
associate professionals (3)
4268 154 64 167 615 1000 34640 3635 40933 4304
clerks (4)
3831 175 50 181 594 1000 35134 3353 42574 4016
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
3563 189 73 180 558 1000 104709 9979 129169 12094
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
4495 112 67 187 633 1000 28256 3084 31835 3662
craft and related trades workers (7)
3564 190 56 187 567 1000 114232 9000 141010 10879
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
3546 189 87 176 549 1000 52648 4672 64897 5642
elementary occupations (9)
3132 214 71 197 518 1000 106798 9231 135874 11301
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
3654 183 68 183 566 1000 616461 56982 754867 68345
others
2197 353 107 202 339 1000 436096 38237 673514 59200
estd. no. of persons (’00) 375823 123491 274042 655024 1428380 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 32326 11355 23082 60782 127545 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia male urban
all
2967 263 86 192 459 1000 1052557 95219 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 140
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
2611 297 65 193 445 1000 8173 812 11630 1053
professionals (2)
3674 173 110 215 503 1000 11932 1241 14428 1589
associate professionals (3)
2821 295 107 176 422 1000 10980 1150 15585 1514
clerks (4)
3050 224 64 245 467 1000 5819 566 7494 801
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
2690 300 81 183 436 1000 11717 1182 16744 1694
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
3311 263 57 197 483 1000 7384 686 10019 1061
craft and related trades workers (7)
3041 229 100 197 474 1000 18673 1485 24214 2034
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
2440 268 64 337 330 1000 2189 145 2992 210
elementary occupations (9)
2546 287 81 206 425 1000 31074 2472 43600 3324
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
2865 264 86 203 447 1000 107940 9739 146705 13280
others
2180 344 108 211 337 1000 749656 68786 1142086 103804
estd. no. of persons (’00) 431195 135911 270792 450893 1288791 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 38559 12662 23395 42468 117084 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia female urban
all
2258 335 105 210 350 1000 857596 78525 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 141
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
3652 182 70 188 560 1000 91849 8827 112222 10360
professionals (2)
4038 171 74 173 582 1000 68302 7254 82409 8729
associate professionals (3)
3869 193 76 170 562 1000 45620 4785 56518 5818
clerks (4)
3714 182 52 191 575 1000 40953 3919 50068 4817
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
3463 202 74 181 544 1000 116426 11161 145913 13788
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
4211 148 65 189 598 1000 35640 3770 41854 4723
craft and related trades workers (7)
3487 196 62 188 554 1000 132905 10485 165224 12913
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
3497 192 86 183 539 1000 54837 4817 67889 5852
elementary occupations (9)
2989 232 73 199 495 1000 137872 11703 179474 14625
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
3526 197 71 186 546 1000 724402 66721 901572 81625
others
2186 347 108 208 338 1000 1185752 107023 1815600 163004
estd. no. of persons (’00) 807018 259402 544834 1105917 2717171 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 70885 24017 46477 103250 244629 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia persons urban
all
2631 297 95 201 407 1000 1910153 173744 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 142
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
4395 128 58 170 644 1000 132515 11630 151951 13160
professionals (2)
5258 125 64 160 652 1000 99995 10086 114226 11539
associate professionals (3)
5543 108 52 140 701 1000 66834 6663 74901 7594
clerks (4)
4490 141 42 172 646 1000 53197 4975 61946 5778
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
4397 146 67 160 627 1000 208344 17143 243861 19969
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
5119 85 58 146 711 1000 833583 57409 910983 64050
craft and related trades workers (7)
4472 134 53 166 647 1000 246672 17678 284809 20224
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
4550 141 61 158 640 1000 110152 8456 128217 9735
elementary occupations (9)
4600 99 62 164 675 1000 745980 42006 827853 47065
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
4775 108 59 157 676 1000 2497271 176046 2798748 199114
others
2336 340 109 201 350 1000 1610027 112264 2439654 172536
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1131104 431164 931631 2744503 5238402 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 83340 31803 64322 192185 371650 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )

all-I ndia male rural+urban
all
3639 216 82 178 524 1000 4107298 288310 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 143
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
3106 230 95 178 497 1000 16822 1438 21846 1780
professionals (2)
4328 153 110 177 561 1000 19702 1975 23250 2432
associate professionals (3)
4331 207 93 161 539 1000 23510 2192 29653 2700
clerks (4)
3511 185 68 241 507 1000 8137 791 9981 1061
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
3727 190 65 202 543 1000 28864 2395 35629 3100
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
3232 203 100 207 491 1000 307994 20276 386545 26120
craft and related trades workers (7)
3573 187 85 204 524 1000 52831 3494 64956 4423
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
5124 253 38 285 425 1000 5075 380 6790 499
elementary occupations (9)
3469 174 84 214 528 1000 306939 15765 371666 19273
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
3441 190 90 207 513 1000 769874 48706 950316 61388
others
2346 330 112 209 348 1000 2636870 190452 3936612 286452
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1480184 528205 1019812 1858727 4886928 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 108682 38443 69127 131588 347840 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same d y trips for each occupation (NCO )
all-I ndia female rural+urban
all
2559 303 108 209 380 1000 3406745 239158 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 144
NCO-1digit
average no.
of trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day visitors number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
legislators, senior officials and managers(1)
4233 141 63 171 626 1000 149337 13068 173797 14940
professionals (2)
5101 129 72 163 636 1000 119696 12061 137476 13971
associate professionals (3)
5199 136 64 146 655 1000 90344 8855 104554 10294
clerks (4)
4355 147 45 181 626 1000 61334 5766 71928 6839
service workers and shop & market sales
workers (5)
4312 151 67 165 617 1000 237208 19538 279490 23069
skilled agricultural and fishery workers(6)
4557 120 70 164 646 1000 1141577 77685 1297528 90170
craft and related trades workers (7)
4305 144 59 173 624 1000 299504 21172 349765 24647
plant and machine operators and
assemblers(8)
4579 147 60 164 629 1000 115227 8836 135007 10234
elementary occupations (9)
4250 122 69 180 629 1000 1052919 57771 1199519 66338
NCO 1-digit (1) - (9)
4437 129 67 170 634 1000 3267145 224752 3749064 260502
others
2342 334 111 206 349 1000 4246897 302716 6376285 458989
estd. no. of persons (’00) 2611306 959369 1951443 4603231 10125349 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 192023 70246 133449 323773 719491 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 38: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each occupatio (NCO)
all-I ndia persons rural+urban
all
3118 258 95 193 455 1000 7514043 527468 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 145
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 5030 82 60 151 707 1000 1269269 76528 1382649 84611
fishing 4490 158 102 132 608 1000 8544 581 10147 657
mining and quarrying 5304 89 29 127 755 1000 13553 873 14871 954
manufacturing 5412 91 46 162 701 1000 123912 7681 136337 8350
electricity, gas and water supply
6998 74 30 109 787 1000 4249 400 4588 422
construction 5236 57 45 132 766 1000 151042 9755 160121 10517
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 5061 91 57 156 696 1000 120698 8593 132711 9406
hotels and restaurants 5713 59 54 101 786 1000 16819 1037 17873 1131
transport, storage and communications 5291 80 42 134 744 1000 71139 4617 77309 5014
financial intermediation 10368 52 22 76 850 1000 5968 438 6298 461
real estate, renting and business activities
6487 67 49 124 759 1000 8590 526 9209 571
public administration and defence; compulsory social security 6306 62 29 120 789 1000 21583 2584 23006 2909
education 7506 36 44 120 800 1000 31983 3176 33178 3350
health and social work 6521 18 39 152 790 1000 7388 583 7527 611
other community, social and personal service activitie 5877 70 72 125 733 1000 25555 1687 27492 1786
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private households 4016 92 79 407 421 1000 3327 222 3665 258
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 0 1000 0 0 0 1000 0 0 5 1
n.r. 2387 336 109 201 354 1000 1171122 73810 1763036 113096
estd. no. of persons (’00) 755280 307673 657589 2089479 3810021 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 51014 20448 41240 131403 244105 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia male rural
all 3891 198 81 173 548 1000 3054741 193091 3810021 244105
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 146
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 3361 186 94 212 508 1000 540153 31059 663754 38846
fishing 2817 66 258 49 627 1000 617 42 661 46
mining and quarrying 3972 70 42 264 624 1000 2200 127 2365 154
manufacturing 4027 161 84 205 550 1000 47552 2797 56678 3357
electricity, gas and water supply
3620 32 209 180 579 1000 170 19 175 22
construction 3953 128 89 192 591 1000 20184 1056 23153 1227
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 4462 130 47 217 605 1000 14103 1046 16213 1230
hotels and restaurants 5017 30 41 245 684 1000 3435 236 3540 266
transport, storage and communications 4812 45 33 252 670 1000 1157 52 1211 66
financial intermediation 7088 17 62 73 847 1000 776 60 789 62
real estate, renting and business activities
4921 11 1 170 818 1000 833 36 843 39
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security 6362 162 48 74 715 1000 2211 334 2640 422
education 6007 92 96 107 705 1000 14503 1221 15981 1380
health and social work 5768 15 65 152 768 1000 4499 344 4566 371
other community, social and personal service activitie 3502 185 111 217 487 1000 5472 319 6716 381
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private hous olds 4276 69 80 223 628 1000 4279 248 4597 281
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 5000 0 0 0 1000 1000 1 1 1 1
n.r. 2413 325 114 208 353 1000 1887003 121636 2794255 182605
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1048989 392295 749019 1407834 3598138 xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 70123 25781 45732 89120 230756 xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia female rural
all
2666 292 109 208 391 1000 2549149 160633 3598138 230756
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 147
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 4489 116 71 171 643 1000 1809422 107587 2046403 123457
fishing 4387 152 111 127 609 1000 9162 623 10808 703
mining and quarrying 5122 86 31 146 737 1000 15753 1000 17236 1108
manufacturing 5006 112 57 174 657 1000 171464 10478 193015 11707
electricity, gas and water supply
6874 72 37 112 779 1000 4418 419 4763 444
construction 5074 66 51 140 744 1000 171227 10811 183274 11744
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 4996 95 56 163 686 1000 134801 9639 148923 10636
hotels and restaurants 5598 54 52 125 769 1000 20254 1273 21413 1397
transport, storage and communications 5284 79 42 136 743 1000 72296 4669 78520 5080
financial intermediation 10003 49 26 76 849 1000 6743 498 7087 523
real estate, renting and business activities
6356 62 45 128 764 1000 9423 562 10051 610
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security 6312 72 31 115 782 1000 23794 2918 25646 3331
education 7019 54 61 116 769 1000 46486 4397 49159 4730
health and social work 6236 17 49 152 782 1000 11887 927 12093 982
other community, social and personal service activitie 5411 93 79 143 684 1000 31026 2006 34208 2167
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private hous olds 4161 79 79 305 536 1000 7606 470 8262 539
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 727 855 0 0 145 1000 1 1 6 2
n.r. 2403 329 112 205 353 1000 3058125 195446 4557309 295702
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1804288 699968 1406608 3497314 7408178
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 121138 46229 86972 220523 474862
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia persons rural
all
3296 244 94 190 472 1000 5603889 353724 7408178 474862
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 148
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 4238 117 70 176 637 1000 38242 3686 43292 4319
fishing 4204 261 72 139 527 1000 2930 329 3967 396
mining and quarrying 3783 66 144 170 620 1000 5735 627 6143 685
manufacturing 3358 223 64 176 537 1000 132610 11070 170680 13496
electricity, gas and water supply
4482 144 43 110 703 1000 3769 467 4403 540
construction 3519 185 54 209 552 1000 69584 5788 85353 7017
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 3579 178 76 193 552 1000 151009 14492 183795 17319
hotels and restaurants 3469 188 61 149 602 1000 22145 1815 27277 2141
transport, storage and communications 3820 153 84 186 576 1000 68645 5881 81072 7046
financial intermediation 4011 161 67 189 583 1000 16080 1312 19175 1544
real estate, renting and business activities
3493 237 71 185 507 1000 23533 2187 30844 2641
public administration and defence; compulsory social security 3949 175 47 188 590 1000 32766 4172 39736 5118
education 4718 103 61 149 688 1000 22014 2394 24548 2710
health and social work 3921 178 38 152 632 1000 8292 896 10089 1071
other community, social and personal service activitie 3527 187 65 162 585 1000 16526 1625 20331 1904
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private households 2756 361 16 203 420 1000 2812 284 4402 442
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 2524 17 7 854 121 1000 31 11 32 13
n.r. 2196 353 107 202 338 1000 435831 38183 673240 59143
estd. no. of persons (’00) 375823 123491 274042 655024 1428380
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons
32326 11355 23082 60782 127545
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia male urban
all 2967 263 86 192 459 1000 1052557 95219 1428380 127545
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 149
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 2713 297 58 192 453 1000 14107 1219 20055 1732
fishing 11107 19 0 39 942 1000 346 26 353 29
mining and quarrying 2091 43 190 528 239 1000 1080 38 1129 45
manufacturing 2906 230 102 204 464 1000 26658 2188 34627 2943
electricity, gas and water supply
1808 560 53 75 311 1000 263 33 598 53
construction 3061 261 43 220 476 1000 5797 522 7840 698
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, torcycles
and personal and household goods 2570 327 83 158 432 1000 11470 1202 17045 1739
hotels and restaurants 2551 284 97 201 417 1000 2690 260 3759 319
transport, storage and communications 3050 346 41 176 437 1000 2168 172 3315 235
financial intermediation 3125 250 63 201 485 1000 1730 174 2308 220
real estate, renting and business activities
2770 322 92 144 442 1000 3070 266 4530 375
public administration and defence; compulsory social security 3259 219 75 210 496 1000 4012 582 5138 866
education 3512 188 100 224 489 1000 14707 1465 18109 1820
health and social work 3088 228 72 233 467 1000 4714 489 6103 614
other community, social and personal service activitie 2952 183 90 223 504 1000 8083 558 9888 754
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private hous olds 1864 411 104 210 275 1000 7149 557 12138 854
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 0 1000 0 0 0 1000 0 0 26 1
n.r. 2180 344 108 211 337 1000 749550 68774 1141827 103787
estd. no. of persons (’00) 431195 135911 270792 450893 1288791
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons
38559 12662 23395 42468 117084
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia female urban
all 2258 335 105 210 350 1000 857596 78525 1288791 117084
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 150
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 3755 174 67 181 579 1000 52350 4905 63347 6051
fishing 4768 242 66 131 561 1000 3276 355 4321 425
mining and quarrying 3521 63 151 225 561 1000 6816 665 7272 730
manufacturing 3282 224 71 181 525 1000 159267 13258 205307 16439
electricity, gas and water supply
4162 194 44 106 656 1000 4033 500 5001 593
construction 3480 191 54 210 546 1000 75382 6310 93194 7715
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 3494 191 77 190 542 1000 162479 15694 200841 19058
hotels and restaurants 3358 200 66 155 579 1000 24835 2075 31036 2460
transport, storage and communications 3789 161 83 186 571 1000 70813 6053 84387 7281
financial intermediation 3916 171 67 190 572 1000 17810 1486 21484 1764
real estate, renting and business activities
3400 248 74 180 498 1000 26603 2453 35375 3016
public administration and defence; compulsory social security 3870 180 50 190 579 1000 36779 4754 44874 5984
education 4206 139 77 180 603 1000 36721 3859 42657 4530
health and social work 3607 197 51 183 570 1000 13006 1385 16192 1685
other community, social and personal service activitie 3339 186 74 182 559 1000 24610 2183 30219 2658
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private hous olds 2101 398 81 208 314 1000 9961 841 16540 1296
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 1382 462 4 468 66 1000 31 11 58 14
n.r. 2186 347 108 208 338 1000 1185381 106957 1815067 162930
estd. no. of persons (’00) 807018 259402 544834 1105917 2717171
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons
70885 24017 46477 103250 244629
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all-I ndia persons urban
all 2631 297 95 201 407 1000 1910153 173744 2717171 244629
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 151

all-India male rural+urban
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 5006 83 60 152 705 1000 1307511 80214 1425941 88930
fishing 4409 187 93 134 586 1000 11474 910 14115 1053
mining and quarrying 4860 82 62 140 716 1000 19289 1500 21014 1639
manufacturing 4270 164 56 170 610 1000 256522 18751 307017 21846
electricity, gas and water supply
5766 108 36 110 746 1000 8018 867 8991 962
construction 4639 101 48 159 692 1000 220626 15543 245474 17534
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 4200 142 68 177 613 1000 271707 23085 316506 26725
hotels and restaurants 4357 137 58 130 675 1000 38965 2852 45150 3272
transport, storage and communications 4538 117 64 161 658 1000 139784 10498 158381 12060
financial intermediation 5583 134 56 161 649 1000 22047 1750 25473 2005
real estate, renting and business activities
4181 198 66 171 565 1000 32123 2713 40053 3212
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security 4813 134 41 163 663 1000 54350 6756 62742 8027
education 6321 65 51 132 752 1000 53997 5570 57726 6060
health and social work 5032 110 38 152 700 1000 15680 1479 17616 1682
other community, social and personal service activitie 4878 120 69 141 670 1000 42081 3312 47823 3690
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private households 3328 239 45 296 420 1000 6139 506 8067 700
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 2180 151 6 738 105 1000 31 11 37 14
n.r. 2334 340 109 201 350 1000 1606953 111993 2436276 172239
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1131104 431164 931631 2744503 5238402
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 83340 31803 64322 192185 371650
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all
3639 216 82 178 524 1000 4107298 288310 5238402 371650
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 152

all-India female rural+urban
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 3342 189 93 211 507 1000 554261 32278 683809 40578
fishing 5704 50 168 46 737 1000 964 68 1014 75
mining and quarrying 3364 61 90 349 500 1000 3280 165 3494 199
manufacturing 3602 187 91 204 518 1000 74210 4985 91305 6300
electricity, gas and water supply
2218 441 89 99 372 1000 433 52 773 75
construction 3727 162 77 199 562 1000 25982 1578 30994 1925
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 3492 231 66 187 516 1000 25573 2248 33258 2969
hotels and restaurants 3747 161 70 222 547 1000 6125 496 7299 585
transport, storage and communications 3522 265 39 196 500 1000 3325 224 4526 301
financial intermediation 4135 191 63 169 577 1000 2506 234 3098 282
real estate, renting and business activities
3107 274 78 148 501 1000 3903 302 5373 414
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security 4312 200 66 164 570 1000 6223 916 7778 1288
education 4682 143 98 169 590 1000 29211 2686 34090 3200
health and social work 4235 136 69 198 596 1000 9213 833 10669 985
other community, social and personal service activitie 3174 184 99 221 497 1000 13555 877 16604 1135
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private households 2527 317 97 214 372 1000 11428 805 16735 1135
extraterritorial organizations and bodies 157 969 0 0 31 1000 1 1 27 2
n.r. 2346 330 112 209 348 1000 2636553 190410 3936081 286392
estd. no. of persons (’00) 1480184 528205 1019812 1858727 4886928
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 108682 38443 69127 131588 347840
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all
2559 303 108 209 380 1000 3406745 239158 4886928 347840
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 153

all-India persons rural+urban
NIC
average
no. of
trips per
1000
persons
number of same day trips number of same day
visitors
number of persons
no trip one trip two trips more than
two trips
total estd.(’00) sample estd.(’00) sample
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
agriculture, hunting and forestry 4467 118 71 171 641 1000 1861772 112492 2109750 129508
fishing 4496 178 98 128 596 1000 12438 978 15129 1128
mining and quarrying 4647 79 66 170 685 1000 22569 1665 24508 1838
manufacturing 4117 170 64 178 589 1000 330732 23736 398322 28146
electricity, gas and water supply
5485 135 41 109 716 1000 8451 919 9765 1037
construction 4537 108 52 163 677 1000 246608 17121 276468 19459
wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
motorcycles and personal and household goods 4133 150 68 178 604 1000 297279 25333 349764 29694
hotels and restaurants 4272 140 60 143 657 1000 45089 3348 52449 3857
transport, storage and communications 4510 122 63 162 654 1000 143109 10722 162907 12361
financial intermediation 5426 141 57 162 641 1000 24553 1984 28571 2287
real estate, renting and business activities
4054 207 68 168 557 1000 36027 3015 45426 3626
public administration and defence; compulsory social
security 4758 141 43 163 653 1000 60573 7672 70521 9315
education 5712 94 68 146 692 1000 83208 8256 91816 9260
health and social work 4731 120 50 170 660 1000 24893 2312 28285 2667
other community, social and personal service activitie 4439 136 77 161 625 1000 55636 4189 64427 4825
activities of private households as employers and
undifferentiated production activities of private
households 2787 292 80 240 388 1000 17566 1311 24802 1835
extraterritorial organizations and bodies
1322 498 4 425 74 1000 32 12 64 16
n.r. 2341 334 111 206 349 1000 4243506 302403 6372376 458632
estd. no. of persons (’00) 2611306 959369 1951443 4603231 10125349
xxx xxx xxx xxx
sample no. of persons 192023 70246 133449 323773 719491
xxx xxx xxx xxx
Table 39: Per 1000 distribution of persons by number of same day trips for each NI C section
all 3118 258 95 193 455 1000 7514043 527468 10125349 719491
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 154
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight
visitor-trips
business holidaying,
le isure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior offic ials and
managers 73 23 673 121 6 71 8 26 0 1000 191497 1401
professionals 91 31 566 92 13 148 5 54 0 1000 196520 1838
associate professionals 49 45 654 95 48 47 10 52 0 1000 122924 1487
clerks 71 30 667 123 22 55 3 30 0 1000 72101 712
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 63 14 661 92 4 115 11 40 0 1000 322127 2598
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 25 13 737 105 4 76 8 32 1 1000 2357117 18604
craft and related trades workers 38 19 721 93 1 95 3 31 0 1000 391898 2982
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 43 31 672 136 1 69 3 45 0 1000 177825 1315
elementary occupations 21 10 759 94 1 79 3 32 0 1000 1569011 10358
n.r. 25 1 566 75 0 285 17 30 0 1000 5826 113
total employed 33 15 724 101 4 82 6 34 0 1000 5406846 41408
unemployed 21 21 549 98 99 49 1 160 0 1000 89999 849
out of labour force 2 24 802 80 10 53 1 28 0 1000 3077026 19381
n.r. 0 0 620 1 41 334 0 4 0 1000 675 11
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 192514 155392 6419722 804526 62420 615981 36881 284922 2189 8574547 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 2060 1312 43997 5547 675 5102 610 2299 47 61649 xxx xxx
T able 40: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia male rural
all 22 18 749 94 7 72 4 33 0 1000 8574547 61649
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 155
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight
visitor-trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 5 36 684 142 9 117 2 6 0 1000 34954 246
professionals 33 68 656 73 20 97 19 33 0 1000 27739 275
associate professionals 6 32 771 87 21 67 0 15 0 1000 46734 392
clerks 10 15 778 44 0 16 2 134 0 1000 8382 77
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 36 33 687 95 9 86 0 54 0 1000 48863 399
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 4 8 808 94 2 69 4 11 0 1000 847871 5703
craft and related trades workers 2 25 772 80 1 84 1 35 0 1000 97363 644
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 6 1 789 46 0 142 0 16 0 1000 6772 65
elementary occupations 5 14 778 105 1 72 0 24 0 1000 740133 4307
n.r. 7 0 922 37 11 21 0 1 0 1000 1585 28
total employed 6 14 786 98 3 73 2 20 0 1000 1860397 12136
unemployed 0 9 731 106 15 70 1 68 0 1000 37882 364
out of labour force 1 16 812 80 3 65 1 21 0 1000 5083536 35664
n.r. 0 0 139 2 0 860 0 0 0 1000 1583 14
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 14339 109014 5612780 593445 19612 473683 10770 148625 1131 6983398 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 230 1004 37737 3904 196 3760 163 1144 40 48178 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 40: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia female rural
all 2 16 804 85 3 68 2 21 0 1000 6983398 48178
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 156
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials
and managers 63 25 674 124 7 78 7 23 0 1000 226451 1647
professionals 85 36 576 89 13 142 7 51 0 1000 224259 2113
associate professionals 38 41 685 92 41 52 7 43 0 1000 169658 1879
clerks 65 28 678 115 20 51 3 40 0 1000 80483 789
service workers and shop &
market sales workers 59 17 664 92 5 111 10 42 0 1000 370990 2997
skilled agricultural and
fishery workers 20 12 755 102 3 74 7 27 1 1000 3204988 24307
craft and related trades
workers 31 20 731 90 1 93 3 32 0 1000 489261 3626
plant and machine operators
and assemblers 42 30 676 133 1 71 3 44 0 1000 184597 1380
elementary occupations 16 11 765 97 1 77 2 30 0 1000 2309144 14665
n.r. 21 1 639 67 2 231 14 24 0 1000 7411 141
total employed 26 15 739 100 4 80 5 30 0 1000 1841263 23709
unemployed 15 17 604 101 74 55 1 132 0 1000 51159 686
out of labour force 1 19 808 80 6 61 1 24 0 1000 1250816 13332
n.r. 0 0 211 2 6 780 0 1 0 1000 60 2
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 206853 264406 12032502 1397971 82032 1089664 47651 433547 3320 15557945 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 2290 2316 81734 9451 871 8862 773 3443 87 109827 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 40: Per 1000 distr ibution of overnight visit or -t rips by pur pose for each broad pr inci pal activity st atus
all-I ndia person rural
all 13 17 773 90 5 70 3 28 0 1000 3143299 37729
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 157
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight
visitor-trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health
&
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 77 64 630 160 9 26 4 31 0 1000 250267 3378
professionals 70 66 659 131 34 19 3 19 0 1000 213240 3002
associate professionals 117 50 591 146 19 22 1 55 0 1000 136553 1856
clerks 34 40 732 121 16 28 2 28 0 1000 124463 1582
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 56 40 705 135 3 34 3 25 0 1000 301258 3858
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 45 17 752 102 2 33 2 48 0 1000 69637 1032
craft and related trades workers 36 20 696 166 2 52 2 26 0 1000 294464 3530
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 17 22 777 128 3 23 0 29 0 1000 184695 1948
elementary occupations 25 15 797 103 1 30 2 28 0 1000 265134 3483
n.r. 271 36 461 203 0 1 0 27 0 1000 1553 40
total employed 52 37 703 136 9 31 2 29 0 1000 1841263 23709
unemployed 4 70 551 210 29 22 0 115 0 1000 51159 686
out of labour force 3 60 729 158 11 24 1 14 0 1000 1250816 13332
n.r. 0 0 310 0 0 690 0 0 0 1000 60 2
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 97323 148069 2235704 459808 31898 88213 5050 77175 59 3143299 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 1642 1962 26166 4880 503 1414 101 1050 11 37729 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 40: Per 1000 distr i but ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia male urban
all 31 47 711 146 10 28 2 25 0 1000 3143299 37729
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 158
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
le isure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health
&
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 16 60 591 295 5 14 0 18 0 1000 32007 360
professionals 17 87 718 119 9 36 1 14 0 1000 38546 589
associate professionals 31 66 684 162 5 38 6 10 0 1000 32545 513
clerks 3 49 719 188 23 8 2 9 0 1000 14983 227
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 16 20 735 77 1 134 1 16 0 1000 48532 513
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 1 2 785 125 0 63 0 25 0 1000 16140 213
craft and related trades workers 2 17 826 105 1 24 0 25 0 1000 50216 565
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 0 2 867 103 0 11 0 16 0 1000 3309 50
elementary occupations 1 11 711 248 0 21 0 7 0 1000 90048 994
n.r. 0 204 321 431 0 43 0 0 0 1000 1088 9
total employed 10 34 723 172 3 42 1 14 0 1000 327415 4033
unemployed 2 66 712 149 22 14 3 33 0 1000 14844 289
out of labour force 1 48 753 146 5 33 0 14 0 1000 2130803 26159
n.r. 0 0 92 908 0 0 0 0 0 1000 151 5
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 5736 115036 1849960 370540 11124 84126 1425 35008 258 2473213 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 146 1547 22656 4127 181 1201 45 570 13 30486 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 40: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia female urban
all 2 47 748 150 4 34 1 14 0 1000 2473213 30486
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 159
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight
visitor-trips
business holidaying,
le isure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health
&
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers
69 63 625 177 9 24 3 30 0 1000 282274 3738
professionals 61 69 669 129 29 22 2 18 0 1000 251786 3591
associate professionals 98 53 611 149 16 25 2 45 0 1000 169098 2369
clerks 30 41 730 129 17 25 2 26 0 1000 139446 1809
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 49 37 710 126 2 50 2 24 0 1000 349790 4371
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 36 14 759 107 2 39 1 43 0 1000 85777 1245
craft and related trades workers 30 20 718 156 2 47 2 26 0 1000 344680 4095
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 17 22 779 127 3 23 0 29 0 1000 188004 1998
elementary occupations 19 14 773 144 1 27 1 22 0 1000 355182 4477
n.r. 150 112 399 306 0 20 0 15 0 1000 2641 49
total employed 45 37 707 142 8 33 2 27 0 1000 2168678 27742
unemployed 3 69 587 196 27 20 1 97 0 1000 66003 975
out of labour force 2 53 744 150 7 30 1 14 0 1000 3381619 39491
n.r. 0 0 137 722 0 141 0 0 0 1000 211 7
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 103059 263105 4085664 830348 43022 172339 6475 112183 317 5616512 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 1788 3509 48822 9007 684 2615 146 1620 24 68215 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 40: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia person urban
all 18 47 728 148 8 31 1 20 0 1000 5616512 68215
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 160
all-India male rural+urban
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious
&
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health
&
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 75 47 647 144 8 44 6 29 0 1000 441764 4779
professionals 80 50 616 113 24 78 4 35 0 1000 409760 4840
associate professionals 86 48 619 123 32 33 5 54 0 1000 259477 3343
clerks 47 36 710 121 18 37 2 29 0 1000 196564 2294
service workers and shop &
market sales workers 59 27 683 114 3 74 7 32 0 1000 623385 6456
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 26 13 738 105 4 75 7 33 1 1000 2426754 19636
craft and related trades
workers 37 20 710 126 1 75 3 29 0 1000 686362 6512
plant and machine operators
and assemblers 30 26 728 132 2 44 2 36 0 1000 362520 3263
elementary occupations 22 11 765 95 1 71 3 32 0 1000 1834145 13841
n.r. 81 9 543 104 0 221 13 29 0 1000 7379 153
total employed 38 21 718 111 6 68 5 33 0 1000 7248109 65117
unemployed 14 42 549 145 70 38 1 142 0 1000 141158 1535
out of labour force 2 36 777 106 11 43 1 23 0 1000 4327842 32713
n.r. 0 0 613 1 40 342 0 4 0 1000 735 13
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 289837 303461 8655426 1264334 94318 704194 41931 362097 2248 11717846 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 3702 3274 70163 10427 1178 6516 711 3349 58 99378 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 40: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose for each broad principal activity status
all 25 27 738 109 8 59 3 31 0 1000 11717846 99378
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 161
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 11 49 633 226 7 60 1 13 0 1000 66961 606
professionals 22 81 696 103 13 57 7 20 0 1000 66285 864
associate professionals 18 48 729 123 13 53 3 13 0 1000 79279 905
clerks 5 39 737 146 16 10 2 46 0 1000 23365 304
service workers and shop &
market sales workers 25 26 714 85 4 113 1 33 0 1000 97395 912
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 3 8 807 95 2 69 4 12 0 1000 864011 5916
craft and related trades workers 2 22 794 90 1 59 1 31 0 1000 147579 1209
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 4 1 820 69 0 90 0 16 0 1000 10081 115
elementary occupations 5 13 769 125 1 65 0 22 0 1000 830181 5301
n.r. 4 98 634 226 6 32 0 1 0 1000 2673 37
total employed 6 18 774 112 3 67 2 19 0 1000 2187812 16169
unemployed 1 27 725 120 18 52 2 56 0 1000 52726 653
out of labour force 1 27 792 102 3 54 1 19 0 1000 7214339 61823
n.r. 0 0 138 15 0 847 0 0 0 1000 1734 19
all 2 25 787 105 3 58 1 19 0 1000 9456611 78664
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 20075 224050 7462740 963985 30736 557809 12195 183633 1389 9456611 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 376 2551 60393 8031 377 4961 208 1714 53 78664 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 40: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visit or -t r ips by purpose for each broad principal activity status
all-I ndia female rural+urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 162
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
le isure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials
and managers 66 47 645 155 8 47 5 27 0 1000 508725 5385
professionals 71 54 628 111 22 75 4 33 0 1000 476045 5704
associate professionals 70 48 645 123 28 38 5 44 0 1000 338756 4248
clerks 42 37 713 124 18 34 2 31 0 1000 219929 2598
service workers and shop
& market sales workers 54 27 688 109 4 80 6 32 0 1000 720780 7368
skilled agricultural and
fishery workers 20 12 755 102 3 73 6 27 0 1000 3290765 25552
craft and related trades
workers 31 20 725 119 1 72 2 29 0 1000 833941 7721
plant and machine
operators and assemblers 29 26 731 130 2 46 2 36 0 1000 372601 3378
elementary occupations 17 11 766 104 1 70 2 29 0 1000 2664326 19142
n.r. 59 34 568 138 2 169 10 21 0 1000 10052 190
total employed 31 20 731 111 5 68 4 30 0 1000 9435921 81286
unemployed 10 38 598 138 56 42 1 118 0 1000 193884 2188
out of labour force 1 30 786 104 6 50 1 21 0 1000 11542181 94536
n.r. 0 0 210 13 6 770 0 1 0 1000 2469 32
estd no. of visitor-trips(’00) 309912 527511 16118166 2228319 125054 1262003 54126 545730 3637 21174457 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 4078 5825 130556 18458 1555 11477 919 5063 111 178042 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 40: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of over night visit or -t ri ps by pur pose f or each broad pr incipal act ivity status
all-I ndia person rural+ urban
all 15 26 760 107 6 58 2 26 0 1000 21174457 178042
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 163
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh 698 260 41 1000 771991 3844
Arunachal Pradesh 583 183 220 1000 6118 650
Assam 550 417 32 1000 128082 2536
Bihar 690 247 59 1000 586372 3467
Chhattisgarh 742 215 39 1000 209892 1120
Delhi 0 60 940 1000 5961 108
Goa
364 374 262 1000 6481 114
Gujarat 655 314 31 1000 364973 2175
Haryana 439 349 212 1000 251041 1409
Himachal Pradesh 721 178 101 1000 105196 1400
Jammu & Kashmir 778 183 39 1000 85685 801
Jharkhand 671 282 47 1000 203362 1358
Karnataka 528 374 98 1000 376221 2129
Kerala 529 370 100 1000 272925 2948
Madhya Pradesh 707 236 56 1000 635059 3749
Maharashtra 630 320 50 1000 628979 4123
Manipur 334 566 91 1000 4192 1037
Meghalaya
684 259 51 1000 10762 656
Mizoram 729 269 2 1000 1995 339
Nagaland 476 478 42 1000 3837 479
Orissa 815 161 24 1000 417505 2802
Punjab 433 407 161 1000 206337 1232
Rajasthan 675 242 84 1000 580299 3146
Sikkim 285 482 233 1000 3866 481
Tamil Nadu
423 493 84 1000 396897 3026
Tripura 783 178 36 1000 21095 1506
Uttarakhand 625 152 223 1000 77766 525
Uttar Pradesh 613 328 59 1000 1573194 9318
West Bengal 802 174 24 1000 628341 4500
A & N Islands 638 309 53 1000 3039 191
Chandigarh 0 0 1000 1000 824 104
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 483 157 360 1000 957 108
Daman & Diu 137 1 862 1000 305 101
Lakshadweep 125 0 875 1000 172 23
Puducherry 106 65 829 1000 4825 144
estd. no. of visitor-trips (’00) 5504842 2495360 570118 8574547 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 37809 18829 4937 61649 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of overnight visit or -t ri ps by main destination separately f or each State/UT of
origin
all-I ndia male rural
all I ndia 642 291 66 1000 8574547 61649
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 164
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh
742 221 36 1000 730751 3841
Arunachal Pradesh 668 122 207 1000 3208 207
Assam 611 367 21 1000 99575 1655
Bihar 782 182 33 1000 360544 1997
Chhattisgarh
797 161 37 1000 171038 810
Delhi 0 92 908 1000 4408 87
Goa 309 398 293 1000 5981 99
Gujarat 672 310 18 1000 292822 1751
Haryana 442 386 172 1000 195245 1105
Himachal Pradesh 808 112 80 1000 91879 1077
Jammu & Kashmir 787 162 51 1000 85639 777
Jharkhand
652 322 26 1000 163899 949
Karnataka 542 397 60 1000 353839 2135
Kerala 658 268 74 1000 295224 3322
Madhya Pradesh 713 242 44 1000 459540 2473
Maharashtra
630 341 29 1000 557380 3454
Manipur 316 581 90 1000 1866 461
Meghalaya 673 297 29 1000 6601 501
Mizoram 721 277 1 1000 722 125
Nagaland 585 394 11 1000 1886 152
Orissa 832 156 12 1000 335773 1915
Punjab 493 399 107 1000 179999 1263
Rajasthan
711 213 76 1000 453903 2241
Sikkim 308 534 158 1000 2807 327
Tamil Nadu 493 439 68 1000 384019 2938
Tripura 845 126 23 1000 22229 1523
Uttarakhand
600 175 225 1000 64561 321
Uttar Pradesh 629 317 55 1000 1073613 5648
West Bengal 828 148 24 1000 576674 4455
A & N Islands 678 249 73 1000 1929 148
Chandigarh 0 0 1000 1000 611 74
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 694 3 303 1000 659 84
Daman & Diu 199 0 801 1000 238 97
Lakshadweep
138 0 862 1000 115 20
Puducherry 160 12 828 1000 4222 146
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 4721544 1889967 369668 6983398 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 31588 13362 3185 48178 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distr ibution of over night visitor-tr ips by ma in destination separately for each State/UT
of origin
all-I ndia female rural
all I ndia 676 271 53 1000 6983398 48178
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 165
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh
720 241 39 1000 1502742 7685
Arunachal Pradesh 605 168 217 1000 9326 857
Assam 573 399 28 1000 227657 4191
Bihar 724 223 49 1000 946916 5464
Chhattisgarh
766 192 38 1000 380930 1930
Delhi 0 73 927 1000 10369 195
Goa 337 386 277 1000 12462 213
Gujarat 663 312 25 1000 657795 3926
Haryana 441 365 194 1000 446286 2514
Himachal Pradesh 760 148 91 1000 197075 2477
Jammu & Kashmir 783 172 45 1000 171324 1578
Jharkhand
663 300 38 1000 367261 2307
Karnataka 535 386 79 1000 730060 4264
Kerala 598 316 86 1000 568149 6270
Madhya Pradesh 710 238 51 1000 1094599 6222
Maharashtra
630 329 40 1000 1186359 7577
Manipur 329 570 91 1000 6058 1498
Meghalaya 680 273 42 1000 17363 1157
Mizoram 727 271 2 1000 2717 464
Nagaland 508 453 33 1000 5723 631
Orissa 822 159 19 1000 753278 4717
Punjab 464 403 133 1000 386336 2495
Rajasthan
690 230 80 1000 1034202 5387
Sikkim 294 504 202 1000 6673 808
Tamil Nadu 458 466 76 1000 780916 5964
Tripura 815 151 29 1000 43324 3029
Uttarakhand
616 161 224 1000 142327 846
Uttar Pradesh 619 324 57 1000 2646807 14966
West Bengal 815 161 24 1000 1205015 8955
A & N Islands 656 282 62 1000 4968 339
Chandigarh 0 0 1000 1000 1435 178
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 565 97 338 1000 1616 192
Daman & Diu 170 1 830 1000 543 198
Lakshadweep
131 0 869 1000 287 43
Puducherry 132 40 828 1000 9047 290
all India 657 282 60 1000 15557945 109827
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 10226386 4385327 939786 15557945
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 69397 32191 8122 109827 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of overnight visitor -t r ips by mai n dest inat ion separately for each State/ UT
of origin
all-I ndia persons rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 166
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh
372 537 91 1000 325041 2569
Arunachal Pradesh 220 329 449 1000 881 214
Assam 196 685 107 1000 19330 580
Bihar 491 356 146 1000 67018 707
Chhattisgarh
353 419 219 1000 44779 520
Delhi 2 94 905 1000 91800 1462
Goa 185 212 604 1000 6901 212
Gujarat 322 507 171 1000 221261 2139
Haryana 248 338 413 1000 89270 847
Himachal Pradesh 424 231 345 1000 12034 273
Jammu & Kashmir 412 333 255 1000 18939 475
Jharkhand
145 388 465 1000 36899 770
Karnataka 216 506 278 1000 235107 2043
Kerala 411 456 134 1000 89600 1530
Madhya Pradesh 352 449 183 1000 187922 2156
Maharashtra
232 588 179 1000 361620 4649
Manipur 348 491 138 1000 1280 437
Meghalaya 237 297 463 1000 1610 241
Mizoram 381 530 84 1000 1131 500
Nagaland 268 589 115 1000 1518 187
Orissa 362 580 58 1000 75011 817
Punjab 223 404 373 1000 107861 1037
Rajasthan
324 442 233 1000 180250 1551
Sikkim 22 297 681 1000 592 131
Tamil Nadu 213 642 144 1000 335726 2949
Tripura 675 260 59 1000 5003 531
Uttarakhand
308 320 372 1000 20634 369
Uttar Pradesh 229 478 293 1000 412727 3841
West Bengal 328 481 191 1000 172586 2837
A & N Islands 508 213 279 1000 609 110
Chandigarh 0 0 1000 1000 7782 341
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 56 65 878 1000 398 118
Daman & Diu 50 8 942 1000 262 85
Lakshadweep
495 0 505 1000 120 131
Puducherry 37 33 931 1000 9795 370
all India 283 499 217 1000 3143299 37729
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 888100 1569989 680844 3143299
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 9762 17327 10551 37729 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distr ibution of over night visitor-tr ips by ma in destination separately for each State/UT
of origin
all-I ndia male urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 167
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh 418 500 81 1000 273533 2378
Arunachal Pradesh 241 350 408 1000 425 83
Assam 280 583 110 1000 11783 379
Bihar 550 302 136 1000 34721 394
Chhattisgarh 462 416 118 1000 34360 459
Delhi 6 113 880 1000 68807 909
Goa
264 205 530 1000 6153 183
Gujarat 288 530 180 1000 165988 1803
Haryana 209 320 472 1000 69061 710
Himachal Pradesh 445 284 271 1000 10393 212
Jammu & Kashmir
499 276 224 1000 15459 380
Jharkhand 154 335 509 1000 26634 503
Karnataka 246 511 243 1000 196927 2001
Kerala 476 409 115 1000 99350 1613
Madhya Pradesh 422 408 152 1000 136711 1589
Maharashtra 236 590 173 1000 297596 3847
Manipur 368 454 136 1000 464 268
Meghalaya
285 355 354 1000 1259 205
Mizoram 364 551 80 1000 522 245
Nagaland 342 550 80 1000 648 76
Orissa 416 522 61 1000 48030 578
Punjab
204 452 343 1000 88649 858
Rajasthan 321 462 217 1000 121277 1048
Sikkim 21 387 592 1000 552 112
Tamil Nadu 253 635 112 1000 305581 2829
Tripura 725 224 40 1000 5100 476
Uttarakhand 247 286 467 1000 16595 326
Uttar Pradesh 275 419 306 1000 279028 2554
West Bengal
405 440 155 1000 140854 2502
A & N Islands 500 127 374 1000 572 105
Chandigarh 7 1 992 1000 5344 275
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 83 41 877 1000 178 60
Daman & Diu
30 16 954 1000 239 93
Lakshadweep 218 0 782 1000 96 97
Puducherry 54 7 939 1000 10322 336
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 773246 1201784 494046 2473213
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 8940 13789 7685 30486 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by main destination separately for each State/UT of origin
all-I ndia female urban
all I ndia 313 486 200 1000 2473213 30486
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 168
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh
393 521 87 1000 598574 4947
Arunachal Pradesh 227 336 436 1000 1306 297
Assam 225 651 108 1000 31113 959
Bihar 512 337 142 1000 101739 1101
Chhattisgarh
408 418 167 1000 79139 979
Delhi 4 101 895 1000 160607 2371
Goa 223 209 569 1000 13054 395
Gujarat 307 517 175 1000 387249 3942
Haryana 231 330 439 1000 158331 1557
Himachal Pradesh 433 253 313 1000 22427 485
Jammu & Kashmir 453 307 240 1000 34398 855
Jharkhand
148 367 482 1000 63533 1273
Karnataka 231 508 261 1000 432034 4044
Kerala 443 432 124 1000 188950 3143
Madhya Pradesh 384 430 168 1000 324633 3745
Maharashtra
234 589 177 1000 659216 8496
Manipur 356 478 137 1000 1744 705
Meghalaya 261 325 410 1000 2869 446
Mizoram 375 538 83 1000 1653 745
Nagaland 291 577 104 1000 2166 263
Orissa 384 557 60 1000 123041 1395
Punjab 215 426 360 1000 196510 1895
Rajasthan
323 450 227 1000 301527 2599
Sikkim 22 344 634 1000 1144 243
Tamil Nadu 232 639 129 1000 641307 5778
Tripura 699 243 50 1000 10103 1007
Uttarakhand
278 303 418 1000 37229 695
Uttar Pradesh 248 454 298 1000 691755 6395
West Bengal 365 461 174 1000 313440 5339
A & N Islands 504 171 325 1000 1181 215
Chandigarh 3 0 996 1000 13126 616
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 65 57 878 1000 576 178
Daman & Diu 40 12 948 1000 501 178
Lakshadweep
371 0 629 1000 216 228
Puducherry 46 19 935 1000 20117 706
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 1661346 2771773 1174890 5616512
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 18702 31116 18236 68215 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 dist ribut ion of overnight visit or -t rips by main destination separ ately for each
St ate/ UT of origin
all-I ndia persons urban
all I ndia 296 493 209 1000 5616512 68215
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 169
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh 585 356 59 1000 1097032 6413
Arunachal Pradesh 520 208 260 1000 6999 864
Assam 502 454 42 1000 147412 3116
Bihar 665 261 70 1000 653390 4174
Chhattisgarh 649 264 82 1000 254671 1640
Delhi 2 91 907 1000 97761 1570
Goa
242 264 494 1000 13382 326
Gujarat 486 412 102 1000 586234 4314
Haryana 394 347 260 1000 340311 2256
Himachal Pradesh 696 183 121 1000 117230 1673
Jammu & Kashmir
691 218 90 1000 104624 1276
Jharkhand 586 299 114 1000 240261 2128
Karnataka 394 431 175 1000 611328 4172
Kerala 498 393 109 1000 362525 4478
Madhya Pradesh 627 284 84 1000 822981 5905
Maharashtra 463 432 105 1000 990599 8772
Manipur 337 551 100 1000 5472 1474
Meghalaya
617 264 113 1000 12372 897
Mizoram 594 371 34 1000 3126 839
Nagaland 414 511 64 1000 5355 666
Orissa 729 240 31 1000 492516 3619
Punjab
364 406 230 1000 314198 2269
Rajasthan 575 299 126 1000 760549 4697
Sikkim 247 456 298 1000 4458 612
Tamil Nadu 314 571 115 1000 732623 5975
Tripura 763 193 40 1000 26098 2037
Uttarakhand 545 194 260 1000 98400 894
Uttar Pradesh 540 357 103 1000 1985921 13159
West Bengal
689 247 64 1000 800927 7337
A & N Islands 608 287 105 1000 3648 301
Chandigarh 0 0 1000 1000 8606 445
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 378 135 487 1000 1355 226
Daman & Diu
93 4 903 1000 567 186
Lakshadweep 268 0 732 1000 292 154
Puducherry 54 41 905 1000 14620 514
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 6392942 4065349 1250962 11717846
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 47571 36156 15488 99378 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by main destination separately for each State/UT of origin
all-I ndia male rural+urban
all I ndia 535 353 111 1000 11717846 99378
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 170
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh 642 308 50 1000 1004284 6219
Arunachal Pradesh 573 173 252 1000 3633 290
Assam 572 393 31 1000 111358 2034
Bihar 755 196 45 1000 395265 2391
Chhattisgarh 698 237 61 1000 205398 1269
Delhi 6 112 882 1000 73215 996
Goa
280 271 450 1000 12134 282
Gujarat 480 420 99 1000 458810 3554
Haryana 387 370 243 1000 264306 1815
Himachal Pradesh 780 125 94 1000 102272 1289
Jammu & Kashmir
732 184 84 1000 101098 1157
Jharkhand 585 323 91 1000 190533 1452
Karnataka 413 447 140 1000 550766 4136
Kerala 614 302 84 1000 394574 4935
Madhya Pradesh 634 287 74 1000 596251 4062
Maharashtra 465 445 89 1000 854976 7301
Manipur 329 549 101 1000 2330 729
Meghalaya
592 309 97 1000 7860 706
Mizoram 550 409 39 1000 1244 370
Nagaland 510 442 32 1000 2534 228
Orissa 758 221 21 1000 383803 2493
Punjab
412 414 173 1000 268648 2121
Rajasthan 610 277 112 1000 575180 3289
Sikkim 249 504 247 1000 3359 439
Tamil Nadu 375 536 90 1000 689600 5767
Tripura 827 141 26 1000 27329 1999
Uttarakhand 483 212 305 1000 81156 647
Uttar Pradesh 552 339 109 1000 1352641 8202
West Bengal
734 213 53 1000 717528 6957
A & N Islands 633 218 149 1000 2501 253
Chandigarh 7 1 992 1000 5955 349
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 569 11 420 1000 837 144
Daman & Diu
121 8 872 1000 477 190
Lakshadweep 167 0 833 1000 211 117
Puducherry 79 8 913 1000 14544 482
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00) 5494790 3091751 863714 9456611
xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 40528 27151 10870 78664 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by main destination separately for each State/UT of origin
all-I ndia female rural+urban
all I ndia 566 336 97 1000 9456611 78664
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 171
State/UT
main destination no. of overnight visitor-
trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Andhra Pradesh 612 333 55 1000 2101316 12632
Arunachal Pradesh 534 199 258 1000 10632 1154
Assam 528 431 38 1000 258770 5150
Bihar 698 237 61 1000 1048655 6565
Chhattisgarh 671 251 72 1000 460069 2909
Delhi 3 99 897 1000 170976 2566
Goa 260 267 472 1000 25516 608
Gujarat 483 416 101 1000 1045044 7868
Haryana 391 357 252 1000 604617 4071
Himachal Pradesh 734 157 109 1000 219502 2962
Jammu & Kashmir 713 200 87 1000 205722 2433
Jharkhand 586 310 104 1000 430794 3580
Karnataka 404 439 158 1000 1162094 8308
Kerala 559 345 96 1000 757099 9413
Madhya Pradesh 630 285 80 1000 1419232 9967
Maharashtra 464 438 97 1000 1845575 16073
Manipur 335 550 101 1000 7802 2203
Meghalaya 607 282 106 1000 20232 1603
Mizoram 580 382 36 1000 4370 1209
Nagaland 443 490 54 1000 7889 894
Orissa 741 232 27 1000 876319 6112
Punjab 388 410 202 1000 582846 4390
Rajasthan 590 290 120 1000 1335729 7986
Sikkim 248 476 276 1000 7817 1051
Tamil Nadu 343 554 103 1000 1422223 11742
Tripura 796 166 33 1000 53427 4036
Uttarakhand 519 202 279 1000 179556 1541
Uttar Pradesh 545 350 106 1000 3338562 21361
West Bengal 711 230 58 1000 1518455 14294
A & N Islands 620 255 125 1000 6149 554
Chandigarh 3 0 996 1000 14561 794
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 450 88 462 1000 2192 370
Daman & Diu 107 6 887 1000 1044 376
Lakshadweep 221 0 779 1000 503 271
Puducherry 66 24 909 1000 29164 996
estd. no. of visitor-trips
(’00)
11887732 7157100 2114676 21174556 xxx xxx
sample no. of visitor-trips 88099 63307 26358 178042 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 41: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by main destination separately for each State/UT of origin
all-I ndia persons rural+urban
all I ndia 549 345 105 1000 21174556 178042
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 172
State/UT
(of main
destinatio n)
purpose no. o f o vernight
visito r-trip s
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
med ical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh 20 22 701 135 3 78 1 40 1000 901961 3898
Arunachal Pradesh 100 13 368 41 39 106 159 159 1000 7161 524
Assam 80 24 630 71 14 127 12 40 1000 84103 2750
Bihar 36 9 772 46 8 102 9 15 1000 460938 3391
Chhattisgarh 20 16 816 55 8 50 13 23 1000 146147 1122
Delhi 81 64 549 31 44 56 61 115 1000 44868 357
Goa 18 210 584 105 70 11 2 0 1000 5357 105
Gujarat 17 16 789 104 5 57 2 10 1000 215522 2298
Haryana 16 1 856 36 4 57 1 31 1000 246122 1281
Himachal Pradesh 31 21 685 140 13 54 17 38 1000 157833 1384
Jammu & Kashmir 19 26 739 116 22 29 8 41 1000 72556 862
Jharkhand 20 34 747 90 10 72 5 22 1000 132129 1446
Karnataka 35 18 675 193 4 42 1 33 1000 305103 2232
Kerala 27 13 680 99 11 96 0 74 1000 510664 2798
Madhya Pradesh 19 7 818 85 4 48 4 15 1000 660473 3644
Maharashtra 18 15 688 146 4 104 3 23 1000 734166 4200
Manip ur 113 22 431 74 19 124 132 81 1000 3968 917
Meghalaya 96 78 549 70 17 107 12 70 1000 8206 673
Mizoram 245 17 438 51 27 75 97 50 1000 3278 347
Nagaland 271 36 238 26 76 172 19 162 1000 4363 464
Orissa 29 38 753 30 3 105 8 35 1000 323578 2811
Punjab 22 5 779 111 6 49 0 27 1000 182818 1211
Rajasthan 13 3 768 94 10 75 2 34 1000 604395 3217
Sikkim 67 69 482 48 25 106 8 195 1000 2241 378
Tamil Nadu 21 35 651 210 5 48 1 28 1000 418963 3174
Tripura 6 45 800 18 4 91 1 32 1000 16398 1403
Uttarakhand 17 12 626 186 6 43 34 75 1000 71845 596
Uttar Pradesh 15 11 807 65 11 50 4 38 1000 1612211 9135
West Bengal 24 48 774 29 2 91 1 32 1000 616740 4549
A & N Islands 25 51 704 37 33 67 37 47 1000 2031 179
Chand igarh 2 26 474 5 102 318 0 73 1000 9714 76
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 3 4 974 2 1 15 0 0 1000 482 70
Daman & Diu 0 341 161 498 0 0 0 1 1000 107 12
Lakshadweep 0 382 618 0 0 0 0 0 1000 91 5
Puducherry
0 32 808 79 0 56 0 24 1000 4221 68
n.r. 82 31 363 129 1 100 4 96 1000 3794 72
estd. no. of visitor-
trip s (’00)
192514 155392 6419722 804526 62420 615981 36881 284922 8574547 xxx xxx
sample no. of
visitor-trips
2060 1312 43997 5547 675 5102 610 2299 61649 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-t rips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of destination
all I ndia male rural
all- I ndia 22 18 749 94 7 72 4 33 1000 8574547 61649
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 173
all India female rural
State/UT
(of main
destinatio n)
purpose no. o f o vernight
visito r-trip s
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
med ical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh 3 4 791 107 2 64 3 26 1000 906095 3873
Arunachal Pradesh 103 44 368 36 37 152 106 140 1000 1900 175
Assam 3 13 809 60 8 89 3 16 1000 49718 1747
Bihar 0 9 788 62 2 133 1 6 1000 236560 2035
Chhattisgarh
1 28 852 59 7 49 0 5 1000 109572 802
Delhi 0 82 756 12 1 127 2 21 1000 16825 168
Goa 0 54 700 146 90 11 0 0 1000 5122 82
Gujarat
10 18 815 79 16 53 1 8 1000 178758 1843
Haryana 0 2 854 39 0 75 1 30 1000 208878 1018
Himachal Pradesh 0 25 799 101 11 41 8 15 1000 135696 1065
Jammu & Kashmir
1 23 890 35 14 21 3 12 1000 91138 792
Jharkhand 1 21 809 60 6 100 1 0 1000 107033 979
Karnataka 1 28 743 164 5 35 0 24 1000 286559 2207
Kerala
1 11 765 49 1 96 0 77 1000 655117 3126
Madhya Pradesh 1 12 885 60 1 33 0 6 1000 429377 2443
Maharashtra 4 6 743 145 1 85 3 13 1000 625714 3531
Manip ur
199 4 412 77 59 156 57 32 1000 1500 415
Meghalaya 16 88 636 71 2 114 9 65 1000 5462 517
Mizoram 192 0 511 31 21 190 33 22 1000 1111 129
Nagaland
46 11 447 242 12 24 25 192 1000 980 148
Orissa 9 34 794 59 1 87 7 9 1000 258983 1958
Punjab 0 1 876 74 6 28 0 15 1000 230596 1284
Rajasthan
1 9 821 75 2 71 0 20 1000 442202 2271
Sikkim 0 1 609 47 24 95 5 219 1000 1471 253
Tamil Nadu 2 31 704 196 2 45 1 19 1000 425388 3113
Tripura
0 40 862 11 0 66 0 14 1000 21442 1445
Uttarakhand 0 19 804 112 0 42 7 15 1000 38388 351
Uttar Pradesh 1 8 851 64 1 50 1 22 1000 816820 5588
West Bengal
0 39 823 34 2 84 1 18 1000 678879 4437
A & N Islands 11 53 774 31 0 86 15 29 1000 1790 138
Chand igarh 0 1 692 5 0 301 0 0 1000 8315 53
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 1 973 2 0 24 0 0 1000 321 66
Daman & Diu 0 0 343 657 0 0 0 0 1000 89 11
Lakshadweep 0 0 988 0 12 0 0 0 1000 48 7
Puducherry 0 6 737 103 13 129 0 13 1000 4241 66
n.r. 10 0 301 330 0 17 0 59 1000 1310 42
estd. no. of visitor-
trip s (’00)
14339 109014 5612780 593445 19612 473683 10770 148625 6983398 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
230 1004 37737 3904 196 3760 163 1144 48178 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-t rips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of destination
all- I ndia 2 16 804 85 3 68 2 21 1000 6983398 48178
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 174
State/UT
(of main
destination)
purpose no. o f o vernight visitor-
trip s
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health
&
medical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh 11 13 745 121 2 71 2 33 1000 1808056 7771
Arunachal Pradesh
101 21 368 40 38 118 145 154 1000 9061 699
Assam 51 20 698 67 12 113 9 31 1000 133821 4497
Bihar 22 9 778 52 6 114 6 12 1000 697498 5426
Chhattisgarh
12 21 831 56 7 50 7 15 1000 255719 1924
Delhi 56 69 612 25 31 77 43 86 1000 61693 525
Goa 10 142 634 123 78 11 1 0 1000 10479 187
Gujarat
14 17 801 92 10 55 1 9 1000 394280 4141
Haryana 9 1 855 37 2 65 1 31 1000 455000 2299
Himachal Pradesh 17 23 736 123 12 48 13 27 1000 293529 2449
Jammu & Kashmir 10 24 816 75 18 25 5 27 1000 163694 1654
Jharkhand 12 28 774 77 9 84 4 12 1000 239162 2425
Karnataka 18 23 709 179 4 39 0 29 1000 591662 4439
Kerala
13 12 725 73 6 96 0 75 1000 1165781 5924
Madhya Pradesh 12 9 845 75 3 42 2 12 1000 1089850 6087
Maharashtra 11 11 714 146 2 95 3 18 1000 1359880 7731
Manipur
138 17 426 75 31 133 110 67 1000 5468 1332
Meghalaya 64 82 584 70 11 110 11 68 1000 13668 1190
Mizo ram 230 12 458 45 26 107 79 42 1000 4389 476
Nagaland
213 29 291 82 60 134 20 170 1000 5343 612
Orissa 21 36 770 43 2 97 7 24 1000 582561 4769
Punjab 11 3 830 92 6 38 0 21 1000 413414 2495
Rajasthan
8 6 791 86 6 73 1 28 1000 1046597 5488
Sikkim 39 40 536 48 24 101 7 206 1000 3712 631
Tamil Nadu 12 33 677 204 4 46 1 24 1000 844351 6287
Tripura 3 42 833 15 2 78 1 22 1000 37840 2848
Uttarakhand 11 15 692 159 4 43 24 53 1000 110233 947
Uttar Pradesh 10 10 823 65 7 50 3 32 1000 2429031 14723
West Bengal
12 44 798 31 2 87 1 25 1000 1295619 8986
A & N Islands 19 52 735 34 18 76 27 39 1000 3821 317
Chandigarh 1 14 577 5 54 310 0 39 1000 18029 129
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 2 3 974 2 1 19 0 0 1000 803 136
Daman & Diu 0 194 239 566 0 0 0 1 1000 196 23
Lakshadweep 0 235 760 0 4 0 0 0 1000 139 12
Puducherry 0 20 774 90 6 91 0 19 1000 8462 134
57 20 342 197 1 72 3 84 1000 5104 114
estd. no. of visitor-
trip s (’00)
206853 264406 12032502 1397971 82032 1089664 47651 433547 15557945 XXX XXX
samp le no. o f
visito r-trip s
2290 2316 81734 9451 871 8862 773 3443 109827 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-t rips by purpose of trip separately for each State/U T of destination
all I ndia persons rural
all- I ndia 13 17 773 90 5 70 3 28 1000 15557945 109827
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 175
All India male urban
State/UT
(of main
destinatio n)
purpose no. o f o vernight
visito r-trip s
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
med ical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
Andhra Pradesh
33 40 698 158 6 29 0 36 1000 392791 2867
Arunachal Pradesh 71 46 373 324 61 21 9 94 1000 1186 138
Assam 122 40 628 36 35 73 3 61 1000 14433 762
Bihar
29 49 666 169 15 49 0 23 1000 94016 1402
Chhattisgarh 59 61 760 70 9 35 0 6 1000 36454 487
Delhi 93 49 685 18 62 28 2 62 1000 54914 850
Goa
110 197 450 211 0 10 0 21 1000 6882 136
Gujarat 25 20 729 194 6 18 1 6 1000 205173 2017
Haryana 23 12 861 43 4 31 0 26 1000 65631 791
Himachal Pradesh 31 144 519 251 1 16 9 28 1000 23231 466
Jammu & Kashmir 23 54 492 384 23 6 3 15 1000 20034 545
Jharkhand 34 50 682 159 7 40 3 25 1000 22240 585
Karnataka
26 59 678 180 11 24 1 21 1000 163294 2023
Kerala 17 49 712 138 6 24 0 55 1000 206505 1624
Madhya Pradesh 33 22 812 78 10 23 1 21 1000 165072 2032
Maharashtra
27 36 686 209 9 21 1 11 1000 393965 4159
Manip ur 216 50 508 43 14 113 29 27 1000 787 358
Meghalaya 172 186 504 35 27 42 8 27 1000 731 156
Mizoram
192 186 466 51 31 37 4 34 1000 1749 456
Nagaland 274 77 338 39 45 78 4 144 1000 1259 174
Orissa 63 101 650 77 17 32 15 44 1000 76836 957
Punjab
40 15 786 90 10 28 0 31 1000 78280 971
Rajasthan 19 24 768 121 13 18 2 34 1000 216753 1994
Sikkim 70 447 171 251 0 0 0 60 1000 627 66
Tamil Nadu 19 61 685 184 5 31 1 14 1000 357760 3364
Tripura 9 78 837 1 8 30 0 35 1000 3776 475
Uttarakhand 47 75 284 557 15 3 4 15 1000 54758 503
Uttar Pradesh
32 41 805 51 8 38 3 22 1000 307495 4494
West Bengal 36 108 723 44 15 43 1 30 1000 156318 2412
A & N Islands 117 347 465 6 18 9 0 37 1000 540 89
Chand igarh 20 122 676 56 8 38 1 79 1000 12532 126
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 0 944 0 0 56 0 0 1000 104 19
Daman & Diu 0 625 375 0 0 0 0 0 1000 77 12
Lakshadweep
27 118 698 21 4 59 0 72 1000 596 64
Puducherry 0 69 675 170 70 14 0 3 1000 3049 76
n.r. 10 11 692 211 13 57 0 0 1000 3453 79
estd. no. of visitor-
trip s (’00)
97323 148069 2235704 459808 31898 88213 5050 77175 3143299 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
1642 1962 26166 4880 503 1414 101 1050 37729 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distr ibution of overnight visi to r-t rips by pur pose of tr ip separately for each State/UT of destination
all- I ndia 31 47 711 146 10 28 2 25 1000 3143299 37729
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 176
State/UT
(of main
destination)
purpose no. of overnight visito r-
trips
business ho lidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religio us &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
medical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
And hra Pradesh 4 46 731 161 5 24 0 29 1000 323268 2646
Arunachal
Pradesh 133 71 365 257 63 40 6 65 1000 390 62
Assam 5 45 745 47 9 113 0 35 1000 5515 446
Bihar 0 39 802 67 2 75 0 16 1000 35069 759
Chhattisgarh 3 50 825 95 4 20 0 2 1000 36241 444
Delhi 3 21 811 21 12 66 1 66 1000 35883 549
Goa 23 262 354 353 0 9 0 0 1000 6165 111
Gujarat 1 29 751 186 3 21 1 8 1000 147569 1728
Haryana 0 24 877 48 3 46 0 1 1000 47300 630
Himachal Pradesh 9 214 524 225 0 12 0 15 1000 23129 389
Jammu &
Kashmir 0 77 599 289 5 9 3 19 1000 17048 433
Jharkhand 0 50 745 125 6 60 4 10 1000 9734 340
Karnataka
2 39 744 175 6 21 0 12 1000 171552 1937
Kerala 0 64 778 87 1 36 0 33 1000 215510 1688
Madhya Pradesh 2 21 820 60 4 87 0 7 1000 123968 1511
Maharashtra 2 38 695 229 4 28 0 3 1000 332489 3499
Manip ur 11 13 521 85 5 310 4 46 1000 264 232
Meghalaya 15 204 680 0 0 50 37 15 1000 741 145
Mizoram
89 180 580 40 18 48 23 22 1000 890 230
Nagaland 24 0 502 190 10 111 29 133 1000 395 74
Orissa 1 118 666 112 4 65 0 33 1000 37777 686
Punjab
11 18 850 101 1 14 0 5 1000 69556 863
Rajasthan 0 18 788 155 7 19 0 11 1000 135733 1392
Sikkim 1 263 259 351 40 5 0 80 1000 433 45
Tamil Nadu
2 41 721 189 2 32 1 12 1000 328406 3232
Trip ura 1 89 884 3 2 15 0 2 1000 2990 438
Uttarakhand 0 95 309 573 10 2 5 7 1000 37910 416
Uttar Pradesh
2 31 847 53 9 40 1 17 1000 171155 2919
West Bengal 0 106 789 49 2 46 2 6 1000 135454 2271
A & N Islands 0 454 528 0 0 0 0 18 1000 483 73
Chand igarh 18 164 654 112 18 25 2 8 1000 9619 99
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 0 1000 71 8
Daman & Diu 0 855 145 0 0 0 0 0 1000 37 6
Lakshadweep 0 295 616 10 0 57 0 22 1000 616 34
Puducherry 0 90 756 146 0 8 0 1 1000 6503 86
n.r. 1 11 745 110 3 57 0 11 1000 3350 65
estd. no. of
visitor-trips (’00)
5736 115036 1849960 370540 11124 84126 1425 35008 2473213 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
146 1547 22656 4127 181 1201 45 570 30486 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of des ation
all I ndia female urban
all- I ndia 2 47 748 150 4 34 1 14 1000 2473213 30486
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 177
State/UT
(of main
destination)
purpose no. of overnight visitor-
trips
business ho lidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religio us &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
And hra Pradesh 20 43 713 160 6 27 0 33 1000 716059 5513
Arunachal
Pradesh 91 54 370 303 61 27 8 85 1000 1576 200
Assam 83 42 667 40 27 86 2 52 1000 19948 1208
Bihar 19 46 713 134 11 58 0 21 1000 129085 2161
Chhattisgarh 29 55 794 83 6 27 0 4 1000 72695 931
Delhi 55 37 739 19 41 44 2 64 1000 90797 1399
Goa 67 229 402 281 0 9 0 10 1000 13047 247
Gujarat 15 24 739 190 4 19 1 7 1000 352742 3745
Haryana 13 17 868 45 4 38 0 15 1000 112931 1421
Himachal Pradesh 20 179 522 238 1 14 5 22 1000 46360 855
Jammu &
Kashmir 13 64 539 343 15 7 3 17 1000 37082 978
Jharkhand 23 50 703 147 7 47 3 20 1000 31974 925
Karnataka
14 49 712 178 9 22 0 17 1000 334846 3960
Kerala 9 56 743 114 4 30 0 44 1000 422015 3312
Madhya Pradesh 18 21 815 69 7 53 0 15 1000 289040 3543
Maharashtra 15 37 690 219 7 24 1 7 1000 726454 7658
Manip ur 147 38 513 57 11 180 21 33 1000 1051 590
Meghalaya 93 195 592 17 13 46 23 21 1000 1472 301
Mizoram
155 184 507 47 26 41 11 30 1000 2639 686
Nagaland 201 55 386 83 35 87 11 141 1000 1654 248
Orissa 38 108 657 91 12 45 9 40 1000 114613 1643
Punjab
27 16 816 95 6 22 0 19 1000 147836 1834
Rajasthan 12 21 776 135 11 19 1 25 1000 352486 3386
Sikkim 41 369 208 294 17 2 0 69 1000 1060 111
Tamil Nadu
11 52 701 186 4 31 1 13 1000 686166 6596
Trip ura 5 83 858 2 5 23 0 20 1000 6766 913
Uttarakhand 26 84 295 564 12 2 4 12 1000 92668 919
Uttar Pradesh
20 37 821 52 8 39 2 20 1000 478650 7413
West Bengal 19 107 755 47 9 45 1 18 1000 291772 4683
A & N Islands 61 398 495 3 9 5 0 28 1000 1023 162
Chand igarh 19 138 667 78 12 33 1 51 1000 22151 225
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 0 969 0 0 31 0 0 1000 175 27
Daman & Diu 0 686 314 0 0 0 0 0 1000 114 18
Lakshadweep 13 209 656 15 2 58 0 47 1000 1212 98
Puducherry 0 82 725 155 26 10 0 1 1000 9552 162
n.r. 6 11 718 161 8 57 0 5 1000 6803 144
estd. no. of
visitor-trips (’00)
103059 263105 4085664 830348 43022 172339 6475 112183 5616512 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
1788 3509 48822 9007 684 2615 146 1620 68215 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of des ation
all I ndia persons urban
all- I ndia 18 47 728 148 8 31 1 20 1000 5616512 68215
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 178
State/UT
(of main
destinatio n)
purpose no. o f o vernight visitor-
trip s
business ho lidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religious &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health
&
medical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
And hra Pradesh 24 28 700 143 4 60 1 39 1000 1294752 6765
Arunachal Pradesh 95 19 369 94 43 90 131 147 1000 8347 662
Assam 86 27 630 66 17 120 11 43 1000 98536 3512
Bihar 34 16 753 68 10 92 8 17 1000 554954 4793
Chhattisgarh
29 26 803 58 8 47 10 19 1000 182601 1609
Delhi 88 55 630 23 55 39 26 84 1000 99782 1207
Goa 74 202 504 169 28 11 1 12 1000 12239 241
Gujarat
21 18 760 148 6 38 1 8 1000 420695 4315
Haryana 17 4 857 37 4 51 0 30 1000 311753 2072
Himachal Pradesh 31 40 660 158 11 49 16 36 1000 181064 1850
Jammu & Kashmir
20 34 668 193 23 22 6 34 1000 92590 1407
Jharkhand 23 36 736 101 10 67 5 22 1000 154369 2031
Karnataka 31 34 676 188 6 35 1 28 1000 468397 4255
Kerala
24 24 690 110 10 74 0 68 1000 717169 4422
Madhya Pradesh 22 11 816 83 6 43 3 16 1000 825545 5676
Maharashtra 22 23 687 171 6 71 2 18 1000 1128131 8359
Manip ur
134 28 448 67 18 121 110 70 1000 4755 1275
Meghalaya 104 89 544 67 18 100 12 65 1000 8937 829
Mizoram 222 89 450 51 29 59 58 43 1000 5027 803
Nagaland
272 47 265 29 68 147 15 158 1000 5622 638
Orissa 36 51 731 40 6 90 9 37 1000 400414 3768
Punjab 27 8 781 105 7 43 0 28 1000 261098 2182
Rajasthan
15 9 768 102 11 59 2 34 1000 821148 5211
Sikkim 68 182 389 108 18 74 6 155 1000 2868 444
Tamil Nadu 20 48 668 197 5 39 1 21 1000 776723 6538
Trip ura
7 51 807 15 5 79 1 32 1000 20174 1878
Uttarakhand 31 41 469 357 10 25 20 48 1000 126603 1099
Uttar Pradesh 18 17 806 63 11 48 4 35 1000 1919706 13629
West Bengal
26 60 763 32 5 81 1 32 1000 773058 6961
A & N Islands 49 128 641 29 29 52 27 44 1000 2571 268
Chand igarh 13 82 592 35 47 154 1 77 1000 22246 202
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 2 3 970 2 1 21 0 0 1000 586 89
Daman & Diu 0 484 269 246 0 0 0 1 1000 184 24
Lakshadweep 22 165 683 18 3 49 0 60 1000 687 69
Puducherry 0 47 754 116 28 39 0 16 1000 7270 144
n.r. 44 20 537 172 8 77 2 45 1000 7247 151
estd. no. of visitor-
trips (’00)
289837 303461 8655426 1264334 94318 704194 41931 362097 11717846 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
3702 3274 70163 10427 1178 6516 711 3349 99378 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of des ation
all I ndia male rural+urban
all- I ndia 25 27 738 109 8 59 3 31 1000 11717846 99378
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 179
State/UT
(of main
destination)
purpose no. of overnight visito r-
trips
business ho lidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religio us &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
And hra Pradesh 3 18 772 125 3 51 2 27 1000 1229363 6519
Arunachal
Pradesh 110 51 367 88 43 126 82 122 1000 2290 237
Assam 3 17 801 58 8 92 3 19 1000 55233 2193
Bihar 0 14 790 63 2 124 1 7 1000 271629 2794
Chhattisgarh 1 35 844 70 6 40 0 4 1000 145813 1246
Delhi 2 39 795 18 8 83 2 53 1000 52708 717
Goa 15 191 472 282 31 9 0 0 1000 11287 193
Gujarat 6 23 784 130 10 38 1 8 1000 326327 3571
Haryana 0 7 859 41 1 68 1 23 1000 256178 1648
Himachal Pradesh 2 59 750 123 9 36 6 15 1000 158825 1454
Jammu &
Kashmir 1 36 823 94 12 18 3 14 1000 108186 1225
Jharkhand 1 24 802 68 6 96 2 1 1000 116767 1319
Karnataka
1 33 744 169 6 29 0 19 1000 458111 4144
Kerala 1 25 768 59 1 81 0 65 1000 870627 4814
Madhya Pradesh 2 15 867 60 2 48 0 7 1000 553345 3954
Maharashtra 3 19 724 179 2 62 2 9 1000 958203 7030
Manip ur 152 6 439 79 46 195 44 36 1000 1764 647
Meghalaya 16 106 643 60 1 104 13 57 1000 6203 662
Mizoram
138 94 547 36 20 117 28 22 1000 2001 359
Nagaland 40 7 464 226 12 50 26 174 1000 1375 222
Orissa 8 50 770 69 2 83 5 14 1000 296760 2644
Punjab
3 5 869 81 5 24 0 12 1000 300152 2147
Rajasthan 1 12 812 97 4 57 0 18 1000 577935 3663
Sikkim 0 79 504 138 28 68 3 178 1000 1904 298
Tamil Nadu
2 36 712 193 2 39 1 15 1000 753794 6345
Trip ura 0 47 866 10 1 58 0 12 1000 24432 1883
Uttarakhand 0 60 536 362 5 20 6 11 1000 76298 767
Uttar Pradesh
1 13 850 62 3 48 1 21 1000 987975 8507
West Bengal 0 53 815 37 2 76 1 15 1000 814333 6708
A & N Islands 8 167 704 22 0 62 11 26 1000 2273 211
Chand igarh 9 84 672 59 9 161 1 4 1000 17934 152
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 0 1 978 1 0 20 0 0 1000 392 74
Daman & Diu 0 278 279 444 0 0 0 0 1000 126 17
Lakshadweep 0 262 658 9 1 51 0 20 1000 664 41
Puducherry 0 53 747 127 6 62 0 6 1000 10744 152
n.r. 4 8 604 180 2 44 0 26 1000 4660 107
estd. no. of
visitor-trips (’00)
20075 224050 7462740 963985 30736 557809 12195 183633 9456611 XXX XXX
sample no. of
visitor-trips
376 2551 60393 8031 377 4961 208 1714 78664 XXX XXX
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of destination
all I ndia female rural+urban
all- I ndia 2 25 787 105 3 58 1 19 1000 9456611 78664
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 180
State/UT
(of main
destination)
purpose no. o f overnight visito r-
trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
med ical
shopping others all estd. * Samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
And hra Pradesh 14 23 734 134 4 56 1 33 1000 2524115 13284
Arunachal
Pradesh 99 28 369 93 43 100 118 140 1000 10637 899
Assam 55 23 694 63 14 109 8 34 1000 153769 5705
Bihar 22 15 767 66 7 104 5 13 1000 826583 7587
Chhattisgarh 16 30 822 63 7 44 5 12 1000 328414 2855
Delhi 55 49 693 21 37 56 16 72 1000 152490 1924
Goa 46 197 489 222 29 10 0 7 1000 23526 434
Gujarat 14 21 771 140 7 38 1 8 1000 747022 7886
Haryana 10 5 858 39 2 58 0 27 1000 567931 3720
Himachal
Pradesh 18 49 701 142 10 43 12 26 1000 339889 3304
Jammu &
Kashmir 11 35 743 145 18 20 5 24 1000 200776 2632
Jharkhand 13 31 764 87 8 79 3 14 1000 271136 3350
Karnataka 16 34 710 178 6 32 0 24 1000 926508 8399
Kerala 12 24 730 84 5 78 0 67 1000 1587796 9236
Madhya Pradesh 13 12 838 73 4 45 2 12 1000 1378890 9630
Maharashtra 13 21 704 175 4 67 2 14 1000 2086334 15389
Manip ur 140 21 445 71 26 144 90 60 1000 6519 1922
Meghalaya 68 96 585 64 11 102 12 62 1000 15140 1491
Mizoram 196 90 480 46 26 77 48 36 1000 7028 1162
Nagaland 210 36 318 82 53 121 18 162 1000 6997 860
Orissa 24 51 747 52 4 87 8 27 1000 697174 6412
Punjab 15 7 826 93 6 33 0 20 1000 561250 4329
Rajasthan 9 10 787 100 8 58 1 27 1000 1399083 8874
Sikkim 39 138 438 121 22 72 5 165 1000 4772 742
Tamil Nadu 11 42 689 195 4 39 1 18 1000 1530517 12883
Trip ura 3 49 837 12 3 68 0 22 1000 44606 3761
Uttarakhand 18 49 496 359 8 23 14 33 1000 202901 1866
Uttar Pradesh 12 15 823 62 8 48 3 30 1000 2907681 22136
West Bengal 13 57 789 35 3 78 1 24 1000 1587391 13669
A & N Islands 30 146 670 26 16 57 20 36 1000 4844 479
Chand igarh 11 83 627 45 31 157 1 45 1000 40180 354
Dadra & Nagar
Haveli 1 2 973 2 1 21 0 0 1000 978 163
Daman & Diu
0 410 272 317 0 0 0 0 1000 310 41
Lakshadweep 11 213 671 13 2 50 0 40 1000 1351 110
Puducherry 0 50 750 122 16 51 0 10 1000 18014 296
n.r.
27 15 566 175 5 63 1 37 1000 11907 258
estd. no. of
visitor-trips (’00) 309912 527511 16118166 2228319 125054 1262003 54126 545730 21174457 xxx xxx
sample no. of
visitor-trips 4078 5825 130556 18458 1555 11477 919 5063 178042 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 42: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-trips by purpose of trip separately for each State/UT of des ation
all I ndia persons rur al+urban
all- I ndia 15 26 760 107 6 58 2 26 1000 21174457 178042
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 181
quintile-
class in
MPCE (%)
major mode of travel no. of overnight visitor-
trip s
on foot bus train ship/
boat
air own transport tansport-
equip ment
rental
others n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
bicycle two
wheeler
rickshaw auto
rickshaw
car/ jeep tractor/
truck
animal
driven
transport
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19)
0-20 71 613 59 1 0 88 23 4 15 11 5 0 106 4 0 1000 1995145 13453
20-40 30 697 61 1 0 51 25 1 10 12 4 3 101 5 0 1000 2477655 16362
40-60 25 702 78 2 0 37 31 2 7 11 4 1 95 5 0 1000 2802014 19413
60-80 24 702 70 1 0 25 39 1 5 14 5 1 109 6 0 1000 3268170 23994
80-100 11 655 88 2 0 16 64 0 5 46 4 0 100 8 0 1000 5014961 36605
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
all 27 674 74 1 0 36 41 1 8 23 5 1 102 6 0 1000 15557945 109827
estd.no. o f
visitor-trips
(’00) 418451 10492800 1157927 19401 1342 565284 639734 19503 118576 358125 71971 16296 1589213 89006 315 15557945 xxx xxx
sample no.
of visitor-
trips 2587 75346 7931 332 94 2955 4003 114 721 2506 357 92 12181 603 5 109827 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 43: Per 1000 distr ibution of overnight visitor-tr ips by major mode of travel for each quintile class of MPCE(%)
all-I ndia rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 182
quintile-
class in
MPCE (%)
major mode of travel no. o f o vernight visitor-
trip s
on
foot
bus train ship/
boat
air own transport tansport-
equipment
rental
others n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
bicycle two
wheeler
rickshaw auto
rickshaw
car/
jeep
tractor/
truck
animal
driven
transport
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19)
0-20 4 648 209 0 0 15 20 0 29 8 2 0 64 1 0 1000 702616 7073
20-40 6 596 207 1 0 2 19 0 101 11 0 0 52 6 0 1000 953399 9838
40-60 2 657 246 1 0 3 22 0 5 17 1 0 42 3 0 1000 953567 12734
60-80 1 607 263 0 0 1 33 1 1 32 0 0 56 3 0 1000 1216056 16923
80-100 2 454 353 0 10 2 17 0 1 111 0 0 43 4 1 1000 1790874 21647
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
all 3 570 273 0 3 4 22 0 22 48 1 0 50 4 0 1000 5616512 68215
estd.no. of
visito r-
trips (’00) 15554 3201464 1531321 2343 18029 19766 124471 2593 124826 270676 2863 0 279443 20823 2341 5616512 xxx xxx
samp le no.
of visito r-
trips 167 36710 20287 318 402 185 1435 31 201 3959 73 0 4231 208 8 68215 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 43: Per 1000 distribution of overnight visitor-tr ips by major mode of travel for each quintile class of M PCE(% )
all-I ndia urban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 183
quintile-class in MPCE (%) major type o f stay no. of overnight visitor-trips
hotel private guest
ho use
govt guest
house
dharamshala rented
house
friends &
relatives
others includ ing
carriages/coaches
n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
0-20 6 4 5 18 2 903 62 0 1000 1995145 13453
20-40 8 7 3 23 2 895 62 0 1000 2477655 16362
40-60 8 4 3 26 8 874 76 2 1000 2802014 19413
60-80 11 6 2 31 4 867 79 1 1000 3268170 23994
80-100 23 9 3 50 6 786 123 0 1000 5014961 36605
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
all 13 6 3 33 5 851 88 1 1000 15557945 109827
estd.no. of visitor-trips (’00) 205702 97431 46047 516936 73819 13244127 1362365 11517 15557945 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 2582 952 512 3626 509 92240 9326 80 109827 xxx xxx
*last 365 days ** last 30 days
T able 44: Per 1000 distribut ion of overnight visi tor- tr ips by major type of stay for each qui nt ile class of M PCE(% )
all-I ndia rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 184
quintile-class in MPCE (%) major type o f stay no. of overnight visitor-trips
hotel private guest
ho use
govt guest
house
dharamshala rented
house
friends &
relatives
others includ ing
carriages/coaches
n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
0-20 3 8 3 39 0 874 72 0 1000 702616 7073
20-40 22 6 1 35 4 849 82 0 1000 953399 9838
40-60 28 10 2 50 2 843 66 0 1000 953567 12734
60-80 37 10 3 43 3 800 103 0 1000 1216056 16923
80-100 94 16 6 47 3 718 116 0 1000 1790874 21647
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
all 47 11 4 44 3 799 93 0 1000 5616512 68215
estd.no. of visitor-trips (’00) 263130 60849 20852 244884 15178 4487028 523788 801 5616512 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 4025 899 501 3134 235 52465 6941 15 68215 xxx xxx
*l ast 365 days **last 30 days
T able 44: Per 1000 distribut ion of overnight visi tor- tr ips by ma jo r type of stay for each quint ile class of M PCE(% )
all-I ndia u rban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 185
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day visitor-trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religio us
&
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senio r o fficials and
managers 133 35 411 80 1 96 186 58 0 1000 321938 1949
professionals 181 24 306 73 11 124 208 72 0 1000 327262 2241
associate professionals 133 31 315 54 18 109 256 85 0 1000 248402 1756
clerks 68 29 448 86 33 79 180 76 0 1000 121240 874
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 130 27 371 66 1 150 172 83 0 1000 652351 3788
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 51 18 374 52 3 151 282 68 0 1000 4768611 25877
craft and related trades workers 96 36 406 73 2 142 169 75 0 1000 741890 4056
plant and machine operators and
assemb lers 64 42 373 69 2 145 148 157 0 1000 359783 1881
elementary occupations 38 21 377 68 1 167 263 64 0 1000 3063041 14401
n.r. 198 24 181 33 19 55 405 84 0 1000 19057 156
total employed 64 23 375 62 3 150 251 72 0 1000 10623576 56979
unemployed 12 54 360 45 59 95 176 199 0 1000 203983 1063
out o f labour fo rce 5 48 408 101 17 232 115 74 0 1000 3995168 14142
n.r. 0 0 294 0 0 101 589 17 0 1000 1244 25
all 52 28 382 69 7 166 223 74 0 1000 14823971 72209
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 765910 418998 5658650 1029633 97705 2464103 3298811 1089644 516 14823971 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 4400 2081 28418 4810 667 12512 13880 5435 6 72209 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia male rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
I f a vi si t or compl et ed mor e t han one same-day t r ip then here he shoul d be count ed the no. of ti mes he has compl eted same-day t ri ps wi t hi n the ref er ence per iod
A- 186
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day visitor-
trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religious
&
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
med ical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senio r o fficials and
managers 29 7 462 102 3 111 161 126 0 1000 44960 268
professio nals 67 27 397 76 16 177 208 32 0 1000 54038 324
associate professionals 166 13 355 51 39 177 121 77 0 1000 116189 572
clerks 16 75 513 181 6 46 82 81 0 1000 17928 118
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 68 14 372 118 8 240 114 66 0 1000 104662 543
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 8 10 453 97 1 192 177 62 0 1000 1224471 5568
craft and related trades workers 94 11 349 203 7 192 65 79 0 1000 187131 760
plant and machine operators and
assemb lers 0 68 274 49 0 77 296 235 0 1000 38704 107
elementary occupations 20 14 405 127 0 205 180 49 0 1000 1062529 4030
n.r. 49 0 441 348 8 32 76 47 0 1000 682 28
total employed 28 13 419 113 3 194 168 62 0 1000 2851294 12318
unemployed 0 33 412 110 29 127 46 243 0 1000 85588 475
out o f labour fo rce 3 27 430 106 9 259 103 62 0 1000 6654709 27404
n.r. 0 31 230 55 0 159 522 2 0 1000 2685 15
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 108697 216384 4088160 1040463 72084 2272765 1183018 612113 594 9594276 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 468 931 17750 4033 286 9468 4643 2627 6 40212 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Note:
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia female rural
all 11 23 426 108 8 237 123 64 0 1000 9594276 40212
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 187
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day visitor-trips
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senio r o fficials
and managers 122 32 416 82 2 98 183 65 0 1000 366898 2217
professio nals 167 25 317 74 12 131 208 67 0 1000 381300 2565
associate professionals 142 26 327 53 24 128 217 83 0 1000 364591 2328
clerks 62 35 456 97 30 75 169 77 0 1000 139168 992
service workers and shop
& market sales workers 122 26 371 72 2 161 165 81 0 1000 757013 4331
skilled agricultural and
fishery workers 43 17 389 60 2 159 263 67 0 1000 5993082 31445
craft and related trades
workers 95 32 396 96 3 151 151 76 0 1000 929021 4816
plant and machine
operators and assemb lers 59 44 364 67 2 139 161 163 0 1000 398487 1988
elementary occupations 34 20 384 82 1 176 244 60 0 1000 4125570 18431
n.r. 194 24 189 43 19 55 395 83 0 1000 19739 184
total employed 58 21 383 71 3 159 235 70 0 1000 13474870 69297
unemployed 9 47 376 66 50 105 134 213 0 1000 289571 1538
out o f labour fo rce 4 34 422 104 12 249 107 67 0 1000 10649877 41546
n.r. 0 11 271 20 0 122 565 11 0 1000 3929 40
all 37 26 398 84 7 192 187 70 0 1000 24418247 112421
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 874607 635382 9746810 2070096 169789 4736868 4481829 1701757 1110 24418247 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 4868 3012 46168 8843 953 21980 18523 8062 12 112421 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia persons rural
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 188
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day
visitor-trips
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religio us &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior o fficials and
managers 147 55 529 132 6 45 49 37 0 1000 367318 2636
professionals 115 75 508 131 9 59 56 46 0 1000 315575 2073
associate professionals 122 46 522 105 6 67 100 32 0 1000 206377 1410
clerks 67 58 532 182 6 50 72 34 0 1000 155615 1058
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 138 40 513 100 6 81 72 50 0 1000 487871 3326
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 85 25 564 64 3 100 63 95 0 1000 160432 1160
craft and related trades workers 92 68 553 114 0 69 55 50 0 1000 457037 2923
plant and machine operators and
assemb lers 51 34 608 140 2 62 60 43 0 1000 219004 1430
elementary occupations 42 28 596 125 0 88 92 31 0 1000 386710 2655
n.r. 385 21 377 0 66 53 83 15 0 1000 5582 54
total employed 101 49 545 119 4 69 68 45 0 1000 2761520 18725
unemployed 21 53 493 129 55 43 69 138 0 1000 91019 593
out o f labour fo rce 2 83 535 160 31 91 58 39 0 1000 1385541 7168
n.r. 0 0 1000 0 0 0 0 0 0 1000 113 4
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 302315 248942 2292800 556041 54289 318577 275225 190003 0 4238193 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 2169 1540 14382 3336 337 1988 1405 1333 0 26490 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia male u rban
all 71 59 541 131 13 75 65 45 0 1000 4238193 26490
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 189
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day
visitor-trips
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religio us &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior o fficials and
managers 53 47 652 137 7 77 21 6 0 1000 36632 247
professionals 66 96 537 126 16 43 54 62 0 1000 46833 380
associate professionals 11 103 533 130 35 37 66 85 0 1000 46756 357
clerks 1 86 439 189 0 240 13 33 0 1000 32880 176
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 78 59 447 215 2 133 24 42 0 1000 51544 402
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 2 28 614 125 0 201 24 6 0 1000 30046 199
craft and related trades workers 16 31 536 192 0 109 33 83 0 1000 75258 442
plant and machine operators and
assemb lers 3 0 648 134 0 144 21 50 0 1000 8931 43
elementary occupations 7 13 644 164 0 80 55 36 0 1000 91912 637
n.r. 191 182 581 0 0 10 0 36 0 1000 231 11
total employed 27 51 559 163 6 105 39 49 0 1000 421022 2894
unemployed 2 59 507 49 31 95 190 67 0 1000 31239 269
out o f labour fo rce 3 53 583 176 8 94 53 29 0 1000 2457308 15048
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1000 0 1000 221 1
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 19956 153627 1683359 501920 23298 279901 152305 95417 6 2909789 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 139 956 10728 3128 151 1640 883 586 1 18212 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia female ur ban
all 7 53 579 172 8 96 52 33 0 1000 2909789 18212
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 190
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day
visitor-trips
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religio us &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior o fficials and
managers 138 55 541 132 6 48 46 34 0 1000 403950 2883
professionals 109 78 512 130 10 57 56 48 0 1000 362408 2453
associate professionals 101 57 524 110 12 61 94 42 0 1000 253133 1767
clerks 55 63 515 183 5 85 61 34 0 1000 188495 1234
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 132 42 506 112 5 86 67 49 0 1000 539415 3728
skilled agricultural and fishery workers 72 26 572 75 2 117 56 80 0 1000 190478 1359
craft and related trades workers 80 62 550 125 0 75 52 55 0 1000 532295 3365
plant and machine operators and
assemb lers 49 33 610 140 2 65 58 44 0 1000 227935 1473
elementary occupations 35 25 605 133 0 86 84 32 0 1000 478622 3292
n.r. 377 27 386 0 63 51 79 16 0 1000 5813 65
total employed 91 49 547 126 4 74 64 45 0 1000 3182542 21619
unemployed 16 54 497 107 48 57 102 118 0 1000 122258 862
out o f labour fo rce 3 63 567 171 16 93 55 32 0 1000 3842849 22216
n.r. 0 0 961 0 0 0 0 39 0 1000 334 5
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 322271 402569 3976159 1057961 77587 598478 427530 285420 6 7147982 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 2308 2496 25110 6464 488 3628 2288 1919 1 44702 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia persons urban
all 45 56 556 148 11 84 60 40 0 1000 7147982 44702
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 191
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. of same-day visitor-trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
Social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senio r o fficials
and managers 139 43 459 101 3 75 131 49 0 1000 689256 4585
professio nals 157 43 380 94 11 100 153 63 0 1000 642837 4314
associate professionals 129 36 383 71 14 95 205 67 0 1000 454779 3166
clerks 68 42 485 128 21 66 133 58 0 1000 276855 1932
service workers and shop
& market sales workers 132 31 415 76 2 129 141 73 0 1000 1140222 7114
skilled agricultural and
fishery workers 51 18 378 53 3 150 278 69 0 1000 4929043 27037
craft and related trades
workers 95 45 446 84 2 122 139 68 0 1000 1198927 6979
plant and machine
operators and assemb lers 61 40 435 88 2 123 125 127 0 1000 578787 3311
elementary occupations 38 22 393 72 1 161 251 62 0 1000 3449751 17056
n.r. 226 24 210 28 26 55 357 74 0 1000 24639 210
total employed 69 26 398 69 3 140 226 68 0 1000 13385096 75704
unemployed 15 53 392 66 58 82 150 184 0 1000 295002 1656
out o f labour fo rce 4 55 433 113 20 204 104 67 0 1000 5380709 21310
n.r. 0 0 433 0 0 81 472 13 0 1000 1357 29
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 1068225 667940 7951450 1585674 151994 2782680 3574036 1279647 516 19062164 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 6569 3621 42800 8146 1004 14500 15285 6768 6 98699 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- tr ips by pur pose for each broad pri ncipal act ivity status
all-I ndia male ru ra l+urban
all 55 33 405 79 8 153 199 69 0 1000 19062164 98699
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 192
principal
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. o f same-day visitor-trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
Social religious &
pilgrimage
education
&
training
health &
med ical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
employed
legislators, senior officials and
managers 38 22 533 115 4 98 108 81 0 1000 81592 515
professio nals 67 54 452 96 16 125 148 44 0 1000 100871 704
associate professio nals 131 34 396 69 38 145 108 79 0 1000 162945 929
clerks 7 81 470 185 3 158 42 53 0 1000 50808 294
service workers and shop & market
sales workers 71 26 392 144 6 212 90 59 0 1000 156206 945
skilled agricultural and fishery
workers 8 10 456 97 1 193 174 61 0 1000 1254517 5767
craft and related trades workers 76 15 392 200 6 173 58 80 0 1000 262389 1202
plant and machine operators and
assemblers 0 58 328 62 0 87 256 208 0 1000 47635 150
elementary occupatio ns 19 14 420 129 0 197 173 48 0 1000 1154441 4667
n.r. 77 36 469 278 6 28 61 45 0 1000 913 39
total employed 28 17 432 118 3 185 155 60 0 1000 3272316 15212
unemployed 1 38 431 97 29 121 75 207 0 1000 116827 744
out of labour fo rce 3 32 461 120 9 225 93 56 0 1000 9112017 42452
n.r. 0 31 226 55 0 156 513 20 0 1000 2906 16
estd no. of visitor-trips (’00) 128653 370011 5771519 1542383 95382 2552666 1335323 707530 600 12504065 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f visitor-trips 607 1887 28478 7161 437 11108 5526 3213 7 58424 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distr ib ut ion of same-day visitor- t rips by pur pose for each broad p ri ncipal act ivity status
all- I ndia female rural+u rban
all 11 28 453 120 8 212 111 58 0 1000 12504065 58424
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 193
princip al
activity
status
NCO
purpose no. o f same-day visitor-trips
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreatio n
Social religio us &
pilgrimage
educatio n
& training
health &
medical
shopping others n.r. all estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)
emp lo yed
legislators, senior officials
and managers 128 41 466 102 3 78 128 53 0 1000 770848 5100
professionals 145 44 389 94 11 104 152 60 0 1000 743708 5018
associate professio nals 130 35 387 70 20 108 180 70 0 1000 617724 4095
clerks 59 47 482 136 18 79 120 57 0 1000 327663 2226
service workers and shop
& market sales workers 125 31 412 84 3 139 135 71 0 1000 1296428 8059
skilled agricultural and
fishery workers 44 17 392 61 2 158 259 67 0 1000 6183560 32804
craft and related trades
workers 91 40 436 104 2 131 125 70 0 1000 1461316 8181
plant and machine
operators and assemb lers 56 41 427 86 2 120 135 133 0 1000 626422 3461
elementary occupatio ns 34 20 399 85 1 170 233 59 0 1000 4604192 21723
n.r. 221 24 218 36 26 54 348 73 0 1000 25552 249
total emp lo yed 62 25 404 78 3 148 213 67 0 1000 16657412 90916
unemp lo yed 10 49 404 75 49 94 127 191 0 1000 411829 2400
out of labour force 4 40 451 118 13 218 97 60 0 1000 14492726 63762
n.r. 0 10 368 17 0 105 485 15 0 1000 4263 45
all 38 31 423 94 8 175 167 65 0 1000 31566229 157123
estd no. o f visito r-trip s (’00) 1196878 1037951 13722969 3128057 247376 5335346 4909359 1987177 1116 31566229 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 7176 5508 71278 15307 1441 25608 20811 9981 13 157123 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 45: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by pu rpose for each b road principal activity status
all- I nd ia persons ru ral+ur ban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 194
State/UT
main destinatio n no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 897 85 16 1000 1287703 4065
Arunachal Pradesh 734 99 165 1000 9152 639
Assam 914 75 5 1000 268978 2930
Bihar 903 67 16 1000 944169 3413
Chhattisgarh 957 35 3 1000 326103 1230
Delhi 293 696 11 1000 15995 106
Goa 878 113 9 1000 10886 88
Gujarat 878 117 6 1000 650100 2360
Haryana 762 188 50 1000 345330 981
Himachal Pradesh 927 49 24 1000 187914 1729
Jammu & Kashmir 779 204 10 1000 191615 1401
Jharkhand 903 82 7 1000 370290 1496
Karnataka 886 105 9 1000 539564 2437
Kerala 833 157 10 1000 788300 5948
Madhya Pradesh 950 37 6 1000 1222839 4784
Maharashtra 896 95 7 1000 1016327 4698
Manip ur 625 341 8 1000 10233 800
Meghalaya 816 160 8 1000 17911 890
Mizoram 890 55 18 1000 1830 256
Nagaland 908 46 26 1000 7471 725
Orissa 959 33 6 1000 977593 4735
Punjab 832 133 35 1000 379056 1547
Rajasthan 916 70 14 1000 821614 3285
Sikkim 732 229 39 1000 6899 539
Tamil Nadu 870 126 4 1000 781995 3497
Trip ura 943 49 3 1000 30708 1338
Uttarakhand 838 95 68 1000 118989 474
Uttar Pradesh 893 100 7 1000 2312873 9645
West Bengal 924 67 2 1000 1160826 5371
A & N Islands 996 4 0 1000 6879 292
Chand igarh 0 0 1000 1000 1391 26
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 820 84 96 1000 2249 174
Daman & Diu 780 0 219 1000 1229 191
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000 172 12
Puducherry 514 25 461 1000 8790 107
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
13283511 1345065 153369 14823971 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 62989 7850 1135 72209 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/U T of or igin
all- I nd ia male rural
all I ndia 896 91 10 1000 14823971 72209
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 195
State/UT
main destination no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 902 83 13 1000 966868 2975
Arunachal Pradesh 807 100 76 1000 5134 319
Assam 898 73 11 1000 162928 1354
Bihar 897 53 26 1000 411784 1008
Chhattisgarh 961 31 2 1000 217679 560
Delhi 177 814 9 1000 10651 49
Goa 918 64 18 1000 9665 69
Gujarat 900 96 3 1000 411904 1262
Haryana 749 213 38 1000 222872 550
Himachal Pradesh 916 62 21 1000 154148 1281
Jammu & Kashmir 862 123 2 1000 138083 817
Jharkhand 914 73 5 1000 218207 642
Karnataka 878 115 7 1000 428358 1770
Kerala 871 115 14 1000 723690 5890
Madhya Pradesh 943 45 5 1000 634570 1540
Maharashtra 871 117 10 1000 703576 2405
Manip ur 553 439 0 1000 8035 671
Meghalaya 769 208 10 1000 14833 798
Mizoram 977 6 17 1000 696 90
Nagaland 938 29 8 1000 3755 391
Orissa 967 26 7 1000 636496 1611
Punjab 776 172 52 1000 295479 1138
Rajasthan 911 79 10 1000 501260 1345
Sikkim 792 145 57 1000 5181 375
Tamil Nadu 881 112 7 1000 666376 2948
Trip ura 964 16 7 1000 23954 1000
Uttarakhand 811 137 52 1000 81966 194
Uttar Pradesh 906 89 5 1000 1127138 3122
West Bengal 934 54 5 1000 794061 3483
A & N Islands 987 13 0 1000 3834 196
Chand igarh 45 0 955 1000 668 19
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 958 22 20 1000 1171 76
Daman & Diu 650 0 350 1000 1021 162
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000 34 6
Puducherry 493 26 481 1000 8199 96
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00) 8568985 883515 112862 9594276
xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 34894 4505 684 40212 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia female r ural
all I ndia 893 92 12 1000 9594276 40212
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 196
State/UT
main destinatio n no. o f same-day visito r-
trip s
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh
899 84 15 1000 2254571 7040
Arunachal Pradesh
762 99 132 1000 14286 958
Assam
909 74 7 1000 431906 4284
Bihar
902 64 19 1000 1355953 4421
Chhattisgarh
958 33 3 1000 543782 1790
Delhi
250 740 10 1000 26646 155
Goa
899 88 14 1000 20551 157
Gujarat
885 110 5 1000 1062004 3622
Haryana
758 197 46 1000 568202 1531
Himachal Pradesh
923 55 23 1000 342062 3010
Jammu & Kashmir
812 171 7 1000 329698 2218
Jharkhand
907 79 7 1000 588497 2138
Karnataka
882 109 8 1000 967922 4207
Kerala
852 136 12 1000 1511990 11838
Madhya Pradesh
949 39 6 1000 1857409 6324
Maharashtra
888 103 8 1000 1719903 7103
Manip ur
593 384 5 1000 18268 1471
Meghalaya
794 183 9 1000 32744 1688
Mizoram
913 42 18 1000 2526 346
Nagaland
917 40 20 1000 11226 1116
Orissa
961 31 7 1000 1614089 6346
Punjab
808 150 42 1000 674535 2685
Rajasthan
915 73 13 1000 1322874 4630
Sikkim
758 192 47 1000 12080 914
Tamil Nadu
875 120 6 1000 1448371 6445
Trip ura
952 35 5 1000 54662 2338
Uttarakhand
830 108 63 1000 200955 668
Uttar Pradesh
896 97 6 1000 3440011 12767
West Bengal
928 61 3 1000 1954887 8854
A & N Islands
993 7 0 1000 10713 488
Chand igarh
17 0 983 1000 2059 45
Dadra & Nagar Haveli
862 65 73 1000 3420 250
Daman & Diu
724 0 276 1000 2250 353
Lakshadweep
1000 0 0 1000 206 18
Puducherry
504 26 471 1000 16989 203
24418247 112421
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
21852496 2228580 266231 24418247 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 97883 12355 1819 112421 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia persons r ural
all I ndia
895 91 11 1000
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 197
State/UT
main destination no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 726 265 9 1000 329937 1440
Arunachal Pradesh 580 127 290 1000 1219 192
Assam 754 206 34 1000 35024 536
Bihar 782 215 4 1000 78338 399
Chhattisgarh 635 360 1 1000 57479 353
Delhi 35 883 82 1000 224479 1338
Goa 694 306 0 1000 14059 205
Gujarat 623 371 6 1000 299665 1293
Haryana 433 364 203 1000 111379 448
Himachal Pradesh 808 92 100 1000 16681 231
Jammu & Kashmir 755 230 14 1000 30025 405
Jharkhand 762 216 22 1000 46301 322
Karnataka 671 296 33 1000 245032 1279
Kerala 779 204 17 1000 211037 2453
Madhya Pradesh 648 333 19 1000 244090 1418
Maharashtra 568 399 33 1000 441388 2224
Manip ur 413 587 0 1000 3409 316
Meghalaya 372 446 167 1000 2683 173
Mizoram 899 70 30 1000 931 322
Nagaland 788 203 9 1000 2631 247
Orissa 792 195 10 1000 134414 695
Punjab 508 405 88 1000 146796 710
Rajasthan 614 353 33 1000 175037 888
Sikkim 553 253 194 1000 679 94
Tamil Nadu 682 303 15 1000 537228 2474
Trip ura 790 197 10 1000 5509 221
Uttarakhand 586 227 187 1000 26383 216
Uttar Pradesh 569 294 137 1000 490019 2342
West Bengal 561 435 3 1000 295638 2381
A & N Islands 998 2 0 1000 1794 132
Chand igarh 2 0 998 1000 10585 215
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 571 93 337 1000 718 167
Daman & Diu 415 0 585 1000 697 155
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000 8 8
Puducherry 243 20 737 1000 16901 198
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
2638648 1411509 186168 4238193 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 15630 9226 1611 26490 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia male urban
all I ndia 623 333 44 1000 4238193 26490
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 198
State/UT
main destination no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 760 229 11 1000 251287 1210
Arunachal Pradesh 484 417 95 1000 574 61
Assam 662 252 79 1000 20320 301
Bihar 931 69 0 1000 30851 130
Chhattisgarh 582 413 0 1000 35947 171
Delhi 26 861 114 1000 157329 830
Goa 604 388 7 1000 11063 207
Gujarat 596 398 5 1000 191369 904
Haryana 465 332 203 1000 78356 274
Himachal Pradesh 890 63 47 1000 13726 164
Jammu & Kashmir 862 126 13 1000 18619 270
Jharkhand 818 155 27 1000 24931 102
Karnataka 681 286 33 1000 200402 1005
Kerala 815 171 14 1000 196342 2420
Madhya Pradesh 583 399 17 1000 124041 576
Maharashtra 569 378 52 1000 310572 1518
Manip ur 533 467 0 1000 3907 348
Meghalaya 529 340 131 1000 1955 164
Mizoram 937 51 0 1000 310 115
Nagaland 837 145 18 1000 1116 139
Orissa 762 236 2 1000 69827 282
Punjab 492 448 60 1000 113286 608
Rajasthan 527 437 36 1000 92306 444
Sikkim 751 119 130 1000 650 57
Tamil Nadu 704 285 11 1000 456048 2259
Trip ura 953 43 0 1000 4694 248
Uttarakhand 602 227 171 1000 18760 144
Uttar Pradesh 472 338 190 1000 259291 896
West Bengal 584 413 1 1000 196761 1657
A & N Islands 1000 0 0 1000 1410 134
Chand igarh 2 0 934 1000 7225 152
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 890 0 110 1000 284 57
Daman & Diu 415 0 585 1000 588 156
Lakshadweep 0 0 0 0 6 0
Puducherry 410 15 575 1000 15637 209
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
1850003 933104 124876 2909789 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 10977 6123 1092 18212 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/U T of or igin
all- I nd ia female u rban
all I ndia 636 321 43 1000 2909789 18212
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 199
State/UT
main destination no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 741 250 10 1000
581224 2650
Arunachal Pradesh 551 212 233 1000
1793 253
Assam 721 222 50 1000
55344 837
Bihar 822 176 3 1000
109189 529
Chhattisgarh 619 376 1 1000
93426 524
Delhi 31 874 94 1000
381808 2168
Goa 646 350 4 1000
25122 412
Gujarat 612 382 6 1000
491034 2197
Haryana 446 351 203 1000
189735 722
Himachal Pradesh 845 79 76 1000
30407 395
Jammu & Kashmir 801 185 14 1000
48644 675
Jharkhand 774 203 23 1000
71232 424
Karnataka 676 292 33 1000
445434 2284
Kerala 797 187 15 1000
407379 4873
Madhya Pradesh 628 353 18 1000
368131 1994
Maharashtra 569 391 40 1000
751960 3742
Manip ur 474 526 0 1000
7316 664
Meghalaya 450 393 149 1000
4638 337
Mizoram 908 65 23 1000
1241 437
Nagaland 804 184 12 1000
3747 386
Orissa 784 206 8 1000
204241 977
Punjab 500 426 74 1000
260082 1318
Rajasthan 584 382 34 1000
267343 1332
Sikkim 602 220 178 1000
1329 151
Tamil Nadu 692 295 13 1000
993276 4733
Trip ura 884 108 4 1000
10203 469
Uttarakhand 592 227 181 1000
45143 360
Uttar Pradesh 543 306 151 1000
749310 3238
West Bengal 570 426 2 1000
492399 4038
A & N Islands 999 1 0 1000
3204 266
Chand igarh 2 0 970 1000
17810 367
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 644 72 285 1000
1002 224
Daman & Diu 415 0 585 1000
1285 311
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000
14 8
Puducherry 332 17 651 1000
32538 407
7147982 44702
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
4488651 2344613 311044 7147982 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 26607 15349 2703 44702 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia persons u rban
all I ndia 628 328 44 1000
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 200
State/UT
main destinatio n no. o f same-day visito r-
trip s
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 876 107 15 1000
1617640 5505
Arunachal Pradesh 712 103 183 1000
10371 831
Assam 897 89 8 1000
304002 3466
Bihar 898 74 16 1000
1022507 3812
Chhattisgarh 929 63 3 1000
383582 1583
Delhi 56 868 77 1000
240474 1444
Goa 759 238 3 1000
24945 293
Gujarat 828 166 6 1000
949765 3653
Haryana 711 215 74 1000
456709 1429
Himachal Pradesh 919 52 29 1000
204595 1960
Jammu & Kashmir 777 206 11 1000
221640 1806
Jharkhand 895 90 8 1000
416591 1818
Karnataka 848 139 13 1000
784596 3716
Kerala 823 165 11 1000
999337 8401
Madhya Pradesh 920 66 7 1000
1466929 6202
Maharashtra 833 154 12 1000
1457715 6922
Manip ur 586 385 7 1000
13642 1116
Meghalaya 788 179 18 1000
20594 1063
Mizoram 893 60 22 1000
2761 578
Nagaland 877 86 22 1000
10102 972
Orissa 947 44 7 1000
1112007 5430
Punjab 792 167 41 1000
525852 2257
Rajasthan 891 93 16 1000
996651 4173
Sikkim 718 231 51 1000
7578 633
Tamil Nadu 811 182 7 1000
1319223 5971
Trip ura 934 58 4 1000
36217 1559
Uttarakhand 802 113 85 1000
145372 690
Uttar Pradesh 855 123 22 1000
2802892 11987
West Bengal 866 126 2 1000
1456464 7752
A & N Islands 996 4 0 1000
8673 424
Chand igarh 2 0 998 1000
11976 241
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 761 86 153 1000
2967 341
Daman & Diu 662 0 338 1000
1926 346
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000
180 20
Puducherry 359 22 618 1000
25691 305
19062164 98699
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
15922159 2756574 339537 19062164 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 78619 17076 2746 98699 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia male ru ra l+urban
all I ndia 855 127 15 1000
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 201
State/UT
main destinatio n no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 884 102 13 1000
1218155 4185
Arunachal Pradesh 773 133 78 1000
5708 380
Assam 867 96 20 1000
183248 1655
Bihar 899 54 24 1000
442635 1138
Chhattisgarh 933 60 2 1000
253626 731
Delhi 37 857 106 1000
167980 879
Goa 710 279 11 1000
20728 276
Gujarat 832 165 4 1000
603273 2166
Haryana 696 235 68 1000
301228 824
Himachal Pradesh 915 62 23 1000
167874 1445
Jammu & Kashmir 862 123 3 1000
156702 1087
Jharkhand 911 76 6 1000
243138 744
Karnataka 843 145 12 1000
628760 2775
Kerala 861 124 14 1000
920032 8310
Madhya Pradesh 901 87 6 1000
758611 2116
Maharashtra 804 175 19 1000
1014148 3923
Manip ur 548 445 0 1000
11942 1019
Meghalaya 752 217 18 1000
16788 962
Mizoram 965 19 12 1000
1006 205
Nagaland 913 58 11 1000
4871 530
Orissa 953 41 7 1000
706323 1893
Punjab 732 215 53 1000
408765 1746
Rajasthan 874 114 12 1000
593566 1789
Sikkim 790 144 60 1000
5831 432
Tamil Nadu 825 167 9 1000
1122424 5207
Trip ura 963 19 6 1000
28648 1248
Uttarakhand 770 154 75 1000
100726 338
Uttar Pradesh 850 121 29 1000
1386429 4018
West Bengal 877 113 4 1000
990822 5140
A & N Islands 990 10 0 1000
5244 330
Chand igarh 4 0 935 1000
7893 171
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 946 18 36 1000
1455 133
Daman & Diu 561 0 439 1000
1609 318
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000
40 6
Puducherry 442 19 539 1000
23836 305
12504065 58424
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00)
10418988 1816619 237738 12504065 xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 45871 10628 1776 58424 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia female rural+u rban
all I ndia 849 132 17 1000
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 202
State/UT
main destinatio n no. of same-day visitor-trips
within the
district
outside the d istrict
but within the
State
outside State total estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
And hra Pradesh 879 105 14 1000
2835795 9690
Arunachal Pradesh 734 114 145 1000
16079 1211
Assam 888 91 11 1000
487250 5121
Bihar 898 69 18 1000
1465142 4950
Chhattisgarh 930 62 2 1000
637208 2314
Delhi 49 864 88 1000
408454 2323
Goa 733 259 7 1000
45673 569
Gujarat 829 165 5 1000
1553038 5819
Haryana 706 223 72 1000
757937 2253
Himachal Pradesh 917 56 26 1000
372469 3405
Jammu & Kashmir 811 172 8 1000
378342 2893
Jharkhand 900 86 7 1000
659729 2562
Karnataka 846 142 13 1000
1413356 6491
Kerala 842 145 13 1000
1919369 16711
Madhya Pradesh 915 72 7 1000
2225540 8318
Maharashtra 823 161 15 1000
2471863 10845
Manip ur 569 413 4 1000
25584 2135
Meghalaya 771 197 18 1000
37382 2025
Mizoram 912 49 19 1000
3767 783
Nagaland 889 77 18 1000
14973 1502
Orissa 949 43 7 1000
1818330 7323
Punjab 765 188 46 1000
934617 4003
Rajasthan 886 99 15 1000
1590217 5962
Sikkim 749 194 55 1000
13409 1065
Tamil Nadu 817 175 8 1000
2441647 11178
Trip ura 947 40 5 1000
64865 2807
Uttarakhand 792 126 82 1000
246098 1028
Uttar Pradesh 854 122 24 1000
4189321 16005
West Bengal 870 120 3 1000
2447286 12892
A & N Islands 994 6 0 1000
13917 754
Chand igarh 3 0 971 1000
19869 412
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 814 66 119 1000
4422 474
Daman & Diu 616 0 384 1000
3535 664
Lakshadweep 1000 0 0 1000
220 26
Puducherry 402 21 577 1000
49527 610
estd. no. of visito r-trips
(’00) 26341147 4573193 577275 31566229
xxx xxx
sample no. of vis itor-trips 124490 27704 4522 157123 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 46: Per 1000 distribution of same-day visitor-t r ips by main destination separately for each State/UT of or igin
all- I nd ia persons r ural+u rban
all I ndia 853 129 16 1000
31566229 157123
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 203
quintile-class
in MPCE (%)
major mode of travel no. o f same day
visito r-trip s
on foot bus train ship/
boat
air own transport tansport-
equip ment
rental
others n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
bicycle two
wheeler
rickshaw auto
rickshaw
car/
jeep
tractor/
truck
animal
driven
transport
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19)
0-20 156 433 14 1 0 220 32 2 15 16 4 3 99 6 0 1000 3390268 14002
20-40 92 546 18 3 0 137 31 2 23 15 4 2 120 7 0 1000 3798775 16103
40-60 71 584 21 1 0 105 48 4 12 15 1 1 131 7 0 1000 4205762 19196
60-80 46 619 17 1 0 68 74 3 12 11 5 1 139 6 0 1000 5270705 24260
80-100 32 616 15 1 0 27 116 1 15 48 1 1 122 6 0 1000 7752738 38860
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
estd.no. o f
visitor-trips
(’00)
1664722 14031308 403905 30237 1409 2271599 1716356 48458 365873 602667 72996 30172 3022209 153046 3225 24418247 xxx xxx
sample no. of
visitor-trips
6790 65094 1937 141 5 8899 7525 292 1609 3140 361 140 15730 734 23 112421 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 47: Per 1000 distr ibution of same-day visitor-t rips by major mode of travel for each quinti le class of M PCE (% )
all- I nd ia ru ral
all 68 575 17 1 0 93 70 2 15 25 3 1 124 6 0 1000 24418247 112421
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 204
quintile-class in
MPCE (%)
major mode of travel no. o f same day
visito r-trip s
on foot bus train ship/
boat
air own transport tansport-
equip ment
rental
others n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
bicycle two
wheeler
rickshaw auto
rickshaw
car/ jeep tractor/
truck
animal
driven
transport
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19)
0-20 10 734 75 3 0 46 24 1 11 9 1 1 86 1 0 1000 910540 5066
20-40 11 696 68 0 0 16 69 2 48 12 2 0 74 3 0 1000 1277628 7402
40-60 11 679 89 1 0 13 84 2 7 27 0 0 81 7 0 1000 1481743 9332
60-80 6 597 105 0 0 6 114 1 7 70 0 0 87 6 0 1000 1556365 11101
80-100 2 443 89 0 0 5 110 1 9 242 0 0 93 4 0 1000 1921707 11801
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
estd.no. of
visitor-trips (’00)
53048 4345037 621310 4111 951 99549 621984 10347 111008 636796 4872 565 605984 32250 171 7147982 xxx xxx
sample no. of
visitor-trips
377 26310 4086 46 9 564 3463 72 485 4121 63 5 4881 219 1 44702 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 47: Per 1000 distr ibut ion of same-day visitor- t rips by major mode of travel for each quinti le class of M PCE (% )
all- I ndia u rban
all 7 608 87 1 0 14 87 1 16 89 1 0 85 5 0 1000 7147982 44702
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 205
quintile-class in MPCE (%) type o f stay no. of same-day visitor-trips
hotel private
guest ho use
govt guest
house
dharamshala rented
ho use
friends &
relatives
did not stay
at all
others
including
carriages/
coaches
n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
0-20 0 3 0 1 0 122 853 21 0 1000 3390268 14002
20-40 0 1 1 1 0 135 839 22 0 1000 3798775 16103
40-60 1 0 1 2 0 147 829 21 0 1000 4205762 19196
60-80 1 1 0 1 2 153 821 20 0 1000 5270705 24260
80-100 1 1 1 1 0 161 798 36 0 1000 7752738 38860
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
estd.no. of visitor-trips (’00) 15586 33197 16340 31441 10654 3602926 20077742 630362 0 24418247 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 302 201 90 230 41 18761 89861 2935 0 112421 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 48: Per 1000 distribut ion of same-day visitor -t r ips by type of stay for each quintile classof M PC E(% )
all-I ndia ru ral
all 1 1 1 1 0 148 822 26 0 1000 24418247 112421
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 206
quintile-class in MPCE (%)
type o f stay no. of same-day visitor-trips
hotel private
guest house
go vt guest
ho use
dharamshala rented
ho use
friends &
relatives
did not stay
at all
others
including
carriages/
coaches
n.r. all estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
0-20 0 2 0 12 0 205 765 14 0 1000 910540 5066
20-40 2 2 0 3 0 259 711 23 0 1000 1277628 7402
40-60 3 2 0 5 0 220 741 29 0 1000 1481743 9332
60-80 1 2 1 3 0 209 754 29 0 1000 1556365 11101
80-100 2 3 1 2 0 218 736 37 0 1000 1921707 11801
n.r. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
estd.no. of visitor-trips (’00) 13540 16310 4914 31447 690 1588672 5291967 200442 0 7147982 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f vis itor-trips 136 111 45 196 3 10560 32533 1118 0 44702 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 48: Per 1000 distribut ion of same-day visitor -t r ips by type of stay for each quintile classof M PC E(% )
all-I ndia ur ban
all 2 2 1 4 0 222 740 28 0 1000 7147982 44702
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 207
State/UT* sample estimated(’00)
number of overnight
trips
number of same day trips number o f o vernight trip s number o f same day
trips
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Andhra Pradesh 30713 54465 676289 1230501
Arunachal Pradesh 4393 7210 6147 10675
Assam 12217 25834 108112 244586
Bihar 21613 37810 460585 860454
Chhattisgarh 7292 12224 136821 239953
Delhi 473 1327 3259 10721
Goa 729 1323 4317 9740
Gujarat 15877 28129 281110 528602
Haryana 10822 15292 184134 270297
Himachal Pradesh 16501 32156 108588 215557
Jammu & Kashmir 14828 33743 102455 217409
Jharkhand 8232 16596 139169 280479
Karnataka 15539 24209 293535 462823
Kerala 21175 57598 250750 788466
Madhya Pradesh 29038 60620 461111 1018039
Maharashtra 30672 52464 557725 961034
Manipur 5813 13989 5781 17743
Meghalaya 4722 8490 10923 19754
Mizo ram 2109 2202 2234 2294
Nagaland 4067 7499 4924 10076
Orissa 26607 63340 383828 969157
Punjab 10504 20841 167631 334007
Rajasthan 26240 39088 462386 703505
Sikkim 4330 8285 3820 7890
Tamil Nadu 18830 38764 307541 704035
Tripura 9136 13300 20746 31886
Uttarakhand 4418 6865 60548 99715
Uttar Pradesh 73141 118121 1218632 2022360
West Bengal 32572 62016 533943 1062032
A & N Islands 1132 2560 2238 5434
Chandigarh 249 324 545 973
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 440 1029 552 1636
Daman & Diu 333 1452 208 1337
Lakshadweep 101 101 112 133
Puducherry 1097 1856 3877 7553
T able 49: N umber of overnigh t t ri ps and nu mber of same day trips, both surveyed and estimated, separately for each State/UT of origin
ru ral
all-I ndia 465955 871122 6964576 13350857
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 208
State/UT* sample estimated(’00)
number of overnight
trips
number of same day trips number o f o vernight trip s number o f same day
trips
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Andhra Pradesh 16357 19325 267058 285072
Arunachal Pradesh 1118 1475 865 1310
Assam 3023 5613 16524 32699
Bihar 4170 5350 55752 71866
Chhattisgarh 3150 4437 30988 42888
Delhi 8211 20776 60030 163262
Goa 1178 2327 4673 11672
Gujarat 12440 17419 161627 242986
Haryana 5740 7475 61523 84027
Himachal Pradesh 2787 4138 10243 15974
Jammu & Kashmir 6600 10869 19840 31352
Jharkhand 4037 5597 27429 36805
Karnataka 11749 14283 169906 190162
Kerala 12016 25899 90702 207544
Madhya Pradesh 15079 23147 142329 207587
Maharashtra 20783 27251 264076 357763
Manipur 1922 7164 1623 7103
Meghalaya 1394 2055 1660 2963
Mizo ram 3109 2345 1458 1118
Nagaland 1411 2549 1815 3501
Orissa 6364 11238 63394 118339
Punjab 7618 12296 89060 139766
Rajasthan 11545 12728 139319 152580
Sikkim 1002 1363 577 839
Tamil Nadu 17542 28993 264699 448680
Tripura 3178 3410 4947 5659
Uttarakhand 1877 2805 14932 21818
Uttar Pradesh 26696 33231 298346 389961
West Bengal 17155 29614 144928 270990
A & N Islands 501 1351 476 1531
Chandigarh 1555 1984 5493 7326
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 548 1065 301 549
Daman & Diu 493 1426 234 764
Lakshadweep 655 67 120 14
Puducherry 2379 3617 8796 14042
T able 49: N umber of overnigh t t ri ps and nu mber of same day trips, both surveyed and estimated, separately for each State/UT of origin
urban
all-I ndia 235382 354682 2425746 3570512
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 209
State/UT* sample estimated(’00)
number of overnight
trips
number of same day trips number o f o vernight trip s number o f same day
trips
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Andhra Pradesh 47070 73790 943347 1515574
Arunachal Pradesh 5511 8685 7012 11985
Assam 15240 31447 124635 277285
Bihar 25783 43160 516337 932320
Chhattisgarh 10442 16661 167809 282840
Delhi 8684 22103 63289 173983
Goa 1907 3650 8990 21412
Gujarat 28317 45548 442738 771588
Haryana 16562 22767 245657 354324
Himachal Pradesh 19288 36294 118831 231531
Jammu & Kashmir 21428 44612 122295 248761
Jharkhand 12269 22193 166599 317285
Karnataka 27288 38492 463440 652984
Kerala 33191 83497 341452 996010
Madhya Pradesh 44117 83767 603440 1225627
Maharashtra 51455 79715 821801 1318798
Manipur 7735 21153 7405 24846
Meghalaya 6116 10545 12583 22717
Mizo ram 5218 4547 3692 3412
Nagaland 5478 10048 6739 13577
Orissa 32971 74578 447221 1087496
Punjab 18122 33137 256691 473773
Rajasthan 37785 51816 601705 856085
Sikkim 5332 9648 4397 8730
Tamil Nadu 36372 67757 572240 1152715
Tripura 12314 16710 25693 37545
Uttarakhand 6295 9670 75480 121532
Uttar Pradesh 99837 151352 1516979 2412320
West Bengal 49727 91630 678871 1333023
A & N Islands 1633 3911 2714 6964
Chandigarh 1804 2308 6038 8299
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 988 2094 853 2186
Daman & Diu 826 2878 443 2101
Lakshadweep 756 168 233 147
Puducherry 3476 5473 12673 21594
T able 49: N umber of overnigh t t ri ps and nu mber of same day trips, both surveyed and estimated, separately for each State/UT of origi n
ru ral+urban
all-I ndia 701337 1225804 9390321 16921369
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 210
leading purpose
type o f trip no. of overnight trips
package non-package n.r. total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
14 986 0 1000 163028 2038
ho lid aying, leisure and recreatio n
69 931 0 1000 130861 1218
social
1 999 0 1000 5224979 40675
religious & pilgrimage
39 961 0 1000 612210 4730
education & training
124 876 0 1000 62992 753
health & medical
4 996 0 1000 508224 4764
shopping
2 998 0 1000 31679 588
others
6 994 0 1000 228397 2262
n.r 26 974 0 1000 2205 51
estd no. of trip s 53418 6911158 0 6964576 xxx xxx
sample no. o f trips 478 56601 0 57079 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 50: Per 1000 distrib ut ion of overnight tr ips by type of trip for each leading purpose
all-I nd ia ru ra l
all 8 992 0 1000 6964576 57079
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 211
leading purpose
type o f trip no. of overnight trips
package non-package n.r. total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
7 993 0 1000 83156 1656
ho lid aying, leisure and recreatio n
91 909 0 1000 121415 1578
social
1 999 0 1000 1729901 22943
religious & pilgrimage
50 950 0 1000 301320 3683
education & training
75 925 0 1000 32714 577
health & medical
0 1000 0 1000 83907 1389
shopping
34 966 0 1000 4162 105
others
3 997 0 1000 68911 1076
n.r 0 1000 0 1000 263 16
estd no. of trip s 31047 2394696 3 2425746 xxx xxx
sample no. o f trips 416 32606 1 33023 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 50: Per 1000 distrib ut ion of overnight tr ips by type of trip for each leading purpose
all-I nd ia ur ban
all 13 987 0 1000 2425746 33023
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 212
leading purpose
type o f trip no. of overnight trips
package non-package n.r. total estd.*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
12 988 0 1000 246184 3694
ho lid aying, leisure and recreatio n
80 920 0 1000 252276 2796
social
1 999 0 1000 6954880 63618
religious & pilgrimage
43 957 0 1000 913530 8413
education & training
106 894 0 1000 95706 1330
health & medical
3 997 0 1000 592131 6153
shopping
6 994 0 1000 35841 693
others
5 995 0 1000 297308 3338
n.r 23 977 0 1000 2468 67
estd no. of trip s 84465 9305854 3 9390322 xxx xxx
sample no. o f trips 894 89207 1 90102 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 50: Per 1000 distrib ut ion of overnight tr ips by type of trip for each leading purpose
all-I ndia r ural+u rban
all 9 991 0 1000 9390322 90102
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 213
all- Ind ia
Category of trip type of trip no. of trips
package no n-package n.r. Total estd* samp le**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
overnight trip 8 992 0 1000 6964576 57079
same day trip 3 997 0 1000 13350857 72919
overnight trip 13 987 0 1000 2425746 33023
same day trip 7 993 0 1000 3570512 25661
overnight trip 9 991 0 1000 9390322 90102
same day trip 4 996 0 1000 16921369 98580
* last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 51: Per 1000 distribution of tr ips by type of t rip for overnigh t t r ips and same day tri ps
r ural
u rban
r ural+u rban
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 214
starting month ending month no. o f o vernight trip s
January February March April May June July August Septem-
ber
October Novem-
ber
Decem-
ber
n.r. all estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
January 2.36 8.86 46.28 90.35 0 165 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.14 533617 4891
February 0 2.11 8.68 64.59 0 0 153 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.71 557564 4666
March 0 0 2.16 9.65 49.25 0 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.9 497134 4293
April 0 0 0 2.25 8.7 53.57 88.19 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.96 621615 5030
May 0 0 0 0 2.38 11.59 68.66 100 120.32 0 0 0 0 3.23 821480 5544
June 0 0 0 0 0 2.23 10.36 62.5 90 0 0 0 0 3.35 382573 2984
July 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.48 8.74 54.07 90.76 120 0 0 2.87 695362 5709
August 154.8 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.46 8.88 63.64 97.85 0 0 3.1 677672 5184
September 130 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.37 7.76 55.1 111.56 0 3.07 434504 3815
October 0 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.51 9.07 68.89 0 3.34 652314 5225
November 59.22 74 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.26 8.97 2.21 2.91 588534 5027
December 7.33 47.58 87.22 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.38 7.57 3.05 483952 4519
n.r. 1.45 24.29 63.05 4.3 3.46 14.67 1.5 4.66 18.34 5.55 5.95 7.06 2.66 7.4 18256 192
estd no. of trip s (‘00) 537308 558554 497991 603652 822409 394352 716360 667483 433479 617999 625061 483441 6488 6964576 xxx xxx
samp le no. o f trips 4888 4716 4311 4922 5665 2896 5810 5138 3813 5099 5173 4571 77 57079 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 52: A verage duration (in terms of nigh t spent) per overnight t rip by starting and ending month
all-I ndia r ural
all 2.94 2.72 2.96 3.01 2.88 3.77 3.32 2.79 3.16 3.11 3.32 3.02 2.9 3.06 6964576 57079
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 215
starting month ending month no. of overnight trips
January February March April May June July August Septem-
ber
October Novem-
ber
Decem-
ber
n.r. all estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
January 3.38 10.24 53 90 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.81 208779 2897
February 0 3.03 7.55 53.01 90 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.45 159557 2428
March 0 0 2.77 8.93 61.08 78.06 0 150 0 0 0 0 0 3.63 172976 2454
April 0 0 0 2.99 11.71 65.58 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.6 205180 3027
May 0 0 0 0 3.29 9.65 43.71 60 124.27 0 0 0 0 4.15 243094 2997
June 0 0 0 0 0 2.86 30.38 59.66 85 0 0 0 0 4.71 64025 779
July 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.39 12.93 62.71 90 0 0 0 5.63 83767 1363
August 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.94 8.01 45 0 0 0 3.46 346769 4588
September 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.76 21.22 46.73 93 0 5.01 253585 3163
October 89.8 130 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.4 10.17 57.15 0 5.09 263550 3091
November 60.67 78.25 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.71 9.75 0 3.6 199504 2955
December 8.79 47.52 0 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.18 0 3.91 221184 3177
n.r. 53.54 47.56 39.79 1.09 20.35 18.12 11.78 13.57 14.25 7.48 24.78 14.19 2.59 18.34 3777 104
estd no. of trips (‘00) 219922 159037 168080 194045 251596 82095 70091 330500 258720 235516 236165 219387 591 2425746 xxx xxx
sample no. of trips 3013 2434 2371 2997 3089 1045 1052 4401 3500 2852 3016 3223 30 33023 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 52: Average duration (in terms of night spent) per overn ght trip by starting and ending month
all-I ndia urban
all 4.14 3.73 3.45 3.73 4.36 5.61 5.21 3.54 3.76 5.71 4.57 3.93 2.59 4.19 2425746 33023
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 216
starting month ending month no. of overnight trips
January February March April May June July August Septem-
ber
October Novem-
ber
Decem-
ber
n.r. all estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
January 2.68 9.21 47.31 90.34 0 165 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.35 742396 7788
February 0 2.34 8.38 62.78 90 0 153 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.89 717121 7094
March 0 0 2.33 9.4 52.54 78.06 120 150 0 0 0 0 0 3.11 670110 6747
April 0 0 0 2.44 9.8 62.95 88.19 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.41 826795 8057
May 0 0 0 0 2.61 11.04 60.45 74.79 123.09 0 0 0 0 3.47 1064574 8541
June 0 0 0 0 0 2.34 11.83 61.45 85.82 0 0 0 0 3.57 446598 3763
July 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.57 10.41 57.04 90.73 120 0 0 3.21 779129 7072
August 154.8 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.63 8.45 62.35 97.85 0 0 3.23 1024441 9772
September 130 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.53 13.86 53.61 107.73 0 3.85 688089 6978
October 89.8 121.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77 9.57 59.98 0 3.9 915864 8316
November 59.37 76.02 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.38 9.25 2.21 3.1 788038 7982
December 7.89 47.57 87.22 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.66 7.57 3.35 705136 7696
n.r. 3.9 29.76 43.5 2.03 5.04 14.96 4.25 7.09 17.72 6.69 7.7 7.29 2.65 9.52 22033 296
estd no. of trips
(‘00) 757230 717591 666071 797697 1074005 476447 786451 997983 692199 853515 861226 702828 7079 9390322
xxx xxx
sample no. of trips 7901 7150 6682 7919 8754 3941 6862 9539 7313 7951 8189 7794 107 90102 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 52: Average duration (in terms of night spent) per overn ght trip by starting and ending month
all-I ndia rural+urban
all 3.32 2.97 3.1 3.21 3.27 4.13 3.52 3.06 3.4 3.91 3.7 3.34 2.87 3.39 9390322 90102
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 217
rural
State/UT
[of destination]
main destination no. of overnight trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 1.1 1.3 1.9 676289 3530
Arunachal Pradesh 1.0 1.2 1.0 6147 656
Assam 1.1 1.3 1.5 108112 2242
Bihar 1.0 1.3 1.3 460585 2904
Chhattisgarh 1.1 1.1 1.2 136821 993
Delhi 0.0 1.0 1.2 3259 72
Goa 1.0 1.0 1.9 4317 93
Gujarat 1.0 1.6 1.7 281110 1834
Haryana
1.1 1.1 1.2 184134 1217
Himachal Pradesh 1.0 1.1 2.0 108588 1448
Jammu & Kashmir 1.1 1.1 2.0 102455 856
Jharkhand 1.0 1.2 1.6 139169 1110
Karnataka 1.0 1.2 1.8 293535 2061
Kerala 1.1 1.2 2.3 250750 3029
Madhya Pradesh 1.0 1.2 1.2 461111 3221
Maharashtra 1.1 1.4 1.4 557725 3905
Manipur 1.0 1.1 5.3 5781 1286
Meghalaya 1.0 1.0 1.4 10923 685
Mizoram 1.0 1.0 2.4 2234 410
Nagaland
1.3 1.7 1.1 4924 547
Orissa 1.0 1.1 1.3 383828 2547
Punjab 1.0 1.1 1.1 167631 1185
Rajasthan 1.0 1.1 1.6 462386 2884
Sikkim 1.0 1.1 4.2 3820 501
Tamil Nadu 1.0 1.1 1.7 307541 2622
Tripura 1.0 1.0 1.9 20746 1634
Uttarakhand 1.0 1.1 1.6 60548 522
Uttar Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.4 1218632 8246
West Bengal 1.0 1.1 1.7 533943 4301
A & N Islands 1.1 1.2 0.0 2238 177
Chandigarh
0.0 0.0 1.4 545 68
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 1.0 1.0 1.0 552 93
Daman & Diu 1.0 1.0 1.3 208 75
Lakshadweep 1.0 0.0 1.0 112 21
Puducherry 1.0 1.0 1.0 3877 104
estd. no. of trips (’00) 4510126 2004072 450378 xxx xxx
sample no. of trips 35436 17149 4494 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 53: Average no. of placesvisited per overnight trip by main destination for each State/UT of destination
all-I ndia 1.0 1.2 1.5 6964576 57079
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 218
State/UT
[of destination]
main destination no. of overnight trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 1.1 1.1 1.3 267058 2117
Arunachal Pradesh 1.2 1.1 1.7 865 233
Assam 1.1 1.4 1.3 16524 550
Bihar 1.0 1.2 1.4 55752 610
Chhattisgarh 1.1 1.1 2.3 30988 460
Delhi 1.3 1.0 1.2 60030 1130
Goa
1.0 1.0 2.1 4673 147
Gujarat 1.1 1.2 2.2 161627 1646
Haryana 1.0 1.5 1.2 61523 711
Himachal Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.8 10243 264
Jammu & Kashmir 1.2 1.3 2.2 19840 438
Jharkhand 1.0 1.0 1.5 27429 635
Karnataka 1.1 1.3 1.5 169906 1793
Kerala 1.0 1.2 1.5 90702 1525
Madhya Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.5 142329 1833
Maharashtra 1.0 1.3 2.1 264076 3863
Manipur 1.0 1.0 1.2 1623 539
Meghalaya
1.1 1.0 3.4 1660 272
Mizoram 1.0 1.0 2.9 1458 628
Nagaland 1.1 1.3 2.2 1815 231
Orissa 1.1 1.3 1.8 63394 757
Punjab 1.0 1.1 1.2 89060 884
Rajasthan 1.0 1.1 1.5 139319 1353
Sikkim 1.0 1.0 2.5 577 143
Tamil Nadu 1.1 1.2 1.4 264699 2609
Tripura 1.0 1.1 2.6 4947 543
Uttarakhand 1.0 1.1 1.9 14932 295
Uttar Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.2 298346 3209
West Bengal
1.0 1.2 1.6 144928 2616
A & N Islands 1.0 1.3 0.0 476 110
Chandigarh 1.0 1.0 1.3 5493 289
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 1.0 2.4 1.0 301 91
Daman & Diu 1.0 1.0 1.0 234 68
Lakshadweep 1.0 0.0 1.9 120 138
Puducherry 1.1 1.2 1.4 8796 293
estd. no. of trips (’00) 729539 1198865 497342 xxx xxx
sample no. of trips 9132 15055 8836 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 53: Average no. of placesvisited per overnight trip by ain destination for each State/UT of destination
urban
all-I ndia 1.1 1.2 1.5 2425746 33023
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 219
State/UT
[of destination]
main destination no. of overnight trips
within the
district
outside the
district but
within the State
outside State estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
Andhra Pradesh 1.1 1.2 1.6 943347 5647
Arunachal Pradesh 1.1 1.2 1.3 7012 889
Assam 1.1 1.4 1.4 124636 2792
Bihar 1.0 1.3 1.4 516337 3514
Chhattisgarh 1.1 1.1 1.9 167809 1453
Delhi 1.3 1.0 1.2 63289 1202
Goa 1.0 1.0 2.0 8990 240
Gujarat 1.0 1.4 2.0 442737 3480
Haryana
1.1 1.2 1.2 245657 1928
Himachal Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.9 118831 1712
Jammu & Kashmir 1.1 1.2 2.1 122295 1294
Jharkhand 1.0 1.2 1.5 166598 1745
Karnataka 1.0 1.3 1.7 463441 3854
Kerala 1.1 1.2 1.7 341452 4554
Madhya Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.3 603440 5054
Maharashtra 1.1 1.3 1.8 821801 7768
Manipur 1.0 1.1 2.9 7404 1825
Meghalaya 1.0 1.0 1.8 12583 957
Mizoram 1.0 1.0 2.8 3692 1038
Nagaland
1.3 1.6 1.4 6739 778
Orissa 1.0 1.2 1.6 447222 3304
Punjab 1.0 1.1 1.1 256691 2069
Rajasthan 1.0 1.1 1.5 601705 4237
Sikkim 1.0 1.1 2.9 4397 644
Tamil Nadu 1.1 1.2 1.6 572240 5231
Tripura 1.0 1.0 2.6 25693 2177
Uttarakhand 1.0 1.1 1.8 75480 817
Uttar Pradesh 1.0 1.1 1.3 1516978 11455
West Bengal 1.0 1.1 1.6 678871 6917
A & N Islands 1.1 1.3 0.0 2714 287
Chandigarh
1.0 1.0 1.4 6038 357
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 1.0 1.2 1.0 853 184
Daman & Diu 1.0 1.0 1.2 442 143
Lakshadweep 1.0 0.0 1.8 232 159
Puducherry 1.1 1.1 1.2 12673 397
estd. no. of trips (’00) 5239665 3202937 947720 xxx xxx
sample no. of trips 44568 32204 13330 xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
T able 53: Average no. of placesvisited per overnight trip by ain destination for each State/UT of destination
rural+urban
all-I ndia 1.0 1.2 1.5 9390322 90102
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 220
leading purpose
type of trip no. of same-day trips
package non-package n.r. total estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
1 999 0 1000 694213 4387
holidaying, leisure and recreation
17 983 0 1000 315695 1805
social
2 998 0 1000 5059506 28528
religious & pilgrimage
4 996 0 1000 792919 4255
education & training
170 830 0 1000 120997 789
health & medical
1 999 0 1000 2261265 12790
shopping
1 999 0 1000 3097954 14734
other
1 999 0 1000 1008185 5627
n.r
7 61 932 1000 120 4
estd. no. of trips(’00)
44812 13304949 1097 13350857
xxx xxx
sample no. of trips
274 72634 11 72919
xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 54: Per 1000 distribution of same-day trips by type of trip for each leading purpose
all-I ndia rural
all
3 997 0 1000 13350857 72919
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 221
leading purpose
type of trip no. of same-day trips
package non-package n.r. total estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
0 1000 0 1000 272364 2189
holidaying, leisure and recreation
79 921 0 1000 194366 1306
social
1 999 0 1000 1948257 13982
religious & pilgrimage
14 986 1 1000 392821 2773
education & training
24 976 0 1000 54687 400
health & medical
1 999 0 1000 299742 2085
shopping
0 1000 0 1000 235937 1538
other
6 994 0 1000 172332 1387
n.r
0 1000 0 1000 6 1
estd. no. of trips(’00)
25827 3544239 445 3570512
xxx xxx
sample no. of trips
150 25509 2 25661
xxx xxx

*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 54: Per 1000 distribution of same-day trips by type of trip for each leading purpose
all-I ndia urban
all
7 993 0 1000 3570512 25661
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 222
all-India rural+urban
leading purpose
type of trip no. of same-day trips
package non-package n.r. total estd .*
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
business
1 999 0 1000 966577 6576
holidaying, leisure and recreation
34 966 0 1000 510061 3111
social
2 998 0 1000 7007763 42510
religious & pilgrimage
6 994 0 1000 1185740 7028
education & training
138 862 0 1000 175684 1189
health & medical
1 999 0 1000 2561007 14875
shopping
1 999 0 1000 3333891 16272
other
1 999 0 1000 1180517 7014
n.r
7 88 906 1000 126 5
all
4 996 0 1000 16921369 98580
estd. no. of trips(’00)
70639 16849188 1542 16921369
xxx xxx
sample no. of trips
424 98143 13 98580
xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 54: Per 1000 distribution of same-day trips by type of trip for each leading purpose
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 223
month of visit
leading purpose no. of same day trips
business holidaying,
le isure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education &
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
January
47 27 346 54 5 162 279 81 0 1000 1080792 5876
February
39 19 394 71 7 152 239 78 0 1000 1069165 5803
March
45 20 374 61 9 171 254 65 0 1000 997996 5403
April
39 18 405 48 25 151 230 84 0 1000 1121745 5546
May
43 19 485 59 8 132 193 63 0 1000 1171146 6005
June
86 28 396 34 11 181 205 59 0 1000 775693 4207
July
51 23 365 76 10 189 221 64 0 1000 1493714 8582
August
54 26 386 46 9 174 238 67 0 1000 1265051 7134
September
62 19 355 52 8 186 239 80 0 1000 929640 5308
October
56 38 317 77 5 185 236 86 0 1000 1239626 6733
November
68 26 356 65 6 176 224 79 0 1000 1216323 6577
December
44 19 379 55 5 170 228 101 0 1000 977442 5648
n.r.
45 0 171 48 2 340 243 150 0 1000 12527 97
estd. no.of trips (’00)
694213 315695 5059506 792919 120997 2261265 3097954 1008185 120 13350857
xxx xxx
sample no.of trips
4387 1805 28528 4255 789 12790 14734 5627 4 72919
xxx xxx

*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 55: Per 1000 distribution of same day trips by leading purpose for each month
all-I ndia rural
all
52 24 379 59 9 169 232 76 0 1000 13350857 72919
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 224
month of visit
leading purpose no. of same day trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education &
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
January
88 66 507 140 10 81 65 43 0 1000 311275 2263
February
59 56 560 118 10 107 52 37 0 1000 280219 1927
March
79 48 535 115 7 70 96 50 0 1000 279320 1878
April
72 34 552 116 21 86 54 66 0 1000 336104 2378
May
67 58 649 61 10 64 57 34 0 1000 337930 2172
June
29 52 607 81 13 79 82 57 0 1000 129468 871
July
64 46 496 126 31 99 68 70 0 1000 90675 830
August
79 42 541 120 28 83 46 61 0 1000 452191 3432
September
97 35 519 115 19 103 71 41 0 1000 424567 2977
October
72 101 488 119 11 68 105 36 0 1000 312541 2177
November
88 54 546 98 11 97 48 59 0 1000 312861 2418
December
76 67 551 105 15 74 70 41 0 1000 301158 2306
n.r.
199 37 676 38 1 17 29 3 0 1000 2202 32
estd. no.of trips (’00)
272364 194366 1948257 392821 54687 299742 235937 172332 6 3570512
xxx xxx
sample no.of trips
2189 1306 13982 2773 400 2085 1538 1387 1 25661
xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 55: Per 1000 distribution of same day trips by leading purpose for each month
all-I ndia urban
all
76 54 546 110 15 84 66 48 0 1000 3570512 25661
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour i sm i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 225
month of visit
leading purpose no. of same day trips
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education &
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. total estd. *
(’00)
sample**
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
January
53 33 370 67 5 150 246 75 0 1000 1392067 8139
February
42 25 418 78 7 146 213 72 0 1000 1349384 7730
March
50 24 398 69 9 156 231 63 0 1000 1277316 7281
April
44 21 427 59 25 141 203 82 0 1000 1457849 7924
May
46 25 509 59 8 122 172 58 0 1000 1509076 8177
June
80 30 416 38 11 172 194 59 0 1000 905161 5078
July
51 23 370 78 11 186 215 64 0 1000 1584389 9412
August
59 29 414 59 13 157 204 66 0 1000 1717242 10566
September
69 22 391 66 11 168 202 72 0 1000 1354207 8285
October
58 47 340 82 5 169 218 80 0 1000 1552167 8910
November
71 30 382 69 7 165 200 76 0 1000 1529184 8995
December
49 26 406 63 7 155 203 91 0 1000 1278600 7954
n.r.
60 4 221 47 2 308 222 136 0 1000 14729 129
estd. no.of trips (’00)
966577 510061 7007763 1185740 175684 2561007 3333891 1180517 126 16921369
xxx xxx
sample no.of trips
6576 3111 42510 7028 1189 14875 16272 7014 5 98580
xxx xxx
*last 365 days **last 30 days
Table 55: Per 1000 distribution of same day trips by leading purpose for each month
all-I ndia ural+urban
all
55 28 403 67 10 157 209 72 0 1000 16921369 98580
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 226
category of expenditure
leading p urpose
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
social religio us &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
155943 2317657 248746 5095511 615338 141871 16938 57002 82523 8731529
1233049 1235114 923797 3640723 854867 6541874 115032 2366789 20219 16931463
3179906 2320280 20271393 10204889 924800 10893506 212839 4429793 25066 52462471
- railways
560853 650094 6386292 2681722 390351 1055091 53747 1708024 821 13486994
- road(excl. transport
equipment rental)
1939442 2094166 47700840 11845212 744059 6237748 367007 2482364 20545 73431383
- water
83328 88076 95441 19440 1612 35903 2105 2954 0 328861
- air
351421 58956 205278 96608 42913 58862 942 135950 0 950931
-transport equip ment
rental
529164 868063 11268041 5975717 131662 4796274 48156 1431819 6511 25055406
- travel agency services
/tour operators
5973 6744 25751 43226 3150 13800 327 6091 496 105558
- others and supporting
services
93003 53014 574995 278040 17793 122435 10002 31362 845 1181488
- clothing & garments
1188967 2550808 49185306 4976021 392856 959636 2963217 1401173 10607 63628591
- processed food
598506 741921 19227882 3074394 328979 2316118 164965 1103208 2571 27558544
-tobacco products
163857 82377 1773825 255393 18069 189116 23386 133113 182 2639318
-alcohol
139835 48561 1128676 126355 1717 13308 30357 66331 228 1555369
-travel related
consumer goods
76866 117720 945024 380207 53348 95936 53018 71383 421 1793923
-footwear
158524 255465 3609946 305672 53895 101108 256040 113822 648 4855119
-toiletries
63187 101577 1226772 296897 40138 266579 63239 123224 291 2181905
-gems and jewellery
47884 228190 24480249 356500 24620 160567 547828 261286 5171 26112294
- books , journal,
magazines , stationery,
etc.
478896 287110 670366 313806 442797 139691 215006 127362 1545 2676577
- others
7134072 621972 22864828 3332698 396467 1239529 3939548 1267933 4850 40801897
- recreation religio us,
cultural and sporting
activities
78176 544873 2468970 4350015 36108 52509 6481 113104 4174 7654410
edical and health-
related activities
425442 220595 11143475 1597830 90680 136418714 595054 25002833 12993 175507616
779155 399226 17094181 1765150 668689 1762295 89567 1225635 16596 23800493
19465449 15892560 243520073 61012026 6274907 173612471 9774800 43662555 217299 573432140
estd. no. of o vernight
trips(‘00)
163028 130861 5224979 612210 62992 508224 31679 228397 2205 6964576
estd. no. of o vernight
visito r-trips (‘00)
210933 272138 12034296 1396680 82007 1093566 44739 420461 3124 15557945
estd. expend iture per
overnight trip(in Rs.)
1193.99 1214.46 466.07 996.59 996.14 3416.06 3085.58 1911.70 985.48 820.75
expend iture per
overnight visitor-trip (in
Rs.)
922.83 583.99 202.36 436.84 765.17 1587.58 2184.85 1038.44 695.58 368.58
T able 56: E stimated total expenditure(in R s.‘000) by categori s of expenditure for each leading pu rpose of overnight tr ips
all-I nd ia ru ral
pack age component
non-pack age component
accommodation
food and drink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cul tural , sporti ng and health- related activit ies
-m
others
total
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 227
category of expenditure
leading purpose
business ho lid aying,
leisure and
recreation
social religio us &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
98696 24805140 208465 3071490 468406 332 57006 25598 0 28735134
4089764 6658233 2053666 5674667 832822 1991036 21546 1350563 1488 22673784
4100467 6680651 14512927 9042679 924186 2078013 65895 1404283 5885 38814987
- railways
1942013 5036488 25672872 7919911 1230351 905923 40735 1123415 1126 43872833
- road(excl. transport
equipment rental)
1969107 4466150 35064228 9655143 686381 1544158 77714 1285563 5593 54754037
- water
48970 19154 60416 15772 5920 10529 225 10790 0 171776
- air
4521855 2501069 4741220 977936 716689 742126 0 207309 0 14408204
-transport equipment
rental
641230 3548875 7626350 6441117 163519 1151490 20847 703973 2801 20300203
- travel agency
services /tour
operators
4605 97999 97545 67228 5052 2558 24 15119 0 290128
- others and
supporting services
13956 148119 271627 162000 14090 21628 1089 62760 450 695719
- clothing & garments
6530994 3616425 31155562 3069048 357496 264789 936439 482848 0 46413601
- processed food
418272 959910 9001770 1847510 159514 445648 27619 270486 180 13130910
-tobacco products
51643 67490 558920 83500 8503 18830 1644 20437 0 810967
-alco ho l
44163 108150 260781 23890 1253 2072 780 17566 0 458654
-travel related
consumer goods
88888 267012 904511 462043 59012 68260 8306 22156 563 1880750
-footwear
150050 288527 1676289 227247 27134 23882 36482 39124 674 2469407
-toiletries
69628 139634 623599 187846 24189 56608 7720 16891 404 1126520
-gems and jewellery
289358 594304 9603698 384352 14154 24194 525275 84782 0 11520117
- books , journal,
magazines ,
stationery, etc.
137386 173515 624290 232237 300001 29213 11585 60844 0 1569071
- others
4104735 2086271 9961151 2350498 217595 438382 418659 376974 1161 19955425
- recreation religious,
cultural and sporting
activities
66672 979026 1520748 3957622 47415 8649 2055 13243 900 6596331
edical and health-
related activities
120308 166366 3072669 214559 70723 47985506 4729 3566458 25674 55226992
321017 778938 11743766 1751694 191112 548099 18818 391042 1122 15745609
estd. no. of overnight
trip s(‘00)
83156 121415 1729901 301320 32714 83907 4162 68911 263 2425746
estd. no. of overnight
visitor-trips (‘00)
104821 262655 4090154 827145 43953 172930 5620 108912 322 5616512
estd. expenditure per
overnight trip (in Rs.)
3585.67 5286.63 988.67 1918.89 1994.74 6955.59 5491.08 1676.41 1828.04 1636.33
expenditure per
overnight visito r-trip (in
Rs.)
2845.21 2443.79 418.12 699.03 1484.66 3374.89 4066.17 1060.69 1491.34 715.07
T able 56: Estimated total expenditu re(in R s.‘ 000) by categories of expenditure for each leading purpose of overnight t rips
all- I ndia u rban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and dr ink
transpor t
shopping
recreation religious, cul tu ral , spor ti ng and health- related activit ies
-m
others
total
29823778 64187444 171017071 57819988 6525517 58361926 2285190 11552223 48021 401621157
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 228
category of expenditure
lead ing purpose
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religious &
pilgrimage
education &
training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
254639 27122797 457212 8167001 1083744 142203 73944 82600 82523 37466663
5322812 7893347 2977463 9315390 1687689 8532910 136578 3717352 21706 39605247
7280373 9000931 34784321 19247568 1848986 12971518 278734 5834076 30952 91277458
- railways
2502866 5686582 32059164 10601632 1620703 1961014 94481 2831438 1946 57359827
- road(excl. transport
equipment rental)
3908550 6560316 82765067 21500355 1430440 7781906 444721 3767927 26138 128185420
- water
132298 107230 155857 35213 7531 46433 2331 13744 0 500637
- air
4873276 2560025 4946498 1074545 759602 800988 942 343259 0 15359135
-transport eq uipment
rental
1170394 4416937 18894391 12416834 295181 5947764 69003 2135792 9312 45355608
- travel agency
services /tour
operators
10578 104743 123295 110454 8202 16358 351 21210 496 395686
- others and
supporting services
106958 201133 846621 440039 31884 144064 11090 94122 1295 1877206
- clothing & garments
7719961 6167233 80340868 8045068 750351 1224426 3899655 1884021 10607 110042191
- processed food
1016778 1701831 28229652 4921904 488494 2761766 192584 1373694 2751 40689454
-tobacco products
215501 149867 2332745 338893 26571 207947 25030 153550 182 3450285
-alco ho l
183998 156711 1389457 150245 2970 15380 31137 83897 228 2014023
-travel related
consumer goods
165754 384732 1849536 842250 112360 164196 61324 93540 983 3674673
-footwear
308574 543992 5286235 532918 81029 124990 292522 152945 1322 7324526
-toiletries
132816 241212 1850371 484744 64327 323187 70959 140116 695 3308425
-gems and jewellery
337242 822494 34083947 740852 38775 184761 1073103 346068 5171 37632411
- books , journal,
magazines , statio nery,
etc.
616282 460625 1294656 546043 742797 168904 226590 188206 1545 4245648
- others
11238807 2708243 32825979 5683196 614062 1677911 4358207 1644907 6011 60757323
- recreatio n religious,
cultural and sporting
activities
144848 1523899 3989717 8307637 83523 61159 8537 126347 5074 14250741
ed ical and health-
related activities
545750 386961 14216144 1812389 161403 184404220 599783 28569290 38666 230734608
1100172 1178164 28837947 3516844 859801 2310394 108385 1616678 17718 39546102
estd. no. of overnight
trips(‘00)
246184 252276 6954880 913530 95706 592131 35841 297308 2468 9390322
estd. no. of overnight
visitor-trips (‘00)
315754 534793 16124450 2223825 125960 1266496 50359 529373 3446 21174457
estd. expenditure per
overnight trip (in Rs.)
2002.13 3174.30 596.04 1300.80 1337.47 3917.62 3364.86 1857.16 1075.04 1038.36
expenditure per
overnight visito r-trip (in
Rs.)
1561.00 1497.40 257.09 534.36 1016.23 1831.62 2394.80 1043.02 769.94 460.49
T able 56: Estimated total expenditure(in Rs.‘000) by categories of expenditure for each leading purpose of overnight trips
all- I ndia ru ral+ ur ban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and dr ink
transpor t
shopping
recreation religious, cul tu ral , spor ting and health- related activities
-m
others
total
49289227 80080004 414537145 118832013 12800424 231974397 12059990 55214778 265320 975053297
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 229
category of
expend iture
leading purpose
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
9.57 177.11 0.48 83.23 97.68 2.79 5.35 2.50 374.32 12.57
75.63 94.38 1.77 59.47 135.71 128.72 36.31 103.63 91.71 24.16
195.05 177.31 38.80 166.69 146.81 214.34 67.19 193.95 113.70 75.19
- railways
34.40 49.68 12.22 43.80 61.97 20.76 16.97 74.78 3.72 19.32
- road(excl.
transport eq uipment
rental)
118.96 160.03 91.29 193.48 118.12 122.74 115.85 108.69 93.19 105.54
- water
5.11 6.73 0.18 0.32 0.26 0.71 0.66 0.13 0.00 0.47
- air
21.56 4.51 0.39 1.58 6.81 1.16 0.30 5.95 0.00 1.35
-transport
equipment rental
32.46 66.33 21.57 97.61 20.90 94.37 15.20 62.69 29.53 36.01
- travel agency
services /to ur
operators
0.37 0.52 0.05 0.71 0.50 0.27 0.10 0.27 2.25 0.15
- others and
supporting services
5.70 4.05 1.10 4.54 2.82 2.41 3.16 1.37 3.83 1.70
- clothing &
garments
72.93 194.92 94.13 81.28 62.37 18.88 935.40 61.35 48.11 91.37
- processed food
36.71 56.70 36.80 50.22 52.23 45.57 52.07 48.30 11.66 39.57
-tobacco products
10.05 6.29 3.39 4.17 2.87 3.72 7.38 5.83 0.82 3.79
-alcohol
8.58 3.71 2.16 2.06 0.27 0.26 9.58 2.90 1.03 2.23
-travel related
consumer goods
4.71 9.00 1.81 6.21 8.47 1.89 16.74 3.13 1.91 2.58
-footwear
9.72 19.52 6.91 4.99 8.56 1.99 80.82 4.98 2.94 6.97
-toiletries
3.88 7.76 2.35 4.85 6.37 5.25 19.96 5.40 1.32 3.13
-gems and jewellery
2.94 17.44 46.85 5.82 3.91 3.16 172.93 11.44 23.45 37.51
- books , journal,
magazines ,
stationery, etc.
29.38 21.94 1.28 5.13 70.29 2.75 67.87 5.58 7.01 3.82
- others
437.60 47.53 43.76 54.44 62.94 24.39 1243.60 55.51 22.00 58.48
- recreation
religio us, cultural
and sporting
activities
4.80 41.64 4.73 71.05 5.73 1.03 2.05 4.95 18.93 11.09
edical and
health- related
activities
26.10 16.86 21.33 26.10 14.40 2684.22 187.84 1094.71 58.93 249.63
47.79 30.51 32.72 28.83 106.15 34.68 28.27 53.66 75.28 34.12
estd. no. of overnight
trips(‘00)
163028 130861 5224979 612210 62992 508224 31679 228397 2205 6964576
estd. no. of overnight
visitor-trips (‘00)
210933 272138 12034296 1396680 82007 1093566 44739 420461 3124 15557945
T able 57: A verage expenditure(in Rs.) per overnight trip by c egoriesof expenditure for each leading purpose
all-I ndia rural
package
component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ranspor t
shopping
recreation religious, cultural , spor ti ng and health- related activit ies
-m
others
total
1193.99 1214.46 466.07 996.59 996.14 3416.06 3085.61 1911.69 985.65 820.75
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 230
category of
expenditure
lead ing p urpose
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreatio n
social religio us &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
med ical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
11.87 2043.01 1.21 101.93 143.18 0.04 136.98 3.71 0.00 114.67
491.82 548.39 11.87 188.33 254.58 237.29 51.77 195.99 56.63 91.63
493.11 550.23 83.89 300.10 282.51 247.66 158.34 203.78 224.04 158.50
- railways
233.54 414.82 148.41 262.84 376.10 107.97 97.88 163.03 42.85 180.34
- road(excl. transport
equipment rental)
236.80 367.84 202.69 320.43 209.82 184.03 186.74 186.56 212.91 225.42
- water
5.89 1.58 0.35 0.52 1.81 1.25 0.54 1.57 0.00 0.70
- air
543.78 205.99 27.41 32.46 219.08 88.45 0.00 30.08 0.00 58.85
-transport equipment
rental
77.11 292.29 44.09 213.76 49.99 137.23 50.09 102.16 106.62 82.90
- travel agency
services /to ur
operators
0.55 8.07 0.56 2.23 1.54 0.30 0.06 2.19 0.00 1.18
- others and
supporting services
1.68 12.20 1.57 5.38 4.31 2.58 2.62 9.11 17.14 2.83
- clothing &
garments
785.39 297.86 180.10 101.85 109.28 31.56 2250.17 70.07 0.00 191.54
- processed food
50.30 79.06 52.04 61.31 48.76 53.11 66.37 39.25 6.86 54.10
-tobacco products
6.21 5.56 3.23 2.77 2.60 2.24 3.95 2.97 0.00 3.34
-alcohol
5.31 8.91 1.51 0.79 0.38 0.25 1.87 2.55 0.00 1.88
-travel related
consumer goods
10.69 21.99 5.23 15.33 18.04 8.14 19.96 3.22 21.42 7.71
-footwear
18.04 23.76 9.69 7.54 8.29 2.85 87.66 5.68 25.64 10.17
-toiletries
8.37 11.50 3.60 6.23 7.39 6.75 18.55 2.45 15.39 4.62
-gems and jewellery
34.80 48.95 55.52 12.76 4.33 2.88 1262.18 12.30 0.00 47.73
- books , journal,
magazines ,
stationery, etc.
16.52 14.29 3.61 7.71 91.71 3.48 27.84 8.83 0.00 6.43
- others
493.62 171.83 57.58 78.01 66.52 52.25 1006.00 54.70 44.19 82.00
- recreation religious,
cultural and sporting
activities
8.02 80.64 8.79 131.34 14.49 1.03 4.94 1.92 34.28 27.03
edical and health-
related activities
14.47 13.70 17.76 7.12 21.62 5718.93 11.36 517.55 977.35 217.76
38.60 64.16 67.89 58.13 58.42 65.32 45.22 56.75 42.73 64.95
estd. no. of overnight
trips(‘00)
83156 121415 1729901 301320 32714 83907 4162 68911 263 2425746
estd. no. of overnight
visitor-trips (‘00)
104821 262655 4090154 827145 43953 172930 5620 108912 322 5616512
T able 57: A verage expenditure(in Rs.) per overnight trip by categoriesof expenditure for each leading purpose
all-I ndia urban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ranspor t
shopping
recreation religious, cultural , spor ti ng and health- related activit ies
-m
others
total
3585.67 5286.63 988.67 1918.89 1994.74 6955.59 5491.08 1676.41 1828.04 1636.33
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 231
category of
expend iture
leading purpose
business holidaying,
leisure and
recreation
social religious &
pilgrimage
education
& training
health &
medical
shopping other n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
10.34 1075.12 0.66 89.40 113.24 2.40 20.63 2.78 334.37 39.90
216.21 312.89 4.28 101.97 176.34 144.11 38.11 125.03 87.95 42.18
295.73 356.79 50.01 210.69 193.19 219.07 77.77 196.23 125.41 97.20
- railways
101.67 225.41 46.10 116.05 169.34 33.12 26.36 95.24 7.89 61.08
- road(excl. transport
equip ment rental)
158.77 260.05 119.00 235.35 149.46 131.42 124.08 126.73 105.91 136.51
- water
5.37 4.25 0.22 0.39 0.79 0.78 0.65 0.46 0.00 0.53
- air
197.95 101.48 7.11 11.76 79.37 13.53 0.26 11.55 0.00 16.36
-transport equip ment
rental
47.54 175.08 27.17 135.92 30.84 100.45 19.25 71.84 37.73 48.30
- travel agency
services /tour
operators
0.43 4.15 0.18 1.21 0.86 0.28 0.10 0.71 2.01 0.42
- others and
supporting services 4.34 7.97 1.22 4.82 3.33 2.43 3.09 3.17 5.25 2.00
- clothing & garments
313.59 244.46 115.52 88.07 78.40 20.68 1088.04 63.37 42.98 117.19
- processed food
41.30 67.46 40.59 53.88 51.04 46.64 53.73 46.20 11.15 43.33
-tobacco products
8.75 5.94 3.35 3.71 2.78 3.51 6.98 5.16 0.74 3.67
-alcohol
7.47 6.21 2.00 1.64 0.31 0.26 8.69 2.82 0.92 2.14
-travel related
consumer goods
6.73 15.25 2.66 9.22 11.74 2.77 17.11 3.15 3.98 3.91
-footwear
12.53 21.56 7.60 5.83 8.47 2.11 81.62 5.14 5.36 7.80
-toiletries
5.39 9.56 2.66 5.31 6.72 5.46 19.80 4.71 2.82 3.52
-gems and jewellery
13.70 32.60 49.01 8.11 4.05 3.12 299.41 11.64 20.95 40.08
- books , journal,
magazines ,
statio nery, etc.
25.03 18.26 1.86 5.98 77.61 2.85 63.22 6.33 6.26 4.52
- others
456.52 107.35 47.20 62.21 64.16 28.34 1215.98 55.33 24.35 64.70
- recreation religio us,
cultural and sporting
activities
5.88 60.41 5.74 90.94 8.73 1.03 2.38 4.25 20.56 15.18
ed ical and health-
related activities
22.17 15.34 20.44 19.84 16.86 3114.25 167.35 960.93 156.67 245.72
44.69 46.70 41.46 38.50 89.84 39.02 30.24 54.38 71.79 42.11
estd. no. of o vernight
trip s(‘00)
249231 261039 6944486 923709 96951 581371 35046 296078 2409 9390321
estd. no. of o vernight
visito r-trip s (‘00)
315754 534793 16124450 2223825 125960 1266496 50359 529373 3446 21174457
Table 57: Average expenditure(in Rs.) per overnight trip by categories of expe diture for each leading purpose
all-I ndia rural+urban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and dr ink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cul tural , sporti ng and health-related activit ies
-m
others
total
2002.13 3174.30 596.04 1300.80 1337.47 3917.62 3364.86 1857.16 1075.04 1038.36
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 232
category of expenditure
quintile class of MPCE(%)
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
41539 12632 56262 187173 411134 0 708739
27124 22818 34918 101309 148670 0 334838
2496572 3011949 3664072 4688246 7996835 0 21857675
- railways 75134 109629 146289 222253 331072 0 884377
- road(excl. transport equipment rental) 4168645 5735599 7176007 10452578 20551483 0 48084313
- water 7631 22524 11905 20361 33491 0 95912
- air 374 0 675 0 13713 0 14762
-transport equipment rental 866795 1339199 2112716 2778220 8275810 0 15372740
- travel agency services /tour operators 4938 2375 2072 1894 19416 0 30694
- others and supporting services 117949 101651 109044 124407 288871 0 741922
- clothing & garments 7332776 9530646 11790641 22085191 37978295 0 88717550
- processed food 4024799 5967163 5872696 7727388 11845996 0 35438042
-tobacco products 580618 798813 771626 994437 958122 0 4103615
-alcohol 229045 239289 202369 258767 584863 0 1514333
-travel related consumer goods 178844 146595 461984 323511 1285495 0 2396430
-footwear 1214707 1427758 1994985 3099519 5689421 0 13426391
-toiletries 851256 1421807 1550359 2170567 3125522 0 9119511
-gems and jewellery 588080 653191 792861 1480376 21296124 0 24810632
- books , journal, magazines , stationery,
etc. 854244 904753 1178856 1332319 2414359 0 6684532
- others 7382181 11667742 13340843 14797989 54409093 0 101597848
- recreation religious, cultural and sporting
activities 393687 491613 668954 803103 2575861 0 4933219
edical and health-related activities 1168011 1731862 2283457 3482974 9994950 0 18661255
7473022 9619917 12277968 18503413 40191301 0 88065622
estd. no. of same day trips(‘00) 1911276 2144627 2291341 2825628 4177985 0 13350857
estd. no. of same day visitor-trips (‘00) 4081158 4384124 4567822 5095780 6289362 0 24418247
estd. expenditure per same day trip (in Rs.) 210.58 254.17 288.40 333.86 534.47
0
358.39
expenditure per same day visitor-trip (in Rs.) 98.62 124.34 144.67 185.13 355.05
0
195.95
T able 58: Estimated total expenditure(in R s. ‘000) by categories of expenditure for each quintile class of M PCE(%) of same-
day trips
all-I ndia rural
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cultural and sporting activities
-m
others
total 40248033 54510833 66081430 94337024 223300913 0 478478237
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 233
category of expenditure
quintile class of MPCE(%)
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
25290 14281 69054 107827 1037033 0 1253485
2438 29230 64536 54789 499594 0 650587
839216 1235056 1849694 2361512 4685712 0 10971190
- railways
175489 234065 357947 564629 832944 0 2165073
- road(excl. transport equipment rental)
2229817 3616602 4849822 6251402 11919866 0 28867509
- water
10636 2837 4228 4356 13328 0 35385
- air
0 0 9 43250 508486 0 551745
-transport equipment rental
450061 878643 1246513 1768527 4328913 0 8672658
- travel agency services /tour operators
2617 3312 2443 1655 28360 0 38387
- others and supporting services
37494 52997 41065 30902 159186 0 321645
- clothing & garments
1913673 2576508 4005458 5068969 12509244 0 26073852
- processed food
1021763 1296594 1392333 2093761 3408963 0 9213414
-tobacco products
143480 115042 104035 148674 108502 0 619733
-alcohol
23952 25654 50054 41473 28825 0 169958
-travel related consumer goods
100163 108522 59733 168706 147003 0 584125
-footwear
200456 351045 489914 661341 1000874 0 2703631
-toiletries
183586 156179 115024 290621 614373 0 1359783
-gems and jewellery
150058 1541136 381560 1012684 2513560 0 5598999
- books , journal, magazines , stationery,
etc.
65884 212156 174265 547790 1047411 0 2047507
- others
1399713 1556581 2161945 3379198 5801903 0 14299341
- recreation religious, cultural and sporting
activities
306594 388955 537644 700763 2029526 0 3963483
edical and health-related activities
315232 662273 1237047 805675 1938763 0 4958991
1719287 2748804 3960739 4070683 6946452 0 19445964
estd. no. of same day trips(‘00)
462369 637769 735318 761373 973682 0 3570512
estd. no. of same day visitor-trips (‘00)
1192106 1386488 1457632 1450596 1661159 0 7147982
estd. expenditure per same day trip(in Rs.)
251.82 274.79 308.06 391.82 612.13 0 395.61
expenditure per same day visitor-trip (in Rs.)
97.67 126.40 155.40 205.65 358.80 0 197.61
T able 58: Estimated total expenditure(in R s. ‘000) by categories of expenditure for each quintile class of M PCE(% ) of same-
day trips
all-I ndia urban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cultural and sporting activities
-m
others
total
11643188 17525565 22652089 29831845 59601724 0 141254408
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 234
Category of expenditure
quintile class of MPCE(%)
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
0.22 0.06 0.25 0.66 0.98 0.00 0.53
0.14 0.11 0.15 0.36 0.36 0.00 0.25
13.06 14.04 15.99 16.59 19.14 0.00 16.37
- railways
0.39 0.51 0.64 0.79 0.79 0.00 0.66
- road(excl. transport equipment rental)
21.81 26.74 31.32 36.99 49.19 0.00 36.02
- water
0.04 0.11 0.05 0.07 0.08 0.00 0.07
- air
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.03 0.00 0.01
-transport equipment rental
4.54 6.24 9.22 9.83 19.81 0.00 11.51
- travel agency services /tour operators
0.03 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.05 0.00 0.02
- others and supporting services
0.62 0.47 0.48 0.44 0.69 0.00 0.56
- clothing & garments
38.37 44.44 51.46 78.16 90.90 0.00 66.45
- processed food
21.06 27.82 25.63 27.35 28.35 0.00 26.54
-tobacco products
3.04 3.72 3.37 3.52 2.29 0.00 3.07
-alcohol
1.20 1.12 0.88 0.92 1.40 0.00 1.13
-travel related
consumer goods
0.94 0.68 2.02 1.14 3.08 0.00 1.79
-footwear
6.36 6.66 8.71 10.97 13.62 0.00 10.06
-toiletries
4.45 6.63 6.77 7.68 7.48 0.00 6.83
-gems and jewellery
3.08 3.05 3.46 5.24 50.97 0.00 18.58
- books , journal, magazines , stationery, etc.
4.47 4.22 5.14 4.72 5.78 0.00 5.01
- others
38.62 54.40 58.22 52.37 130.23 0.00 76.10
- recreation religious, cultural and sporting
activities
2.06 2.29 2.92 2.84 6.17 0.00 3.70
edical and health-related activities
6.11 8.08 9.97 12.33 23.92 0.00 13.98
39.10 44.86 53.58 65.48 96.20 0.00 65.96
estd. no. of same day trips(‘00) 1911276 2144627 2291341 2825628 4177985 0 13350857
estd. no. of same day visitor-trips (‘00) 4081158 4384124 4567822 5095780 6289362 0 24418247
T able 59: A verage expenditure (in R s.) per same-day trip by categoriesof expenditure for each quintil classof M PCE (%)
all-I ndia rural
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cultural and sporting activities
-m
others
total
210.58 254.17 288.40 333.86 534.47 0.00 358.39
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 235
Category of expenditure
quintile class of MPCE(%)
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
0.55 0.22 0.94 1.42 10.65 0.00 3.51
0.05 0.46 0.88 0.72 5.13 0.00 1.82
18.15 19.37 25.16 31.02 48.12 0.00 30.73
- railways 3.80 3.67 4.87 7.42 8.55 0.00 6.06
- road(excl. transport equipment rental) 48.23 56.71 65.96 82.11 122.42 0.00 80.85
- water 0.23 0.04 0.06 0.06 0.14 0.00 0.10
- air 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.57 5.22 0.00 1.55
-transport equipment rental 9.73 13.78 16.95 23.23 44.46 0.00 24.29
- travel agency services /tour operators 0.06 0.05 0.03 0.02 0.29 0.00 0.11
- others and supporting services 0.81 0.83 0.56 0.41 1.63 0.00 0.90
- clothing & garments 41.39 40.40 54.47 66.58 128.47 0.00 73.03
- processed food 22.10 20.33 18.94 27.50 35.01 0.00 25.80
-tobacco products 3.10 1.80 1.41 1.95 1.11 0.00 1.74
-alcohol 0.52 0.40 0.68 0.54 0.30 0.00 0.48
-travel related consumer goods 2.17 1.70 0.81 2.22 1.51 0.00 1.64
-footwear 4.34 5.50 6.66 8.69 10.28 0.00 7.57
-toiletries 3.97 2.45 1.56 3.82 6.31 0.00 3.81
-gems and jewellery 3.25 24.16 5.19 13.30 25.81 0.00 15.68
- books , journal, magazines , stationery, etc. 1.42 3.33 2.37 7.19 10.76 0.00 5.73
- others 30.27 24.41 29.40 44.38 59.59 0.00 40.05
- recreation religious, cultural and sporting
activities 6.63 6.10 7.31 9.20 20.84 0.00 11.10
edical and health-related activities 6.82 10.38 16.82 10.58 19.91 0.00 13.89
37.18 43.10 53.86 53.47 71.34 0.00 54.46
estd. no. of same day trips(‘00) 462369 637769 735318 761373 973682 0 3570512
estd. no. of same day visitor-trips (‘00) 1192106 1386488 1457632 1450596 1661159 0 7147982
T able 59: Average expenditure (in Rs.) per same-day trip by categories of expenditure for each quintile class of M PCE (%)
all-I ndia urban
package component
non-package component
accommodation
food and drink
t ransport
shopping
recreation religious, cultural and sporting activities
-m
others
total 251.82 274.79 308.06 391.82 612.13 0.00 395.61
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 236
leading purpose
quintile class of MPCE
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all estd no.
of
overnight
trip (’00)
sample
no. of
overnight
trip **
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
business 759.38 541.48 2519.66 777.11 1184.73 0 1193.99 163028 2038
holidaying, leisure and
recreation
291.62 440.92 398.38 497.88 2405.94 0 1214.46 130861 1218
social 246.95 498.5 325.45 395.15 675.62 0 466.07 5224979 40675
religious & pilgrimage 538.91 545.37 628.42 776.77 1529.93 0 996.59 612210 4730
education & training 468.62 443.27 765.12 845.92 1353.52 0 996.14 62992 753
health & medical 1769.61 1891.53 1589.26 2034.09 5508.06 0 3416.06 508224 4764
shopping 1092.8 907.1 1534.29 2014.78 6980.1 0 3085.61 31679 588
other 512.58 462.86 1112.99 2085.61 2822.97 0 1911.69 228397 2262
n.r 700 183.05 1011.17 1004.96 2577.26 0 985.65 2205 51
estimated no. of
households with at
least one overnight
trip('00)
237942 270259 280454 310870 364373 0 1463898 XXX XXX
estimated no. of
overnight trip('00)
876290 1069150 1209250 1460391 2349494 0 6964576 XXX XXX
sample no. of
households with at
least one overnight
trip
12343 14648 16639 20488 27802 0 91920 XXX XXX
sample no. of
overnight trip
6703 8205 9803 12515 19853 0 57079 XXX XXX
* 365 days **30 days
T able 60 : Average expenditure(in Rs.) per over night tr ip by qui nt ile class of M PCE and leading pur pose of
t ri p
all- I ndia r ural
all 370.07 589.73 509.86 605.13 1393.17 0 820.75 6964576 57079
Appendix A
NSS Repor t No. 536: Domesti c Tour ism i n I ndi a, 2008-09
A- 237
leading purpose
quintile class of MPCE
00-20 20-40 40-60 60-80 80-100 n.r. all estd no.
of
overnight
trip (’00)
sample
no. of
overnight
trip **
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
business 879.96 4399.51 984.53 4265.16 4187.31 0 3585.67 83156 1656
holidaying, leisure and
recreation
210.62 1408.04 1232.69 2085.06 8966.73 0 5286.63 121415 1578
social 436.44 591 686.98 832.44 1572.48 0 988.67 1729901 22943
religious & pilgrimage 812.29 785.71 1420.45 1829.45 3291.9 0 1918.89 301320 3683
education & training 952.14 1947.38 838.78 1476.24 2522.28 0 1994.74 32714 577
health & medical 1761.62 3140.22 4147.88 8773.45 11578.14 0 6955.59 83907 1389
shopping 3177.61 2194.86 7047.46 5353.78 6309.82 0 5491.08 4162 105
other 570.17 769.85 1186.24 836.68 3208.06 0 1676.41 68911 1076
n.r 545.93 2749.68 5674.6 5300 0 0 1828.04 263 16
estimated no. of
households with at least
one overnight trip('00)
92547 102247 114054 124846 163720 0 597415 XXX XXX
estimated no. of
overnight trip('00)
287138 347847 406137 512339 872285 0 2425746 XXX XXX
sample no. of
households with at least
one overnight trip
6323 8425 10338 12504 14874 0 52464 XXX XXX
sample no. of overnight
trip
3134 4560 6046 8193 11090 0 33023 XXX XXX
* 365 days **30 days
T able 60 : Average expenditure( in Rs.) per over night tr ip by qui nt ile class of M PCE and leading pur pose of
t ri p
all- I ndia ur ban
all 556.12 843.08 963.19 1430.78 2728.3 0 1636.33 2425746 33023



Appendix B




Sample Design
and
Estimation Procedure













NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

Sample Design and Estimation Procedure

1. Introduction

1.1 The National Sample Survey (NSS), set up by the Government of India in 1950 to collect
socio-economic data employing scientific sampling methods, conducted its sixty-fifth round from 1
st

July 2008 to 30
th
June 2009.

2. Outline of Survey Programme

2.1 Subject coverage: The subjects covered in the 65
th
round (July 2008 – June 2009) of NSS were
‘Domestic Tourism’, ‘Housing Condition’ and ‘Urban Slums’.

2.2 Geographical coverage: The survey covered the whole of the Indian Union except (i) interior
villages of Nagaland situated beyond five kilometres of the bus route and (ii) villages in Andaman
and Nicobar Islands which remained inaccessible throughout the year. For Leh (Ladakh) and Kargil
districts of Jammu & Kashmir there were no separate sample first-stage units (FSUs) for central
sample. For these two districts, the State sample was treated as Central sample.

2.3 Period of survey and work programme: The period of survey was of one year duration starting
on 1
st
July 2008 and ending on 30
th
June 2009. The survey period of this round was divided into four
sub-rounds of three months’ duration each as follows:

sub-round 1 : July - September 2008
sub-round 2 : October - December 2008
sub-round 3 : January - March 2009
sub-round 4 : April - June 2009

2.3.1 In each of these four sub-rounds, equal number of sample villages/ blocks (FSUs) were
allotted for survey with a view to ensuring uniform spread of sample FSUs over the entire survey
period. Attempt was made to survey each of the FSUs during the sub-round to which it was allotted.
Because of the arduous field conditions, this restriction was not strictly enforced in Andaman and
Nicobar Islands, Lakshadweep and rural areas of Arunachal Pradesh and Nagaland.

2.4 Schedules of enquiry: During this round, the following schedules of enquiry were canvassed:

Schedule 0.0 : list of households
Schedule 21.1 : domestic tourism
Schedule 1.2 : housing condition
Schedule 0.21 : particulars of slum
Appendix B
B- 2
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
2.5 Participation of States: In this round all the States and Union Territories except Andaman &
Nicobar Islands, Chandigarh, Dadra & Nagar Haveli and Lakshadweep participated. The following
was the ratio of State sample size (number of first stage units) to the Central sample size for the
participating States/ UTs.

Nagaland (U) : triple
J & K , Manipur & Delhi : double
Maharashtra (U) : one and half
Gujarat : less than equal
Remaining States/ UTs : equal

3. Sample Design

3.1 Outline of sample design: A stratified multi-stage design was adopted for the 65
th
round
survey. The first stage units (FSU) were the 2001 Census villages (panchayat wards in case of
Kerala) in the rural sector and Urban Frame Survey (UFS) blocks in the urban sector. For towns with
no UFS frame available (applicable to Leh and Kargil towns of J & K), each town was treated as an
FSU. The ultimate stage units (USU) were households in both the sectors. In case of large FSUs, one
intermediate stage of sampling was the selection of two hamlet-groups/ sub-blocks from each FSU.

3.2 Sampling frame for first-stage units: For the rural sector, the list of 2001 Census villages
(panchayat wards for Kerala) constituted the sampling frame. For the urban sector, the list of latest
available Urban Frame Survey (UFS) blocks was considered as the sampling frame. However, for
Leh and Kargil towns of J & K, UFS frame was not available. Accordingly, Census 2001 served as
the frame for these two towns (to be referred to as non-UFS towns).

3.3 First-stage stratification

3.3.1 Rural sector: All villages of a district formed a separate stratum.

3.3.2 Urban sector: In the urban sector, strata were formed within each NSS region on the basis of
size class of towns as per Census 2001 town population. This departure was made in the stratification
principle in order to facilitate generation of town-class wise estimates to satisfy the requirements of
the user ministries. The stratum numbers and their composition (within each NSS region) are given
below.

Stratum Composition (within NSS region)
1 All towns with population < 50,000
2 All towns with population 50,000 – 99,999
3 All towns with population 1,00,000 – 4,99,999
4 All towns with population 5,00,000 – 9,99,999
5, 6, …. Each million-plus city
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

3.3.3 The non-UFS towns of Leh and Kargil of J & K within the NSS region (region number ‘014’)
were grouped together to form a separate urban stratum.

3.4 Sub-stratification: There was no sub-stratification in the rural sector and for strata
corresponding to non-UFS towns. However, for all other urban strata, each stratum was divided into
two sub-strata as follows:
sub-stratum 1: all UFS blocks having area type ‘slum area’
sub-stratum 2: remaining UFS blocks

3.5 Total sample size (FSUs): 12952 FSUs were allotted for the Central sample and 13996 FSUs for
State sample at all-India level.

3.6 Allocation of total sample to States and UTs: The total number of sample FSUs was allocated
to the States and UTs in proportion to population as per Census 2001 subject to a minimum sample
allocation to each State/UT, and subject to resource availability in terms of number of field
investigators.

3.7 Allocation of State/UT level sample to rural and urban sectors: The State/UT level sample
was allocated between the two sectors in proportion to population as per Census 2001 with 1.5
weightage to urban sector subject to the restriction that urban sample size for bigger States like
Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, etc. should not exceed the rural sample size. At least 4 FSUs were
allocated to each State/UT separately for rural and urban areas. Further, the State level allocations for
both rural and urban sector were adjusted marginally in a few cases to ensure that each stratum got a
minimum allocation of 4 FSUs.

3.8 Allocation to strata/ sub-strata: Within each sector of a State/UT, the sample size was allocated
to the different strata in proportion to the stratum population as per Census 2001. Allocations at
stratum level were adjusted to multiples of 4 with a minimum sample size of 4. Stratum-level sample
size in the urban sector pertaining to strata belonging to UFS towns was further allocated to the 2
sub-strata in proportion to the number of UFS blocks in them with double weightage to sub-stratum
1, subject to a minimum allocation of 4 to each of the two sub-strata.

3.9 Selection of FSUs: Villages were arranged as per Census ordering and FSUs were selected by
Circular Systematic Sampling with probability proportional to population from all rural strata. For
urban strata × sub-strata (wherever applicable), the towns within the stratum were arranged in
ascending order of population; then FSUs were selected by Circular Systematic Sampling with equal
probability for UFS towns. Within each stratum/ sub-stratum, a multiple of 4 FSUs was selected. The
sample was drawn in the form of two independent sub-samples and an equal numbers of sample
FSUs was allocated to the four sub-rounds.

Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
Since UFS frames were not available for Leh and Kargil towns of Jammu and Kashmir, a somewhat
different approach was adopted for the survey in these two towns. Each of these two towns was
treated as an FSU (instead of UFS blocks being considered as the FSUs for UFS towns). Both these
towns were selected and repeated in each of the sub-rounds 1 to 4 of the sample list.

3.10 Selection of hamlet-groups/ sub-blocks

3.10.1 Large sample FSUs with approximate present population of 1200 or more were divided into
a suitable number (say, D) of ‘hamlet-groups’ in the rural sector and ‘sub-blocks’ in the urban sector,
by more or less equally dividing the present population of the FSU, as shown below.
approximate present population
of the sample FSU
no. of hg’s/sb’s
formed
less than 1200 (no hg’s/sb’s formed) 1
1200 to 1799 3
1800 to 2399 4
2400 to 2999 5
3000 to 3599 6
…………..and so on

3.10.2 For rural areas of Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim, hilly districts of Uttaranchal, Poonch, Rajouri,
Udhampur, Doda, Leh (Ladakh) and Kargil districts of Jammu and Kashmir and Idukki district of
Kerala, the number of hamlet-groups to be formed was determined as follows:
approximate present population
of the sample village
no. of hg’s
formed
less than 600 (no hg’s) 1
600 to 899 3
900 to 1199 4
1200 to 1499 5
.………..and so on

3.10.3 Wherever hamlet-groups/ sub-blocks were formed, two were selected from among them in
the following manner – the hg/sb with the highest percentage share of population was always
selected; one more hg/sb was selected from the remaining hg’s/sb’s by SRS. Listing and selection of
the households was done independently in the two selected hamlet-groups/ sub-blocks.

3.10.4 Procedure for Leh and Kargil towns: Sub-blocks were formed in the usual way treating the
entire town as one FSU. For the selection of two sub-blocks in any given town (FSU) of Leh or
Kargil during sub-round 1, the sub-block having the highest percentage share in total present
population of the FSU/town was selected with probability 1 and another one was selected randomly.
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
It was possible that the sub-block with the highest population and hence selected with probability 1
in a particular sub-round might not have the highest population in subsequent sub-rounds. So a
different sub-block might be selected with probability 1 in a subsequent sub-round. Again, the
second sub-block to be surveyed was, in subsequent sub-rounds, selected afresh with the help of
random number tables. If the randomly selected sub-block happened to coincide with any of the
selected sub-blocks of the previous sub-round(s), it was rejected and a fresh sub-block was again
selected.

3.11 Second-stage stratification

3.11.1 Two cut-off points ‘A’ and ‘B’ (in Rs.), determined from NSS 61
st
round data for each NSS
region for urban areas in such a way that the top 30% of the population had MPCE equal to or more
than ‘B’ and the bottom 30% of the population had MPCE equal to or less than A, were used for
second-stage stratification in the urban sector.

3.11.2 For Schedule 21.1, all the households listed in the selected FSU/ hamlet-group/ sub-block
were stratified into five second-stage strata (SSS) as shown below.
rural
SSS 1 households having pucca dwelling structure and having at least one member,
who performed at least one overnight trip during last 30 days
SSS 2 households not having pucca dwelling structure and having at least one
member, who performed at least one overnight trip during last 30 days
SSS 3 remaining households having pucca dwelling structure and having at least one
member who performed at least one same-day trip during last 30 days
SSS 4 remaining households not having pucca dwelling structure and having at least
one member who performed at least one same-day trip during last 30 days
SSS5 other households
urban
SSS 1 households with MPCE > B and having at least one member, who performed
at least one overnight trip during last 30 days
SSS 2 households with MPCE < B and having at least one member who performed at
least one overnight trip during last 30 days
SSS 3 remaining households with MPCE > B and having at least one member who
performed at least one same-day trip during last 30 days
SSS 4 remaining households with MPCE < B and having at least one member who
performed at least one same-day trip during last 30 days
SSS 5: other households
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
3.12 Allocation of households to different second-stage strata

3.12.1 Numbers of households allotted for survey to different SSS’s for Schedule 21.1 were as
follows:

SSS
number of sample households allotted for
survey
FSU’s without
hg/sb formation
FSU’s with hg/sb
formation (for each hg/sb)
SSS 1 4 2
SSS 2 2 1
SSS 3 2 1
SSS 4 2 1
SSS 5
2 1


3.13 Selection of households
3.13.1 From each SSS the sample households were selected by SRSWOR.

4. Estimation Procedure

4.1 Notations

s = subscript for s-th stratum
t = subscript for t-th sub-stratum (only for UFS towns of urban sector)
m = subscript for sub-sample (m =1, 2)
i = subscript for i-th FSU [village (panchayat ward)/ block/ non-UFS town]
d = subscript for a hamlet-group/ sub-block (d = 1, 2)
j = subscript for j-th second stage stratum in an FSU/ hg/sb, j = 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 for Sch. 21.1
k = subscript for k-th sample household under a particular second stage stratum within an FSU/ hg/sb
D = total number of hg’s/ sb’s formed in the sample FSU
D* = 0 if D = 1
= (D – 1) for FSUs with D > 1
N = total number of FSUs in any urban sub-stratum
Z = total size of a rural stratum (= sum of sizes for all the FSUs of a stratum)
z = size of sample village used for selection.
n = number of sample FSUs surveyed including zero cases but excluding casualty for a particular
sub-sample and stratum/sub-stratum.
H = total number of households listed in a second-stage stratum of an FSU / hamlet-group or sub-
block of sample FSU
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
h = number of households surveyed in a second-stage stratum of an FSU / hamlet-group or sub-block
of sample FSU
x, y = observed value of characteristics x, y under estimation
X
ˆ
,
Y
ˆ
= estimate of population total X, Y for the characteristics x, y

In terms of the above symbols,

y
stmidjk
= observed value of the characteristic y for the k-th household in the j-th second stage stratum
of the d-th hg/ sb (d = 1, 2) of the i-th FSU belonging to the m-th sub-sample for the t-th sub-stratum
of s-th stratum.

However, for ease of understanding, a few symbols have been suppressed in following paragraphs
where they are obvious.

4.2 Formulae for Estimation of Aggregates for a particular sub-sample and stratum (for
rural/non-UFS towns of urban i.e. Leh and Kargil) / sub-stratum (for UFS towns of urban)
for Schedule 21.1:

4.2.1 Rural:

(i) For j-th second stage stratum of a stratum:


¯ ¯ ¯
= = =

× + =
j
i
h
k
jk i
j i
j i
i
h
k
jk i
j i
j i
i
j
j
n
y
h
H
D y
h
H
z n
Z
Y
j i j i
1 1
2
2
2 *
1
1
1
1
2 1
1
ˆ


(ii) For all second-stage strata combined:

¯
=
j
j
Y Y
ˆ ˆ


4.2.2 Urban:

(i) For j-th second stage stratum of a sub-stratum:


¯ ¯ ¯
= = =

× + =
j
i
h
k
jk i
j i
j i
i
h
k
jk i
j i
j i
j
j
n
y
h
H
D y
h
H
n
N
Y
j i j i
1 1
2
2
2 *
1
1
1
1
2 1
ˆ


(ii) For all second-stage strata combined:

¯
=
j
j
Y Y
ˆ ˆ

Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
(iii) Estimate for a stratum (
s Y
ˆ
) will be obtained by adding sub-stratum level estimates
(
st Y
ˆ
).

Note: N = 2 in the above formula in the case of NSS region ‘014’ of J & K comprising two towns of
Leh and Kargil.

4.3 Overall Estimate for Aggregates
Overall estimate for aggregates for a stratum (
s
Y
ˆ
) based on two sub-samples is obtained as:
¯
=
=
2
1
ˆ
2
1
ˆ
m
sm s
Y Y

4.4 Overall Estimate of Aggregates at State/UT/all-India level

4.4.1 The overall estimate
Y
ˆ
at the State/ UT/ all-India level is obtained by summing the stratum
estimates
s
Y
ˆ
over all strata belonging to the State/ UT/ all-India.

4.5 Estimates of Ratios

4.5.1 Let
Y
ˆ
and
X
ˆ
be the overall estimates of the aggregates Y and X for two characteristics y and
x respectively at the State/ UT/ all-India level.
Then the combined ratio estimate
)
ˆ
(R
of the ratio
) (
X
Y
R =
is obtained as
X
Y
R
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
=

4.6 Estimation of total number of trips/ visitor- trips /expenditure, etc.

4.6.1 Number of overnight/same-day trips during last 365 days

Total number of overnight trips and same day trips during last 365 days are to be estimated by
using the relevant information recorded against items 7.2 and 8.2 of block 3.

4.6.2 Number of visitor-trips during last 365 days

Number of visitor-trips by different classifications are obtained from column (11) and (13) of
block 4.

4.6.3 Number of trips (overnight/same-day) classified by different categories for 365 days

Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
(a) Number of trips for 30 days by different categories such as purpose of the trip, type of trip,
mode of travel, etc. is available from blocks 5.1 and 5.2. But this information is not
available for 365 days by different categories. Therefore, to provide estimates for 365 days
for these categories, the following assumption is made:

Assume that the joint distribution for the last 365 days for households/trips/visitor-trips, etc.
classified by different categories is the same as the joint distribution obtained for last 30
days.

(b) Under the above assumption, for the tables where estimates for 365 days are given, the
distribution is obtained on the basis of information for last 30 days while marginal totals are
based on information for last 365 days.

(c) These marginal totals are obtained at appropriate level (e.g., State × sector, State × sector ×
sex, etc.). The information necessary for deriving marginal totals is the (i) the estimated
total number of trips/visitor-trips during last 365 days obtained from blocks 3/4 and (ii)
marginal distribution of trips or visitor-trips during last 30 days obtained from blocks 5.1 or
5.2. The proportion of trips for a particular category (for 30 days) multiplied by the
estimated total number of trips (for 365 days) is the estimated marginal total number of
trips for that category for 365 days.


4.6.4 Expenditure incurred

(a) Information on total expenditure during last 30 days is recorded in block 6.1 for latest 3
overnight trips only and in block 6.2 for all same-day trips. However, this information is
not available for 365 days in respect of overnight / same-day trips in blocks 6.1 and 6.2.

To obtain estimates of expenditure for all the overnight trips during last 30 days and also
the expenditure during last 365 days for overnight/same-day trips, certain assumptions are
made similar to 4.6.3 (a) above:

It is assumed that the average expenditure per trip based on last 3 overnight trips during
last 30 days for any group of trips or visitor-trips remains invariant for the last 30 days.
Also, average expenditure for last 30 days for (any group of trips × particular category of
expenditure) is assumed to be same for the last 365 days.
(b) Under the above assumption,
(i) average expenditure per overnight trip for a group/category of trips is obtained as the
ratio of total estimated expenditure incurred on the group/category of overnight trips
to the estimated number of overnight trips on the basis of the latest three trips during
last 30 days for which the expenditure has been reported in block 6.1.
(ii) average expenditure per same-day trip for a group/category of trips is obtained as the
ratio of total estimated expenditure incurred on the group/category of same-day trips
to the estimated number of same-day trips during last 30 days.
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

(c) Marginal totals of trips for last 365 days are obtained using the procedure explained in
para 4.6.3.

4.6.5 Further explanatory notes on how the estimates of cell values and marginal totals are derived
in various tables of the approved Tabulation Plan are given in paragraphs 6 & 7.

4.7 Estimates of Error: The estimated variances of the above estimates are as follows:

4.7.1 For aggregateY
ˆ
:


¯
=
s
s Y r a V Y r a V )
ˆ
( ˆ )
ˆ
( ˆ
where
)
ˆ
( ˆ s Y r a V
is given by


( ) ( )
2
2 1
ˆ ˆ
4
1
ˆ
ˆ
s s s
Y Y Y r Va ÷ =
for rural stratum,
1
ˆ
s
Y and
2
ˆ
s
Y being the stratum estimates for sub-
sample 1 and 2 respectively
and

( ) ( )
¯
÷ =
t
st st s
Y Y Y r Va
2
2 1
ˆ ˆ
4
1
ˆ
ˆ
for urban stratum, where
1
ˆ
st
Y and
2
ˆ
st
Y are the estimates for
sub-sample 1 and sub-sample 2 respectively for stratum ‘s’ and sub-stratum ‘t’.

4.7.2 For ratio R
ˆ
:

(i) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) | |
¯
÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ + ÷ =
s
s s s s s s s s
X X Y Y R X X R Y Y
X
R E S M
2 1 2 1
2
2 1
2
2
2 1
2
ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ
2
ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ
ˆ
4
1
)
ˆ
(
ˆ
for
rural

and
(ii) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) | |
¯¯
÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ + ÷ =
s t
st st st st st st st st
X X Y Y R X X R Y Y
X
R E S M
2 1 2 1
2
2 1
2
2
2 1
2
ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ
2
ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ
ˆ
4
1
)
ˆ
(
ˆ

for urban,

Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
where
1
ˆ
s
Y ,
1
ˆ
st
Y and
2
ˆ
s
Y ,
2
ˆ
st
Y are the estimates for sub-sample 1 and sub-sample 2 respectively
for stratum ‘s’ and sub-stratum ‘t’.

4.7.3 Estimates of Relative Standard Error (RSE)

( )
( )
100
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ ˆ
× =
Y
Y r a V
Y E S R


( )
( )
100
ˆ
ˆ ˆ
ˆ ˆ
× =
R
R E S M
R E S R


5. Multipliers
The formulae for multipliers at stratum/sub-stratum level for a sub-sample are given below:
sub-
stratum
formula for multipliers
hg / sb 1 hg / sb 2
rural
j smi
j smi
smi smj
s
h
H
z n
Z
1
1
1
× ×
j smi
j smi
smi
smi smj
s
h
H
D
z n
Z
2
2 *
1
× × ×
Urban
j stmi
j stmi
stmj
st
h
H
n
N
1
1
×
j stmi
j stmi
stmi
stmj
st
h
H
D
n
N
2
2 *
× ×
j=1,2,3,4,5

Note: (i) For estimating any characteristic for any domain not specifically considered in sample
design, indicator variable is used.
(ii) Multipliers are computed on the basis of information available in the listing schedule
irrespective of any misclassification observed between the listing schedule and the
detailed enquiry schedule.
(iii) For estimating number of villages possessing a characteristic,
*
smi
D = 1 in the relevant
multipliers and there is only one multiplier for the village.


Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
6. An Explanatory Note on Preparation of Appendix Tables

I. For tables 40-48, the estimates for 365 days marginal totals for rows & cols. are derived by
distributing estimated total number of visitor-trips for 365 days (obtained from block-4) to the
row/col. variable as per their distribution of 30 days estimates. Since the distribution pattern of
row/column variables with respect to 30 days estimates may not be similar in rural and urban sectors,
the rural & urban sectors marginal totals do not add up to marginal totals for combined sector.

II. Similarly for tables 50-57, the estimated total number of trips for 365 days, obtained from
block-3, is distributed over the marginal variables as per their distribution of 30 days estimates to
arrive at the estimates for marginal totals for 365 days. Hence the rural & urban sectors marginal
totals do not add up to marginal totals for combined sector for the same reason as mentioned above.

III. For table 56, the item-wise expenditure for each leading purpose of overnight trips and also
for column ‘all’ are derived by multiplying the average expenditure of the corresponding cell in table
57 with the total no. of estimated trips for 365 days for that leading purpose. So the expenditure for
col. ‘all’ for a particular item does not match with the summation of expenditure over leading
purposes for that item.

IV. For table 58, the estimated total expenditure for ‘all’ MPCE classes together corresponding to
a particular item of expenditure in the rural & urban sectors marginal totals do not add up to
marginal totals for combined sector for that particular item.

V. For all these tables, the estimated totals for (rural + urban) sector are calculated by adding the
corresponding figures from rural and urban sectors respectively, except for the estimated totals
corresponding to MPCE classes.

VI. The expenditure for column ‘all’ for a particular category of item in table 56 are obtained by
adding the corresponding category of expenditure over different leading purposes.

VII. The average expenditure per overnight trip for (rural + urban) sector in table 57 is obtained
from table 56 for (rural & urban) sector.

7. An Explanatory Note on Estimation of Cell Values and Marginal Totals
A. For tables 1-39 and 49
Estimates for 365 days are obtained from block 3, items 7.2 and 8.2. Distributions wherever
applicable are based on 365 days estimates.

Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
B. For all other tables

1. (a) Distribution is obtained for the households/trips/visitor-trips/expenditure, etc. on the basis
of estimates of last 30 days.

(b) It is assumed that the joint distribution for the last 365 days for households/trips/visitor-
trips/expenditure, etc. classified by different categories is the same as the joint distribution
obtained for last 30 days.
(c) Under the above assumption, for the tables where estimates for 365 days are given, the
distribution is that of the last 30 days while marginal totals are that of 365 days. These
marginal totals are obtained at appropriate level (e.g., State × sector, State × sector × sex,
etc.).
2. For tables 40-48, estimates of visitor-trips for 365 days by different classifications are
obtained from col (11) of block 4 for tables 40-44 and col (13) of block 4 for tables 45-48.
Subsequent method of estimation is illustrated for table 40.

For table 40, the estimates of visitor-trips by activity status × NCO at State × sector × sex
level are used as marginal totals for the rows. Marginal totals for columns are obtained by
using the distribution of column variables obtained from block 5.1 and the total number of
visitor-trips obtained from block 4, column 11.

3. For tables 50-55, joint distribution is obtained for last 30 days at State × sector level.
Subsequent method of estimation is illustrated for table 50.

For table 50, to obtain the marginal totals representing 365 days’ estimate for the leading
purposes at State × sector level, the marginal distribution by leading purposes using last 30
days’ data is first obtained. This distribution is then applied to the estimated number of trips
during last 365 days obtained from block 3. Marginal distribution of 30 days of column
variables is used wherever necessary to obtain marginal column totals for 365 days.

4. For table 57, it is assumed that average expenditure per trip based on last 3 trips during last
30 days for any group of trips or visitor-trips remains invariant for the last 30 days. Also,
average expenditure for last 30 days for (any group of trips × particular category of
expenditure) is assumed to be the same for the last 365 days.

[A trip in block 5.1 which is supposed to be reported but is not actually reported in block 6.1
is assumed to be present in block 6.1 with zero expenditure.]

(i) Average expenditure per overnight trip for a cell is obtained as follows:

(a) The trips in block 5.1 which are to be reported in block 6.1 are identified.
Appendix B
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NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
(b) The estimated number of trips for a leading purpose is obtained using the information
regarding leading purpose of the identified trips in block 5.1.
(c) The estimated total expenditure for a cell (leading purpose × expenditure category) is
obtained from block 6.1 classified by category of expenditure in block 6.1 and leading
purposes given in block 5.1.
(d) Ratio of estimated expenditure to estimated number of trips obtained as per (b) and (c)
gives the estimated average expenditure for each cell.

(ii) To obtain the marginal totals for columns (estimated no of overnight trips by leading
purpose for 365 days), the following procedure is used:

(a) Estimated total no of overnight trips for last 365 days are obtained from block 3.
(b) The above estimated total number of overnight trips are distributed over the cells
corresponding to the row ‘estimated no of overnight trips’ using the procedure given
in (3) above. This agrees with marginal row totals of table 50.

(iii) To obtain the marginal column totals for ‘estimated number of visitor-trips’ for 365 days,
the following steps are involved:

(a) The total number of visitor-trips for 365 days from block 4, column 11 for overnight
trips are estimated.
(b) The distribution of visitor-trips by the leading purpose for overnight trips using the
information on visitor-trips by leading purposes obtained from column (12), block
5.1, is found.
(c) Using this distribution and the estimate of total number of visitor-trips obtained as per
(a) and (b), marginal totals are obtained.

5. For table 56, (i) estimated total expenditure for a cell (i.e. leading purpose × expenditure
category) = (estimated average expenditure for the cell) × (corresponding marginal column
totals for ‘estimated no of overnight trips’ for the leading purpose during last 365 days) is
obtained from table 57.

6. (i) For table 59, average expenditure per same-day trip for a cell is obtained as follows:

(a) The estimated number of same-day trips for 30 days by quintile class of MPCE using
the information in blocks 3 (quintile class) and 5.2 (number of same-day trips) is
obtained.
(b) The estimated expenditure for a cell (quintile class of MPCE × expenditure category)
from blocks 3 and 6.2 is obtained.
(c) Ratio of estimated expenditure to estimated number of trips obtained as per (a) and
(b) gives the estimated average expenditure for each cell.

Appendix B
B- 15
NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
(ii) To obtain the marginal column totals for ‘estimated number of same-day trips’ by
quintile classes for 365 days, the information in block 3, items 8.2 and 18 is used.

(iii) To obtain the marginal column totals for ‘estimated number of visitor-trips’ for 365
days, the following step is taken:

The total numbers of visitor-trips by quintile classes of MPCE are estimated using
information from block 3, item 18 and block 4, column 13 for same-day trips.

7. For table 58, (i) estimated total expenditure for a cell (i.e. quintile class of MPCE ×
expenditure category) = (estimated average expenditure for the cell) × (corresponding
marginal column totals for ‘estimated no of same-day trips’ for quintile class of MPCE
during last 365 days) are obtained from table 59.

8. (i) For table 60, average expenditure per overnight trip for a cell (quintile class of MPCE ×
leading purpose) is obtained as follows:

(a) The trips in block 5.1 which are to be reported in block 6.1 are identified.
(b) The estimated number of trips for a leading purpose is obtained using the information
regarding leading purpose of the identified trips in block 5.1.
(c) The estimated total expenditure for a cell (quintile class of MPCE × leading purpose)
is obtained from block 6.1 classified by category of expenditure in block 6.1 and
leading purposes given in block 5.1 and MPCE information in block 3.
(d) Ratio of estimated expenditure to estimated number of trips obtained as per (b) and
(c) gives the estimated average expenditure for each cell.

(ii) A column with heading ‘estimated no of overnight trips’ is inserted giving the marginal
row totals for leading purposes. To obtain the marginal totals for rows (estimated no of
overnight trips by leading purpose for 365 days), following procedure is used:

(a) Estimated total no of overnight trips for last 365 days are obtained from block 3.
(b) The above estimated total number of overnight trips are distributed over the cells
corresponding to the column ‘estimated no of overnight trips’ using the procedure
given in (3) above. These agree with marginal row totals of table 50.

(iii) A row with heading ‘estimated no of overnight trips’ is inserted giving the marginal
column totals for quintile classes. These marginal totals for columns (estimated no of
overnight trips by quintile classes for 365 days) are obtained using the information from
block 3.

(iv) The marginal total for columns (estimated number of households with at least one
overnight trip during last 365 days) are obtained using information from block 3, item 18
where item 7.2 > 0.



















Appendix C



Facsimile of Schedule 21.1


NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009



GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
NATIONAL SAMPLE SURVEY ORGANISATION
SOCIO-ECONOMIC SURVEY
SIXTY-FIFTH ROUND: JULY, 2008-JUNE, 2009
SCHEDULE 21.1: DOMESTIC TOURISM


[0] descriptive identification of sample household
1. state/u.t.

5. hamlet name
2. district

6. ward/ inv. unit/ block**
3. tehsil/town

7. name of head of household
4. village name

8. name of the informant


[1] identification of sample household
item
no.
item code Item
no.
item code
1. serial no. of sample
village/block
11. sub-sample
2. round number

6 5 12. FOD sub-region
3. schedule number

2 1 1 13. sample hamlet-group/ sub-
block number

4. sample
(central-1, state-2)
14. second-stage stratum number
5. sector
(rural-1, urban-2)
15. sample household number
6. NSS region

16. sl. no. of informant
(as in col.1, block 4)

7. district code

17. response code
8. stratum number

18. survey code
9. sub-stratum number
#



10. sub-round

19. reason for substitution of
original household (code)


CODES FOR BLOCK 1

item 17: response code: informant co-operative and capable – 1, informant co-operative but not capable – 2,
informant busy – 3, informant reluctant – 4, others – 9
item 18: survey code: original h.h. surveyed – 1, substituted h.h. surveyed – 2, casualty –3
item 19: reason for substitution of original household : informant busy – 1, members away from home – 2, informant non-
cooperative –3, others – 9
* tick mark () may be put in the appropriate place

** strike out whichever is not applicable

# for urban only

*
CENTRAL
STATE
*
RURAL
URBAN
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 2

[2] particulars of field operations
sl. no. Item
investigator/ senior
investigator
superintendent /
senior superintendent
other supervisory
officer
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
1. i) name
(block letters)

ii) code
2. date(s) of : DD MM YY DD MM YY DD MM YY
(i) survey/inspection
(ii) receipt
(iii) scrutiny
(iv) dispatch
3. number of additional sheets
attached

4. total time taken to canvass
schedule 21.1
(in minutes)

5. whether the schedule contains
remarks? (yes-1, no-2)
in block 7 in block 8/9 elsewhere in the schedule

6. signature

[7] remarks by investigator/senior investigator



[8] comments by superintendent / senior superintendent









[9] comments by other supervisory officer









Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 3

[3] household characteristics
1. household size 11.1 whether any member of the household is
aware of the “Incredible India” campaign by
the Govt. of India? (yes-1, no-2)

2. principal
industry
(NIC – 2004)
description
code (5-digit)
if ‘yes’ in
item 11.1,
11.2 where has/have the
member(s) seen /heard the
campaign? (code)

3. principal
occupation
(NCO-2004)
description

11.3 what was the impact of
seeing/ hearing the
campaign? (code)

code (3-digit) 12.1 whether any member of the household is
aware of the tourism promotional campaigns
by state tourism departments / development
corporations or any other organization?
(yes-1, no-2)

4. household type (code)
if ‘yes’ in
item 12.1,

12.2 where has/have the
member(s) seen /heard the
campaign? (code)

5. religion (code)

12.3 what was the impact of
seeing/ hearing the
campaign? (code)

6. social group (code)


household consumption expenditure (Rs.) during last 30
days out of:

7.1 number of overnight trips undertaken by the
household during last 30 days

7.2 number of overnight trips undertaken by the
household during last 365 days
13. purchase

8.1 number of same-day trips undertaken by the
household during last 30 days
14. home produced stock


8.2 number of same-day trips undertaken by the
household during last 365 days

15. receipts in exchange of goods and services

9.1
whether any NRI visited the household during last
365 days? (yes-1, no -2)
16. gifts and loans


9.2 what was the impact of the NRI visit in
influencing the household to undertake trips?
(code)
17. free collection


10. whether some portion of the house was rented out
to the tourists for at least one night during the last
365 days? (yes-1, no-2, cannot say-3)
18. total (items 13 to 17)



CODES FOR BLOCK 3

item 4: household type: for rural areas: self-employed in non-agriculture-1, agricultural labour-2, other labour-3,
self-employed in agriculture-4, others-9
for urban areas: self-employed-1, regular wage/salary earning-2, casual labour-3, others-9
item 5: religion: Hinduism-1, Islam-2, Christianity –3, Sikhism-4, Jainism-5, Buddhism-6, Zoroastrianism-7, others-9

item 6: social group: scheduled tribe-1, scheduled caste-2, other backward class-3, others-9

item 11.2/12.2: where have the member(s) seen /heard the campaign?(code): newspaper/magazine-1,radio-2, TV-3, internet-4,
billboard/hoarding-5, more than one of these-6, others-9

item 9.2/11.3/12.3: impact (code): resulted into one or more trips-1, planning to make a trip in near future –2, willing to make trip
but could not make it due to other constraints (like time, money etc) – 3, no impact – 4, cannot say-5
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 4


CODES FOR BLOCK 4


Col (3): relation to head: self-1, spouse of head-2, married child-3, spouse of married child-4, unmarried child-5, grandchild-6, father/mother/father-in-
law/mother-in-law-7, brother/sister/brother-in-law/sister-in-law/other relatives-8, servants/employees/other non-relatives-9
Col (4): sex: male-1, female-2
Col (6): marital status: never married – 1, currently married – 2, widowed – 3, divorced/separated – 4
Col (7): educational level: not literate -01, literate without any schooling: 02, literate without formal schooling: through NFEC/AIEP -03, literate though TLC/
AEC -04,others -05; literate with formal schooling including EGS: below primary -06, primary -07, upper primary/middle -08, secondary -10, higher /senior
secondary -11, diploma/certificate course -12, graduate -13, postgraduate and above -14
Col (8): usual principal activity status:
worked in h.h. enterprise (self-
employed): own account worker
-11 worked as casual wage labour: in other
types of work
-51 attended domestic duties and was also
engaged in free collection of goods
(vegetables, roots, firewood, cattle feed,
etc.), sewing, tailoring, weaving, etc. for
household use
-93
worked in h.h. enterprise (self-
employed): employer
-12 did not work but was seeking and/or
available for work
-81
worked as helper in h.h. enterprise
(unpaid family worker)
-21 attended educational institution -91 rentiers, pensioners , remittance recipients,
etc
-94
worked as regular salaried/ wage
employee
-31 attended domestic duties only -92 not able to work due to disability -95
worked as casual wage labour: in
public works
-41 others (including begging, prostitution, etc.) -97

Col (10): NCO-2004 (code): legislators, senior officials and managers-1, professionals-2, associate professionals-3, clerks-4, service workers and shop &
market sales workers-5, skilled agricultural and fishery workers-6, craft and related trades workers-7, plant and machine operators and assemblers-8,
elementary occupations-9






Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 5



[4] demographic and other particulars for all household members


sl.
no.


name of household member


relation
to head
(code)


sex
(male-1,
female-
2)


age
(years)


marital
status
(code)


educational
level
(code)


usual
principal
activity
status
(code)

for employed
members
(code 11-51, col. 8)


number of overnight trips
completed by the member
during

number of same-day trips
completed by the member
during

NIC-2004
(code)
(2-digit)


NCO-
2004
(code)
(1-digit)

last 365 days

last 30 days

last 365
days

last 30 days
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)


























Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 6


CODES FOR BLOCK 5.1

Col 5/12: purpose of trip for the member/ leading purpose for all the members performing the trip: business –1, holidaying, leisure and recreation-2, social (including visiting
friends and relatives, attending marriages, etc.)-3, pilgrimage & religious activities -4, education & training –5, health & medical –6, shopping-7,others- 9

Col 6: type of trip: package-1, non-package- 2

Col 7/8: mode of travel: on foot-01, bus-02, train(railways)-03, ship/boat-04, air-05, own transport: bicycle-06, two-wheeler-07, rickshaw-08, auto rickshaw-10, car/jeep-11,
tractor/truck-12, animal driven transport-13; transport equipment rental(hired transport): bicycle-14, two-wheeler-15, rickshaw-16, auto rickshaw-17, car/jeep-18,
tractor/truck-20, animal driven transport-21; others -29

Col 9/10: type of stay: hotel-1, private guest house-2, Govt. guest house -3, dharamshala-4, rented house-5, friends & relatives-6, others including carriages / coaches -9

Col 13/14: starting/ending month: January-01, Februray-02, March-03, April-04, May-05, June-06, July-07, August-08, September-09, October-10, November-11, December-12

Col 15: main destination: destination within the district - 1, destination outside the district but within the state-2, destination outside the state but within the country-3

Col 16: state code:














Andhra Pradesh ….28 Gujarat ….24 Madhya Pradesh ….23 Punjab ….03 West Bengal ….19
Arunachal Pradesh ….12 Haryana ….06 Maharashtra ….27 Rajasthan ….08 A & N Islands ….35
Assam ….18 Himachal Pradesh ….02 Manipur ….14 Sikkim ….11 Chandigarh ….04
Bihar ….10 Jammu & Kashmir ….01 Megahlaya ….17 Tamil Nadu ….33 Dadra & Nagar Haveli ….26
Chhattisgarh ….22 Jharkhand ….20 Mizoram ….15 Tripura ….16 Daman & Diu ….25
Delhi ….07 Karnataka ….29 Nagaland ….13 Uttaranchal ….05 Lakshadweep ….31
Goa ….30 Kerala ….32 Orissa ….21 Uttar Pradesh ….09 Pondicherry ….34
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 7


[5.1] Particulars of overnight trips completed by household members during last 30 days

sl. no.
of trip
#

no. of hh
members
in the
trip

sl. no. of hh
member who
was in that
trip
(as in col. 1,
block 4)


age
(as in
col. 5,
block 4)

purpose of
the trip for
the
member
(code)

type of
trip
(code)
mode of travel
(code)
type of stay
(code)

no. of nights
spent outside
usual place of
residence
(including
journey)

leading
purpose* for
all the
members
performing
the trip
(code)

starting
month
(code)

ending
month
(code)

main
destination
(code)



if code ‘3’
in col. 15
then state
code


no. of places
visited during
the trip
major
(max.
distance
traveled)
minor
(2
nd
max.
distance
traveled)
major
(max. no.
of nights
spent)
minor
(2
nd
max. no.
of nights
spent)
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)





.















# ordering the trips commencing from the latest completed trip.
* leading purpose of trip as a whole is that purpose without which none of the members in that trip would have undertaken the trip.


Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 8


CODES FOR BLOCK 5.2

Col 5/10: purpose of trip for the member/ leading purpose for all the members performing the trip: business –1, holidaying, leisure and recreation-2, social (including
visiting friends and relatives, attending marriages, etc.)-3, pilgrimage & religious activities -4, education & training –5, health & medical –6, shopping-7, others- 9
Col 6: type of trip: package-1, non-package-2
Col 7/8: mode of travel: on foot-01, bus-02, train-03, ship/boat-04, air-05, own transport: bicycle-06, two-wheeler-07, rickshaw-08, auto rickshaw-10, car/jeep-11,
tractor/truck-12, animal driven transport-13; transport equipment rental (hired transport): bicycle-14, two-wheeler-15, rickshaw-16, auto rickshaw-17, car/jeep-18,
tractor/truck-20, animal driven transport-21; others -29
Col 9: type of stay: hotel-1, private guest house-2, Govt. guest house -3, dharamshala-4, rented house-5, friends & relatives-6, did not stay at all -7, others including carriages
/ coaches -9
Col 11: month of visit: January-01, Februray-02, March-03, April-04, May-05, June-06, July-07, August-08, September-09, October-10, November-11, December-12
Col 12: main destination: destination within the district-1, destination outside the district but within the state-2, destination outside the state but within the country-3
Col 13: state code:




















Andhra Pradesh ….28 Gujarat ….24 Madhya Pradesh ….23 Punjab ….03 West Bengal ….19
Arunachal Pradesh ….12 Haryana ….06 Maharashtra ….27 Rajasthan ….08 A & N Islands ….35
Assam ….18 Himachal Pradesh ….02 Manipur ….14 Sikkim ….11 Chandigarh ….04
Bihar ….10 Jammu & Kashmir ….01 Megahlaya ….17 Tamil Nadu ….33 Dadra & Nagar Haveli ….26
Chhattisgarh ….22 Jharkhand ….20 Mizoram ….15 Tripura ….16 Daman & Diu ….25
Delhi ….07 Karnataka ….29 Nagaland ….13 Uttaranchal ….05 Lakshadweep ….31
Goa ….30 Kerala ….32 Orissa ….21 Uttar Pradesh ….09 Pondicherry ….34
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 9

[5.2] Particulars of same-day trips completed by household members during last 30 days

sl. no. of
trip
#

no. of hh
members
in the
trip

sl. no. of hh
member who
was in that
trip
(as in col. 1,
block 4)


age
(as in col. 5,
block 4)

purpose of
the trip for
the member
(code)

type of trip
(code)

mode of travel
(code)


type of stay
(code)

leading purpose*
for all the
members
performing the
trip
(code)


month of
visit
(code)

main
destination
(code)



if code ‘3’
in col. 12
then state
code


no. of places visited
during the trip
major
(max.
distance
traveled)
minor
(2
nd
max.
distance
traveled)
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
(8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)





.















# ordering the trips commencing from the latest completed trip.
* leading purpose of trip as a whole is that purpose without which none of the members in that trip would have undertaken the trip.
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 10


[6.1] particulars of expenditure* (in Rs.) for latest 3 trips in last 30 days covered in block 5.1
trips
(1) (2) (3)
1. trip serial no. [as in col.1,block 5.1]


2. type of trip [as in col.11, block 5.1]


3. package component (in Rs.)


non-package component (in Rs.)


4. accommodation

4.1 hotel
4.2 private guest house
4.3 Govt. guest house
4.4 dharamshala
4.5 rented house
4.6 friends & relatives
4.9 others
4.0 sub-total (4.1 to 4.9)

5. food & drink

5.1 in the accommodation unit
5.2 outside accommodation unit and during
journey and transit

5.0 sub-total (5.1 to 5.2)

6. transport

6.1 railways
6.2 road (excluding transport equipment rental)
6.3 water
6.4 air
6.5 transport equipment rental
6.6 travel agency services/tour operators
6.9 others and supporting services
6.0 sub-total (6.1 to 6.9)

7. shopping

7.01 clothing and garments
7.02 processed food
7.03 tobacco products
7.04 alcohol
7.05 travel related consumer goods
7.06 footwear
7.07 toiletries
7.08 gems and jewellery
7.11 books, journals, magazines, stationery, etc.
7.19 others
7.00 sub-total (7.01 to 7.19)
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 11

[6.1] particulars of expenditure* (in Rs.) for latest 3 trips in last 30 days covered in block 5.1
trips
(1) (2) (3)

8. recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related activities

8.1 cinema, theatre, amusements, etc.
8.2

entry fee to and other expenses at religious
sites

8.3

entry fee to and other expenses at cultural
sites

8.4 sporting activities
8.5


medical
and
health
related
activities
8.5.1 medicine
8.5.2 medical accessories
8.5.3 other health related
services

8.5.0 sub-total
[8.5.1 to 8.5.3]

8.0 sub-total [8.1 + 8.2 + 8.3 + 8.4 + 8.5.0]

9.

others



10.

sub-total [4.0 +5.0+ 6.0+7.00+8.0+9]



11.

total [3 +10]



12.

whether any reimbursement/direct payment made
by any institution? (code)



if code ‘1’ in
item 12,
amount (Rs.)
paid/
reimbursed by



source

13.


Government


14.

other agencies



CODES FOR BLOCK 6.1

Item 12: whether any reimbursement/direct payment made by any institution? (code):
yes and amount known -1, yes and amount not known -2, no -3

* Notes:
(i) all expenditure paid or payable by the selected household in connection with the trip except
those to be used / intended to be used for productive purposes/enterprises are to be included in this
block.
(ii) if the expenditure or break-up of the expenditure cannot be reported for any trip, detailed
remarks and comments should be recorded in Blocks 7, 8 & 9 respectively.


Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 12



[6.2] particulars of aggregate expenditure* (in Rs.) for all trips in last 30 days covered in
block 5.2

(1)
1.

trip serial no.
2. type of trip
3. package component (in Rs.)


non-package component (in Rs.)


4. accommodation

4.1 hotel
4.2 private guest house
4.3 Govt. guest house
4.4 dharamshala
4.5 rented house
4.6 friends & relatives
4.9 others
4.0 sub-total (4.1 to 4.9)

5. food & drink

5.1 in the accommodation unit
5.2 outside accommodation unit and during journey and transit
5.0 sub-total (5.1 to 5.2)

6. transport

6.1 railways
6.2 road (excluding transport equipment rental)
6.3 water
6.4 air
6.5 transport equipment rental
6.6 travel agency services/tour operators
6.9 others and supporting services
6.0 sub-total (6.1 to 6.9)

7. shopping

7.01 clothing and garments
7.02 processed food
7.03 tobacco products
7.04 alcohol
7.05 travel related consumer goods
7.06 footwear
7.07 toiletries
7.08 gems and jewellery
7.11 books, journals, magazines, stationery, etc.
7.19 others
Appendix C: Schedule 21.1

NSS Report No.536: Domestic tourism in India, 2008- 2009

C- 13

[6.2] particulars of aggregate expenditure* (in Rs.) for all trips in last 30 days covered in
block 5.2

(1)
7.00 sub-total (7.01 to 7.19)

8. recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related activities

8.1 cinema, theatre, amusements, etc.
8.2

entry fee to and other expenses at religious
sites

8.3

entry fee to and other expenses at cultural
sites

8.4 sporting activities
8.5

medical
and
health
related
activitie
s
8.5.
1
medicine
8.5.
2
medical accessories
8.5.
3
other health related services
8.5.
0
sub-total [8.5.1 to 8.5.3]
8.0 sub-total [8.1 + 8.2 + 8.3 + 8.4 + 8.5.0]

9.

others


10.

sub-total [4.0 +5.0+ 6.0+7.00+8.0+9]


11.

total [3 +10]


12.

whether any reimbursement/direct payment made by any institution? (code)


if code ‘1’ in
item 12,
amount (Rs.)
paid/
reimbursed
by



source

13.


Government


14.

other agencies



CODES FOR BLOCK 6.2

Item 12: whether any reimbursement/direct payment made by any institution? (code):
yes and amount known -1, yes and amount not known -2, no -3

* Notes:
(i) all expenditure paid or payable by the selected household in connection with the trip except
those to be used / intended to be used for productive purposes/enterprises are to be included in this
block.
(ii) if the expenditure or break-up of the expenditure cannot be reported for any trip, detailed
remarks and comments should be recorded in Blocks 7, 8 & 9 respectively.

















Appendix D



Projected Population


 
Appendix D


NSS Report No 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
D-1

Statement 1.1: Projected population (000) as on 1
st
March 2008, 1
st
March 2009 and 1
st
January 2009 for each State/UT

male
State/UT/all-India rural

urban

rural+ urban

1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Andhra Pradesh 29955 30218 30174 11520 11644 11623 41475 41862 41797
Arunachal Pradesh 449 448 448 182 191 189 631 639 638
Assam 12921 13049 13028 2220 2278 2268 15141 15327 15296
Bihar 43360 43976 43873 5248 5327 5314 48608 49303 49186
Chhattisgarh 9028 9120 9105 2654 2728 2716 11682 11848 11820
Delhi 484 478 479 8881 9161 9114 9365 9639 9593
Goa 361 368 367 471 496 492 832 864 859
Gujarat 17672 17840 17812 12000 12281 12234 29672 30121 30046
Haryana 8793 8885 8870 4253 4399 4374 13046 13284 13244
Himachal Pradesh 2967 2993 2989 397 407 405 3364 3400 3394
Jammu & Kashmir 4284 4326 4319 1628 1664 1658 5912 5990 5977
Jharkhand 11872 12029 12003 3667 3730 3719 15539 15759 15722
Karnataka 18533 18639 18621 10679 10886 10851 29212 29525 29473
Kerala 12242 12350 12332 4224 4251 4246 16466 16601 16578
Madhya Pradesh 25966 26365 26298 9885 10096 10061 35851 36461 36359
Maharashtra 30343 30588 30547 25978 26583 26481 56321 57171 57028
Manipur 890 902 900 303 305 305 1193 1207 1205
Meghalaya 1027 1038 1036 253 257 256 1280 1295 1292
Mizoram 241 243 243 259 263 262 500 506 505
Nagaland 941 953 951 199 200 200 1140 1153 1151
Orissa 16715 16832 16812 3353 3417 3406 20068 20249 20219
Punjab 8908 8952 8945 5427 5571 5547 14335 14523 14491
Rajasthan 25530 25959 25887 8126 8286 8259 33656 34245 34146
Sikkim 275 278 277 39 40 40 314 318 317
Tamil Nadu 16155 15918 15957 17048 17508 17430 33203 33426 33389
Tripura 1461 1474 1472 327 335 334 1788 1809 1805
Uttarakhand 3435 3475 3468 1414 1449 1443 4849 4924 4911
Uttar Pradesh 78295 79607 79387 21969 22506 22416 100264 102113 101802
West Bengal 31941 32226 32178 12879 13008 12986 44820 45234 45165
A & N Islands 153 155 155 91 95 94 244 250 249
Chandigarh 78 83 82 627 664 658 705 747 740
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 99 97 97 73 82 80 172 179 178
Daman Diu 114 123 121 34 34 34 148 157 155
Lakshadweep 23 24 24 14 13 13 37 37 37
Puducherry 195 206 204 418 445 440 613 651 645
all-India 415709 420214 419460 176742 180602 179953 592451 600816 599414
Note: 1. Projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 are from RGI (reference Tables 8 and 9 of the Population Projections
for India and States: 2001-2026).
2. Table 8 provides projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for rural+urban combined and Table 9 provides projected
population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for urban.
3. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived using the formula, A= 1 ∗ [(
2
1
)
[1/12]
]
10
, where A1 is the population for 1
st

March 2008, A2 is the population for 1
st
March 2009 and A is the population for 1
st
January 2009.
4. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived for rural+urban and urban separately and the figure for rural has been derived
by subtraction.

Appendix D


NSS Report No 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
D-2


Statement 1.1: Projected population (000) as on 1
st
March 2008, 1
st
March 2009 and 1
st
January 2009 for each State/UT

female
State/UT/all-India rural

urban

rural+ urban

1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Andhra Pradesh 29689 29974 29926 11211 11342 11320 40900 41316 41246
Arunachal Pradesh 410 407 407 157 166 164 567 573 572
Assam 12302 12434 12412 1992 2052 2042 14294 14486 14454
Bihar 40440 41065 40960 4585 4659 4647 45025 45724 45607
Chhattisgarh 9086 9180 9164 2501 2573 2561 11587 11753 11725
Delhi 390 385 386 7200 7413 7377 7590 7798 7763
Goa 340 346 345 423 445 441 763 791 786
Gujarat 16626 16775 16750 10328 10538 10503 26954 27313 27253
Haryana 7600 7678 7665 3525 3635 3616 11125 11313 11281
Himachal Pradesh 2926 2951 2947 305 311 310 3231 3262 3257
Jammu & Kashmir 4022 4073 4064 1323 1351 1346 5345 5424 5411
Jharkhand 11376 11518 11494 3266 3334 3323 14642 14852 14817
Karnataka 18175 18284 18266 10163 10372 10337 28338 28656 28603
Kerala 12885 12986 12969 4451 4476 4472 17336 17462 17441
Madhya Pradesh 23999 24357 24297 8887 9079 9047 32886 33436 33344
Maharashtra 28941 29144 29110 22710 23238 23149 51651 52382 52259
Manipur 861 873 871 310 313 312 1171 1186 1183
Meghalaya 990 999 997 260 266 265 1250 1265 1262
Mizoram 223 224 224 247 251 250 470 475 474
Nagaland 855 865 863 176 179 178 1031 1044 1042
Orissa 16509 16630 16610 3077 3146 3134 19586 19776 19744
Punjab 7883 7916 7910 4503 4609 4591 12386 12525 12502
Rajasthan 23677 24066 24001 7200 7339 7316 30877 31405 31316
Sikkim 240 243 242 36 37 37 276 280 279
Tamil Nadu 16033 15798 15837 16870 17342 17262 32903 33140 33100
Tripura 1388 1402 1400 315 322 321 1703 1724 1720
Uttarakhand 3457 3496 3489 1205 1236 1231 4662 4732 4720
Uttar Pradesh 70878 72090 71887 19111 19560 19484 89989 91650 91371
West Bengal 30411 30687 30641 11763 11918 11892 42174 42605 42533
A & N Islands 130 134 133 75 81 80 205 215 213
Chandigarh 47 49 49 475 501 497 522 550 545
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 79 83 82 48 56 55 127 139 137
Daman Diu 53 55 55 36 36 36 89 91 91
Lakshadweep 24 24 24 13 13 13 37 37 37
Puducherry 185 192 191 405 423 420 590 615 611
all-India 393133 397386 396674 159150 162611 162029 552283 559997 558704
Note: 1. Projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 are from RGI (reference Tables 8 and 9 of the Population Projections
for India and States: 2001-2026).
2. Table 8 provides projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for rural+urban combined and Table 9 provides projected
population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for urban.
3. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived using the formula, A= 1 ∗ [(
2
1
)
[1/12]
]
10
, where A1 is the population for 1
st

March 2008, A2 is the population for 1
st
March 2009 and A is the population for 1
st
January 2009.
4. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived for rural+urban and urban separately and the figure for rural has been derived
by subtraction.

Appendix D


NSS Report No 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09
D-3

Statement 1.1: Projected population (000) as on 1
st
March 2008, 1
st
March 2009 and 1
st
January 2009 for each State/UT

male+female
State/UT/all-India rural

urban

rural+ urban

1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
1st Mar
2008
1st Mar
2009
1st Jan
2009
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Andhra Pradesh 59645 60192 60100 22730 22986 22943 82375 83178 83044
Arunachal Pradesh 860 855 856 338 357 354 1198 1212 1210
Assam 25222 25484 25440 4213 4330 4310 29435 29814 29750
Bihar 83800 85041 84833 9833 9985 9960 93633 95026 94792
Chhattisgarh 18114 18299 18268 5155 5301 5276 23269 23600 23545
Delhi 874 863 865 16081 16574 16491 16955 17437 17356
Goa 703 714 712 893 941 933 1596 1655 1645
Gujarat 34298 34616 34563 22328 22818 22736 56626 57434 57299
Haryana 16393 16563 16535 7778 8034 7991 24171 24597 24525
Himachal Pradesh 5892 5944 5935 703 718 715 6595 6662 6651
Jammu & Kashmir 8307 8399 8384 2950 3015 3004 11257 11414 11388
Jharkhand 23248 23547 23497 6933 7064 7042 30181 30611 30539
Karnataka 36708 36922 36886 20842 21259 21189 57550 58181 58075
Kerala 25127 25336 25301 8675 8727 8718 33802 34063 34019
Madhya Pradesh 49965 50722 50595 18772 19175 19107 68737 69897 69702
Maharashtra 59284 59732 59657 48688 49821 49630 107972 109553 109288
Manipur 1751 1775 1771 613 618 617 2364 2393 2388
Meghalaya 2016 2037 2033 514 523 521 2530 2560 2555
Mizoram 465 466 466 505 515 513 970 981 979
Nagaland 1796 1818 1814 375 379 378 2171 2197 2193
Orissa 33225 33462 33422 6430 6563 6541 39655 40025 39963
Punjab 16792 16868 16855 9930 10180 10138 26722 27048 26993
Rajasthan 49208 50025 49888 15326 15625 15575 64534 65650 65463
Sikkim 516 520 519 75 78 77 591 598 597
Tamil Nadu 32188 31716 31794 33918 34850 34693 66106 66566 66489
Tripura 2849 2876 2871 642 656 654 3491 3532 3525
Uttarakhand 6892 6971 6958 2619 2685 2674 9511 9656 9632
Uttar Pradesh 149174 151697 151274 41080 42066 41900 190254 193763 193174
West Bengal 62353 62913 62819 24642 24926 24878 86995 87839 87698
A&N Islands 282 289 288 167 176 174 449 465 462
Chandigarh 125 132 131 1102 1165 1154 1227 1297 1285
Dadra & Nagar Haveli 178 181 180 121 137 134 299 318 315
Daman Diu 168 178 176 70 70 70 238 248 246
Lakshadweep 47 49 49 27 26 26 74 75 75
Puducherry 382 398 395 822 869 861 1204 1267 1256
all-India 808843 817600 816134 335891 343213 341982 1144734 1160813 1158118
Note: 1. Projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 are from RGI (reference Tables 8 and 9 of the Population Projections for
India and States: 2001-2026).
2. Table 8 provides projected population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for rural+urban combined and Table 9 provides projected
population as on 1
st
March 2008 and 1
st
March 2009 for urban.
3. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived using the formula, A= 1 ∗ [(
2
1
)
[1/12]
]
10
, where A1 is the population for 1
st

March 2008, A2 is the population for 1
st
March 2009 and A is the population for 1
st
January 2009.
4. Projected population as on 1
st
January 2009 has been derived for rural+urban and urban separately and the figure for rural has been derived by
subtraction.



1
List of NSS Reports available for sale

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Unorganised Trade, NSS 46th Round
1 403 Small Trading Units in India 150 11 7 380 27 17
2 403/1 State Level results on small trading units in India:
Vol.-I
250 18 11 710 51 32
3 403/1 State Level results on small trading units in India:
Vol.-II
250 18 11 710 51 32
Land & livestock holdings and Debt &
investment, NSS 48th Round

4 407 Operational land holdings in India, 1991-92: Salient
features
250 18 11 710 51 32
5 408 Live-stock and Agricultural implements in House-
hold operational holdings, 1991-92
150 11 7 380 27 17
6 414 Seasonal variation in the operation of land holdings
in India, 1991-92
250 18 11 710 51 32
7 419 Household Assets and Liabilities as on 30.6.91 250 17 11 1140 75 46
8 420 Indebtedness of Rural Households as on 30.6.1991 250 15 9 1370 82 50
9 421 Indebtedness of Urban Households as on 30.6.1991 250 15 9 1370 82 50
10 431
(Part I)
Household Borrowings and Repayments during
1.7.91 to 30.6.92
250 15 9 1140 68 42
11 431
(Part-II)
Household Borrowings and Repayments during
1.7.91 to 30.6.92
250 15 9 1140 68 42
12 432
(Part-I)
Households Assets and Indebtedness of Social
Groups as on 30.6.91
250 15 9 1140 68 42
13 432
(Part-II)
Households Assets and Indebtedness of Social
Groups as on 30.6.91
250 15 9 710 43 26
14 437 Household capital expenditure during 1.7.91 to
30.6.92.
250 15 9 1370 82 50
Housing Conditions and Migration with special
emphasis on slum dwellers, NSS 49th round

15 417 Slums in India 150 11 7 380 27 17
16 429 Housing Conditions in India 150 11 7 380 25 16
17 430 Migration in India 250 15 9 710 42 26
Employment & Unemployment, NSS 50th Round
18 406 Key Results on Employment & Unemployment 150 11 7 610 44 26
19 409 Employment & Unemployment in India, 1993-94 250 18 11 710 51 32
20 411 Employment & Unemployment situation in cities
and Towns in India, 1993-94
150 11 7 380 27 17
21 412 Economic activities and school attendance by
children in India, 1993-94
150 11 7 380 27 17
22 416 Participation of Indian women in household work
and other specified activities, 1993-94
150 11 7 380 27 17
23 418 Unemployed in India, 1993-94: Salient Features 150 11 7 380 27 17
24 425 Employment & Unemployment situation among
social groups in India, 1993-94
250 17 10 480 32 19
25 438 Employment & Unemployment situation among
religious groups in India, 1993-94
150 10 7 610 37 23
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 50th Round
26 401 Key results on Household Consumer Expenditure,
1993-94
150 11 7 380 28 17
27 402 Level and Pattern of Consumer Expenditure 250 19 12 710 52 32
28 404 Consumption of some important commodities in India 250 18 11 710 51 32
continued



2
List of NSS Reports available for sale (contd.)

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 50th Round
29 405 Nutritional intake in India 250 18 11 710 51 32
30 410/1 Dwellings in India 250 18 11 710 51 32
31 410/2 Energy used by Indian households 150 11 7 380 28 17
32 413 Sources of household income in India, 1993-94 150 11 7 380 28 17
33 415 Reported adequacy of food intake in India, 1993-94 150 11 7 380 28 17
34 422 Differences in level of consumption among
socioeconomic groups
150 11 7 380 28 17
35 423 IRDP assistance and participation in Public Works,
1993-94
150 11 7 380 28 17
36 424 Ownership of Live-Stock, cultivation of selected crops
and consumption levels, 1993-94
150 11 6 610 40 24
37 426 Use of durable goods by Indian households, 1993-94 150 11 7 380 28 17
38 427 Consumption of tobacco in India, 1993-94 150 11 7 610 40 24
39 428 Wages in kind, Exchanges of Gifts and Expenditure on
Ceremonies and Insurance in India, 1993-94
150 11 7 610 40 24
Consumer Expenditure and Unorganised
Manufacture, NSS 51st Round

40 433 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India Its Size,
Employment and Some Key Estimates.
250 15 9 710 43 26
41 434 Unorganised Manufacturing Enterprises in India: Salient
Features
250 15 9 710 43 26
42 435 Assets and Borrowings of the Unorganised
Manufacturing Enterprises in India
150 10 7 380 23 15
43 436 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment
Situation in India, 1994-95
150 10 7 610 36 23
Education, NSS 52nd Round
44 439 Attending an Educational Institution in India:
Its level, nature and cost
250 15 9 1140 68 42
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 52nd Round
45 440 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment
Situation in India, 1995-96
150 10 7 610 36 23
Health, NSS 52nd Round
46 441 Morbidity and Treatment of ailments. 250 15 9 1140 68 42
47 445 Maternity and Child Health Care in India 150 10 7 1270 76 46
Aged in India, NSS 52nd Round
48 446 The Aged in India: A Socio-Economic Profile, 1995-96 150 10 7 610 36 23
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 53rd Round
49 442 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment
Situation in India, 1997
150 10 7 610 36 23
Unorganised Trade, NSS 53rd Round
50 443 Small Trading units in India and their Basic
Characteristics: 1997 Vol. I
250

15 9 710

43 26
51 444 Small Trading Units in India and Their Basic
Characteristics: 1997 Vol. II
250 15 9 710 43 26
Consumer Expenditure, Common Property
Resources, Sanitation & Hygiene, Services,
NSS 54th Round

52 448 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment
Situation in India
150 10 7 610

36 23
53 449 Drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in India 250 15 9 1140 68 42
continued


3
List of NSS Reports available for sale (contd.)

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Consumer Expenditure, Common Property
Resources, Sanitation & Hygiene, Services,
NSS 54th Round

54 450 Travel and Use of Mass Media and Financial Services
by Indian Households
150 10 7 610 10 7
55 451 Cultivation Practices in India 250 15 9 1370 82 50
56 452 Common Property Resources 250 15 9 1370 82 50
Choice of Reference Period for Consumption Data,
NSS 51
st
, 52
nd
, 53
rd
& 54
th
Round

57 447 Choice of Reference Period for Consumption Data 150 10 7 1700 102 64
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 55th Round
(July’99 to June 2000)

58 453 Household Consumer Expenditure in India (July –
December 1999) - Key Results
150 10 7 610 36 23
59 454 Household Consumer Expenditure in India, 1999–2000
- Key Results
150 10 7 610 36 23
60 457 Level and Pattern of Consumer Expenditure in India,
1999 - 2000
250 15 10 1520 81 57
61 461 Consumption of some important Commodities in India,
1999-2000
250 15 10 1370 73 52
62 463 Sources of household income in India, 1999-2000 150 10 7 380 28 17
63 464 Energy Used by Indian Households, 1999-2000 150 10 7 610 36 23
64 466 Reported Adequacy of Food Intake in India, 1999 -
2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
65 467 IRDP Assistance and Participation in Public Works:
1999-2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
66 471 Nutritional Intake in India, 1999-2000 250 15 10 710 43 26
67 472 Differences in the level of consumption among socio
economic groups, 1999-2000
250 15 10 480 32 19
68 473 Literacy and Levels of Education in India, 1999 - 2000 250 15 10 610 36 23
69 474 Sources of household consumption in India, 1999 - 2000 250 15 10 710 43 26
Employment & Unemployment, NSS 55th Round
(July’99 to June 2000)

70 455 Employment and Unemployment in India, 1999-2000
- Key Results
150 10 7 610 36 23
71 458
(Part-I)
Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
1999 - 2000
250 15 10 750 40 28
72 458
(Part-II)
Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
1999 - 2000
250 15 10 1370 73 52
73 460 Non agricultural workers in Informal Sector based on
Employment and Unemployment Survey, 1999-2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
74 462 Employment and Unemployment situation in Cities and
Towns of India, 1999-2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
75 465 Participation of Indian Women in Household work and
other specified activities, 1999-2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
76 468 Employment and Unemployment among religious
groups in India, 1999-2000
150 10 7 610 36 23
77 469 Employment and Unemployment among social groups
in India, 1999-2000
250 15 10 2950 156 110
78 470 Migration in India, 1999-2000 250 15 10 1140 68 42
continued


4
List of NSS Reports available for sale (contd.)

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Non-agricultural Enterprises in Informal Sector 1999-
2000, NSS 55th Round (July’99 to June 2000)

79 456 Non-agricultural Enterprises in the Informal Sector in India,
1999-2000 - Key Results
150 10 7 610 36 23
80 459 Informal Sector in India, 1999 - 2000 - Salient Features 250 15 10 1600 85 60
Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 56th Round (July 2000 - June 2001)

81 476 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment -
Unemployment Situation in India, 2000 - 2001
150 10 7 1040 66 41
Unorganised Manufacturing,
NSS 56th Round (July 2000 - June 2001)

82 477 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India 2000-2001 -
Key Results
250 15 10 710 52 32
83 478 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India 2000-2001 -
Characteristics of Enterprises
250 15 10 1370 82 50
84 479 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India, 2000 – 2001:
Employment, Assets and Borrowings
250 15 10 1370 82 50
85 480 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India, 2000 – 2001:
Input, Output and Value added
250 15 10 1370 82 50
Pilot Survey on Suitability of Reference Period for
Measuring Household Consumption

86 475 Results of a Pilot Survey on Suitability of Different
Reference Periods for Measuring Household Consumption
150 10 7 610 36 23
Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 57th Round (July 2001 - June 2002)

87 481 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment -
Unemployment Situation in India, 2001 - 2002
250 15 10 2680 158 105
Unorganised Service Sector,
NSS 57th Round (July 2001 - June 2002)

88 482 Unorganised Service Sector in India 2001 - 02 Salient
Features
250 15 10 1925 98 65
89 483 Unorganised Service Sector in India 2001 - 02
Characteristics of Enterprises
250 15 10 1370 82 55
Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 58
th
Round (July 2002 - December 2002)

90 484 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment -
Unemployment Situation in India, 2002 - 2003
150 8 4 2380 129 70
Disability, NSS 58
th
Round
91 485 Disabled Persons in India, July-December 2002 250 14 7 7080 385 208
Urban Slums,
NSS 58
th
Round (July 2002 - December 2002)

92 486 Condition of Urban Slums, 2002: Salient Features 250 14 7 2080 112 62
Village facilities,
NSS 58
th
Round (July 2002 - December 2002)

93 487 Report on village facilities, July-December 2002 150 8 4 980 53 29
Housing Condition,
NSS 58
th
Round (July 2002 - December 2002)

94 488 Housing Condition in India, 2002: Housing stock and
constructions
250 15 10 9280 548 350
95 489 Housing Condition in India, 2002: Household Amenities
and Other Characteristics
250 15 10 9220 524 285
continued


5
List of NSS Reports available for sale (contd.)

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)


Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 59
th
Round (January - December 2003)

96 490 Household Consumer Expenditure and Employment -
Unemployment Situation in India
150 8 4 1580 85 47
Situation Assessment Survey of Farmers,
NSS 59
th
Round (January - December 2003)

97 495 Consumption Expenditure of Farmer Households, 2003 250 15 10 2140 121 67
98 496 Some Aspects of Farming, 2003 250 15 10 2680 149 83
99 497 Income, Expenditure and Productive Assets of Farmer
Households, 2003
250 15 10 3480 209 139
100 498 Indebtedness of Farmer Households 150 8 4 1380 78 43
101 499 Access to Modern Technology for Farming, 2003 250 15 10 1680 93 52
Land & livestock holdings and Debt & Investment,
NSS 59th Round

102 491 Household Ownership Holdings in India, 2003 250 15 10 3680 221 147
103 492 Some Aspects of Operational Land Holdings in India,
2002-03
250 15 10 5080 305 203
104 493 Livestock Ownership Across Operational Land Holding
Classes in India, 2002-03
150 8 4 1580 84 42
105 494 Seasonal Variation in the Operational Land Holdings in
India, 2002-03
250 15 10 2080 125 83
106 500 Household Assets and Liabilities in India as on
30.06.2002
250 15 10 4880 293 195
107 501 Household Indebtedness in India as on 30.06.2002 250 15 10 6000 360 240
108 502 Household Borrowings and Repayments in India during
1.7.2002 to 30.6.2003
250 15 10 4750 285 190
109 503 Household Assets Holdings, Indebtedness, Current
Borrowings and Repayments of Social Groups in India
as on 30.06.2002
250 15 10 3880 233 155
110 504 Household Capital Expenditure in India during 1.7.2002
to 30.6.2003
250 15 10 7280 437 291
Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 60
th
Round (January - June 2004)

111 505 Household Consumer Expenditure in India, January -
June 2004
150 8 4 2580 138 69
Employment & Unemployment, NSS 60
th
Round
(January - June 2004)

112 506 Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
January - June 2004
250 15 10 3580 202 112
Health, NSS 60
th
Round (January - June 2004)
113 507 Morbidity, Health Care and the Condition of the Aged 250 15 10 4480 269 179
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 61
st
Round
(July 2004 - June 2005)

114 508 Level and Pattern of Consumer Expenditure, 2004-05 250 16 8 5080 322 163
115 509
Vol. I
Household Consumption of Various Goods and
Services in India, 2004-05 Vol. I
250 16 8 4480 284 144
116 509
Vol. II
Household Consumption of Various Goods and
Services in India, 2004-05 Vol. II
250 16 8 4080 259 131
continued


6
List of NSS Reports available for sale (contd.)

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 61
st
Round
(July 2004 - June 2005)

117 510
Vol. I
Public Distribution System and Other Sources of
Household Consumption, 2004-05 Vol. I
250 16 8 3880 246 124
118 510
Vol. II
Public Distribution System and Other Sources of
Household Consumption, 2004-05 Vol. II
250 16 8 3680 234 118
119 511 Energy Sources of Indian Households for Cooking
and Lighting, 2004-05
250 16 8 2480 157 79
120 512 Perceived Adequacy of Food Consumption in Indian
Households 2004-2005
150 10 5 1780 113 57
121 513 Nutritional intake in India, 2004-2005 250 16 8 3680 234 118
122 514 Household Consumer Expenditure among Socio-
Economic Groups: 2004 - 2005
250 16 8 2880 183 92
Employment & Unemployment,
NSS 61
st
Round (July 2004 - June 2005)

123 515
(Part-I)
Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
2004-05 (Part-I)
250 16 8 4680 297 150
124 515
(Part-II)
Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
2004-05 (Part-II)
250 16 8 4680 297 150
125 516 Employment and Unemployment Situation Among
Social Groups in India, 2004-05
250 16 8 3680 234 118
126 517 Status of Education and Vocational Training in India
2004-2005
250 16 8 2680 170 86
127 518 Participation of Women in Specified Activities along
with Domestic Duties
150 10 5 1380 88 44
128 519
(Part-I)
Informal Sector and Conditions of Employment in India,
2004-05(Part-I)
250 16 8 3880 246 124
129 519
(Part-II)
Informal Sector and Conditions of Employment in India,
2004-05(Part-II)
250 16 8 4480 284 144
130 520 Employment and Unemployment Situation in Cities
and Towns in India, 2004-2005
150 10 5 1570 100 50
131 521 Employment and Unemployment Situation among
Major Religious Groups in India, 2004-05
250 16 8 2480 157 79
Employment & Unemployment,
NSS 62
nd
Round (July 2005 - June 2006)

132 522 Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
2005-06
250 16 8 4480 284 144
Consumer Expenditure,
NSS 62
nd
Round (July 2005 - June 2006)

133 523 Household Consumer Expenditure in India, 2005-06 150 10 5 1380 88 44
Unorganised Manufacturing Enterprises,
NSS 62
nd
Round (July 2005 - June 2006)

134 524 Operational Characteristics of Unorganised
Manufacturing Enterprises in India, 2005-06
250 16 8 4880 310 156
135 525 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India, 2005-06 –
Employment, Assets and Borrowings
250 16 8 2880 183 92
136 526 Unorganised Manufacturing Sector in India, 2005-06 –
Input, Output and Value Added
250 16 8 4280 272 137
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 63
rd
Round
(July 2006 - June 2007)

137 527 Household Consumer Expenditure in India, 2006 - 07 150 7 5 1380 69 48
continued


7
List of NSS Reports available for sale

Sl.
No.
Report
No.
Title of the Report
Price
Hard Copy Soft Copy (CD)
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
Rs. US$ Pound-
Sterling
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Service Sector Enterprises, NSS 63
rd
Round
(July 2006 - June 2007)

138 528 Service Sector in India (2006-07): Operational
Characteristics of Enterprises
250 12 9 880 44 30
139 529 Service Sector in India (2006-07): Economic
Characteristics of Enterprises
250 13 8 1280 68 43
Consumer Expenditure, NSS 64
th
Round
(July 2007 - June 2008)

140 530 Household Consumer Expenditure in India, 2007-08 150 8 5 1380 75 48
Employment & Unemployment and Migration
Particulars, NSS 64
th
Round
(July 2007 - June 2008)

141 531 Employment and Unemployment Situation in India,
2007-08
250 14 9 4080 221 152
142 533 Migration in India, 2007-2008 250 14 9 2280 123 85
Participation & Expenditure on Education
NSS 64
th
Round (July 2007 - June 2008)

143 532 Education in India : 2007-08 Participation and
Expenditure
250 14 9 6280 345 232
Particulars of Slum
NSS 65
th
Round (July 2008 - June 2009)

144 534 Some Characteristics of Urban Slums, 2008-09 150 8 6 1180 64 44
Domestic Tourism
NSS 65
th
Round (July 2008 - June 2009)

145 536 Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 430 24 15 860 48 31

Copies are available with the Dy. Director General, SDRD, NSSO, 164, Gopal Lal Tagore Road, Kolkata-700 108 on
payment basis through Demand Draft drawn in favour of “Pay & Accounts Officer, Ministry of Statistics & P.I.,
Kolkata”. Postal Charges will be Rs. 85/- by Speed Post and Rs. 30/- by Regd. Parcel for single copy within India.

Preface
The National Sample Survey Office (NSSO) conducted an all- India survey of households in the 65th round of NSS during July 2008 - June 2009. The survey comprised enquiries on (i) domestic tourism (ii) housing condition (iii) condition of urban slums. The subject of domestic tourism was covered in the NSS household survey during the 65th Round on the request of Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India. This has not been covered in any earlier NSS round as comprehensively as in the 65th round. In the 54th round (January-June 1998) of NSS, one of the subjects covered was tours involving overnight stay. The results of the 54th round enquiry on travel (which included commuting to work or for education as well as tours involving overnight stay) were published in NSS Report No.450. This report, based on data collected in the 65th round, inter alia, presents the magnitude of domestic tourism activity as revealed by estimates of numbers of households and persons making overnight and same-day trips during a year. It studies the numbers of overnight and same-day trips per household and per person and provides key indicators on domestic tourism in cross classification of household and individual characteristics such as economic level, occupation, religion, social group, sex, age and activity status. It examines the pattern of trips undertaken in respect of trip features such as leading purpose, duration, type of main destination, number of places visited, and the expenditure related to trips by leading purpose of trip, by broad head of expenditure, etc. Estimates are provided separately for overnight trip and same-day trip and for rural and urban sectors at all-India or State/Union Territory level. Chapter One of the report is introductory. Major definitions and concepts related to the survey are given in Chapter Two. Chapter Three contains the survey findings on (a) incidence and characteristics of trips (b) participation of various population groups in domestic tourism activity (c) visitor-trip characteristics and (d) occurrence of domestic tourism activity among households and persons in a one-year period. Findings on expenditure related to trips are presented in Chapter Four. Detailed statistical tables are presented in Appendix A. The sampling design and estimation procedure is explained in Appendix B, and a facsimile of the schedule of enquiry canvassed in the field is provided as Appendix C. The Survey Design and Research Division (SDRD) of the NSSO undertook the development of the survey methodology and survey instruments, and the drafting and finalisation of the report. The field work was carried out by the Field Operations Division (FOD) of NSSO and the data processing and tabulation work by the Data Processing Division (DPD) of NSSO. The Coordination and Publication Division (CPD) coordinated various activities pertaining to the survey. I am indebted to the members of the then Steering Committee of National Sample Survey, the Working Group for NSS 65th round and the National Statistical Commission for their valuable guidance at various stages of survey activities from designing of the questionnaire to the preparation of this report. I gratefully acknowledge the contribution of the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, for publicity of the survey during field operations. I also express my thanks to various officers of different divisions of the NSSO involved in the preparation of this report. I hope the report will be found useful by policy makers, academicians and researchers.

New Delhi October 2010

J. Dash Director General & Chief Executive Officer National Sample Survey Office

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in urban India. All estimates relate to a period of 365 days. NUMBER OF TRIPS MADE IN A YEAR In a one-year period. The incidence of same-day trips. roughly the same level.719 urban blocks spread over all States and Union Territories of India. which is devised as a unit of movement of members of a household as ‘domestic visitors’. the number of overnight as well as same-day trips per person rose gradually and then declined. The number of overnight trips made per 100 persons in the population was 210 in rural India and 207. For the urban population.53. rural. being highest for the age-group 30-34 in rural India and highest for the age-group 40-44 in urban India. was substantially higher than that of overnight trips. The number of same-day trips per 100 of population was 330 in rural India and 263 in urban India. that is. and 192. The number of trips per 100 households was 440 for the rural population. which was noticeably higher than 537 trips per 100 households. and every 100 same-day trips had 200 participants. the proportion of overnight trips was a little higher – over 40%. urban. and every 100 same-day trips had 183. for which it was 365. For the urban population.109 sample villages and 4.June 2009 from 1. The important indicators for studying domestic tourism in a demographic domain are derived through the concept of ‘trip’. per child was highest in the lowest age group 0-4 for rural as well as urban India. In rural India it was 389 for males and 266 for females. CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS Overnight/ Same-day: For the rural population.308 surveyed households in 8. every 100 overnight trips had 223 participating members. The number of overnight trips per 100 persons was higher for males – 225 for the rural population and 220 for the urban – than for females – 194. slightly over one-third of all trips were overnight trips and nearly two-thirds were same-day trips. and in urban India it was 297 among males and 226 among females. 418 overnight trips were made per 100 Indian households (on an average. i  NSS Report No. There was not much variation among persons of different occupations or industries in number of overnight or same-day trips per 100 persons. With increase in age.Highlights The results on ‘Domestic Tourism in India’ are based on data collected during July 2008 . at 753 per 100 households in a year. however. about 4 per household). perceptibly higher than for the urban population. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. both same day as well as overnight. Among children under 15. 2008-09    . Rural households undertook same-day trips at the rate of 844 per 100 households. Trip size: For the rural population. every 100 overnight trips had 232 participants. the rate for urban households. the number of trips.

2008-09  . the average duration varying from 2. For the urban population. 21% of urban and 6% of rural overnight visitor-trips involved travel beyond one’s state. about 119 places were visited. ii NSS Report No. for the rural population. Among same-day visitors the male-female break-up did not differ much across sectors and was about 55:45.5 nights in the months of February and August to 5. the average duration of overnight trips undertaken by the urban population varied from 3.7 nights in February to 3. In rural areas month-to-month variation was relatively low. Leading purpose (same-day trips): About 55% of same-day trips of the urban population and 38% for the rural population were made for ‘social’ visits. and less common in urban India. VISITOR CHARACTERISTICS AND VISITOR-SPECIFIC CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS Gender profile: Among every 1000 overnight visitors. However. 49% of overnight visitor-trips were to a place outside one’s district but within one’s state. about 104 places were visited. For every 100 trips made to a destination outside one’s district but within one’s state. Visitor purpose: The break-up of overnight or same-day visitor-trips by the purpose that led the visitor to make the trip did not differ appreciably from the break-up of overnight/ same-day trips by leading purpose. Number of places visited: For every 100 trips made to a destination outside one’s state. Trips for ‘holidaying. Duration: The average number of nights spent on overnight trips was about 3 for the rural population and about 4 for the urban. but was less common in urban India. 28% of overnight visitor-trips were of this kind. too. 537 were males and 463 were females for the urban sector while 525 were males and 475 females for the rural sector. were much more common in rural India. about 150 places were visited. accounting for 23% of such trips. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. ‘Health and medical’ purposes. where their share was about 8%.6 in the month of July.Highlights Leading purpose (overnight trips): Trips whose purpose was ‘social’ (social visits) accounted for 75% of overnight trips of the rural population and 71% of overnight trips of the urban population. Destination location: Travel within one’s own district accounted for about 66% of overnight visitor-trips of the rural population but only about 30% for the urban population. Trips with ‘religious and pilgrimage’ purposes accounted for about 9% of overnight trips for the rural population and 12% for the urban population. where its share was only about 7%. Trips for ‘health and medical’ purposes formed 7% of overnight trips of the rural population and about 3½% for the urban population of India. For every 100 trips made to a destination within one’s district. ‘Shopping’ was found to be the next leading purpose for undertaking same-day trips in rural India.4 nights in June. leisure and recreation’ accounted for 5% of overnight trips of urban people but only 2% for rural people. accounting for 17% of same-day trips.

Highlights

Mode of travel: Buses were the dominant mode of travel for overnight and same-day trips alike, accounting for two-thirds (67%) of overnight visitor-trips of the rural population, 57% of overnight visitor-trips by the urban population, and 57-61% of same-day visitortrips of the rural and urban populations. About 21% of same-day visitor-trips, for both rural and urban sectors, were by own transport. Trains were used as the major mode of travel for 27% of overnight visitor-trips by urban Indians; for rural Indians their share in overnight visitor-trips was 7%. Trains were also used in 9% of same-day visitor-trips by urban Indians but their share was only 2% for rural Indians. Type of stay: In case of 85% of rural and 80% of urban overnight visitor-trips, the visitors stayed with friends and relatives for the major part of their stay. OCCURRENCE OF DOMESTIC TOURISM ACTIVITY IN A ONE-YEAR PERIOD About 77% of the population of both rural and urban sectors took part in at least one overnight trip during a one-year period. For same-day trips the proportion of population making at least one trip was about 76% in rural India and 70% in urban India. Households in which at least one member had made an overnight trip during the past one year formed 92% of all households (about 93% in the rural sector and 90% in the urban sector). As many as 96% of rural households, but only 86% of urban households, had at least one member who had taken part in a same-day trip during the past one year, the overall percentage for India being 93%. The percentage of households with at least one member making an overnight trip during the past one year did not vary appreciably with household occupation, household social group or household religion. Nor was there any clear pattern of variation with household economic level. EXPENDITURE ON TRIPS At all-India level, average expenditure per overnight trip was Rs.821 for the rural population and Rs.1,636 for the urban population. Overnight trips with ‘social’ leading purpose had a per-trip expenditure of Rs.466 (43% lower than the average trip considering all purposes) for the rural population and Rs.989 for the urban population (40% lower than average). Overnight trips for ‘health and medical’ purposes were four times as expensive as the average trip for both rural and urban populations. The urban population’s overnight trips for ‘holidaying, leisure and recreation’ were on the average more than three times as expensive, and its ‘business’ trips twice as expensive as the average trip considering all purposes. In both sectors, religious trips had a per-trip expenditure close to, but slightly higher than, the all-purposes average.

iii NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 

Highlights

Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip was Rs.369 in rural India and Rs.715 in urban India. Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip made for ‘social’ reasons was only Rs.202 in rural India and Rs.418 in urban India. In urban India ‘religious and pilgrimage’ trips had an average expenditure per visitor-trip of Rs.699, lower than the all-purposes average. In both rural and urban India, ‘social’ purpose trips accounted for about 43% of all overnight trip expenditure. Trips for ‘health and medical’ purposes had a share of 30% in overnight trip expenditure for the rural population and 15% for the urban. ‘Religious and pilgrimage’ trips had a share of about 11% in the rural sector and about 14% in the urban. The share of transport in overnight trip expenditure was 20% in rural India but as much as 33% in urban India. The share of shopping was 30% in rural India and 25% in urban India. The share of recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related expenditure was as high as 32% in rural India but only 15% in urban India. The share of food and drink in overnight trip expenditure was about 9-10% for both rural and urban India. The share of accommodation was 3% in rural India and about 6% (excluding payments made as part of a ‘package’) in urban India. For same-day trips, shopping was the largest component of expenditure, accounting for 60% of expenditure in case of the rural population and 44% in case of the urban. For ‘social’ overnight trips, shopping expenditure formed 51% of the total in rural India and about 38% in urban India. For the urban population, transport commanded the largest share of expenditure (around 43%) for both ‘social’ and ‘religious and pilgrimage’ trips. The share of recreation, religious, cultural, sporting and health-related expenditure for the rural population was over 78% in ‘health and medical’ trips but under 10% in ‘religious’ trips and lower still in trips for ‘social’ visits. Of the total expenditure by households on domestic tourism, expenditure on overnight trips accounted for 61% – 36% being incurred by rural and 25% by urban households. Same-day trips had a share of 39% in total expenditure, 30% incurred by rural and 9% by urban households. Thus, of the total domestic tourism expenditure, the share of the rural households was about two-thirds (66%). *******************

iv NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 

Contents
Chapter Title Highlights Contents Chapter One Introduction
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 The report in perspective Background Scope of the present survey Outline of the survey Sampling design Contents of the report Households Monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE) Travel Usual Place of Residence Usual Environment Trip Visit Tourism expenditure Non-resident Indian (NRI) Major states Incidence of trips per household Trips: overnight and same-day Leading purpose of trips Month of visit Trip duration Package and non-package trips Destination type Number of places visited per overnight trip Trip size and leading purpose Overall incidence per person The gender effect The effect of age Variation with occupation Variation with industry Distribution of visitors by activity status Visitor purpose Mode of travel Major type of stay Measures of occurrence Occurrence among persons Occurrence among households Household occupation Household social group
v NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

Page no. i v
1 1 1 2 3 3 3 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 10 12 12 12 13 13 15 16 17 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 25 26 27 28 28 30 32 32

Chapter Two

Concepts and Definitions
2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 2.10

Chapter Three

Characteristics of Domestic Tourism
3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 3.21 3.22 3.23

Contents

Chapter Chapter Three..contd.

Title
3.24 3.25 3.26 3.27 Household type Household religion Household economic level Households visited by NRIs: impact of the NRI visit(s)

Page no.
32 33 33 34 35 35 36 37 38 40 42

Chapter Four

Expenditure on Trips
4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Expenditure per overnight trip and leading purpose Expenditure per overnight visitor- trip and leading purpose Break-up of overnight trip expenditure by leading purpose Break-up of trip expenditure by broad expenditure head Leading purpose and trip expenditure pattern for overnight trips Break-up of domestic tourism expenditure by kind of trip and sector

Appendix A

Detailed Tables (list on pages A- i – A-vi)
Appendix B

A-1 – A-237

Sample Design and Estimation Procedure

B-1 – B-15

Appendix C

Schedule 21.1: Domestic Tourism in India

C-1 – C-13

Appendix D

Projected Population

D-1 – D-3

vi NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

Chapter One Introduction
1.1 The report in perspective 1.1.1 An all-India household survey on domestic tourism during the period July 2008 to June 2009 was carried out by the National Sample Survey Office (NSSO),National Statistical Organisation,Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation,Government of India, as part of the 65th round of National Sample Survey (NSS). The data were collected through a schedule of enquiry (Schedule 21.1).The aim, inter alia, was to provide estimates of the volume of domestic tourism in terms of number of visitors (i.e. persons performing trips), number of households undertaking domestic tourism activity and number of trips that contributed to domestic tourism in India. It was also intended to study domestic tourism activity by different population categories such as age, economic level, activity status, occupation and industry of work, etc.; characteristics of trips such as purpose, main destination, etc. and the expenditure incurred by the households in domestic tourism activity. Based on the data collected during the survey period (July 2008 - June 2009), estimates pertaining to domestic tourism in India along with various characteristics associated with these have been generated and presented in this report.

1.2 Background 1.2.1 Past Surveys: Domestic tourism has not been covered comprehensively in any earlier NSS round. In the 54th round (January-June 1998) of NSS, one of the subjects covered was tours involving overnight stay. The main household schedule of that round recorded details of journeys on tours involving overnight stay undertaken by household members during a specified period. 1.2.2 The results of the 54th round enquiry on travel (which included commuting to work or for education as well as tours involving overnight stay) were published in NSS Report No.450. The report, in its chapter on tours involving overnight stay, gave State-sector-wise estimates of rate of occurrence of such journeys per 100 households and per 1000 population in 60 days, distribution of journeys by mode of journey, distance travelled and purpose, and average number of travellers, average duration of a journey and average expenditure on a journey for each mode and purpose. Because of differences in the coverage of “tours involving overnight stay” as studied in the 54th round survey from the “overnight trips” of the 65th round survey, it is not possible to compare the estimates from the two surveys in this report.1 1.2.3 The present survey: Considering the significant impact of domestic tourism in the national economy, as per the proposal of the Ministry of Tourism , the then Steering Committee of NSSO decided to conduct an annual household survey on domestic tourism during NSS 65th round.
                                                            
1

 The two main differences between the 54th round concept of tour involving overnight stay and the concept of overnight trip

adopted in the survey under study (65th round ) are: (i) movements within the regular routine of a person’s life (which included commuting) were excluded from the coverage of domestic tourism (that is, not considered trips) in the 65th round and (ii) expenditure on tours in the 54th round included only expenditure on passenger transport, whereas in the 65th round all expenditure related to the trip and made before, after, or during the trip were included.  

1 NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09

 

Chapter One: Introduction 

1.3

Scope of the present survey

1.3.1 Items of enquiry: In the present survey on domestic tourism, a schedule of enquiry (Schedule 21.1) was used for collection of data from the sample households. Data were collected on household characteristics such as household size, principal industry, principal occupation, household type, religion, social group, household consumption expenditure, number of overnight trips and same-day trips undertaken by the household, visits, (if any) of NRIs to the household and their impact, renting out of some portion of the house to tourists during the last 365 days, and awareness, source of information, and impact of the “Incredible India” campaign by the Government of India or other tourism promotional campaigns. 1.3.2 Data were also collected for each household member on age, sex, marital status, educational level, usual principal activity status, industry (NIC) and occupation (NCO) of employed members, number of overnight trips completed during (a) last 30 days and (b) last 365 days and number of same-day trips completed by the member during (a) last 30 days and (b) last 365 days. 1.3.3 For each overnight trip and each same-day trip made during the last 30 days by one or more household members, two kinds of data were collected. One was trip characteristics, which included leading purpose of the trip, main destination, number of places visited, number of household members going on the trip along with month(s) of visit for the trip. The other was the characteristics corresponding to different trip members such as mode of travel, type of stay, and number of nights spent outside usual place of residence (including journey), the last item being collected for overnight trips only. 1.3.4 For the latest three overnight trips completed during the last 30 days, detailed data were collected on particulars of expenditure on different items under the broad heads of accommodation; food and drink; transport; shopping; recreation; religious, cultural, sporting and health-related activities; and other expenditure, along with information on reimbursement/direct payment by any institution for such trips. For same-day trips, instead of separate break-ups of expenditure for the latest three different trips, the break-up of total expenditure incurred on all same-day trips completed during last 30 days was recorded. 1.3.5 Choice of reference period: For a subject such as domestic tourism, the choice of the length of the period for which data are to be sought is always a difficult one. Too short a period makes the data vulnerable to sampling fluctuations. On the other hand, a long reference period creates problems of recall lapse, especially when it is not only the number of trips made during the period but also various details of each trip undertaken that have to be studied. In this survey, a combination of reference periods was used in the sense that while number of trips made by each household member was recorded with a reference period of ‘last 365 days’ (and used to build up various measures of the level of tourism activity), the various characteristics of trips such as purpose, destination, mode of travel, etc., were, to minimize recall lapse, recorded only for trips completed within the ‘last 30 days’ by the members of the surveyed households. Details of expenditure relating to trips, as elaborated in the last paragraph, were also recorded with reference to the trips completed within the ‘last 30 days’ only. 1.3.6 Geographical coverage: The survey covered the whole of the Indian Union except (i) interior villages of Nagaland situated beyond five kilometres of the bus route and (ii) villages in Andaman and Nicobar Islands which remain inaccessible throughout the year.

2 NSS Report No. 536: Domestic Tourism in India, 2008-09 

 

5. The sample design based on which selection of households was made is briefly stated in the following sub-section. the survey period of this round was divided into four sub-rounds.5 Sampling design 1. 1. a sample of 12 households ( second stage units) was planned to be surveyed from each selected village and urban block.719 urban blocks were actually surveyed.2 Method of data collection: The survey used the recall-based interview method using a schedule for data collection from a sample of randomly selected households. This report is based on the Central sample only. For these two districts.308 households were actually surveyed – 97. 3 NSS Report No.Chapter One: Introduction  1. 12952 first stage units (FSUs) – 8.21.3 Central and State samples: As is usual. along with their correlates. were the households. In case of large FSUs. as far as possible. For towns with no UFS frame available.188 villages and 4. was allotted for survey in each of these four sub-rounds. 1. the villages and blocks drawn as ‘State sample’ were themselves used for drawing the Central sample of households.1 in a separately drawn sample of villages and blocks called the State sample. 1.6. The ultimate stage sampling units. 1. Statement 1. As regards the sample size.1. Estimates for overnight trips and same-day trips are provided separately for rural and urban sectors at all-India or State/Union Territory level. in both sectors. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. Of these.1 A stratified multi-stage design was adopted for the 65th round survey. The first-stage units (FSUs) were the 2001 census villages (panchayat wards in case of Kerala) in the rural sector and Urban Frame Survey (UFS) blocks in the urban sector. As usual.3 Details of sampling design and estimation procedure are given in Appendix B.2 For canvassing the detailed enquiry Schedule 21.1 This report is based on central sample only.234 in urban areas. each with a duration of three months. each town was treated as an FSU. 1.53. 8.4.5. one intermediate stage of sampling was the division of the FSU into a number of parts and random selection of one part for survey.1. In the Central sample.074 in rural areas and 56. It presents and discusses estimates of various aspects of domestic tourism. For Leh (Ladakh) and Kargil districts of Jammu & Kashmir there were no separate sample first-stage units for the ‘Central sample’. the Governments of different States and UTs participated in the survey by canvassing Schedule 21.4.764 urban blocks – were allocated at all-India level for the Central sample. as distinct from the Central sample surveyed by NSSO officials. as obtained from the data collected on relevant items for the entire round. 2008-09    . 1.109 villages and 4. An equal number of sample villages/blocks (first-stage units or FSUs).6 Contents of the Report 1.5.4.0 presents the number of villages and urban blocks allotted and finally surveyed for NSS 65th round besides the numbers of sample households and persons surveyed for Sch.1 Period of survey and work programme: The fieldwork of the 65th round of NSSO started from 1st July 2008 and continued till 30th June 2009. 1.4 Outline of the survey 1.

Chapter Two states in detail the concepts and definitions of terms used in the survey. of blocks no. the expenditure related to domestic tourism. The detailed tables on which the findings of this survey are based are presented in Appendix A. Appendix C is a copy of the schedule of enquiry through which the data were collected.Chapter One: Introduction    Statement 1. of villages no.1 State/UT no. of sample no. corresponding number of households and persons surveyed for Schedule 21. including the present introductory chapter. of sample (rural) (urban) households persons selected surveyed selected surveyed rural urban rural urban Andhra Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Assam Bihar Chhattisgarh Delhi Goa Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Sikkim Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttarakhand Uttar Pradesh West Bengal A & N Islands Chandigarh Dadra & Nagar Haveli Daman & Diu Lakshadweep Puducherry all-India 488 104 376 472 152 16 16 280 144 160 176 184 304 336 456 520 192 128 64 80 384 160 384 88 400 216 72 1120 632 24 8 16 16 4 16 8188 487 103 375 469 149 16 16 280 144 160 127 184 303 334 456 519 192 127 63 79 383 158 382 85 399 216 72 1119 631 21 8 16 16 4 16 8109 272 40 88 88 64 272 24 248 96 32 88 88 240 184 248 520 96 48 96 32 104 128 176 24 392 72 40 448 376 16 40 16 16 12 40 4764 272 40 88 87 64 269 24 246 96 32 63 88 240 183 245 516 96 48 96 32 103 128 176 23 392 72 40 445 376 16 39 16 16 12 40 4719 5835 1212 4499 5621 1787 189 192 3343 1727 1885 1506 2205 3635 4000 5454 6213 2304 1524 756 948 4590 1888 4571 1016 4787 2592 864 13400 7571 252 93 191 192 40 192 97074 3261 480 1056 1037 764 3101 288 2915 1142 379 751 1041 2870 2181 2931 6134 1152 576 1152 384 1234 1535 2102 276 4702 864 479 5308 4489 192 450 192 192 144 480 56234 23555 5947 22713 28674 9258 844 880 16666 8937 8488 8596 11037 16861 17084 28424 29458 12339 8019 3804 4914 21007 9658 24463 4579 18551 11392 4236 76237 33762 1140 409 1032 939 187 772 474862 12635 2109 4231 4881 3532 12215 1277 13412 5378 1372 3607 4824 12121 8896 13957 27552 5600 2610 5719 1721 4927 7102 10389 894 16998 3094 2339 27214 17423 776 1691 679 860 692 1902 244629 Ref: Table 1 in Appendix A 1.0 : Number of villages/blocks allotted and surveyed for NSS 65th Round Central sample). 536: Domestic Tourism in India. 2008-09    . 4 NSS Report No. The sample design and estimation procedure is explained in Appendix B. Chapter Three discusses the various features of domestic tourism and Chapter Four.6.2 The report contains four chapters.

while the aggregates of population/household are given as marginal row/column totals in the detailed Appendix tables. in this report. the estimates of aggregates are also given in the margin of the detailed tables in Appendix A2 . 2008-09    .4 The estimates. ratios obtained from the survey are presented. However. By and large.                                                              2 In the detailed tables. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. 5 NSS Report No.6. however.3 The analysis has been done primarily at all-India level while the corresponding state level estimates of a few key parameters have been summarised in the state-level statements. projected population as on 1st March 2008 and 1st March 2009 supplied by the RGI Office is given in Appendix D. some sample sizes may be small and this may have a bearing on the precision of the corresponding estimates. along with those projected for 1st January 2009 using compound rate of growth. The projections have been given separately for male and female population of rural and urban sectors. in some of the deeper classifications.Chapter One: Introduction  1. are generally presented as ratios.6. 1. In order to facilitate the users to derive aggregates corresponding to projections of population made by the Office of the Registrar General of India (RGI) .

etc. 2. in a shop or a different house) due to shortage of space. the level below which 40 per cent of the population lie.2. was considered to be a single-member household except that a family living in a hotel (say) was considered one household only. MPCE was the total consumer expenditure over all items divided by the household size and expressed on a per month (30 days) basis. Some of the aspects of domestic tourism have been studied with respect to the level of living of the households which was proxied by monthly per capita consumer expenditure. and so on. In this round quintiles were estimated separately for the distribution of MPCE in the rural and urban sector of each State/U. 2. but a resident domestic servant or paying guest (but not just a tenant in the house) was included in the employer’s/host’s household. the NSSO. Thus a child residing in a hostel for studies was excluded from the household of his/her parents. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. the household formed by such a person’s family members was taken to include the person also.2 Quintile classes of MPCE: The population of any region or domain can be divided into five quintile classes of MPCE. The adverb “normally” meant that the temporary visitors and guests (whose total period of stay in the household was expected to be less than 6 months) were excluded but the temporary stay-aways (whose total period of absence from the household was expected to be less than 6 months) were included. data on household consumer expenditure during the last 30 days was ascertained through five questions (see Appendix C).Chapter Two Concepts and Definitions 2. 2.1 Household: A group of persons who normally lived together and took food from a common kitchen constituted a household. This helps in portraying the survey variables in the hierarchy of levels of living of the households classified as quintile classes of MPCE. 2. to facilitate the ordering of households in respective level of living for deeper synthesis of survey results. collects data on consumption expenditure in its surveys. in the special case of a person taking food with his family but sleeping elsewhere (say. “Living together” was given more importance than “sharing food from a common kitchen” in drawing the boundaries of a household in case the two criteria were in conflict. boarding-lodging house. This ordering of the households in respect of level of living has been derived as the distribution of the households in the quintile classes corresponding to the distribution of the population in the quintile classes. hostel.1). mess. However. In the present survey on Domestic Tourism (Schedule 21..0 Important concepts and definitions used in this survey as given in the instructions to field staff conducting the survey are stated below.2 Monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE): For a household.T and all-India. The same principle was applicable for the residential staff of such establishments. 6 NSS Report No. 2008-09   .2. The size of a household is the total number of persons in the household. the second quintile. Each inmate of a hotel.1 As it is difficult to collect reliable income data. where the 1st quintile of the distribution of MPCE means the level of MPCE below 20 per cent of the population lie.

religious places. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. in other words. visiting homes of friends or relatives.for a duration of not more than six months .7) to different places. 2008-09    .1 With reference to domestic tourism. centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a substantial distance away but nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited. However. shopping centers. 2. Member(s) of sample 7 NSS Report No. all movements of persons. hired taxis.6.6 Trip 2.4 Usual Place of Residence: The usual place of residence (UPR) of a person is the place (village/town) where the person had been staying continuously for at least six months immediately prior to the date of survey. Even if a person was not staying in the village/town continuously for six months immediately prior to the date of survey but was then staying there with intention to stay there continuously for six months then that place was taken as his/her UPR.6. whose nature of activities within their regular routine of life involved making movements outside their UPR to different places. Such movements might be within his/her UPR or beyond it. visiting homes of friends or relatives. Travel can occur within a country (domestic travel) or involve more than one country (international travel).6. like travelling salesmen. religious places.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  2. extending beyond the UPR of an individual. Those who travel are referred to as travelers.2 Thus.by one or more household members traveling to a place outside their usual environment (which includes the usual place of residence(UPR)) and return to their UPR (a round trip) for purposes other than those of migration or getting employed or setting up of residence in that place and which is outside their regular routine of life. etc were not considered as trips. domestic movements performed by on-board aircraft crew as part of their duty were not considered as trips. It refers to the movement . 2.e. were not considered as trips. Similarly.4 A trip might be made up of visits (i. shopping centers. 2. mobile hawkers. within which he/she moved in the course of his/her regular routine of life.3 Travel: It is the movement of persons between different geographic boundaries. medical representatives. A trip might be single-member or multimember. for any purpose and any duration.3 Exceptions for exclusion from the coverage of trip as mentioned above: All domestic movements performed by air except for the purpose of migration or getting employed or setting up of residence in that place were considered as trips even if such movements falls within the regular routine of life of the visitor. 2.6. 2. on-board staff of airlines/railways or of buses. 2. centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a substantial distance away but nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited. stay for a purpose in a place visited during a trip – details in sub-section 2. the term trip related to those household members who were resident Indians. a trip might be undertaken by one or more members of the sample household with or without members of other households participating.5 Usual Environment: The usual environment (UE) of an individual referred to the notional geographical space. all movements of persons commuting regularly and frequently (nearly every day/ every week/every fortnight) between their UPR and some fixed places for the purpose of work or study. By the term movement of a person within his/her regular routine of life is meant the regular and frequent (nearly every day/ every week/every fortnight) movements of a person between his/her UPR and some place for the purpose of work or study.

5.7). recorded for different trip members.4 Purpose of a trip: The purpose of a trip of a household member was that purpose but for which he/she would not have undertaken the trip.6. A trip might be same-day or overnight. However.than the others due to other engagements.6. etc.1 In case of a multi-member trip for which the set of destinations differed slightly from person to person (among those who undertook the trip) if the persons were together for most of the time (duration of the trip).6. 2. health and medical . For example. There might be exceptional situations where no one purpose could be identified as the leading purpose.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  households participating in a trip were visitors (details in sub-section 2. But if two members of a household spent most of the time away from each other during the period since leaving their residence to returning to their residence. education and training..5 Leading purpose of a trip: The leading purpose of a trip as a whole was that purpose without which none of the household members in that trip would have undertaken the trip.6. An overnight trip was of duration at least one night outside the usual environment. the main destination was to be defined as the place where the visitors spent most of their time during the trip. then such a member was considered to have gone on the same trip as the rest of the members.e. and the other date. In such a case. its leading purpose and its starting and ending date (the last for overnight trips only). holidaying. In the survey. 2. leisure and recreation. too. If the visitors spent the same amount of time in two or more places during the trip. if no such place could be identified by the informant.5 A trip was uniquely specified by its set of destinations..5. then the main destination is defined as the one among these places that was the farthest from the usual place of residence of the visitors. be it single or multi-member. the leading purpose was identified 8 NSS Report No.2 Main destination: The main destination of a trip was the place. the trip started and ended on the same day (0000 hrs to 2359 hrs). attending marriages. In case of a multi-member trip for which one (or more) member(s) among those who went on a trip starting later . However. 2. shopping and others (e. is in order . then this member was considered to have undertaken a different trip from the rest. 2. the night was spread over two consecutive dates implying that it had started before and ended after twelve midnight. social including visiting friends and relatives.g. if at least one of these two dates was the same for this member as for the rest of the members. 2008-09    .3 Starting and ending dates: The starting (ending) month was the month of starting (completing) of the trip. then they were considered to have been on two different trips even though their starting and returning dates were the same. religious and pilgrimage. The main destination of a trip was same for all the members who undertook that trip.5. these purposes were broadly categorized as: business.6.5. say. if both the starting date and the ending date for this member were different from that of the rest of the members. 2.  A same-day trip was a trip which did not cover even a single night i. they were considered to be on the same trip. volunteer work). did not differ from that of the rest of the members by more than 3 days.Some elaboration of various features associated with a trip.6. there could be two or more purposes.5.or returning earlier . visiting of which was central to the decision to undertake the trip. pilgrimage and health. In case of a single night overnight trip. 2. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. In these cases the earliest starting date (latest ending date) was used to determine the starting month (ending month).

Similarly.5. auto rickshaw. if the expenditure on transport and one or more chargeable travel services availed for some time during the trip did not cover the whole trip but covered only a minor time of the duration of the trip then such a trip was not considered as package trip although the trip has a package component. a package trip must have had a package component but not vice versa. where the visitor(s) spent some considerable time for spending night. rented house.g.2 Minor mode of travel : The means of transport by which second maximum distance was traveled was treated as ‘minor’ mode of travel for that trip . taking rest.2 For the purpose of the survey. air. 2008-09    . transport equipment rental (hired transport): bicycle. train. tractor/truck.g. e. train(railways).) and sold by tour operators through travel agencies or directly to final consumers as a single product for a single price.6. two-wheeler.6.viz. The leading purpose of a trip was the same for all the members who undertook that trip.g. accommodation. 2.5. dharamshala.7. Therefore.6. own transport: bicycle. or walking inside a museum.1 Package Trip: A package was a combination of transport and any one or more chargeable travel services (e. during the trip.6. If such a package was availed of for a major part of time in a trip. The term package trip as used in the survey is detailed below. The travel relevant here was the travelling done to cover the distances to the destinations and not joyrides or movement for adventure.5. 2.6 Type of a trip : a trip could be of two types – package or non-package. 2. animal driven transport and others .5.5. 9 NSS Report No..7 Mode of travel: Mode of travel refers to means of transport used by visitor(s) to travel in a trip. tractor/truck. rickshaw. The components of a package tour might be pre-established or tailor-made. entertainment and/or sightseeing. 2. etc. friends and relatives or others including carriages / coaches. auto rickshaw.6. air) for which equal distance was traveled then that means which was more expensive was treated as ‘major’ mode of travel for that trip.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  as that purpose which the informant considered to be the most important for performing the trip. In case more than one such mode was there (e.6. car/jeep.7. 2.5. usually for paid lodging. a visitor could avail himself of accommodation and other services in the package through some tour operator but made some special sight-seeing arrangements in some places of visit in the trip on his own. the visitor chooses a combination of services he/she wishes to acquire from a pre-established list of such services. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. a trip which was not a package trip could have both package and non-package components. 2. a package trip could also contain non-package component in addition to its package component. in which case. refreshing oneself. spending some leisure time. rickshaw. car/jeep. private guest house.6. ship/boat. meals/food. etc. fort or maze. such a trip was considered as a package trip.6. It could be: hotel. Government guest house. two-wheeler. 2. as in skiing or boating for pleasure.5. One or more of the following means of transport were possible in a trip.8 Type of stay: The type of stay refers to the accommodation used for stay by visitor(s) in a trip.: on foot. Accommodation refers to the space. bus.6. Thus.1 Major mode of travel : The means of transport by which maximum distance was traveled was treated as ‘major’ mode of travel for that trip. animal driven transport..

3 Thus. residing in the country.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  2. shopping centres. 2.7 Visit: The term visit referred to the stay (overnight or same-day) for a purpose in a place visited during a trip.8.6. Dharmashala) where same no. every week or every fortnight) between their usual place of residence and place of work or study. of places visited during the trip: The ‘main destination’ was counted as a place of visit.5. from the purview of domestic visitors in the survey. 2.or second highest length of time for same-day tripswas spent was treated as ‘minor’ type of stay. centres of health care or any other facilities that might be at a distance but nevertheless were regularly and frequently visited (ii) persons arriving at a place. visiting frequently places within their current routine of life in the neighbouring areas(which might be outside their UPR). for duration of not more than six months at a time and completed the trip during the reference period and whose main purpose of visit was other than (a) getting engaged in employment or taking up an occupation in that place or (b) setting up of residence in that place or (c) migrating to that place.1 Visitor: A person performing a trip as elaborated above was termed a visitor in this survey. who traveled to a place within the country. 2008-09    . Entering a geographical boundary without stopping there for a purpose was considered as being in transit and did not qualify as a visit to that area. In other words. a domestic visitor was a person (household member). including the nights spent in transit.2 Minor type of stay: The category of accommodation where the second highest number of nights for overnight trips . 2.5. of nights (equal length of time) was spent then that type which was more expensive was treated as ‘major’ type of stay. The stay need not be overnight to qualify as a visit. It may be noted that a trip might consist of visits to one or more places. to take up an occupation or to engage in employment in that place (iii) persons arriving at a place for setting up of residence in that place 10 NSS Report No. who had completed a ‘trip’.7.7. they were counted once only. outside his / her usual place of residence and not as a part of his/her regular routine of life. 2.6.7 No. the following were excluded: (i) persons commuting regularly and frequently (nearly every day. visiting homes of friends or relatives. hotel. for instance.9 No.5.5.g. religious places.6. 2. of nights spent outside usual place of residence (including journey): This was the number of nights spent by the visitor outside his/her usual place of residence from starting of the trip to the completion of the trip. with or without a contract. 2.7.8.6.2 Domestic Visitor: A domestic visitor was a household member.1 Major type of stay: The category of accommodation where the highest number of nights (for overnight trips) or maximum time (for same-day trips) was spent was treated as ‘major’ type of stay. 2. In case more than one such category was there (e. If two or more places were reported to have been visited which were in the same town or in the same village. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.

                                                             1  An important clarification regarding usage of the term ‘visitor’ as used in this survey : In this survey. throughout the remaining part of this report. shopping. say H-a.). 536: Domestic Tourism in India. the following were included in the purview of domestic visitors in the survey: (i) persons who completed a trip during the reference period and the duration of trip was not more than six months (ii) persons who were household members at the time of canvassing the schedule but were not household members at the time of actually completing a trip within the reference period (iii) persons on a trip for any of the following purposes: business. religious and pilgrimage. holidaying.6 Domestic Tourism: It covered trips of household members within the territory of India. the term visitor and domestic visitor are one and the same. This means that the trip covered at least two calendar days.1 Domestic Overnight Visitor: A domestic overnight visitor was a domestic visitor who spent at least one night in a trip during last 365 days. less than six months) in institutions within the country (v) foreigners resident in India (vi) persons arriving at a place on migration or migrants. hired taxis etc.5. either as a domestic trip or as part of an international trip. Further.7. i. a household. Thus. etc. volunteer work) (iv) domestic component (not in transit) of the trip of a household member visiting a place outside the country 2. 11 NSS Report No. 2008-09    . was one whose at least one member made a trip: overnight or same-day. However. the term visitor has been used.g. social including visiting friends and relatives. reporting a domestic visitor: overnight or same-day. like travelling salesmen. education and training. 2.5. information was collected for both these categories in respect of those visitors who belong to the sample households. on-board staff of airlines/ railways or buses. 2. whose nature of activities within their regular routine of life involved making movements outside their UPR to different places.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  (iv) persons who traveled to work temporarily (i. attending marriages.7. the survey being on domestic tourism in India. others (e. health and medical. during last 365 days. 2.5 Domestic visitors were classified into two categories: domestic overnight visitors and domestic same-day visitors. any non-member (of household H-a) making a visit to household H-a is NOT a ‘visitor’ with respect to sample household H-a as per this survey.7. 2.7. A migrant was a person whose place of enumeration was different from his/her last usual place of residence (UPR) (vii) persons.e. In this survey. mobile hawkers. leisure and recreation.7. This means that the trip started and ended on the same day (0000 hrs to 2359 hrs).4 On the other hand.e of domestic visitors 1.2 Domestic Same-day Visitor: A domestic same-day visitor was a domestic visitor who did not spend even a single night in any trip during last 365 days. medical representatives. wholly or partly.

2.7% of India’s population in 2001.3 Tourism expenditure included (i) monetary expenditure on goods and services paid or payable by the visitor out of his/her own pocket (ii) direct expenditure by the visitor reimbursed by some institution like Government or other agencies or expenses of the visitor directly paid by such institutions (iii) expenditure incurred on items of high unit values like cars. 2. 2008-09    . Assam. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.8 Tourism Expenditure 2. religious. tourism expenditure included expenditure made not just during the trip but also the expenditure related to the trip even if made before or after the trip. They are: Andhra Pradesh.2 Tourism expenditure was classified as (a) package component and (b) non-package component. computers. including land. 2.4 Tourism expenditure excluded (i) payment of taxes and duties not levied on products (goods and services) (ii) purchase of financial and non-financial assets.8. Kerala. by some institution like Government or other agencies on behalf of the selected household. Bihar. But all expenditure made by other households for any trip undertaken by a sample household was excluded. Chhattisgarh.1 For the purpose of this survey. related to a trip if those are used for consumption purpose and not for productive purpose. Gujarat. It included all expenses related to the trip paid or payable by the household.8. Tamil Nadu.9 Non-Resident Indian (NRI): Indian citizens (including officials of Indian diplomatic missions abroad ) who stay abroad for employment or for carrying on business or vocation or any other purpose indicating a period of stay abroad exceeding 6 months were considered as Non-Resident Indian (NRI) for the purpose of this survey.8. etc. Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. Madhya Pradesh.Chapter Two: Concepts and Definitions  2.10 Major states: This refers to the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or more according to the 2001 Census. It also included expenditure related to the trip. Alms are also excluded. Maharashtra. All expenditure in connection with the trip except those used/intended to be used for productive purposes/enterprises was included. Rajasthan. Punjab. Together these States accounted for 94. with the latter further sub-divided as: (i) accommodation (ii) food and drink (iii) transport (iv) recreation. cultural.8. Karnataka. Haryana. Jharkhand. sporting and health related activities (v) shopping and (vi) others. real estate (iii) all transfers of cash or used goods such as donations to charities or to members of other households as these do not correspond to the purchase of consumption goods or services from these charities or individuals. All expenditure made by a sample household (whose members were on a trip) on members of other households was included. Orissa. whether directly paid or reimbursed. 12 NSS Report No. 2. 2.

and by persons of different ages. (b) participation of various population groups. the trip and the visitor. was the ultimate unit to study the activity of domestic tourism and it related to the movement of one or more members of the household to a main destination with a leading purpose.0.1. Further. In this framework. are also examined. four overnight trips in a year were undertaken by an Indian 13 NSS Report No. the break-up of visitor-trips by important visitor-trip characteristics: purpose of visit. being confined to the framework of concepts and definitions adopted in the survey. Incidence of trips per household 3.1 As stated earlier. and major place of stay.Chapter Three Characteristics of Domestic Tourism 3. 3. a trip was the basic unit to study the activity of domestic tourism and it corresponded to movement of the members of the households outside their usual place of residence (excluding the movements which were part of the usual routine of life) with distinctive leading purposes.2 The chapter presents the average number of trips made during a year by households and persons in different States/UTs. On an average. The break-up of trips (occasionally.3 The findings presented in this chapter are grouped into four sections: (a) incidence and characteristics of trips. (c) visitor-trip characteristics. cover its intensity and variations over different categories of households.1 The present chapter elucidates various aspects of domestic tourism based on the information collected in the NSS 65th round. In other words. mode of transport. accordingly. viz. the activity of domestic tourism undertaken by the members of the households has two district features.1.0. The salient characteristics of domestic tourism activities presented in this chapter. 3. the trip. are studied.0. Estimates of occurrence of domestic tourism activity are also presented in terms of percentages of persons and households reporting at least one overnight/same-day trip during a one-year period – in case of households.were used for collecting information related to trips. separately for different household occupations. the aggregate estimates on trips and trip-related characteristics have been generated pertaining to a one-year period unless otherwise specified and the procedure thereof is explained in the Appendix B on ‘Sample Design and Estimation Procedure’. The members of the households who happened to be the members of the trip are the visitors and the information profiling the visitors was also collected in the survey. 3. month of visit. However. either same-day or overnight. questions such as “Which were the most common purposes for which people went on overnight trips?” “Which modes of transport were most commonly used for same-day trips?” are answered. destinations and other trip characteristics. of visitor-trips) by various trip characteristics such as leading purpose. As elaborated in Chapter Two. social groups and religions. and (d) occurrence of domestic tourism activity among households and persons in a one-year period.4 Two different reference periods – ‘last 30 days’ and ‘last 365 days’ preceding the date of survey . SECTION A: INCIDENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPS 3. 2008-09   . and main destination type (within or outside district/state) and the distribution of visitors by activity status.0. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. Thus one of the important measures of intensity of domestic tourism is the number of trips during one year per household. occupations and industries. visitors and trips.

Statement 3. The all-India average was 753.s state/u.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  household.t.53. 53. The State-wise incidence of average number of overnight as well as same trips per 100 households is presented above in Statement 3.2. at eight in a year. 54 in Appendix A *last 365 days Kind of trip 3.2: Average number of trips* per 100 households in different state /u.1. In these two States. The average number of same-day trips per 100 households during a year was noticeably higher in rural India (844) than in urban India (537). with trips made by rural households marginally higher in number than their urban counterpart (Statement 3. was thus almost double that of overnight trips. To be more precise.54 in Appendix-A 453 853 297 576 227 504 335 627 370 649 232 546 308 665 402 794 530 849 769 1569 836 1919 346 692 381 605 445 1396 491 1099 371 781 173 581 260 505 212 238 310 649 541 1394 470 1005 516 823 338 714 331 765 310 471 422 715 480 819 371 782 340 1014 256 340 179 454 139 643 231 218 437 885 418 844 *last 365 days 3. 418 overnight trips were undertaken per 100 households at all-India level – 440 trips per 100 households in rural areas and 365 in urban areas. overnight urban 416 171 258 333 366 237 322 370 424 593 601 360 376 446 469 269 131 178 188 293 479 417 447 296 328 326 380 432 308 181 265 259 211 293 429 365 same-day urban rural+urban 444 259 510 429 507 645 804 557 579 925 950 483 420 1021 684 364 573 318 144 565 895 654 490 430 556 373 555 564 575 582 353 473 688 34 686 537 727 508 505 606 623 638 734 700 765 1497 1700 659 536 1297 996 596 579 469 196 625 1314 867 734 672 668 453 680 763 729 872 352 459 659 146 744 753 rural 469 332 223 336 370 166 295 422 578 791 904 343 384 444 498 453 189 279 232 317 552 504 541 346 334 307 434 493 393 418 191 153 100 184 455 440 rural+urban rural Andhra Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Assam Bihar chhatisgarh Delhi Goa Gujrat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharastra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab Rajasthan sikkim Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttarakhand Uttar Pradesh West Bengal Andaman & N.1.1).3 The intensity of domestic tourism activity was also compared over States and was found to show considerable variation.1: Average number of overnight and same-day trips * per 100 households: all-India Average number of trips per 100 households rural urban rural+urban Overnight 440 365 418 Same-day 844 537 753 Ref: Table 3. 2008-09   . Island Chandigarh Dadra & Nagar Haveli Daman & Diu Lakshadeep Puduchery All-India Ref: Tables 3. Statement 3.2 The incidence of same-day trips among Indian households. this 14 NSS Report No. Average number of overnight trips during a year per urban household in Jammu & Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh was almost double the all-India average. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.t.

West Bengal and Orissa – the highest proportion being reported by Kerala (70%). the proportion of overnight trips was somewhat higher (40. The percentage of same-day trips for the rural population in every major State except Haryana and Rajasthan (both around 60%) was at least 61%. 2008-09   .5 59.2 Trips: overnight and same-day 3.3 65. For the urban population.7%) were same-day trips (Statement 3. 3.0 Urban 40. As regards same-day trips.3 100. Kerala and Orissa. 3. Rajasthan and Karnataka (47-48%). the proportion of same-day trips was lowest in Andhra Pradesh and Rajasthan (about 52%). the incidence was significantly higher in Jammu & Kashmir.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  average was considerably higher in respect of rural households as well.7 64.5%). As for the urban population of the major States. the proportion of overnight trips was again lowest in Kerala (30%). slightly over one-third (34.5%.3: Percentage of overnight and same-day trips* to total: allIndia Percentage of trips Sector Overnight Same-day All Rural 34. The percentage of overnight trips for the rural population in every major State1 except Kerala (24%) and Orissa (28%) was at least 30%.2. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. As for the urban population of the major States. the highest percentages being those of Haryana and Rajasthan (around 40%).7 100.1 For the rural population of India.3%) of all trips were overnight trips and nearly two-thirds (65.5 100. Here. the proportion of same-day trips being 59. 15 NSS Report No.2.4 shows inter-State and sectoral variation in the proportion of overnight (and same-day) trips.3).                                                              1 Major States are the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or more according to the 2001 Census. in both rural and urban areas. Himachal Pradesh. West Bengal and Orissa – the highest proportion of overnight trips being reported by Andhra Pradesh. Together these States accounted for 94. Statement 3. the highest percentages being those of Kerala (76%) and Orissa (72%).0 Ref: Table 49 in Appendix A *last 365 days 3.2 Statement 3.2.0 Combined 35. and above 65% in three other States – Assam. and was also below 35% in three other States – Assam.3 The situation was almost reverse for same-day trips.7% of India’s population in 2001.

4 23.4 62.1 In the survey.5 66.0 100.1 17.0 38.1 43.0 100.0 100.6 60.1 34.0 100.3 32.2 57.0 100.0 100.2 29.4 56.5 33.4 39.0 65.1 74.5 81.0 64.8 69.0 100.9 35.0 100.9 31.5.6 37. It was recognized that if the individual purposes of different participants differed.7 24.3 57.0 100.4 56.1 61.1 66.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3. was identified as the leading purpose of the trip.0 100.4 23.9 82.6 58.0 100.0 100.1 69.0 100.1 73.0 100.4 61.2 35.5 59.9 34.0 100.9 28.2 71.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.3 59.5 63.5 69.0 64.7 34.6 35.9 64.6 60.7 40.5 33.0 100.5 66.0 42.5 18.3 66.6 52.2 62.6 35.0 100.9 58.9 47.1 46.0 100.9 56.8 42.0 100.0 35.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.2 13.7 65.1 63. Thus two members on a trip might have had different purposes each strong enough to make the trip possible even if the other person dropped out of the trip.2 38.0 100.0 100.8 33.5 all rural+ urban overnight 38.0 100.0 100.2 66.3 all 100.3 37.4 59.1 31.0 100.0 35.4 39.0 100.4 48.0 100. The leading purpose of a trip was understood as the purpose in the absence of which the trip would not have been undertaken.0 33.4 89.0 100.0 100.0 100.3 65.0 100.8 86.3 65.3 23.0 100.0 100.5 68.0 100.0 100.0 100.3 33.0 100.0 100.4 66. a distinct leading purpose was identified.4 69.6 38.3 rural sameday 64.0 33.8 59.0 100.0 100.1 57.0 100.2 40.5 45.4 65.2 30.5 29.0 100.5 36.6 43.7 42.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.6 76.7 61.0 100.4 60.2 26.1 71.0 100.7 29.3.9 53.3 62.0 100.0 100.0 100.3 59.6 59.6 38.0 100.0 57.0 100.9 71.1 52.4 63.6 39.0 100.0 100.3 52.0 100.0 100.6 34.9 65.0 100. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.6 60.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.7 all 100.7 42.2 76.0 100.3 58.6 40.0 100.4 64.9 33.0 100.4 36.7 40.3 67.4: Percentage of overnight and same-day trips* to total: States/UTs percentage of trips state/ut overnight Andhra Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Assam Bihar Chhattisgarh Delhi Goa Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Sikkim Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttarakhand Uttar Pradesh West Bengal A & N Islands Chandigarh Dadra & Nagar Haveli Daman & Diu Lakshadweep Puducherry all-India Ref: Table 49 in Appendix A 35.0 100.8 24.3 72.7 76. 2008-09   .7 32.7 67.0 100.7 60.0 100.8 70.7 69.0 100.6 10.2 36.0 100.4 37.0 100.0 100.3 57.5 59.5 30. there might be trips without a leading purpose in the above sense.8 64.5 33.0 100.6 49.0 100.0 100.2 75.9 36.0 100.1 38.0 100.4 33.8 73.0 66. In such cases the most important purpose among the purposes of the individual participants.5 54.6 30.7 63.5 74.7 sameday 61.0 100.8 23.0 100.6 33.4 61.0 100.4 64.9 68.3 30.4 61.9 61.4 66.3 70. The all-India break-up of overnight and same-day trips by leading purpose is shown in Statement 3.3 39.6 62.1 64.0 100.5 70.0 100. 16 NSS Report No.6 36.7 28.0 100.0 35.8 28.0 100.6 43.6 63.0 100.0 34.7 41.3 34.7 47.3 Leading purpose of trips 3.1 35.5 67.7 66.0 100.0 100.0 100.4 40.9 33.0 *last 365 days 3.5 25.0 100.7 37.7 34.5 40.5 urban sameday 51.9 38.9 42.3 75.0 100.0 64.0 100.0 100.8 37.8 61.6 33.9 25.6 66.7 33.5 32.3 38.4 39.9 26.1 65.4 41.5 40.1 41. for each reported trip.0 100.6 77.0 overnight 48.0 100.0 61.0 100.0 100.1 67.0 100.8 63.0 66.0 100. as perceived by the informant.6 38.1 28.4 50.

3.0 9. In both rural and urban India.2 7. the numbers of trips recorded as made in January.0 urban 7.0 3.0 rural 5. it is often the case that the survey work is not in full swing before the second half of July.3% compared to 3. The social purpose accounted for 75% of overnight trips made by the rural population and 71% of such trips made by the urban population. 8% urban) than overnight trips.4.9 0. and the figures for July in the urban sector.0 Ref: Tables 50 & 54 in Appendix A *last 365 days urban 3.2 100.2 0. 3.9 16. where they had a share of 7.2 By and large. it may not be appropriate to read too much into the month-to-month differences in percentage of trips.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3.7 2.4 6. Under the circumstances. etc. which are not very large except that the figures for June for both sectors. however.6 5.0 rural +urban 2. depend not only on the real intensity of tourism activity during these months but also on the numbers of households surveyed during these months and in the succeeding months (e.g.7 20.9 5.0 1. 17 NSS Report No. 2008-09   .9 recreation social 75.5 0. 3.5 others 3.6. it is seen that 7-10% of trips were made in most                                                              2 It was mentioned that January (2009) trips would be recorded by interviews made in January or February (2009). say.6 100.4 5.3 12.3. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. 11% urban) than overnight trips were.5 2. It may be noted that the estimates are based on information on trips made by sample household members in the 30 days preceding the day the household was interviewed.2 2.3 shopping 0. 5% of the overnight trips of the urban population and only 2% of those of rural population were reported to be for holidaying.4 Month of visit 3.8 40.6 4.9 7.7 1. leisure and recreation.9 health & medical 7.2 2.1 Taking the ‘month of visit’ as the ending month (in case the starting and ending months are different).8 74.4 3.5% in urban India.5: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips *by leading purpose percentage of trips with the purpose among leading purpose overnight trips same-day trips rural business 2.0 6.8 100.3 3.8 education & training 0. leisure and 1. June trips would be recorded by interviews made in July 2008 (June 2008 trips) and by interviews made in June 2009 (June 2009 trips). Same-day trips were made for religious purposes slightly less often (6% rural.0 71. February.0 rural +urban 5. Because of the logistics of launching of surveys.3 Leading purpose: same-day trips: Social visits were the leading purpose of 38% of the same-day trips of rural Indians and nearly 55% of those of urban Indians.4 1. trips made in January may be recorded by interviews taking place in January or in February).0 15.3 holidaying. Religious trips and pilgrimages accounted for 12% of urban and 9% of rural Indians’ overnight trips. Overnight trips for health and medical purposes were more common in rural India. are noticeably low compared to. The case of June is a little different.4 37. Shopping – very rarely the purpose of an overnight trip – was the leading purpose of 23% of same-day trips by the rural population but less than 7% for the urban population. the figures for May or August.3 6.2 100. This would affect the estimates of not only June but also July.3 all 100.6 11.0 religious & pilgrimage 8.8 100. many more same-day trips were made for health and medical reasons (17% rural.9 23. as July trips have to be recorded by interviews in July and August.4 54. Since exactly equal numbers of households were not interviewed in every month of the survey year.8 1. the percentage distribution of trips over months of the year is shown in Statement 3.5 8.2 Leading purpose: overnight trips: By far the most common leading purpose of overnight trips was social – this included visiting friends and relatives and attending marriages.

0 9.6 6.5 12.0 rural+urban 8.8 8.) 100.7 February 8.9 8.9 5.5 3.4 November 8.1 7.1 Statement 3.7 11.1 3.0 @ending month for overnight trip same-day trips urban 8.9 3.5 8.7 9.0 5.8 8. The average duration of trips is seen to have greater variability over months in the urban sector.3 100.5 December 6.6 3.8 9.0 100.7 2.6 3.5 7.0 3.0 9.4 9.9 3.9 3. of nights spent) month@ January February March April May June July August September October November December all Ref: Tables 52 in Appendix A Average duration of overnight trips (no.0 2.6 8.8 9.5 5.8 8.2 3. of nights spent) rural urban rural+ urban 3.1 8.6 4.9 3.5 Trip duration 3.4 9.2 3.5 July 10. 2008-09   .5 8.6 4.00 Ref: Tables 52 & 55 in Appendix A overnight trips urban 8.4 11.3 8.7 5.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 March 7.8 7.9 3.6 2.1 3.4 100.2 nights for urban households.0 3.9 8.3 10.5 8.3 in all other months. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.9 May 11. separately for trips ending in different months.1 @ending month 3.0 August 9. On an average.6: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips by month of visit percentage of trips made in the month month@ rural January 7.5 3.4 18 NSS Report No.7 gives the average duration of overnight trips in number of nights.3 8. Statement 3.1 3.7 September 6.6 3. The low percentage shares of June (and also July for the urban sector) are offset by above-average shares in the months immediately following.7 5.0 7.6 7.4 3.5 14. where it varied from 3.0 7. the duration of a trip was 3.5 10.1 11.1 2.0 9.1 7. The duration of each reported trip was ascertained by the survey in terms of the number of nights spent.2 9.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  months of the year.2 8.5 in February and August to 5.1 7.5 7.5 100.2 October 9.7 7.1 7.8 June 5.5 10.7 to 3.4 2.6 7.2 11.r.1 3.8 4.4 and within 2.9 3.9 All (incl.1 nights for rural households and 4. Statement 3.4 3.8 8.5 10.6 3.2 *last 365 days 3.9 4.2 9.9 8.1 100.1 April 8.7: Average duration of overnight trips* (no.3 2.8 3.2 4.9 7.6 in July.5 3. n. In the rural sector it was highest in June at 3.4 2.00 rural+urban rural 7.5.

6. This would enable the study of the relative frequencies of trips by these three destination types. or outside the district but within the same State.9.8 shows that only 1.7 99. or outside the State.7. Statement 3. This.3% of overnight trips for the urban population and 0. The majority of same-day visitor-trips – nearly 90% in rural and 63% in urban India – kept the visitors within the district of their residence. Among same-day trips.8 non-package 99. a main destination was identified and classified according to whether it was within the district to which the household residence belonged.g.1 100. 3.6. accommodation. One may also study the relative frequencies of visitor-trips by destination type (counting each trip as many times as the number of participating members) and so get an idea of the relative volumes of visitor movements of these three kinds.6 100. A package trip was one (see Chapter Two.3 100. that many non-package trips might have had a package component.3 99.6. (The components of a package tour might be pre-established or tailor-made. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.7 Destination type 3.3 98. A package was a combination of transport and any one or more chargeable travel services – e. however. but only 6% of rural overnight visitor-trips involved travel to a different state from their place of residence. they travelled beyond their district to a place within their state.7 100. with only about 30% that were limited within the boundaries of the visitors’ district.3 Destination type: same-day trips: Travel within one’s state accounted for nearly 99% of rural and about 96% of urban same-day visitor-trips.7% of trips by the urban population and 0. In the majority (66%) of overnight visitor-trips of the rural population.0 3.6 Package and non-package trips 3.0 rural+ urban 0.3% of those by the rural population were of the package type.7 100. About 33% of urban but only 9% of rural same-day visitor-trips involved travel beyond the boundaries of the visitors’ district.3 Statement 3.) The survey revealed only a marginal presence of package trips in domestic travel habits of Indian households. has been done in Statement 3.1 For each trip.1) in which a package was availed of for the major part of the duration of the trip.0 same-day trips urban 0.7.                                                              3 It should be noted. while in 28%. 19 NSS Report No.8: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day trips by type of trip percentage of trips of the type among type of trip rural package 0.2 Destination type: overnight trips: About 21% of urban. the visitors remained within their district. it was journeys beyond one’s district (within the state) that were more common (49%). sightseeing – and sold by tour operators through travel agencies or directly to final consumers as a single product for a single price.9 99.5.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  3.1 Among the characteristics of trips identified was whether or not it was a package trip..7. in fact. 3.4 99.2 all 100. paragraph 2.8% for the rural were package trips. entertainment.0 rural+ urban 0. meals/food. Among overnight visitor-trips of the urban population.0 Ref: Tables 50 & 54 in Appendix A overnight trips urban 1. remaining within their state.0 rural 0. only 0. 2008-09   .

while trips within one’s district rarely saw more than one place visited. of places visited per 100 overnight trips* by main destination type average no. of overnight visitor-trips rural within district 65. The estimates show negligible variation over sectors. The estimated average number of places (towns or villages) visited per overnight trip was studied by sector of location of the visitor household and main destination type.5 100. and separately for overnight trips with different leading purposes.6 49.8 1.0 rural+ urban 54. The number of household members participating in a trip reported by a household could vary from 1 to the size of the household. 20 NSS Report No. For every 100 trips to outside-district but within-state destinations.0 per trip).8. of sameday visitor-trips rural urban rural+ urban 85.0 Ref: Tables 41 & 46 in Appendix A urban 29.9.2 per trip) and every 100 same-day trips had 183 members (1. about 118 places were visited (about 6 places visited for every 5 trips). This indicator is more relevant for overnight trips. separately for same-day and overnight trips.0 percentage to total no.5 62. it is relevant to examine the average trip size in terms of the average number of household members per trip. every 100 overnight trips had 232 participants (2.1 Another parameter of interest in the activity of domestic tourism is the number of places visited per trip.3 12. in studying the characteristics of trips.3 20.10.9 100.9 34.8 Number of places visited per overnight trip 3. about 150 places were visited.0 all 100.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3.9: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips* by main destination type destination type percentage to total no. the results are shown in Statement 3. In rural areas.11 gives an idea of the average trip size by presenting the average number of visitors per 100 trips.10: Average no.1 32.8 per trip).9 1.2 outside state 6. it is also worthwhile to look into the question of how many persons travelled together on a trip.0 *last 365 days 89.5 10.6 100.9 Trip size and leading purpose 3. every 100 overnight trips had 223 participating members (2. Hence.4 100. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. In urban areas.8 9.0 100. 2008-09   . It is seen that for every 100 trips made to a main destination outside the visitor household’s state.7 outside district but within state 28. Statement 3.0 3.3 per trip) and every 100 same-day trips had 200 participants (2.1 4. In other words. of places visited per 100 overnight trip rural 104 119 150 urban 105 118 152 *last 365 days rural+ urban 104 119 151 destination type within district outside district but within state outside state Ref: Table 53 in Appendix A 3. Statement 3.1 A trip would comprise one or a group of members of a household.

too.) same-day all Note: Figures derived from Tables 56 & 58 in Appendix A 3. about 230 members (2.3 per trip) travelled in every 100 social or religious trips of rural households and every 100 social trips of urban households. in both sectors. occupation.75 per trip) travelled in every 100 religious trips of urban households.10. SECTION B: PARTICIPATION OF VARIOUS POPULATION GROUPS 3. 21 NSS Report No. average size of the group travelling on an overnight trip varied noticeably with the leading purpose of the trip. Business trips and trips for education and training had the smallest number of members travelling together (about 130 per 100 trips for both rural and urban areas) and shopping trips.12 also brings out male-female differences in number of trips per person. This personwise information enables the study of participation in domestic tourism activity by different population categories. The average number of overnight trips made by a person (Statement 3.30) and also in urban India (2. Various characteristics of each household member such as age. For overnight trips the average for females.11.63).9.10.1 A distinction evident in the incidence of trips undertaken in a year by persons in rural and urban areas is that the incidence was appreciably higher for rural persons in case of sameday trips but of the same order for both sectors in case of overnight trips.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3. The average number of same-day trips was considerably higher.2 As expected. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. were also recorded as part of the survey.r. with rural females making 266 same-day trips per 100 persons while rural males made 389 (46% more). was below the average for males by about 30 per 100 persons.1 Statement 3. Male-female differences were wider for same-day trips.10 for rural Indians and 2.0 As stated earlier. On the other hand.12) was estimated as 2. etc.07 for urban Indians.11: Average number of visitors per 100 trips* trip category leading purpose rural 129 208 230 228 130 215 141 184 223 183 urban 126 216 236 275 134 206 135 158 232 200 rural+ urban 128 213 232 245 132 213 140 177 225 *last 365 days business holidaying.10 Overall incidence per person 3. 3. Urban females made 226 same-day trips per 100 persons while urban males made 297 (31% more). the trips recorded for a sample household were movements in which members of the household had participated. and as many as 275 members (2. 3. leisure and recreation social religious & pilgrimage education & training overnight health & medical shopping other all (including n. especially in rural India (3. 2008-09   .11 The gender effect 3. had only 135-140 members per 100 trips.

However. 35. among every 1000 overnight urban visitors.30 per person.0 100.2 Gender profile of visitors: As an overnight/ same-day visitor is understood as a person who made at least one overnight/ same-day trip during the reference period of ‘last 365 days’. 22 NSS Report No. This was true for rural as well as urban India. persons of age 60 years and above had a lower average per year than the all-ages average both in rural and urban sectors.0 100.0 100.1 female 47. In urban areas.14 shows the variation with age in average number of trips made by a person. Thus. presumably because they could not be left alone by their parents. 40 & 45 in Appendix A 3. One matter of interest here would be the gender profile of visitors. the average number of trips per person is seen to rise gradually up to a certain age-group and then decline. and the proportion of males was slightly lower among rural overnight visitors.18 age-groups are considered. In rural India the average number of trips. was highest in the age-group 30-34.12: Average number of same-day and overnight trips* per 100 persons of each sex: all-India Average number of trips per 100 persons Kind of trip Rural all 210 330 male 220 297 Urban female all 192 207 226 263 *last 365 days male female Overnight 225 194 Same-day 389 266 Ref: Tables 30.11.12.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3. In all. Younger children made more trips than older ones. in case of same-day trips of the rural population.5 44.13: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitors by gender of visitor Overnight visitors Same-day visitors Gender Rural Urban Rural Urban male 52.5 46.9 Total 100. shown by their male-female break-up. even elderly persons in the age group 65-69 made more trips per year than the rural all-ages average of 3. The average number of both overnight and same-day trips made by children was higher than the average number of trips made by the aged. 537 were males and 463.3 45. the decline being steeper for overnight trips. thus the average number of trips falls instead of rising as one moves up the age range from 0-4 to 10-14. Statement 3. For both overnight and same-day trips.63 same-day trips per year. the age-group 60-64 was the oldest group to surpass the all-ages average of 2. in urban India it was highest in the age-group 40-44. both overnight and same-day. but higher for same-day visitors – both rural and urban – among whom the male-female ratio was about 55 to 45 in the urban sector and slightly lower in the rural sector.1 Statement 3. This is given in Statement 3. all of width 5 years except the last. 2008-09   .7 54. An interesting phenomenon regarding trips made by the elderly was revealed in this study. the population of overnight or same-day visitors can be identified and various characteristics studied.12 The effect of age 3.5 55. In case of overnight trips.0 Ref: Tables 30 and 35 in Appendix A 3.5 53.13. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.

94 1.91 3.55 2.37 2.56 40-44 2.14: Average no.03 2.05 2. implying that the persons with no occupation made fewer trips on the average than the working or gainfully employed population.27 2.50 2. as well as children of the 5-14 age-group.25 3.41 2.67 1.94 1.40 3.09 2.81 1.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism    Statement 3. of trips age-group rural 0-4 1.52 2.85 1.15 shows variation with occupation in the average number of overnight and same-day trips in a one-year period.67 2.45 1. was higher than the average (“all” row) for the population of the sector (rural/urban) as a whole. made fewer trips on the average than the rest of the population (see previous paragraph).54 3.16 0.13.16 4. Among the gainfully employed.25 2. No estimate of average number of trips was generated for this heterogeneous category.66 35-39 2.65 2.13 Variation with occupation 3.63 rural+ urban 1.03 2.70 3. of trips per person* for different age-groups average no. prostitutes and other persons not gainfully employed.43 1.22 2.10 all Ref: Tables 30 & 35 in Appendix A overnight urban 1.21 3.45 75-79 1.52 3.54 4.28 4.31 2. This is not surprising in view of the fact that the aged.28 2.84 2.55 45-49 2.06 1.09 rural+ urban 2.78 1.89 1.89 2.45 2. and so did clerks.53 3.16 above 84 0.4 It is seen that for all the categories listed.33 1.27 80-84 1.64 15-19 1.12 *in last 365 days 3.66 3.89 2. remittance receivers.96 65-69 1.46 2.21) in urban India.03 2.22 3.90 1.01 2.31 3.14 2.83 10-14 1.                                                              4 The “all” row of Statement 3.13 1.85 1.16 3.66 4.19 0.56 2.45 1.1 Statement 3.44 1. housewives.78 2. including the residual category “persons with blank occupation (NCO) code”.12 60-64 1.83 2.22 4. The “all” estimate also takes into account those sample persons for whom the occupation code was not recorded.35 3.66 2.15 covers not only these nine categories but the entire population.48 2. whether overnight or same-day.99 5-9 1. This includes persons too young or too old to work.16 2.52 30-34 2.30 same-day urban 1.38 2. the average number of trips.39 3.78 1.93 2.07 rural 2.76 70-74 1.28 55-59 2.98 1.91 1. beggars.75 2.57 4.23 3. with nine occupational categories of households considered.22 25-29 2. students.33 4.50 4.34 2. rentiers.16 2.98 3.26 0. but did not enjoy this distinction in case of overnight trips or the rural sector. the professionals and associate professionals made trips more frequently than the rest.89 1. who would form a sizeable proportion of those without any occupation.74 20-24 2.05 1.02 2. pensioners.81 4. 2008-09   .80 2. 23 NSS Report No.13 1.75 4.96 1.21 3. Skilled agricultural and fishery workers had the highest average number of same-day trips (4.90 3.43 50-54 2. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.

01 2.43 4.49 3. As in case of occupation.66 5.27 2.02 6.69 associate professionals 3.56 2.21 3.28 10.45 2.67 elementary occupations 2. hunting and forestry fishing mining and quarrying manufacturing electricity.04 plant and machine operators and assemblers 2.07 *in last 365 days                                                              5 The all-India sample included only 16 persons who were reported to be employed by extra-territorial organizations.29 professionals 3.79 3.07 2. repair of motor vehicles.86 3.15 2.55 2.76 clerks 2.00 6.05 4.59 2.10 2.59 2. social and personal service activities activities of private households as employers and undifferentiated production activities of private households extraterritorial organizations and bodies all Ref: Tables 34 & 39 in Appendix A rural 2.1 Statement 3. gas and water supply construction wholesale and retail trade.68 0. “financial intermediation”.81 2.12 *in last 365 days 3.12 2.88 6.41 4.67 2.97 3.59 2.40 4. “all” includes those with blank industry code. those employed in “electricity.58 4.16 shows variation with industry of employment (NIC industry group) in average number of overnight and same-day trips during a one-year period.51 5.64 5.10 2.33 2.12 4. Variation over industry groups in number of trips per person was relatively low for overnight trips and a little more prominent in case of same-day trips.09 5. which applies to all those not gainfully employed.90 3.74 2. of trips per person* for different occupation groups average no.71 4.49 3.27 2. persons not gainfully employed in any industry made fewer trips on an average than the gainfully employed population.15: Average no.36 6. motorcycles and personal and household goods hotels and restaurants transport.20 3.88 2.27 4.82 service workers and shop & market sales workers 2.87 2. that.52 2.52 4.53 1.10 3.76 2.87 4.14 Variation with industry 3.36 3.87 5. Again it is clear.71 4.28 4.55 2.57 2. of overnight trips urban rural+ urban rural 2.99 2.73 2.58 2.00 5.54 3.60 5.27 6. of trips per person * for different industry groups industry agriculture.73 3.36 4. and 6 or more same-day trips in a year. compulsory social security education health and social work other community. 24 NSS Report No.56 2.50 2.57 craft and related trades workers 2.31 7.66 average no.29 3.15 0.12 1. from a comparison of the “all” row figures with the rows for specific industries.68 0.49 3.30 Ref: Tables 33 & 38 in Appendix A same-day trips urban rural+urban 3. “health and social work”.43 3.09 3.31 4. and “real estate.13 4.10 2.30 same-day trips urban rural+ urban 3.64 2.38 2.34 2.16 5.48 4.16 0.39 2.65 4. of overnight trips occupation rural urban rural+urban rural legislators.61 3.58 2. especially in the rural sector.79 1.57 4. renting and business activities public administration and defence.50 3.44 2.10 2.34 2.76 5. Statement 3. renting and business activities” had higher averages than other industry groups – 3 or more overnight trips in a year.85 6. 2008-09   .60 2.63 4.77 4.51 2.21 3.86 2.04 2.35 2.73 2.25 3.13 2.49 3.38 5.65 3.50 4. “education”.63 4.65 2.23 4.24 5.56 4.42 5.10 1.64 5.92 3.49 2.16: Average no.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism    Statement 3.40 5.73 3.76 4.31 4.58 2.55 2.50 2.04 5.07 2. there were no striking inter-industry differences in case of overnight trips.68 1.75 2. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.44 2.87 2.40 3.24 skilled agricultural and fishery workers 2. In rural India.69 2.69 2.14.26 2.59 5.63 2.73 4.36 3.93 2.47 4.39 2.37 2.46 4. senior officials and managers 2. Among the gainfully employed.09 2.47 all 2.69 2.62 5. with the exception of persons employed by private households5.32 3. storage and communications financial intermediation real estate. gas and water supply”.16 2.

may vary from one participant to another – and therefore were recorded separately by the survey for each trip for each participant.5 100. This finding is not surprising in view of the results presented above on number of trips by different age-groups and the fact that the “not in labour force” category would include large numbers of the aged and children too young to work.0 1.15.2 63.8 58.17 shows this break-up for both overnight and same-day trips.17: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitors by broad activity status rural broad activity status percentage of visitors overnight employed unemployed out of labour force 42.0 percentage of population 38.3. into the categories “employed”.0 percentage of population 37.1 Visitor purpose: overnight trips: The estimated break-up of trips by leading purpose – the purpose in the absence of which the trip would not have been undertaken – has already been discussed in Section 3. or. separately for overnight and same                                                             6 Sometimes words such as “percentage of visitors” have been used in this section for simplicity.18 shows the all-India percentage break-up of rural/urban visitors-trips6 by visitor purpose. major place of stay.7 100.4 100. in other words.6 100.7 57. which is fixed for a particular trip).2 1. that strictly speaking. 2008-09   .9 55. should be counted in terms of number of visitor-trips.5 0. Statement 3.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  3. the shares of these three categories in the entire population. and even purpose of the visitor (as distinct from leading purpose.4 60.5 0. lower than its share in the number of overnight and same-day visitors.0 100. and.7 100.16 Visitor purpose 3.3 0. These include (major) mode of travel.8 100. The reason prompting some of the participants to make the trip may.0 all 100. and the share of the same category in the number of same-day visitors is about 7 percentage points lower than its share in the entire population. the employed. modes of travel. however.16. 25 NSS Report No.7 60. and “out of labour force”.15 Distribution of visitors by broad activity status 3.1 0. it is “visitor-trips” that are being counted here. in overall population is. is discussed. differ from the leading purpose..4 65. correspondingly. rather than in terms of number of trips or visitors.0 urban percentage of visitors overnight 35.8 53.2 same-day 45. It is seen that the percentage share of the “out of labour force” category in the number of overnight visitors for rural and urban India is about 2 to 3 percentage points lower than the share of this category in the entire population. etc. Certain features of trips.4 1.1 A related point of interest is the percentage break-up of visitors by broad activity status: that is. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. it should be remembered. 3. The share of the other major group.16. Statement 3. This is done in this section.0 sameday 38.0 percentage of population 33.5 0.0 rural+ urban percentage of visitors overnight 40. Statement 3.4 100. or reported mode of travel. “unemployed”.0 Ref: Tables 31& 36 in Appendix A SECTION C: VISITOR-TRIP CHARACTERISTICS 3. It follows that the relative frequencies of reporting of each category of reported purpose. These characteristics are termed visitor-trip characteristics as they may vary with each visitor-trip combination. however. where the relative prevalence of different purposes.9 62. however.0 The classification of trips by characteristics of trips such as leading purpose of trip and month of visit was studied in Section A of this chapter. that a visitor is counted as many times as the number of trips he or she made. differ not only from trip to trip but.0 sameday 43.1 0. side by side. for the same trip.

  26 NSS Report No. and 57-61% of same-day trips by the rural and urban populations.8 4.1 8. Statement 3. health and medical purposes for 7% of rural and 3% of urban visitors.7 7. the percentage of trips with leading purpose business is smaller than the percentage of visitortrips where the visitor’s purpose is business. 2008-09   . 3. Religious purposes.7 19.3 1.4 0.4 0.6 100.16.5 2.7 77.8 3.19 gives the percentage distribution of visitor-trips by mode of travel separately for overnight and sameday trips made by rural and urban Indians.9. visitor-trips.3 Leading purpose and visitor purpose: Comparison of Statement 3. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.8 100. By far the commonest purpose reported by persons who made overnight trips was social.7 2.2 2. but the converse would be relatively rare. Trains were used for 27% of overnight trips by urban Indians.1 0.2) than the average number of persons travelling together on a social trip. The same two purposes together accounted for about 14% of the visitor-trips for the urban population.00 urban 4.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  day trips.0 0.7 72.2 18. of same-day visitor-trips rural 3.6 14.18 with Statement 3.17. 3.00 rural+urban 3.8 14. 3.0 4.3 9.16.18: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by purpose of visit purpose percentage to total no.0 100. it needs to be clarified that it is the major mode reported for each visitor – in other words.0 100. This is not surprising as (a) the average number of persons travelling together on a business trip is smaller (see paragraph 3.6 39. leisure and recreation for about 2% of rural and 5% of urban visitors. For both overnight and same-day trips.3 9.00 3.00 percentage to total no.8 0.8 0.17.7 0.6 55.0 10.00 rural+urban 1. the mode by which the visitor covered the longest distance – that is being referred to here. This purpose alone prompted 77% of rural and 73% of urban overnight visitors to make their trips. and holidaying. For the rural population this was explained by the much larger shares of health and medical and shopping (about 19% each).5 100.6 76.18 shows that for same-day visitors. including pilgrimages. accounting for two-thirds (67%) of overnight trips7 by the rural population.00 urban 1. the word “trips” is used here for simplicity. and (b) a business trip may occasionally include one or more household members whose purpose of travel is health or shopping.5 does not reveal any striking differences in the break-up of trips by leading purpose from the break-up of visitor-trips by visitor purpose. but that the share of the social purpose was smaller. 57% of trips by the urban population.5 16.1 2.1 42. leisure and recreation social religious & pilgrimage education & training health & medical shopping others all Ref: Tables 40& 45 in Appendix A 1. the predominant purpose of trips was again social.2 Visitor purpose: same-day trips: Statement 3.8 1.5 5. Statement 3.2 Buses were the dominant mode of travel for overnight and same-day trips alike.17 Mode of travel 3.8 8.5 7.3 2.0 0.0 100.4 6.6 5. accounted for 9% of rural and about 15% of urban visitors. for rural Indians their share in                                                              7 Strictly. especially for the rural population (about 40%) and also for the urban (about 56%).8 17.1 As a typical trip involves more than one mode of transport.8 3.7 6. of overnight visitortrips rural business holidaying.

The motorized two-wheeler (owned) accounted for 7% of same-day trips in rural areas and nearly 9% in urban areas. frequently.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  overnight trips was 7%.7 60.5 100.1 0.0 percentage to total no.4 7.8 8.6 100. Hotels were the major type of stay for an estimated 1.8 57.4 0.0 rural+urban 5. of course. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.18 Major type of stay 3.0 0.1 0.0 20. motorized two-wheelers and motor cars (including jeeps) – together accounted for 19% of same-day trips in both rural and urban India.1 0..3 13.1 0. this refers to the type of accommodation : hotel. with the share of the bicycle and the motor car.3 0.8 0. About 9% of same-day trips in rural India were made on bicycles. etc.1 0. For same-day trips. estimates are given separately for different forms of owned transport but not for different forms of rented transport.0 3. religious) purposes as well.7 0.3 Rented transport8 had a larger share in rural areas than in urban: 10% for overnight trips (5% in urban areas) and over 12% for same-day trips (8.7 0. This is.9 12. an overwhelmingly large number of visitors (strictly.5 0.4 0. stayed with friends and relatives.17. guest house. It would appear from the estimates that friends and relatives provided accommodation not only when trips were for such purposes but.5% in urban areas).6 100. Statement 3. of overnight visitortrips rural on foot bus train ship/boat air own transport transport-equipment rental others all Ref: Tables 43& 47 in Appendix A 2. the estimates (Statement 3.18.8 0. for other (for example.0 8.0 20.5 100.6 0.2 0.0 11.1 For a visitor on a trip.5 1. For overnight trips.16).0 rural+urban 2.6 100. 27 NSS Report No.3 9.19: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by mode of transport mode of transport percentage to total no.0 urban 0.0 64.9 11. In Tables 43 and 47 in Appendix A. Urban people used their own motorcars or jeeps for about 5% of overnight trips and about 9% of same-day trips. of course. 3. of same-day visitortrips rural 6.                                                              8 Note that owned transport and transport rented for private use were classified separately in the schedule of enquiry.3 57.3% of rural and less than 5% of urban overnight visitors.7 67.4 100. and dharamshalas for about 3% of rural and 4% of urban overnight visitors.8 8.9 58.0 urban 0. not surprising in view of the fact that 77% of trips of urban visitors and 73% of trips of rural visitors were for a social purpose (Section 3. differing substantially between the sectors.1 11.0 2.4 0.0 0.9 while most of those who did. visitor-trips) – 85% in rural areas and 80% in urban areas – reported that their major type of stay was with friends and relatives. Three types of owned transport – bicycles.0 20.  9 Same-day trips are those that started and ended on the same day (0000 hours to 2359 hours).5 10. where the visitor spent the greatest number of nights for overnight trips or maximum time for same-day trips. Trains were also used in 9% of same-day trips by urban Indians but their share was only 2% for rural Indians. 2008-09   .0 27.20) are not of great interest as the majority – 82% in rural areas and 74% in urban – did not stay anywhere on the trip.7 5.

0 80. giving rise to estimates of occurrence during a one-year period. 3.2 74.0 100.1 dharamshala 3.21 shows all-India levels of TP(S) and TP(O) for rural and urban areas separately and for the two sectors combined.2 rented house 0. of same-day mode of stay visitor-trips visitor-trips rural urban rural+urban rural urban rural+urban hotel 1. an alternative way would be to measure the proportion of persons or households participating (at least once) in trips during a period such as one year.6 1.6 Ref: Table 1 & 2 in Appendix A 28 NSS Report No.0 Ref: Tables 44 & 48 in Appendix A SECTION D: OCCURRENCE OF DOMESTIC TOURISM ACTIVITY IN A ONEYEAR PERIOD 3.0 100.2 It may be observed that the choice of the period during which occurrence of tourism activity is to be observed in households or persons will affect the quality of the measure that is being proposed here.1 0.2 15.9 83. Statement 3.2 0.0 100.0 100.1 0. one measure of the intensity of tourism activity is provided by the percentage of persons who made at least one trip (overnight/ same-day) during the last one year (or percentage of visitors). too long a period is chosen.2 Statement 3.0 100.3 8.1 0.2 0. a period of ‘last 365 days’ was used to observe the occurrence of tourism activity. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. It reveals that at the all-India level.6 2.4 3. If.1 0. on the other hand.3 74.4 0.3 4.20.1 0.4 Same-day 75.5 0. of overnight percentage to total no.3 0.19 Measures of occurrence 3.8 22. In this survey.0 0. 3.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3.3 4.6 all 100.4 0.1 Instead of measuring the level of tourism activity in terms of number of trips per household or per person.6 0.3 77. This percentage is occasionally referred to as TP(O) for overnight trips and TP(S) for same-day trips.4 0.6% in rural areas but appreciably less – about 70% – in urban areas.19. near-100% occurrence rates (nearly all households or persons reporting at least one trip) will be observed for every category of households and persons. Further.6 14.4 70. the percentage of persons reporting at least one same-day trip during the last one year was 75.8 9.8 2.3 0.3 0.8 0.0 friends & relatives 85. which means the measure will be insensitive. Too short a period will render the measure vulnerable to sampling fluctuations.0 0.20: Percentage distribution of overnight and same-day visitor-trips by major place of stay percentage to total no.7 2. We may call this a measure of the occurrence of tourism activity among households or persons.1 private guest house 0.1 0.2 govt guest house 0. failing to discriminate between states or between socio-economic categories in respect of level of tourism activity. 2008-09   .9 others including carriages/coaches 8. The overall percentage – rural and urban considered together – was 74%. the percentage of persons reporting at least one overnight trip in the last one year was around 77% and roughly the same for rural and urban areas.21: Percentage of persons undertaking overnight and same-day trips*: allIndia Kind of trip Percentage of persons reporting trips urban rural + urban 77. 3.2 *last 365 days rural Overnight 77.1 As explained above.19.1 79.20 Occurrence among persons 3.20.3 0.9 did not stay at all 82.9 2.

29 39.21 54.33 75.73 82.33 69.61 71.65 80.55 39.07 82.71 72.27 2.54 76.39 89.70 75.99 89.05 61.81 84.29 70.84 69. 2 UTs and Bihar (54%).46 81.67 82.40 90.97 82.04 30.30 72.75 77.11 69.37 89. also 29 NSS Report No.92 80.54 26.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3.72 77.66 62. and two UTs (see column 3 of the statement).29 80.11 86.02 77.66 64.86 79.00 84.20 85.77 55.77 78.11 56.04 78.89 83.38 rural 88.53 70.31 Same-day rural + urban 86.28 49.68 80.73 46.24 73.30 79.94 81.20 88.72 88.20 73.79 82.30 rural + urban 82.52 22.95 45.81 82.57 81.91 67.68 82.65 75.26 77.74 72.36 82.21 3.84 79.65 59.02 60.  The percentage of rural population reporting at least one same-day trip.41 77.28 45.44 54.43 87.30 82.37 75.39 23.56 68.93 38.12 91.52 86.44 70.17 20.50 63.38 57.97 76. and between 64% and 92% for all States and UTs except for 4 of the North-Eastern States.42 81.99 65.3 The propensity to engage in the activity of domestic tourism has considerable interState variation.49 77.22 75.25 69.99 75.45 84.44 45.79 87.33 84.33 66.84 82.20.  The absolute difference between rural and urban percentages of persons reporting at least one overnight trip was within 9 percentage points in all the major States.53 48.83 59.78 36.02 83.22 78.50 83.13 68.60 42.40 67.64 *last 365 days urban 68.56 74.78 78. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.28 79.73 80.37 28.55 51.78 38.  The percentage of population reporting at least one same-day trip varied between 64% and 83% for 22 States and UTs.6.21 16.95 65.06 77.27 80.30 78.71 76.82 65.85 84.20 81.81 56.08 52.83 77.75 71.55 20.64 18.86 72.06 76.44 89.18 71.67 80.07 84.68 59.22: Percentage of persons undertaking overnight and same-day trips*: states/UTs Percentage of persons reporting trips State/UT Andhra Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Assam Bihar Chhattisgarh Delhi Goa Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Sikkim Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttarakhand Uttar Pradesh West Bengal A & N Islands Chandigarh Dadra & Nagar Haveli Daman & Diu Lakshadweep Puducherry all-India Ref: Tables 1 & 2 in Appendix A rural 87.22 67.61 87.41 41.42 90.00 88.27 72.62 77.29 77.99 63.34 87.84 80.71 77.04 50.88 79.57 82.95 88.05 89.95 82. the exceptions being Assam and Kerala.70 78.93 92. the TP(O) was between 70% and 85%.47 74.35 41.09 68.89 85.80 76.13 81.73 65. five of the North-Eastern States (20-45%).68 69.03 21.65 83.26 58.87 84.97 70.89 84.23 75.25 71.47 80.69 92. The main features are stated below.44 68.19 44.92 45.79 89.68 84.57 43.83 79.45 45.75 58.22 for both rural and urban sectors as well as for the entire area of each State. 2008-09   .61 91.00 81.28 62.47 65. which exceeded the urban percentage at all-India level by 5 (rural TP(S)=75.47 50. This inter-State variation in TP(S) and TP(O) is shown in Statement 3.40 66.83 77.3).64 79.  The absolute difference between same-day and overnight figures TP(S) and TP(O) (rural and urban sectors combined) was within 12 percentage points in nearly all major States.41 Overnight urban 84.88 42.22 85.53 79.47 67.03 64.49 79.48 60.23 83. For 20 States and UTs. where TP(S) exceeded TP(O) by about 21 and 13 respectively.12 24.12 20. urban TP(S)=70.  The percentage of population taking part in at least one overnight trip during the past one year varied from 60% to 90% for all States and UTs except Assam (50%).21 78.14 76.68 87.69 68.82 65.19 40.27 67.31 38.26 79.85 82.29 83.

12.7%).9% for same-day trips (TH(S)=92.1 Like percentage of persons reporting trips.7 *last 365 days rural+urban 91.2 Statement 3. 91.9) and only slightly less.9 85. only one or two household members went on trips.24.8 92. This percentage is occasionally referred to as TH(O) for overnight trips and TH(S) for same-day trips. but the reverse was true for rural areas.5 in Punjab. of which 4 were North-Eastern States and 2 were UTs.0 urban 89. suggesting that poor communication facilities remained a significant barrier to domestic tourism. in most households.9 3. the percentage of households reporting at least one trip in the last one year was 92. The main features are stated below.8). and 21 in Maharashtra. and Nagaland (57 or less). 20 in Andhra Pradesh.7% of India’s population in 2001. Compared with the figures of percentages of households reporting trips.18) are lower. Statement 3. 30 NSS Report No. In urban areas.                                                              Major States are the 17 States of India that had a population of 20 million or more according to the 2001 Census. 19 in Rajasthan.  In the North-Eastern region.  Apart from Assam (81%). where TH(S) exceeded TH(O) by about 11 and 6 respectively. all had TH(S)>90.21. where same-day trips were reported by a larger number of households (as many as 96%) than overnight trips (92.6 96.3 The values for TH(S) and TH(O) for both rural and urban sectors as well as for the entire area of each State is shown in Statement 3.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  exceeded the urban percentage by 10 in West Bengal.9%) was larger than the percentage reporting same-day trips (85. 3. all the TP(S) and TP(O) values – rural and urban – were low. the percentage of households where at least one member made a trip (overnight/ same-day) during the last one year provides a measure of the intensity of tourism activity. the percentage of households reporting overnight trips (89. the estimates of percentages of persons making trips (Statement 3. Both overnight and same-day trips were reported by a larger proportion of rural households than urban households.21. for overnight trips (TH(O)=91.  The absolute difference between TH(S) and TH(O) (rural and urban sectors combined) was less than 5 in all the major States except Assam and Tamil Nadu.8%. especially in Mizoram (26 or less). 536: Domestic Tourism in India. all major States10 had 90% or more households reporting at least one overnight trip (TH(O)≥90) during a one-year period (see column 3 of the statement). Punjab and Bihar. with the exception of Sikkim and Tripura.21 Occurrence among households 3.6%). It is seen from the statement that at all-India level.  All major States had at least 84% households reporting at least one same-day trip in a one-year period. There were only 6 States/UTs with TH(O)<80. 2008-09 10   .23: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* : all-India Percentage of households reporting trips Kind of trip Overnight Same-day Ref: Tables 2 & 4 in Appendix A rural 92. but not as low as they would have been if.21. Kerala (83%) and Bihar (85%). Together these States accounted for 94. 3. and except for Maharashtra.23 shows all-India levels of TH(S) and TH(O) for rural and urban areas separately and for the two sectors combined. Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh (below 46).

3 89.5 96.6 87. which exceeded the urban percentage at all-India level by 10 (rural TH(S)=96.9 96.9 75.7 90.2 85.9 90.4 97.2 78.1 83.9 Tamil Nadu 90.9 Jharkhand 92.0 91.9 Punjab 90.4 91.6 all-India Ref: Tables 2 & 3 in Appendix A Overnight urban 93.3 89. 15-17 in Rajasthan.8 98.2 96.7 85.8 94.6 92.8 96.2 94.8 62.8 92.6 89. and 11-12 in Gujarat and West Bengal.1 94.6 Uttar Pradesh 96.8 Bihar 84.6 97.7).4 Haryana 95.2 100.8 rural 98.0 62.6 92.9 31 NSS Report No.5 96.7 Dadra & Nagar Haveli 64.2 96.0 Goa 89.2 Gujarat 93.8 86.0 97.1 100.8 93.9 96.1 96.0 89.2 83.2 94.8 84.7 Meghalaya 77.5 97.9 94.3 100.8 88.7 Himachal Pradesh 99.3 Maharashtra 94.8 95.1 84.0 90.5 83.2 93.5 90.2 95.6 98.4 94.4 71.8 94.0 94.9 rural+urban 94.6 97.6 90.8 70.1 59.9 90.  The percentage of rural households reporting at least one same-day trip.5 86.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism   The absolute difference between rural and urban percentages of households reporting at least one overnight trip did not exceed 6 in any major State except West Bengal and Maharashtra.5 95.2 80.6 Karnataka 88.2 61.4 97.5 83.8 91.9 Chandigarh 99.7 90.1 Nagaland 82.0 71. Andhra Pradesh and Punjab.7 94. where the rural-urban difference was 12 and 9 respectively. Statement 3.9 86.3 98.6 93.4 86.5 94.3 92.9 86.6 95.3 A & N Islands 86.0.7 71.7 78.3 96.0 96.6 98.0 87.5 92.1 Mizoram 65.5 Delhi 85.7 94.9 98.0 90.9 87.1 68.4 93.8 84.1 57.6 Tripura 94.8 90.7 Daman & Diu 45.6 78. 2008-09   .2 70.5 84.3 89.9 88.5 96.8 Jammu & Kashmir 93.4 90.1 91.8 92.0 55.3 55.2 92.3 West Bengal 93.0 93.3 87.5 93.3 Assam 79.1 94.7 89.2 93.0 89.2 84.2 92.6 93.8 97.7 86.5 Rajasthan 98.2 88.1 81.7 98.1 60.5 Chhattisgarh 92.3 90.0 Same-day urban 82.2 Orissa 95.0 71.3 96.6 9.4 Sikkim 93.5 88. also exceeded the urban percentage by 23 in Maharashtra.0 Puducherry 90.5 93.2 95.9 97.1 92.1 59.4 99.6 54.24: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips*: States/UTs Percentage of households reporting trips State/UT rural Andhra Pradesh 94.2 90.3 59.2 93.1 93.9 46.7 92. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.7 *last 365 days rural+urban 93.1 98.7 Lakshadweep 100.7 92.4 75.6 Arunachal Pradesh 70.5 79.6 89.5 80.1 Uttarakhand 94.9 93.5 94.2 91.2 68.1 93.6 82.9 94.3 93.4 91.8 99.4 Madhya Pradesh 97.8 91.7 98.4 95.7 93.9 80. urban TH(S)=85.9 83.0 94.5 94.3 85.0 91.5 97.0 99.1 94.8 91.6 Kerala 84.5 Manipur 60.8 94.3 59.9 97.1 86.

6 associate professionals 97.24 Household type 3.3 92. Statement 3.3 91.9 77.6 96.0 82.3 90. deviations of more than 3 percentage points from the all-occupations average were rare.1 Statement 3. Statement 3.9 89.0 93.6 96.7 87. For rural India.8 86.4 96.6 96.3 90.2 95.8 85.6 80.24.0 80.6 92. 2008-09   . for overnight as well as same-day trips.3 77.7 80. In case of same-day trips. 97.9 professionals 92.2 all 92.9 91.8 96.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  3.9 87.0 96.22. 85 for SC.9 93.27 shows variation over household (occupational) types in the all-India rural and urban percentages of households reporting overnight and same-day trips during a one-year period.0 89.6 96.0 90.8 89.2 plant and machine operators and assemblers 95.0 91. It is seen that the only notable variation is in the TH(S) values for urban India. though the variation between groups is much less.8 91.6 89.0 91. in case of both overnight and same-day trips.9 85.7 skilled agricultural and fishery workers 94.3 89.1 Statement 3.3 93.26 shows variation over social groups in the all-India rural and urban percentages of households reporting overnight and same-day trips during a one-year period.8 88.5 87.7 clerks 92.0 85.6 Others 92.26: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by social group Percentage of households reporting overnight trips same-day trips Social group rural urban rural + urban rural urban rural + urban ST 90.0 88.3 90.3 SC 92.23 Household social group 3.9 99. For overnight trips.9 85.0 91.4 96.0 82.0 89.6 82.9 Ref: Table 5 in Appendix A *last 365 days 3.0 91.0 91.0 90.9 88. senior officials and managers 92.7 Ref: Table 3 in Appendix A *last 365 days Both 83.6% for all rural households).8 81. the variation among household types is still less pronounced.5 all 92.1 Statement 3.0 95. There are no striking variations in the percentages.23. the highest figure for urban India is reported by the OBC group.0 88.2 93.7 92. and also for same-day trips in rural India.8 90.8 elementary occupations 91.6 OBC 92. too.7 83.25: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by household occupation Percentage of households reporting trips occupation Rural Urban Overnight Same-day Both Overnight Same-day legislators.25 shows the variation in the all-India rural and urban percentages of households reporting overnight and same-day trips over nine occupational categories of households. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.8 3.4% such households reported at least one overnight trip in the last one year compared to 92.1 86. 83 for Others.3 service workers and shop & market sales workers 90. which are: 90 for OBC.9 93.5 96.2 89.6 84. the percentages for the four household types in urban India range from 82 for “others” to 89 for the self-employed.3 97. and 77 for ST.6 96.1 94.8 95.9 91.0 91. Except for the fact that overnight trips were reported somewhat more frequently by households that were “associate professionals” by occupation (in rural areas. the percentages for the different social groups deviate only very slightly from the all-groups average.4 94. 32 NSS Report No. In case of overnight trips.5 craft and related trades workers 92.22 Household occupation 3.5 87.7 94.

7 89.8 92.9 Sikhism 89. Statement 3.28: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by religion Percentage of households reporting Religion rural Hinduism 93.1216 and 1753 sample households respectively at the all-India level.29 examines whether the all-India percentages of rural and urban households reporting overnight and same-day trips vary with the MPCE level of the households.5 90.6 86.1 91.7 89. Apart from the fact that only about 82% of Christian households in rural areas reported overnight trips compared to the allreligions average of 92.4 Others (incl.8 rural 96.9 84. the largest two religious groups. Zoroastrianism) 89.6 60.9 *last 365 days 96.9 93.1 87.7 3.9 92.4 90. there was little variation worthy of note among these religions. “others” and “Buddhists” are based on 418.6 81.0 89.1 83.5 96.0 89.4 93.27: Percentage of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* by household type Household type Rural Self-employed in non-agriculture Agricultural labour Other labour Self-employed in agriculture others all Urban Self-employed Regular wage/salaried Casual labour others all Ref: Tables 15 (R&U) in Appendix A Percentage of households reporting Overnight Same-day trips trips 92. Hindus and Muslims.7 87.7 91. are above 80.3 83.7 89.6 94.4 85. For this purpose rural households are classified into five ranges (quintile classes) of MPCE so that each range contains one-fifth of the rural population of India.2 rural + urban 93.0 same-day trips urban 85.6 90.9 92.3 92. The estimates for “Jains”.6%.8 88.1 Statement 3.7 93.9 rural + urban 92.0 89.1 84.0 *last 365 days 3.8 85.0 92. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.0 all 92.3 94. though divergences were somewhat greater in case of same-day trips by urban households.2 95.3 96.6 Buddhism 88.28 shows the variation in TH(O) and TH(S) among households of different religions.2 93.3 70.9 90. Estimated percentages of households reporting trips.6 85. 2008-09   .25.6 85.25 Household religion 3.9 92.1 Statement 3.5 91.5 89.6 Ref: Table 10 in Appendix A overnight trips urban 90. A similar classification is made of urban households.26. Some variation over MPCE levels is noticed in the percentages of urban households reporting same-day trips.1 86.8 97.3 Christianity 81.2 Islam 90. for all other religions.6 92. In rural areas.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  Statement 3.2 95.26 Household economic level 3.4 Jainism 85. The percentage for individual religions rarely differed by more than 3 percentage points from the all-religions average.7 94.4 96. had higher percentages reporting both overnight and same-day trips than other religions.9 91.0 82. with the second quintile (20th 33 NSS Report No.5 68.2 92.4 82.

0 90. that the visit had resulted in their making at least one trip themselves.3 97.7 Rural 0-20 91.1 100. 11% of the rural households and 13% of the urban households were willing but unable to make a trip due to other constraints.7 85. which is 4 percentage points lower than the all-classes percentage.0 rural + urban 13.2 90. however.27 Households visited by NRIs11: impact of the NRI visit(s) 3.0 *last 365 days Urban 88.7 60-80 92. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.30 summarises the responses of households that had been visited by any NRI during the past one year to the question: What was the impact of the NRI visit (that is. One in eight of the rural households and about one in six of the urban households reported.0 1.2 40-60 92.8 86.Chapter Three: Characteristics of Domestic Tourism  to 40th percentiles) showing a figure of 90.27.30: Households visited by NRIs: Percentage distribution by impact of NRI visit Percentage of households Impact Resulted in one or more trip Planning to make Willing but unable to make a trip due to other constraints No impact Cannot say total % of households visited by NRIs Ref: Table 4 in Appendix A rural 12.7 7.1 89.9 12.5 5.0 96.5 80-100 93.0 all 92.7 11.6 Ref: Tables 20 in Appendix A 3.5 95.7%.0 1.2 91.0 20-40 93. 5 percentage points higher than the all-classes percentage.5 9. on tourism activity of the household members)? The majority of households (nearly 60% in rural areas and 53% in urban) visited by NRI(s) reported “no impact”.8                                                              11 Non-Resident Indians  34 NSS Report No. and the topmost quintile showing a figure of 81.3 53. however.0 2. deviations of even 2 percentage points from the overall percentage are rare.9 hhs reporting same-day trips Rural 94.3 96.9 57.5 11.4 13.9 11.2 5. Apart from this.8%.6 89.29: Percentage distribution of households reporting overnight and same-day trips* over quintile classes of MPCE Percentage of households in the class among Quintile class of MPCE (%) hhs reporting overnight trips Urban 88.1 59.3 96.1 100.1 Statement 3. Statement 3.6 urban 15. Statement 3.7 81.8 83.2 100.6 89. 2008-09   .

4.1 At all-India level. it is further investigated how the expenditure pattern varies with the leading purpose of a trip. trips with social leading purpose had a considerably lower-than-average expenditure per trip – 43% lower than the overall (all-purposes) average for the rural population and 40% lower for the urban. all expenditure incurred by the surveyed households on or in connection with a trip made by any of their members. hence the expenditure per trip could not be separated by leading purpose or any other trip characteristic. In the urban sector. 35 NSS Report No.18) – this suggests that visitors stayed with friends and relatives in the overwhelming majority of social visits and helps to understand how expenditure on such visits remained low.2 It may be recalled (Chapter Three. data on expenditure was not collected separately trip-wise.466 for the rural sector and Rs.1 shows that for both the rural and the urban population. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.15 for rural India and 8.Chapter Four   Expenditure on Trips 4. that the major place of stay of the visitor in 85% of visitor-trips for the rural population and 80% for the urban was with friends and relatives (Chapter Three. 4. as well as separately for each leading purpose. with a share of 9% for the rural and over 12% for the urban sector.6 at the end of this Chapter.58 for urban India. Section 3. One may recall. Section 3.3) that there was a preponderance of social purposes among the factors giving rise to domestic tourism activity in the country with the leading purpose of 75% of overnight trips for the rural sector and 71% for the urban being reported as social.1).1636 (very nearly double) for the urban population (Statement 4. As explained in Chapter Two.                                                              Relative Standard Error(RSE) of the average expenditure per overnight trip was 4. Average expenditure on such trips was only Rs.1. No other purpose had a share of 3% or more in either sector. 2008-09 1   . leisure and recreation commanded a share of 5% and business of over 3%. the average expenditure per overnight trip was estimated1 as Rs. only all-India estimates for a one-year period days are discussed here. The share of medical and health was small in the urban sector (3. The state-wise RSEs are presented in Statement 4. or members of other households.0.1.1 Expenditure per overnight trip and leading purpose 4. holidaying.989 for the urban sector and was the lowest among all the purposes used for classification of trips by leading purpose. Estimates were generated for average expenditure per trip and per overnight visitor-trip by sector and State/UT of the reporting households.821 for the rural population and Rs.1 This chapter deals with expenditure incurred in connection with overnight and same-day trips. Next came religious trips and pilgrimages.2 4. The break-up of overnight and same-day trip expenditure over broad expenditure heads is also examined. in this connection. was recorded as expenditure on the trip provided it was not incurred for productive purposes.1. For overnight trips.5%) compared to the rural (7%). 2 For same-day trips.3 Statement 4.

2 gives average trip expenditure per overnight visitor. trips for health and medical purposes were the most expensive in both rural and urban sectors – expenditure on such trips being. as the overall average. leisure and recreation social religious & pilgrimage education & training health & medical shopping others all Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A 1194 1214 466 997 996 3416 3086 1912 821 urban 3586 5287 989 1919 1995 6956 5491 1676 1636 rural+urban 2002 3174 596 1301 1337 3918 3365 1857 1038 4.1 Statement 4. leisure and recreation were on the average more than three times as expensive. about 21% more for the rural sector and 17% more for the urban. 4.) leading purpose rural business holidaying.1 by factors equal to the average number of visitors per trip. The urban population’s trips for holidaying. on the average. The estimates.1: Average expenditure per overnight trip by leading purpose average expenditure per trip (Rs. separately for trips with different leading purposes.2. 36 NSS Report No.) leading purpose rural business holidaying.715 for the urban population. in fact.1.5 In both sectors. for each purpose and each sector.4 On the other hand. religious trips were only slightly more expensive than average. At allIndia level.2: Average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip by leading purpose average expenditure per visitor-trip (rs. more than four times as high as the all-purpose average for both rural and urban populations. in general. gets spread over more than one participant. differ from the corresponding estimates in Statement 4. the average expenditure per overnight visitor-trip was estimated as Rs. The estimates of expenditure per visitor-trip are smaller than the estimates of per-trip expenditure – the expenditure on a trip. and its business trips twice as expensive.1. 536: Domestic Tourism in India.369 for the rural population and Rs.Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips   Statement 4. leisure and recreation social religious & pilgrimage education & training health & medical shopping others all Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A 923 584 202 437 765 1588 2185 1038 369 urban 2845 2444 418 699 1485 3375 4066 1061 715 rural+urban 1561 1497 257 534 1016 1832 2395 1043 460 4.2 Expenditure per overnight visitor-trip and leading purpose Statement 4. 4. 2008-09   .

21 42.5% of those of the urban population. Statement 3.3 gives the break-up of estimated expenditure on overnight trips by leading purpose of trip.11).2 Trips with health and medical purposes.24 5.699) was substantially lower than expenditure per trip (Rs.1919).3% of the rural population’s overnight trips and 3.00 100.19 1.2. for both rural and urban travellers. expenditure per overnight trip.62 14.3: Percentage break-up of expenditure on overnight trips by leading purpose leading purpose business holidaying. It may be recalled (see Chapter Three. the estimates in Statement 4. whereas expenditure per religious trip was. indicating a large number of visitors per trip (see Statement 3. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. for religious trips in urban sector. as seen in paragraph 4. leisure and recreation”. 37 NSS Report No.4) to be on the average four times as expensive as the all-trips average.43 15.3) that among trips with different leading purposes. on the average 45% lower than the overall average for the rural sector and 42% lower for the urban sector. the share of social trips was. for trips with leading purpose “business”. in both sectors.64 1. 4. was the lowest for social (leading purpose) trips. Statement 3.11 for the exact average of trip size).09 30. urban average expenditure per visitor-trip for religious trips (Rs.00 100.79 1.1.31 23.40 1. 2008-09   . It was.77 42.2. in fact.1. separately for the rural and urban populations.1.2 Had trips with different leading purposes had the same average number of visitors per trip. which were seen earlier (paragraph 4. just as it was low in terms of expenditure per trip. only 42-43% (Statement 4.51 12.98 42. As such. are seen to account for 30% of all expenditure on overnight trips for the rural population and 15% for the urban. 4.3 Expenditure on social trips was low compared to the overall average in terms of expenditure per visitor-trip. Finally.58 14. It was seen above (paragraph 4.3 Break-up of overnight trip expenditure by leading purpose Statement 4.5) that such trips accounted for 7.57 2. even though such trips accounted for 75% of all overnight trips for the rural population and 71% for the urban.2 would. while for trips with leading purpose “holidaying.3.1.39 2. was only 21-23% lower than average expenditure per trip. leisure and recreation social religious & pilgrimage education & training health & medical shopping others all Ref: Table 56 in Appendix A percentage share in total expenditure on overnight trips rural 3. Thus. be exactly proportional to those in Statement 4.28 1. This explains why average expenditure per visitor-trip. 4.70 7.1 Statement 4.47 10. But average number of persons per trip varies with leading purpose: a business trip is likely to have fewer participants than a trip whose leading purpose is holidaying (Chapter Three.88 rural+urban 5.00 4.66 100.5. expenditure per visitor-trip became lower than the overall average.3.53 0.3).61 urban 7. 17% higher than the overall average.06 8.Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips   4. for each sector. expenditure per visitor was less than half of average expenditure per trip – the expenditure was shared by a larger number of visitors.

which accounted for about 9% of all overnight trips of the rural population and about 12% in case of the urban population (Chapter Three. food. (See also Chapter Two. For overnight trips. had a share of about 11% in overnight trip expenditure for the rural sector and about 14% for the urban sector. be a package trip (Chapter Three. etc. Section 3.6.1.6). shopping.4 Break-up of trip expenditure by broad expenditure head 4. cannot report the exact break-up of their total trip expenditure over the heads transport.9% for the urban sector and less than 0.2 Statement 4.3 Visitors who avail themselves of such packages. (3) transport. (See also Fig. For same-day trips it was 0. sight-seeing.) 38 NSS Report No. some of these components become commercially available in the form of a package.4. not.Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips   4. This imposes a constraint on the generation of estimates of the break-up of trip expenditure by its components. (2) food and drink. accommodation. 536: Domestic Tourism in India..1. for a whole trip or for part of it.3.                                                              3 A trip with a package component need.5. expenditure incurred as a package – the “package” component mentioned above – was made a separate category for the purpose of deriving the percentage break-up. 2008-09   .5). As is the practice in tourism activity. 4. food. A package trip is one in which a package is availed of for the major part of the trip. 4.5% for the rural sector. 4.) Apart from these. paragraph 2. Statement 3. but only the total expenditure incurred on the package component and the break-up of the remainder (non-package component).4. however. religious. (4) shopping and (5) recreation. sporting and health-related activities – and a residual category. accommodation.1 Package component of trips: Trip expenditure in general has several components present in varying combinations: transport.3 Religious and pilgrimage trips. etc.4 gives the percentage break-up of overnight and same-day trip expenditure by five broad heads – (1) accommodation. the share of the package component was 7% for the urban sector and about 1.2% for the rural sector. cultural.6.

which had a share of 29%.     etc. rural sector the share o transport was 20%.4. transp had the largest sha in the ur port e are rban sector – nearly 33 in the 3%. The share of shopping was 30% in the rural sector and r of t o g n s 25% in the urban sect Recreat e tor.  recreat religio ous.   . religio cultural sporting a health-related acti ous. d s in n d ral 39 NSS Report No. s n 4. accounting a for 60% of trip expen nditure for the rural population and 44% for the urban The secon largest a n.     etc. nd component for the ur t rban popula ation was t transport. p ure ut The share o accommo of odation was about 3% in the rural sector and under 6% in the urban.4.1 Pattern o expendit 1: of ture on ove ernight and same-day trips d y package  component c 2% Overnight : Rur O ral accommo‐ dation  3% food and d  drink 9% tion.4 In b both sectors the share o food and drink in ov s of d vernight trip expenditu was abou 9-10%.Chapter Fou Expenditur on Trips ur: re   Fig 4.5 For same-day t r trips.4. hese three xpenditure a accounted f 82% of overnight tr expendit for rip ture for the rural population and heads of ex 74% for th urban. The share oth of food and drink was about 8% i the urban sector and less than 5% in the rur sector. e 6% 6 transport 28% shopping 43% Ref: R Table 56 & 58 in Appe endix A 4.     etc. tion. 536 Domestic T R 6: Tourism in Ind 2008-09 dia.     etc. l.  religious. shopp ping was by far the largest compo y onent of exp penditure. and ivities had the largest share in the rural secto – nearly 32% – and a 15% shar in the urb Thus th e or re ban. 5% shopping s 59% transpo ort 13% recre eation. 32% others 4% Overnight‐U Urban package  component 7% accommo‐ dation  6% food and  drink 10% tra ansport 33% transport 20% shop pping 30 0% shopping 25% package  component c 0% others 18% Same‐da S ay : Rural accommo‐ ‐ dation  0% food and  k drink 5% packa age  compo onent 1% % others 13% Same‐day: U Urban accommo‐ dation  1% food and  drink 8% recreation. he 4.  religious. Shop w pping and transport t together acc counted for 73-74% of same-day trip expend f t diture for bo sectors.3 For overnight t r trips. % 15% others 4% recreation.  religious.

37 6. noticeably higher than the all-purposes average.93 urban 7.77 28. cultural.41 100.00 100.15 0. the all-purposes average of 30%. about 17%. The share of transport. sporting and health-related activities others all Ref: Tables 56 & 58 in Appendix A 100. The share of accommodation in expenditure on social trips was only 0. religious. It is notable that the share of shopping for social trips was higher than average. however.3 For religious and pilgrimage trips. for both the rural and the urban sector.95 9.78 44.49 24. shopping trips (trips with leading purpose shopping). For health and medical purpose trips.00 18. for trips of all other purposes except business and.5 Leading purpose and trip expenditure pattern for overnight trips 4. and the shares of the other categories are correspondingly low.1 One may reasonably surmise that overnight trips with different leading purposes will not exhibit a uniform pattern of expenditure.57 13.38% whereas for all other purposes (except shopping and health and medical purpose trips).00 13. The share of food and drink in social trips was also low (8%) compared to trips with other purposes except for health and medical purpose.97 30.5.73 15.32 accommodation food and drink transport shopping recreation. 536: Domestic Tourism in India. of course.5.4: Percentage break-up of expenditure on overnight and same-day trips by major group of items percentage share of group in total expenditure on group of items overnight trips rural package component non-package component 1.77 100. was 27%.65 9.92 urban 0. the share of shopping was lower than.31 31.15 4. it was 5% or more. Statement 4. Shopping took up 22% of expenditure and food and drink.Chapter Four: Expenditure on Trips   4.39 3.00 4. cultural. religious. or close to. the category transport commanded the largest share of expenditure (34%). 2008-09   .07 4. the break-up of total expenditure has been shown separately in Statement 4.15 19.66 33. which was 20%. 4. To examine this possibility.94 4.15 same-day trips rural 0.89 0.5 (R&U) for trips with different leading purposes. expenditure on recreation.63 60.52 2.15 5. 40 NSS Report No.