A SHORT GRAMMAR OF THE HARAPPĀ LANGUAGE

Ficha Técnica
Título: Autor: Editor: Direcção da Colecção: Paginação: Capa: Ano: A Short Grammar of the Harappā Language José Carlos Calazans © Edições Universitárias Lusófonas, 2010 Paulo Mendes Pinto José Carlos Calazans Rui A. Costa Oliveira 2010 2

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

Foreword

3

4

FOREWORD

The Importance of Publishing a Harappā Grammar Book

Knowledge of ancient cultures has as an unsurpassable tool: the knowledge of their languages. This is what occurs in the so-called Classical Studies in which the Latin and Greek languages play a fundamental role in the constitution of knowledge. Language is the mark of knowledge and of the domain of emerging thoughts. The decipherment of an ancient language which is striking within a certain cultural context defines the birth of a certain field of knowledge. This occurred with the decipherment of the great pre-classical civilizations ancient languages (H.C. Rawlinson Cuneiform writing 1846; J. F. Champollion Hieroglyphic writing 1822; B. Hrozny Hittite writing 1915). In what concerns the case of the Harappā writing and language, the impossibility of reading the pre-classical texts from the Indus Valley has made it very difficult to understand the relationships between West and East, especially with the Assirian-Caldaic, Egyptian and Indo-European cultures. Probably more ancient than the Hittite writing and as ancient as the Egyptian Hieroglyph, the Indus River Valley writing (c. 2.800-1500 B.C.) presents the most versed testimony of the Indo-European thought and culture expressed through ―stamps‖ (containing astronomic and astrologic information) that later appeared in the Vedic hymns in written form. Unlike what happened with previous researchers, the decipherment of the Harappā/Mohenjo-Dāro ideographic writing was not offered a
5

bilingual or trilingual stone. The decipherment resulted from a long and thorough process of 21 years of research, resorting to Linguistics, History, Archaeology, and Anthropology. Since the beginning of the 20th century, several researchers have tried to break this code, but they did not achieve the desired results. The last great orientalist who also dedicated twenty years of his life without having attained the ultimate goal was Professor Asko Parpola from the University of Helsinky who in the end abandoned his research. After him, N.S. Rajaram and Natwar Jha also tried to read the inscriptions based on models that ended up not producing a grammar book or a dictionary. Our researcher, José Carlos Calazans, after a long study period, shows his research results with the publication of a Short Grammar of the Harappā Language. In 2007, Calazans presented a communication on the Harappa Seals at the 19th International Conference on South Asian Archaeology (Ravenna) in 2007. Shortly after, in 2008, Calazans became acquainted with research led by Dr. Rajesh P. N. Rao, Associate Professor from the University of Washington (Seattle) of Computational Science and Engineering. Dr. Rao and his team published an article titled ―Entropic Evidence for Linguistic Structure in the Indus Script‖, where, after undergoing computational analysis, this form of writing presented characteristics that favoured the linguistic hypothesis of belonging to a group of regional natural languages; although, to date, the language itself had not been deciphered. José Carlos Calazans, in a humble but solid approach, appears before this scientific forum to present his findings. We do not intend to say, as science defines itself, that this is one more stone to build knowledge. A stone that is available to everyone for criticism and to all the other scholars who carry on with their studies by refuting and overcoming it.
6

For the moment, we have an interesting work which endured throughout more than two decades of research and that Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, through its original area of Religions History and Science and its Edições Universitárias Lusófonas, has the pleasure to make available to all who may be interested.

Paulo Mendes Pinto
Director of the Center for the Science of Religions Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias

7

INTRODUCTION

The Indus Civilization (Harappa / Mohenjo-Daro) is undoubtedly one of the oldest cultures in the world, and its importance is augmented by its influence which surpassed that of the Egyptian Dynasty or even Sumer in duration and territory. With the same features of any developed civilization (architecture, urban planning, sewage system, writing, and so on) its fame reached distant kingdoms through land and sea trade. This influence was also extended through ideographic writing via seals (or stamps), commonly used in a vast area between present Pakistan and India, while trade took these artifacts as far as Sumer, Tell Asmar, Susa, Ur, Dilmun, Magan, Failaka, Pirak, etc. Since the beginning archaeologists understood the uniqueness of this writing within India’s history and that there was no memory of it in Indian religious tradition or epic texts. Excavations performed in Dilmun (1950), Pirak (1968-74), Mehrgarh, Sibri and Nausharo (1974-87) revealed a period that goes beyond the ancestry of Sumer and Egypt, dating the oldest locations of the Indus Civilization back to the 7 th Millennium B.C. As far as the ideopictographic objects are concerned, the Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions (Asko Parpola 1987-1991) contains the greatest contribution to the Indus written culture. Through this in-depth study, and for the first time, researchers and Orientalists had access to the largest collection of seals and inscriptions of a culture about which much is known except the most important thing: its thinking, its language and its writing. The Corpus represents the best research tool, to date, for those studying pre-classical India and mainly those who have tried to decipher the seals. We must, therefore, pay a fair tribute not only to A. Parpola and
8

his team (P. Aalto, S. Parpola, Kimmo e Seppo Koskenniemi), but also to other researchers (H. Heras, B. B. Lal, Krishna Rao, I. Mahadevan, Natwar Jha, G. L. Possehl et al.), whose commitment and contribution to the deciphering of this language, although not having reached its intended aim, have managed above all to launch the first methodological and systematic foundations with unique accuracy and remarkable scientific credibility. The particular focus of our research inevitably falls on two major points: the origin of the Kassits and Mitanians and the location of the Indian Aratta. The Kassits and the Mitanians are considered foreign invaders in Northern Mesopotamia, possessing an Indo-Iranian linguistic tradition since the 18 th to 16th centuries BCE: (sapta > satta; Indra > Indara; Surya > Shuriash; Marut > Maruttash;Indra-Baga > IndaBugash, and so forth). It seems likely that it was this same Indo-European migration, which originated in the Indian Aratta (Eastern Punjab) with the Kassits, and later migrated into Sindh, Afghanistan and the marshy region of Southern Iraq. This migration could explain the existence of the different Arattas mentioned in different regions. As for the term itself it is noticeably a Prakrit of ra (―without kingdom‖), and its meaning melds with mlecchadeśa (―land of the confederate‖) or of the ―nonAryan‖, understood as non-Brahmin. Our research began in 1982 starting with the assumptions set by A. Parpola. Later, in 1984, we considered abandoning these assumptions, which stated that the Tamil language (proto-Tamil) was the key for decipherment; these assumptions already used by H. Heras (1953), did not lead to any satisfactory results despite the contributions made by Y.V. Knorozov (1965). In 1985, we noticed certain similarities between some of the compound words that followed the same morphological procedure in possibility that we were dealing with an Indo-Iranian branch language,
9

close to the Vedic or to the Avesta. These similarities with juxtaposed ideopictograms took the same literal meaning as other equivalent compound words in Vedic, Sanskrit that it was not possible to identify the corresponding sources in known etymologies ― other researchers took up the same procedure of agglutinating consonants, even words, which they presumably discovered in each ideopictogram, in order to decipher compound words just like they did in Sanskrit. But we questioned whether the parallelism was a simple coincidence or an accident between the intrinsic morphology of pictographic writing and the agglutinated composition of compound words that appear both in indo-European and Tamil forms. One of the different methods we have tried was the association of consonants or words by forming compound groups, as suggested by the pictographic morphology. However, if the deciphering was successful with half a dozen seals, that same method seemed to fail when applied to them all. This paradox was felt by many researchers. Some insisted in their ―half a dozen‖ method, not checking whether it could be applied to the whole collection, whereas others just surrendered to the seemingly impossibility of deciphering and humbly kept quiet. Like them, we went forward and backward but we never intended to announce any ―triumph‖ before actually achieving it nor take the risk of repeating what others had already said before. The problem was determining in which level of language the seals were written, and never forcibly ―fitting‖ the language expressed by the Indus Culture seals into Vedic or classical Sanskrit – which, in this latter case would seem to be a true anachronism. Initially, a fit was sought in the grammar rules as a technical tool, a significant deviation from Sanskrit and Vedic became clear given the lexical peculiarities of the Harappā Seals.
10

The distance that separates Vedic from the written dialect of the seals seems to be almost the same as that which separates Sanskrit from , in itself, is a remarkably important indicator of social-religious differences. For the Jainas, the Ardhamāgadhī language of the Āgamas, and not the Sanskrit was believed to be the genuine language of the Arians and gods, even though they mixed Sanskrit with the Prakrits and used other languages, such as, Guajarati, Marathi, Hindi, Kanada and Tamil. Within this context, the concept of mleccha takes form, particularity given the linguistic and cultural synthesis observed by the Brahmins, who considered themselves purists with their unique and superior dialect. As more and more Indus Civilization artifacts were revealed by archaeology the larger the problem became: a parallel with the contents of the could not be found except for ritualistic situations as described in the Atharvaveda. Given this cultural paradox, we tended more and more toward the hypothesis that this language was of a different linguistic extract. Although it still belonged to an Indo-Iranian branch, it was distinct from the Vedic and from the cultural fringe of Brahamanic influence. Despite this seal iconography, we were far from understanding how the different dialects spread out, and which could have been the most influential in this period. If it could verified that a certain dialect had produced these seals, an underlying problem would emerge: the would have to belong to a different cultural tradition within the same linguistic family. This might even be possible because references different tribes and ethnic groups which are not considered Aryan, and are many times compared to demonic forces. Oriental studies have taken and other Vedas as fundamental for the comparative studies of Indo-European languages. Brahmins assumed that the oldest heritage was that of the Aryans — taken as the homogeneous people who occupied the Indus and Saraswatī valleys, and who politically and religiously dominated a vast region. Nineteenth century linguists and historians perpetuated this (erroneous) assumption
11

regarding it as true evidence for the beginning of Hinduism. All other fringes of Vedic society were excluded from this listing and had no right to linguistic recording. This thesis went on throughout the 20 th century, and as archaeology brought more artifacts and seals to light, the clearer it became that the hardly fit into this scenario, especially after the seal collection expanded. The Vedas do not mention an alphabet previous to the Brahmī. In general, Hinduism researchers take one of two positions: those who defend an (almost) pre-historic antecedence (―pure Aryans‖) of the , and those who accept that it emerged from simultaneous cultures co-existing within in the same geographical space. How could this problem be solved? The answer seems too simple to be credible: following the collapse of the Indus Civilization, Brahmins took control of society and only recorded the founding texts orally known in Vedic. Later, all the religious and ritualistic traditions were written in Vedic. became a natural candidate to the rising cultures of the Sumer borders, including the Indo-European (Indo-Iranian). Some Sumer texts refer to Aratta as being a land placed somewhere in the mountains outside Sumer1. Samuel Noah Kramer came to identify it as a region near the Zagros Mountains, but Sumer geography is not clear enough to give us a definite answer. Since Kramer formulated his hypothesis, however, very little has been said or clarified about the true location of the Aratta, and the question has not yet been satisfactorily answered. Nevertheless, most historians disagree as to the true location, and in general they concede that it is placed between Northwestern Iran and Azerbaijan, with its borders spread from the Caucasus to Zagros, and from the Caspian to the Black Sea. At times it is identified as the archaeological station of Godin, east of Kangawar, to the south of the Iranian Kurdistan
1- Inana and Ebiḫ (ETCSL: 1.3.2), Gilgamesh and Ḫuwawa (ETCSL: 1.8.1.5.1), Lugalbanda in the mountain cave (ETCSL: 1.8.2.1), Lugalband and the Azud bird (ETCSL: 1.8.2.2), Enmerkar and En-suḫgir-ana (ETCSL: 1.8.2.4). See texts translated by the Oriental Institute of the Oxford University. 12

border, or as the Trypilliana-Cucuteni civilization. But the question is far from solved, since the Sumern texts describe this land as being rich and competing with the Sumern territory in natural richness and in control of over land and sea trade. Among those who claim Aratta as their land of origin and its irrefutable territory, is the Neolithic Ukraine named ―Trypilliana -Cucuteni civilization‖ (5400-2750 BCE); it is close to Kiev and was discovered and excavated for the first time by Vikentiy Khvoika between 1893 and 1899. The concept of the Trypilliana civilization’s ethnic origin has been discussed, but consensus has not yet been reached. Researchers are divided among three general classifications: 1) proto-Slavic (Vikentiy Khvoika); 2) Traco-Frigians (R. Schtern); and 3) Celts (K. Schugardt) & Tocharians (O. Mengin et al.). Aratta is also claimed to be the region of Kurdistan. More recently, the country of Aratta, described as ―the cedar-filled mountain‖ (ETCSL: 1.8.1.5.1) or ―the mountain chain of Ebiḫ‖ (ETCSL: 1.3.2), has been claimed as the birth of emerging cultures. These descriptions are most probably related to the emergence of late 20 th- early 21st century nationalisms, particularly after Perestroika and the fall of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Through these cuneiform texts, Aratta seems to come back to life, as in the old dispute between Enmerkar (―Lord of Kullaba‖) and Ensuḫgirana (―Lord of Aratta‖). The controversy of Aratta’s true location will certainly continue. The work presented herein will be followed, in due time, by the publishing of our complete research covering 20 years of investigation, meanwhile, we will now take the more inquisitive reader, into the details of this publication.

13

14

I. LANGUAGE AND DIALECT 1. Dialect ( or ) and jargon (paiśāca). A translation is only possible when two languages share equivalent words for the same concept; otherwise, new notions become necessary. In the case of the Harappā culture seals, all researchers assumed they were researching the old version of a well known old language, be it Vedic, Sanskrit or Tamil. A possible translation could thus use equivalent (Vedic or Tamil) pictographically represented concepts. The problem was finding a correct pictographic representation for the concepts which, supposedly, were still in use during the classical period. For several researchers, the starting point had always been the use of a well structured standard language, such as Sanskrit or Tamil. From one of them, attempts were made to fit known etymologies insofar as the pictographic morphology suggested, while guessing meanings taken from the short syntax found in pictographic texts. Perhaps it was never considered, however, that the ―language‖ ideopictographically expressed could be a dialect ( ), a distant variation from the Vedic, the Sanskrit ( ), the Pāli, or even a jargon (paiśāca). As A. Bharati states:
In each religious and philosophical tradition a specific idiom is developed and constantly used by its adherents. This happened to the tantric tradition, too, and the pressure from orthodox Hinduism and Buddhism might have enhanced

langage intentionnel’. …the tantric texts are frequently couched in intentional language — a secret, obscure language with a double meaning, wherein a particular state of consciousness is expressed in erotical terminology, the mythological and -yogic and with sexual significance (Cf. Bharati 1983: p. 172).

As time went by, each social class created a specific idiom and sole indicator of a certain group of activities ― doctors, lawyers, engineers, sailors, astrologers and so on ― which is historically recognized as
15

professional jargon. Another semantic deviation emerged from the normal setting of the standard language, equally derived from the need to keep a class identity relative to different social and religious groups. In this sense we can quote several examples, such as the European Middle Age argot and the Indian . However, our study of Harappā culture pictographic writing did not reveal any linked to a social or religious class, although it could have been in use at the time. Nevertheless, references can be found in the classical and Vedic texts pointing to the existence of several jargons (paiśāca) and variations ( ), some probably never taken seriously because they were seen as mythical or imaginary. Thus, we can assume that the ―dogs‖ (śva), the ―owls‖ (ulūka), the ―cuckoos‖ (koka), the ―eagles‖ ( ) and the ―vultures‖ ( ), quoted as demons in the 2 (7.104.20-23) , and the Kīkata priests Kilāta and Ākuli (ŚBr. 1.1.4.14-17) and the Śámman (ŚBr. 6.3.1.24) ― had their own paiśāca, or probably their . The Vedic from the hymns was opposed to the lower dialects of the , such as the ancient Greek of the Iliad and the Odyssey to the Koiné, and later the scholarly Latin to the barbaric Latin. Quite often, Vedic demons assume the anthropomorphic shapes as seen in the mythology consecrated by the Indian art canon; simultaneously, many of the ―wizards‖ also mentioned in the Vedas take the form of the same animals which help them in their magical practice ― a mythical and anthropologically well known figure of shamanism. Given their common nature, the same etymology and the same root was formed ― (wizards) and (demons) ― intentionally charged with a meaning and to which a specific dialect was assigned:
– The dogs step back under the weight of mischief, (them which) joyfully would like to upset Indra, who cannot be subjugated. Śakra (Indra) sharpen your – Indra has always been the destructor of demons who spoil the offerings of the 210.87.19. 16

Gods’ supplicants; so be it, Śakra, like an ax which cuts wood, strike and smash them as if they were pottery pots. – Destroy the owl (male) and the owl (female), the dog and the cuckoo. Destroy the eagle and the vulture as a stone (does). Oh Indra, – couple) put aside the two Kimidins (male and female demons). Oh Earth deliver us from the misfortune and problems of this life; from the sadness which comes from the sky, protects us (oh) atmosphere (divyā). -23 ____________________________ – cauldron. Bring us the richness of the Pramaganda; oh Maghavan, grant us the one of lower condition (servant).

This semantic opposition between Brahmins, wizards ( ) and , could likewise explain the antinomy between the Vedic tribes of the Anus, the Yadus and Druhyus on one side, and the Pūrus on the other. In this sense, we should also consider the antinomy between the good Persian god (Ahura) and the evil Vedic god (Ásura), a difference etymologically explained by Yāska:
Demons (a-subreath; inhaled, it rests in the body, i. e. endowed with it (asuhe created gods (surān) from good (su), that is the characteristic of gods; he created demons (asurān) from good (a-su) that is the characteristic of demons.
(Cf. Sarup 1998. Nirukt. 3.7: p. 42).

We cannot help but wonder how the Persians etymologically explained the same difference? Should we then accept as true the descriptions of the (wizards) and (demons), or should we take them as mere figures of speech?

-23,5

– cunning. Save us from him who is evil to us or tries to kill us, oh younger god of luminous shine! -11,15 – against curses. (...) – (...) Ruling at night and at the beginning of Dawn through your own power,
28,6

– Oh Agni of the thousand eyes who live among all tribes, put aside the demons
-28,12

17

– (... much. – (... – (...)
5.2.3.8.14-15,9

-22,14 -25,1

Brahmin priests were not all seen as equals, such as Kilāta and Ākuli, who the Brahmin orthodoxy considered as two priests of the Asura. Therefore, their linguistic variant must have reflected this same religious difference. In fact, the language of the was assigned to these bizarre Brahmin priests. This kind of was well known to the Brahmins, and went into the Sanskrit lexis with the names of (AnRwk-a;a ―dialect without meaning‖) or (imït-a;a ―adulterated dialect‖). It is however very curious that the Nirukta derives the term from the root * (―protect‖, ―keep‖), explaining that life must be protected from demons (Nirukt. 4.17), whereas Rudolph Roth derives the same term from the root * (―kill‖). As the saying goes, ―what can cure can kill‖. There are references to ―mythical‖ which would necessarily possess lexical peculiarities close to the jargon (paiśāca), and which could have expressed socio-religious groups considered as outcast as far as language and religious options were concerned. Within this historical and anthropological context, we advance the possibility of being in the presence of a proto-caste situation. From these ―mythical‖ emerge the (ipzac-a;a) and the (ra]is-a;a), two terms clearly associated to the class of Vedic demons ― according to the itself, asura and belong to the group of the piśāca demons. On the other hand, the still mythical and perhaps not less exact states, through Rāma’s mouth, that Ājāneya spoke one of the nine erudite existing languages (navanvVyakr[p{ift). We have thus two linguistic levels which must have been opposed for a very long time, and which must have meant profound differences in the
18

social and religious behavior, the similar to the way a Brahmin distanced himself and opposed a shaman, or .

In these linguistic subtleties and differences, Yāska mentions a dialect difference in spoken Sanskrit as if it were some sort of provincialism. He divides language speakers into those who employ primary forms and those who use secondary forms. According to this distinction, Yāska introduces the Kambojas3 and the ―Orientals‖ as belonging to the former, and the ―Northerners‖ as the later group of Sanskrit derived secondary forms. Yāska thus differentiates the Āryas from the ―Orientals‖ and likewise from the ―Northerners‖. In fact, he states the Kambojas, the Orientals and the Northerners were not Āryas despite having been under Aryan ―influence‖ to the point of adopting the dominant, Aryan language4In his , Patañjali makes the same distinction with almost the same words as Yāska (cf. Sarup, 1998: pp. 223-224), thus showing that among the classical grammarians there was the secular tradition of distinguishing between erudite and popular and jargon. But neither Yāska nor Patañjali mention the languages from the Southern India (such as Tamil) as existing or being spoken among the Northerners or the Orientals; this leads us to conclude that the area of great influence
3- Yāska comes to the pretension of stating that the Kambojas, who take their name from a particular type of blanket (kambala) they like so much, are the only ones to have the verb śavati (go). 4- About the question of the Arian paternity or not of the Vedic ethnic groups, and of who is a true Brahman, the Dhammapa explains that neither one are race distinctions but a sign of education and a synonym of ―noble in spirit‖: ―It is good to be with the noble (Ariya). Living with them always brings happiness. Not finding ignorant is to be happy all the time‖ (XV-206); ―Make yourself an island, try without delay and be wise. Purify yourself from the impurities and, spotless, you will enter the house of the Ariyas‖ (XVIII -236); ―He who hurts the living beings is not an Ariya. Through the non-violence towards all living beings one becomes an Ariya‖ (XIX-270); ―One is not a Brahman by birth (cast) or by having braided hair. But he who lives in truth and righteousness is pure and a Brahman.‖ (XXVI-393). (Cf. Calazans: 2006). 19

of the Vedic, including the popular and professional jargons, was in fact the Northwest of India. Of course we must not mistake jargon (paiśāca) for variant ( ) ― a linguistic variety that can support several jargons and not the opposite. And because Sanskrit is always used as a skilful tool in the Prakrits translations (for being both an artificial and synthetic language) we opted for the same convention, using the etymologies and skilful instruments supplied by the grammar protocol, but applying the Pāli language, as assumed by us to be much older and a lingua franca among many variants. The result of using this method has revealed us the existence of a possible variant-jargon belonging to the Indo-European; it was certainly a jargon in use by the astronomers / astrologers class, and being piśāca might, perhaps, find still today a lineage among the Dardic languages (equally named pisacha). Among the Dardic or pisacha languages we can list the following: Kohistani, Dameli, Domāki, Gawari, Gojri, Kalasha, Kalkoti, Kashmiri, Chitrali, Pahari, Shina and Torwali. As a professional jargon, it should not be classified as a ―demonic dialect‖ ( ). The morphology and syntax of classical Indian astrological speech and its corresponding etymologies are within orthodox Sanskrit canon. However, the structure of the texts of the seals also does not diverge from the body of knowledge that the recorded. Naming language expressed in the seals as ―demonic dialect‖ is of our own initiative, and it is simply based on the fact that memory ( ) does not mention ―writing‖ before the appearance of the brāhmī alphabet. Vedic and Brahmin orthodox traditions have always made a point of distancing themselves from the non āryan groups, relegating the ―non-āryans‖ (who were often compared to ―demons‖) to a miserable existence, assigning them a ―strange‖ language in comparison to theirs and, therefore, ―demonic‖ (or ―infamous‖). The seals of the Harappā culture, their pictographic writing and the jargon-variant were excluded from the Brahmin social influence. Although the seals may have been used by all
20

social strata (as amulets or personal marks for other purposes), the social and linguistic group of speakers who can be included in the jargon is very limited simply because they were astrologers ( ) and wizards ( ). Moreover, and finally, the amulets (kávaca or ) are objects made drive demons and all sorts of evil influences away; for that reason they take the name of the same formative root * (―protect‖, ―keep‖). Therefore, wizard ( ), amulet ( ), demon ( ) and ―demonic dialect‖ ( ) share the same nature, be it ―protect‖ (according to Yāska) or ―kill‖ (according to R. Roth). Since the depreciatingly employs those words whenever it mentions them, any jargon (paiśāca) or variant ( ) associated to them must have had a magical, social and linguistic component of considerable importance, to the point of being referred to both in the Śruti and in the . The writing and the jargon inscribed in the seals can be taken as (the name we generically give them in our grammar and dictionary) because this pictographic writing only appears engraved in seals or pottery and the amulets are named . Some etymons used in this jargon are exactly the same as those used Śabdānuśāsana grammar. The terminology used to classify the cases in Sanskrit ( and āmantrita) is the same to indicate the lunar days in astronomy and astrology, as it appears later in the classical compendiums. Other terms follow the same procedure, showing the way a jargon is formed from a standard language, and how a Professional group (the astronomers and astrologers) exercised its activity among the priests mentioned in the . Some lexical forms stopped being used in this Professional jargon, for the sole reason that a linguistic and orthographic reform (from ideopictographic to phonetic) almost always leaves out words obliterated by phonetics; this is a phenomenon that involves the whole language structure. Expressions and terms which are no longer used have become what we later called lost etymologies.
21

Seemingly inevitable, a problem has arisen. Why is there a total absence of memory over a particular ancient writing system? The answer most probably lies in the social and religious differences between the ethnic group responsible for the Vedic tradition and at the origin of the brāhmī alphabet, and another group of shamanic tradition who could, eventually, have developed a system of ideographic writing that vanished with the collapse of the Harappā culture. From the classical period, only the texts grouped in five collections are recognized as (memory): , Ithiāsa (Ramāyana and Mahābhārata), , Āgama and ; but this ―memory‖ is related to a tradition and an orally transmitted memory which has values such as Ethics, Philosophy, History and Mythology. Śruti, on the contrary, is a set of texts derived from divinely inspired clairaudience, as the tradition states, and which form the core of the Hindu religion: , Yajurveda, Sāmaveda and Atharvaveda. It is precisely in the Śruti ( ) where we find more information about ―the others‖, the Brahmin priests who were not considered ―Āryans‖; in the Yajurveda they are lightly mentioned; they are well discussed, mainly, in the Atharvaveda which is dedicated to enchantments and invocations to cure diseases, to protect commoners and kings, to provide water and cattle in abundance and to destroy demons and wizards. The hymns in Atharvaveda are a ―software‖ version of invocative magic, while the practical magic course books Saundaryalaharī and Yantrachintamani, of tantric tradition, provide detailed dscriptions of magic in its hardware version; but, be it in the Atharvaveda or in the latter two books, the resource to amulets was a current practice, as it is still custom today all around India. If there was a process of evolution among the several graphic reforms from the ideopictographic to the devanāgarī phonetics (a process we are not aware of), during such reforms several expressions (compound words, for instance) must have fallen out of use. This situation was
22

manifestly dramatic for the older generation of scribes who made the transition between both writing periods. This supposition, however, seems to be only be applicable to the reforms that may have occurred during the writing evolution process. It is known that the devanāgarī alphabet appeared after several graphic reforms which began with the brāhmī until it reached the classical 48 character alphabet. The 52 characters used in the sounds of the Vedic language were a late way of perpetuating those sounds with the alphabet nāgarī phonemes.
Twelve centuries before Christ, Tiglath Pilaser I seized Aramea and let groups of people close to the Hindu, opening communication between Assyria and the Syrian territory, in the occident, and the Punjab, in east. The Aramaic became later (745 BCE) the language of the trade and of the politics; and it is from an well-known Aramaic alphabet in Mesopotamia that, as it seems more probable, were derived the two alphabets, i.e., the Indian writing characters of the registrations of Aśoka. The relations between India and the Scithian territories are, certainly, very old …(cf. Wanzke: 1984, pp.71-79).

This was the hypothesis established by linguists and Sanskrit specialists of the 19th century to explain the creation of the brāhmī and nāgarī alphabets. But they ignored the existence of ideopictographic writing of the Indus Valley, which does not seem to have directly or indirectly derived from the brāhmī alphabet, unlike what is stated by Natwar Jha (cf. Natwar Jha and N. S. Rajaram: 2000). Assuming our previous idea that writing appeared in the midst of a social group different than the Brahmin orthodoxy, the latter would never use an alphabet identified with demons and shamans. This seems to be a probable reason to explain why the Aramaic alphabet was chosen over one which had already been used in exactly in the same Indus region for the past 500 years. The ―lost link‖ between the and the brāhmī cannot be found. Nevertheless, the linguistic affiliation between the and proto-Pāli unexpectedly and disconcertingly appears to be evident. Beginning with the translation of the seals we were able to establish a phonetic and
23

phonologic bridge between the Vedic Sanskrit, Pāli rules, and this jargon. Hence, we can say that was in use at the same time as Vedic, though separate, just as linguistic level of the Atharvaveda distanced itself from the Vedic ( ). The later emergence of Sanskrit later brought a graphic reform that included most part of the different jargons, and adjustment of many to the new synthetic language.

4. Archaic (ārśam) versus and had their respective names, but what was the Vedas language (Vedic Sanskrit, as named by western linguists) time: the chandas (the language of the hymns, also called ) and the , which would correspond to the spoken language including professional jargon. Therefore, spoken variants ( ) as Vedic (chandas) lost its use and statute of religious language. The current language of the religious elite in which the was written was, thus, . seems to be an artificial language because the way it appears inthe texts shows it as archaic in the sense of not being spoken anymore (cf. Abreu, 1883: p. 205). If the priest caste spoke and others castes spoke middle Indian (including variants and jargons) then perhaps we should assume that the language used in the seals is a , such as the and mentioned before. We can equally consider that there are links between these and Tocharian C, as suggested by D. Q. Adams (1995, pp. 399-411). and zend have still great similarities as far as the palatalization of the velars and the cacuminalization of the sibilants preceded by i and u are concerned, as Grammont states in his Inde Classique (cf. Villar, 1972: p. 54). But presents some characteristics of its own, some new aspects in relation to Indo-European languages, although still maintaining a certain original legacy.
24

Among its characteristics we distinguish: 7 flexional cases; 3 genders; 2 voices; weak and strong cases; tonic and vocal changes; proverb and proposition autonomy; choice of verbal morphemes (partially determined by the meaning of the root – the aspect); preponderance of form over meaning; preponderance of esoteric meaning over the literal one (which makes its vocabulary symbolic). Among the novelties: strictness and extension given to ; the absolutive; the accusative in p; the use of perfect normative and the passive voice. The original legacy: nominal forms; the injunctive; nominal themes in i and u as consonantal. , like the classical Sanskrit, follows a procedure whose structural characteristic indicates an agglutination ― a remote expression of the morphological construction which is found in an ideographic writing and which can be observed in . Despite the apparent anachronism and given these similarities, we believe the grammar rules common to Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli can be applied to this kind of writing (as long as the necessary distance is kept between an ideopictographic and a phonetic language). As the deciphering process (transliteration and translation) proceeded, we observed no discrepancy when this principle was applied to both nominal compound declensions and adjectives or numerals. The morphologic and syntactic ideopictographic structure is so similar to Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli that we are forced to recognize a linguistic continuity which has been kept almost intact through the two later stages of graphic reform. introduced by his predecessors and established in writing protocol circa 400 BCE) must have formed a systematic body of norms which existed sixty-

25

In the same way in which we identify differences between the Vedic -Sanskrit and Pāli, it is also possible to find common rules among ideopictographic morphological compounds and Vedic morphology. The supposition that both systems decisively contributed to providing language with stable structures in its formative process and until fixation becomes evident. The relationship between Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli (including the jargons) is not based only on linguistic evolution, whose older extract can be traced to the ancient hymns. The Harappā ideopictographic writing reveals much of the same Vedic tradition (orthodox and non-orthodox) in all its mythical, cosmogonist and astrological aspects, but became separate from the Vedic through a linguistic variant and an iconographic choice. May the Vedic gods and seal iconography be compared! The difference was, therefore, a specificity and a social and religious intentionality which is certain to have caused clashes on many occasions; this could explain the known opposition between Anus, Yadus and Druhyus on one side, and Pūrus on the other, or of people, Kukura and other ethnic groups of shamanic tradition who placed themselves on the opposite side of the Brahmin orthodoxy. Like in Vedic and Sanskrit, each ideopictogram contains (in its formative structure) a root charged with religious and profane symbolism. The linguistic relation between and the , between the Vedic and Sanskrit (or between the Vedic and the pisachas Prakrits, Pāli included) is valid because it is the same language in different evolutionary stages ― from the pre-classical period to the classical moment with no interruptions. The brāhmī and devanāgarī alphabets represent the two last graphic reforms. If initially it was thought that the Vedic period was characterized by oral tradition and in the absence of any existing writing, the discovery of the Harappā culture seals and the solution presented herein forces us to
26

reformulate that equation and push back the dating of the first written form to the pre-classical period. Another not least surprising fact is the way in which the seals appear written: the aphoristic style. This stylistic form, as well as the writing itself, necessarily meant a continuous and careful teaching in which particular attention was paid to the homologue meanings of each pictogram, to the declensions, and to the formation of simple and compound words. The written tradition expressed in these seals is, most probably, the first source of astronomical and astrological calculus, and can be considered as the origin of the later śastras linked to the science of astronomy. Ideopictographic writing of the Harappa Culture seals abundantly uses morphograms, and therefore analyses cannot be focused on sound or pronunciation, vowels or consonants. The pictogram functioned as a whole, a single idea, representing religious, divine and human principles. As such, it was regarded as a fixed and stable member that accepted other elements (affixes) by agglutination, thus originating more complex ideas. The principle of agglutinant and syntactic formation was applied in a continuous tradition until the establishment of Sanskrit. In summary, it is possible to state that this ideopictographic writing agrees with a syntactic agglutinant formation through which a sentence develops through successive agglutinations in a syntagmaatic disposition. This formation obeys a structure which is determinant of the rules of ideopictographic composition ― one pictogram can be placed in a syntactic way in relation to other. These pictograms also appear in a basic or simple form, or in an equivalent form to the nominal Vedic, Sanskrit and Pāli compounds, which are both subject to the competent declension.

27

28

II. TRANSLITERATION.

Three levels of diacritical register were adopted for the transliteration: 1 – signals indicating terms formed by morph grammatical composition or terms formed by morphological composition; 2 – single slash (dandá) indicating a change of line and double for period endings; 3 – diacritical signaling for phonetic equivalence and overwriting indication in cases of questionable ending. Ex.: 1.a – morph grammatical composition — (…) trí•ásta. 1.b - morphological composition— (…) kúla-tara. 2.a – change of line single slash — (...) cakrám śani-śukra guru-iśu| 2.b – end of period double slash — (…) parva-cakra-ásta|| 3.a – conventional diacritical signalling — ā, , ī, 3.b – overwriting indication — bhavana
s

; māsaka.

This transliteration method uses the same principles generally observed in Indo-European languages transliterations, namely Vedic and Sanskrit. Thus the diacritical signs are maintained and the single ( ,) and double (.) slashes of the Devanāgarī are equally used. Two transliterations were also made for each ideopictographic fragment: the first one without (keeping the original phonetics of each pictogram), and the second one with from which proceeds its respective translation.
29

III. CONCEPTS AND RULES 1. IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC PRINCIPLE

1.1. Basic Ideopictogram (BI). Each basic ideopictogram represents an ideographical root which is simultaneously a potential and permeable formative core. It can, by itself, form a term (noun or adjective) defined by context, but it also allows the agglutination of other elements called morph grams; these might complete the basic idea or contribute to a new word of multiple meaning, viz.: N, d, P, A.

1.2. Ideopictographic Compound (IC). An ideopictographic compound is the result of the permeability of the basic ideopictogram. By itself, it can represent a new core of multiple significant possibilities (homonyms and homographs) during the process of ideopictographic formation, but it never exceeds three ideopictograms in its symbiosis. This is similar to what is seen in Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli noun compounds. Ideopictographic compounds are organized in a morph grammatical and morphological construction. When basic ideopictograms are subjected to the appropriate constitution, they form morph grams. In these cases, they are placed as infixes inside the main ideopictogram (cf. Macdonell. Cap. I, artº 8: 1987, p. 8). The natural syntactic process is responsible for morphological formation: two or more ideopictographic compounds are placed amongst themselves as prefixes or suffixes. Indeed, they represent the most coherent keys to the morphological development of sentences, and precede compound formation as seen in Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli.

30

1.3. Syntactic Agglutinating Formation (SAF). The Syntactic Agglutinating Formation is the way through which ideopictograms are linked in a sentence. Ideopictographic syntagma can be formed by the basic ideopictogram or by ideopictographic compounds. Despite forming well defined units on their own (words) they are syntagmaatically agglutinated regardless of their graphic representation.

1.4. Ideopictographic Formative Composition (IFC). Composition of each ideopictogram (basic or compound) follows a very simple principle: it respects the formative root of the main ideopictogram. The idea is always represented by an image. Such is the case of the basic ideopictogram, where elements from other basic ideopictograms (morphograms) are placed around it, or inside by infixation. In the presence of this main root, these elements lose their primacy and phonetic function. The ideopictographic formative composition is thus related to the rules of ideopictographic composition. The rules that determine ideopictographic composition are linked to the morph grams which, in turn, connect with the basic ideopictogram, and as such, behaving as affixes. These rules are called: preffixation; infixation or over position (inside closed or open basic ideopictogram); and suffixation. All affixes in the form of digits indicate declensions or specific number values. Infixation is used to form ideopictographic compounds (morphogrammatical and morphological).

1.5. Ideopictographic Noun Composition (INC). The ideopictographic noun composition is the result of an agglutination phenomenon which leads to ideopictographic compounds. The same rules are followed as in the noun compounds of Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli.
31

2. DECLENSION 2.1. Nouns and Adjectives. Declensions are applied to nouns and adjectives, as in Vedic and other Indo-European dialects. However there is no indication for gender; f. or m. are inferred by the equivalent terms found in Vedic and Prakrits. There are no specific ideograms for adjective formation; morphographic signs are not used to determine/indicate adjectivation. Instead, the syntagmaatic position occupied by the ideopictogram in the sentence identifies an adjective. In general, adjectives are basic ideopictograms, and rarely appear as ideopictographic compounds. Basic attributes and qualities of adjectives are represented either by the nature of a planet (usually its positive aspect) or by the diverse features of geography; they can also represented by different human or animal body parts which are associated with specific activities.

2.2. Number: singular, dual and plural. The singular is represented by a single ideopictogram and dual by its duplication (pair), a similar process to the Dvandvá compounds, viz.: B, DD, QQ, X, II, etc. Plural is indicated by the preffixation of digits placed on the left of the ideopictogram, viz.: ,,F, ,,,x, /B , ;;;0, etc. In the case of two continuous ideopictograms, the first one exhibits digits indicating case (placed on the right); the second also has digits but indicating plural (normally placed on the left upper corner); the latter submits to the graphic predominance of the former and the number goes to the lower left corner, viz.: Q,,+Å, Q,,+++v, Q,,++++v, etc. For three and above, there is a vertical graphic representation / , 0, 1, ;, ;; (and not horizontal +++, ++++). The rule applied to the previous cases is herein understood, viz.: T,,1x, Q,,2, Q,,;, è,,;;. ―. There appears to be no distinction between the Dvigu compounds and plural formation.

32

2.3. Cases. The designation of cases in Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli is similar to the old ideopictographic use of computation ( or ) through digits. This system was used to count time and objects and, in the classical period, for identifying cases: , prathamā (nom.), ,, (ac.), / or ,,, (inst.), -- cathurtī (dat.), 0 pañcamī (abl.), 1 (gen.), 2 saptamī (loc.) and āmantrita (voc.). The formation of cases invariably occurs when the respective digits are placed in the upper right corner of the ideopictogram to be inflected. The distinction (vibhakti) or ending among the cases follows, therefore, the normal sequence of enumeration or computation. The cases known to date and which can be observed in the Corpus of Hindu Seals and Inscriptions (Parppola et all., 1989), are predominantly six: nominative/vocative ( Q); accusative (Q,); instrumental (Q,,); dative/genitive (Q/); ablative (Q;,); and locative (Q;,,)5. The nom./voc. (āmantrita) ideopictogram has no digit: it stands as spoken or named. As mentioned above, this layout of numbers is entirely distinct from the representation of number values, because these are invariably placed in the upper left corner.

3. CARDINALS The number system follows the same composition of the VedicSanskrit and Pāli or any other Prākrit. It is extraordinarily similar to the old Chinese number system (pictographic), which strongly suggests a common origin; there is also a resemblance to other systems, such as the Egyptian and Sumer. The Chinese, however, is the most similar. This most probably comes from the time when the two mythical regions of Uttara-Kuru and Takla-Makan were a cultural melting pot.
5- The concept of ―inffix‖ used in this grammar is not the same used in modern and classic linguistics. In this context it means the sign placed inside the ideogram when ideographic compounds are formed. 33

1. , 2. ,, 3. ,,, or / 4. ,,,, 5. ,,,,, or 0 6. 1 7. 2 or 3 8. 8 9. 9 10. ; 40. ;;;; *70. 100. E *200.

11. > 12. ? 13. @ 14. A 15. B *16. *17. *18. *19. 20. ;; 50. ;;;;; 80. ;;;;;;;; 102. F 300. EEE ou

21. +;; 22. ++;; 23. /;; 24. --;; or C 25. 0;; 26. 1;; 27. 2;; 28. 8;; 29. 9;; 30. ;;; 60. ;;;;;; *90. 105. J

L

700. EEEEEEE ou

M

* The items in outline show the hypothetical cases that follow the system’s logic.

34

4. VERB The concept of verb (conjugation) as the nuclear part of a term only appeared with the creation of the consonantal alphabet. Before this, ideas were represented solely by ideopictograms. There seems not to have been no distinction between what was inferred as verb and what was defined as noun; therefore, no specific ideopictograms existed for one or the other. It was only afterward, with the emergence of the consonantal alphabet and the phoneme function that the verb began to represent an independent member or a visible root. In ideopictographic writing, the importance of the message lies in itself, and not in morpheme conjugation; this principle of unity can be seen in several ideopictographic nouns, where the underlying verb that animates or gives them life is understood. In a later stage, morphemes began by representing roots of nouns and verbs. The phonetic root only became important after the alphabetization of the language, never before. The verb (action) is implicit because basic ideopictogram or in an ideopictographic compound represents a whole, which is a figuratively and significantly important feature. The inexistence of a specific morphographical element indicating a verb does not prove its absence at the spoken level ― this would not make sense in a language. Within this context, using an ideopictographic syntagma could have meant to represent the indicative tense of the verb. This characteristic, however, is not sufficiently clear in this ideopictographic system to be accepted as a general rule. But an unmistakably derivation of an ideopictographic verb can be built simply by using a basic ideopictogram, viz.: D *aś (run); Í ;À ; Ä ; m ; A viśva (universe) > *viś (enter); ï ; etc. In the classical period, the creative power of the verb for the formation of nouns is directly derived from the intrinsic importance attributed to the subject; hence, the subject must agree with the
35

corresponding verb. In the Nirukta, Yāska’s statement on the nature of verbs and nouns becomes now easier to understand, given the Harappa Culture seal ideopictographic morphology and etymology; nevertheless Yāska believed that all etymological and grammatical tradition had been oral, and no writing system had ever existed during the Vedic period:
Moreover, substantives should be named according to the regular and correct grammatical form of a verb, so that their meaning may be indubitable, e.g. (man) should take the form of puri-śaya (city-dweller); aśva (horse), of (runner); (grass), of tardanam (pricker). Further, people indulge in sophistry with regard to current expressions, e. g. they declare that earth ( thivī) is (so called) on account of being spread (√ prath); but who spread it, different verbs, in spite of the meaning being irrelevant, and of the explanatory radical modification being non-existent, e.g. (explaning sat-ya) he derived the later syllable ya from the causal form of (the root) i (to go), and the former syllable sat from the regular form of (the root) as (to be). Further, it is said that a becoming is preceded by a being, (hence) the designation of a prior (being) from a posterior (becoming) is not tenable; consequently this (theory of the derivation of nouns from verbs) is not tenable. (cf. Sarup. Chap. I, 1998: p. 14).

It is possible that after the collapse of the Harappā culture (including the region of Dholavira), the memory of an ideopictographic writing fell into oblivion, and with it the knowledge on how to form ideopictogrphic compounds from basic ideopictograms (pictographic roots). However, the idea of creating names from ideopictographic roots and forming compound words received great attention on behalf of classical Indian grammarians. As far as the origin of nouns (etymology), suffixes and verbs were concerned, the lack of unanimity seems to indicate the old procedure of formation based on ideopictographic or oral composition. For successive generations of grammarians the intention was the adaptation to a new phonetic system. of nouns based on verbs, emerged from this linguistic anachronism. However, as Gārgya counter-argued, this method ―forced‖ etymologies into submitting to a false origin ― as can be seen in the term aśva (horse). If this term had truly derived from the root *aś (travel), then all travels
36

would be called aśva, as well as all things whose names started by the try to justify word derivation through suffixation? Which linguistic current Amazingly, and despite the discussion on the derivation of aśva giving a fallacious origin to horse, regarding the root *aś, there is not a single pictogram among the whole pictographic corpus that might have been related to the horse or any of its parts; however, if the root presented by Yāska ( ―runner‖ ← *aś ―run‖) is accepted, then there is a pictogram that perfectly fits the term and etymological meaning, viz.: D jamghā ―leg‖ / aticāra, ―fast‖ / ―runner‖. The ―leg‖ D of a goat is ―fast‖ because B (róhinī) is a ―runner‖ and that movement derives from ―running‖ D (*aś); this way, the goat’s leg takes the name of ―runner‖. Yāska and Gārgya agree as to the process of etymologic formation from roots, as can be observed in all ideopictographic formation. When applied to an ideopictographic system, the linguistic procedure becomes clearly evident. Changing from one system to another (ideopictographic to phonetic) implied successive etymological reforms, the disappearance of some words and the creation of others based on a phonetic system. A problem persists however, linked to the spreading of the Harappā culture seals between the Indus river valley and the Dholavira region: apparently, no memory of this writing survived to the classical period. No long texts were found, which could corroborate the thesis of a written language amidst a society that has always claimed an oral tradition. Yet, in Harappa Culture ideopictography, the idea suggested by a verb and from which a noun can be defined is clear, just as Yāska,

37

5. BASIC IDEOPICTOGRAM. 5.1. Ideopictographic Formation (IF). Basic ideopictogram formation begins with a real and symbolic principle. It is a fixed element around which and by affixation of other characters (basic ideopictograms and morphograms), a new term can be developed into an ideopictographic compound. The basic ideopictogram always represents real objects that are readily identifiable within the Vedic and Indo-European imaginary. Its real meaning however, gives place to another, in most cases symbolic and homonym.

5.2. Homologue Ideopictograms (HI). The phenomenon related to ideopictographic homology is limited to the level of the basic ideopictogram and the symbology expressed in the Vedas through double meanings and crossed synonyms. Etymologists Yāska and Durga explain the different meanings of a word when the synonym is different in a sentence. This difference appears to be an adaptive way of explaining etymologies not through a phonetically rooted evolution, but instead by an ideopictographic tradition directly applied to a phonetic system. This is the most plausible reason we found to explain the disagreement between etymologists and grammarians. Ideographic compounds carry on the same phenomenon in the presence of basic ideopictograms. The original roots of basic ideopictograms’ are connected both by the actions they represent and the ideas they transmit. These roots are not clearly expressed and their previous knowledge is a necessary first condition in order to reach the original pictographic root. But how can one obtain this previous knowledge? This strongly suggests the existence of an oral tradition-based school, despite the great importance given to graphics. Since the basic
38

ideopictogram is subjected to the phenomena of homonymy6, homography and antonymy, only through an oral teaching process could hundreds of ideopictographic combinations be fully understood. The ideopictographic homonyms are basic ideopictograms which present a double meaning: one represented by the image as such, and another symbolic one. As for pronunciation and tone, they are usually the same. The ideopictographic homographs behave as synonyms (payayīpyyI), viz.: and in ideopictography N ceiling / sky, O floor / earth. Ideopictographic antonyms are basic ideopictograms whose first meaning is derived from the respective homonym e homograph meanings but to which an opposite meaning was added. Its accent, tone and meaning are different. The phenomenon related to antonymy is only applied to asymmetrical ideopictograms, the only ones allowing ―mirror projection‖, viz.: F G , Æ É, v z, N O , ß Þ, etc.

5.3. Ideopictographic Groups (IG). Ideopictograms can be grouped by similarity (topic) and form homogeneous pictographic cycles; they can also be organised by simple symbolic similarity, herein termed heterogeneous pictographic cycles. The homogeneous cycles are easily identified because they show very clear ideopictographic rigidity and a basic topic, despite the constant intervention of morphograms. The heterogeneous cycles indicate homonymic and homographic meanings as well as meanings of symbolic themes.

6 - Yāska designates the set of homonymic words by aikapadikam. (Cf. Sarup, op. cit.: Chap. IV, p. 56). 39

5.4. Morph Graphism. The concept of morphographics is extended to a wide variety of pictograms. These are elements that are added to the composition of the basic ideopictograms in order to complete the main meaning, viz.: ,, ;, =,

x, F, U, S, f, etc.
5.4.1. Morph grams (Mf). An isolated root does not always form a basic ideopictogram. It is oftentimes the result of the addition of two other ideopictograms by inffixation or juxtaposition of morphographic elements. This kind of composition creates a new word transforming it into a new basic element ― it is, therefore, a symbiosis to which generally contribute all ideopictograms that can be agglutinated. In any of these cases, symbiosis occurs inside the pictogram (open or closed) A, x -N or linked to the basic formative element such as in ÀI (bahútārá) and IA (tareśa). Morphograms form basic ideopictograms through affixes, preffixes, inffixes & suffixes. In the first situation morphograms determine the formation of plurals and numerals. In the second they represent numerals, adverbs, adjectives and inflexions. In the third they only show inflexions.

5.4.2. Noun Compounds (NC). In Vedic, Noun Compounds are generally formed by two members, three at the most. The same is observed in Harappā ideopictographic writing. At first, noun compounds are formed by two terms whose meaning doesn’t necessarily indicate the sum of the two as Macdonell refers: independent members are met with, and those in which three occur are rare, such as pūrva.7
7- Vocative is not considered a case according to the classic rules and has no equivalence in this ideographic system. 40

Although it represents the group of many, the first element changes into an invariable form ― which is not inflected, or is the mere theme of a word subject to inflexion ― and generally appears in the week degree. The second will never be a pronoun because it only has noun value, and receives appropriate inflexion. In the pronoun, however, the first element strengthens the singular neutral nominative form for any gender or case. If the noun compound contains a root in the second term, its function is of adjective or noun, always in the week degree.

5.4.3. Ideopictographic Compounds (IC). Ideopictographic compounds exhibit the same formative structure of two or three basic ideopictograms, but mostly two, as in Vedic where some small compounds appear. With time, these compounds grew in extension and frequency, and including widespread use of inflexions. The ideopictographic noun composition discloses this type of starting point, with a minimum of two ideopictograms, and rarely developing into one of three. In these cases though, it is linked to a sole basic ideopictogram. Indian grammarians divide compounds into four semantic groups languages: dvandvá, karma-dhāraya and tatsubgroups), dvigu and . (which form two

Whitney grouped them into three classes with subdivisions: copulative, determinant (dependent and descriptive) and secondary (possessive and compound, whose final member is inflexible). Macdonell believes the triple division to be more convenient. Whiney’s copulative compounds were termed coordinative by Macdonell, who also included Whitney’s secondary group under the generic name of possessive.
41

In this ideopictographic case, the three groups of compounds were termed as follows: dvandvá (copulative), karma-dhāraya and tat(descriptive and dependent) and dvigu (numeral). Regarding the group, and in spite of being possessive, its ideopictographic composition is equivalent to that of karma-dhāraya and tat. (cf. Macdonell 1987: p. 267). The classification adopted herein followed the principles of the ideopictographic formation, although the coordinative, determinant and possessive groups were clearly recognizable. To date, the avyaībhāva group (adverbials) has not been detected; only superiority comparatives beginning with nouns, adjectives and numerals were observed.
(noun + noun) Rv ( ) the auspicious hour.

]I (agníkśetratārá) the transit of agníkśetra. tb ( ÎZ ( ) the visible jewel. ) the deacanate of Karmadhāraya (adj. + noun) ur ( aI ( ) the rising of nándā. ) the transit of . .

ar (rucyucchala) the praised and luminous. Dvigu (num. + noun) ,,,r (tryucchala) three praised. ,,,,v (catúrmuhūrta) four muhūrtas. 0Z ( 1ÅI( ) five (degrees) ) six very big. .

42

As far as gender is concerned, and because in this ideopictographic writing there seems to be no identification for such an aspect, the VedicSanskrit and Pāli procedures of transliteration were followed. When an ideopictographic compound ends in a noun it is this noun which determines gender.

43

BASIC IDEOPICTOGRAMS

N
ka

d
dvāra

P
uttara

A
viśva

À
grhá

I
párvan

O
deśá

A
īśá

I
tārá

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC MORPHOGRAMMATIC COMPOUNDS

G x
upa•muhūrta

: è
náva•ka vi•rāśí

á
eka•áhar 44

L
viśva•bālava

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC MORPHOLOGIC COMPOUNDS

Þb
áhar-man viśva-tārá

ÅR
bahú-gáti párva-tārá

ßA
rāśí-īśá agni-tārá

AI II UI
AGGLUTINANT SYNTACTIC FORMATION

m;,Äc
bhū || (M-183) cakrā

Q,,;;;;F
-bālava || (M-385)

Ãc
mangala-ís || (M-185)

è,,;;ÑdI,j
vi•rāśyā dvidaśati-áyana bha-tārá eka-revátī || (M-21)

INFFIXES

L
viśva•bālava

G
45

S
viśva•traya

PREFFIXES


éka•candrá

:
náva•ka

;;;;v
catvārim ati-muhūrta

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC NOUN COMPOSITION


dhy -mangala (M-57) SINGULAR DUAL

Ó
párvan-áyana (M-261) PLURAL

E
(M-181)

A
viśva cakra

B
viśvā

,,,,Ã
catúr-mangala

Q QQ V
bhāgá

2F
sápta-bālava

X
46


dvādaśa-śani

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC FORMATION

jvi

è
ßrāśi Aviśva

vi•rāśi

L
Fbālava Dmeru ; B

viśva•bālava

G F
Puttara

47

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC HOMONYMS roof

N
ka

Z

brick

who?

sacrifice

tail

bridge

F
bālava horn

r
bandhá(u) capture bird top

Q d I c

U

wing

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC HOMOGRAPHS dvāra door bha star

janghā leg cara fast pipīlá

D h ó
48

three peaks párvata tie udaká water man nayá observant

ant eclipse

cabin

subdivision

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC ANTONYMS

A s
nándā

us
náva

Þ
áhar

ß G
bālava

u
nándā

F
bālava

u

s

Æ
mandā

É
ámanda

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC HOMOGENEOUS CYCLES

ß ã è ä â ð æ ç
rāśí rāśí•áyana vi•rāśí rāśí•agníkśetra rāśí•muhūrta tri•vi•rāśí rāśí•cakra

Í Ñ Þ ß
áyana áhar meru meru•ka meru•dan

Ý á ç ã
áhar•ahar eka•áhar -áhar vi•áhar samá uttara pūrva apācī

D E G H M P R Q A c D
nayá dan

N
bhágín

P U l X
bhágan agni śakrá

49

IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC HETEROGENEOUS CYCLES

B

H
citrā bhāgá

T K j a m Q
hemā púnarnavā revátī aśvathá sūtā Róha

; V Z
hala

q
dhvajá

c
śákta

h
cāpa

n Q
chāyā cakra

SUFFIXES

Q,
cakrám (acc.)

r,
ucchalám (acc.)

c,
śáktam(acc.)

a,,
aśvinyā (inst.)

r,,,
ucchalassa (dat.)

Q;,
cakrasmā (ab.)

v;,
nándāsmā (ab.)

Ñ;,
ayanāsmā(ab.)

PREFFIXES

ã
vi•áhar

,,,v
tri-muhūrta 50

0Q 2p
páñcasápta-bha

INFFIXES

(basic id.)

(basic id.)

(basic id.)

N
viśva•muhūrta

ß
rāśí

ç
rāśí•cakra

J
Tárám

A
Viśva

â
viśva•áhā

e
bha°

n
bha•ka

I
tara°

K
tarā

L
viśva•bālava

0

E L
Tarāya

D
viśva•bīja

c
nayá° 51

`
nayá•tara

MORPH GRAMS = AFFIXES PREFFIXES INFFIXES SUFFIXES

j

m

n

o

, ,, ,,, 1
etc.

j l ·······

;

, ,, ,,, ;,

, ,, ,,,
etc.

v F

52

DECLENSION

nom. voc.

Q
cakrás

v
nándās

b b,

a
aśvinīs

c
śáktas

acc.

Q,
cakrám

v,
nándam

a,
aśvinam

c,
śáktam

inst.

Q,,
cakrā

v,,
nándā

a,,
aśvinyā

c,,
śáktā

dat.

c,,,
śáktassa

ab. gen.

Q;,
cakrasmā

v;,
nándāsmā

b;,
manismā

a;,
aśvinismā

c;,
śáktasmā

loc.

v;,,
nándāsmim

b;,,
man

a;,, c;,,
aśvinismim śáktasmim

Q
cakrás

v
nándā 53

b
man

a
aśvinī

c
śáktas

APENDICES. DICTIONARY.

This dictionary is organized around eight pictographic themes, but only seven will be discussed herein. These themes are a representative universe of the magical and symbolic reality of the Harappā culture. Each of them follows a logical pattern, evolving from a single pictogram and thematically developing into multiple meanings. Through these themes, one discovers a universe shared by other cultures such as the Vedic, Jainism, Tantrism and Shaktism, all of which represented an important sector of society that apparently managed to keep their identity after the fall of the Harappā culture. Thus, all the known number sequences from 1 to 24, tens and hundreds are found according to the decimal metric system; in Architecture, house evolves into meaning a section of human space in urban planning, and a section of sidereal space in astrology; in Geography, only the orographical motive was taken into account, where the mountain Meru becomes center stage in cosmological and astrological observation; in the ―stars and sidereal movements‖ the formulation of the entire is obvious, and is previous to the body of the actual śastra. This is also true for the seasons, the yearly cycle and planets; for the ―divinities / man and body parts‖, the forms are obvious in the idea and pictogram ―sir‖ (īśá), upon whom divinities and men are built: pingalá, dandīn, nāyá, bhága, agní, vyādha, agástya, śakrá, bharanī, yāja, yajus, áksi, hasta, bāhú; for ―animals‖, their qualities are lent to lunar themes, constellations and planetary movements; ―plants‖ are associated with the seasons of the year and constellations. 1. Digits. In the collection of seals supplied by the Corpus of Hindu Seals and Inscriptions (A. Parpola, 1987-1991), not all digits appear in their natural
54

sequence. For this reason the only classifies the detected occurrences. The existence of those missing numerals can be inferred through analysis of this digital number system in accordance with the logic of digital systems. From the same analysis, we can also conclude that normal counting not only used the fingers (amgúli) of each hand but their respective phalanxes (bhogavyūhá) ― a procedure still used in India and within other traditional cultures such as New Guinea, China, Pakistan, Iraq, Turkey, and so on. This is the reason why numerals are only show two sizes. The small size is represented by the medium streak (vyūhá) and indicates the combination of numbers from 1 to 24, ,, -, /, --, 0, 1, 2, 8, 9, ?... C, (corresponding to the counting of two hands and two palms‖) and all the combinations associated with lunar and solar days and, possibly, astronomic degrees (bagas). The large streak, shaped like a stick ; (dandávyūhá), indicates the numeral 10, used as the basic tens unit (daśā), as well as all possible combinations formed by pairs of crossed sticks and digits:;, ;;, ;;;, ;;;;, ;;;;;, @, A, B . Of course all combinations of digits are possible, and this is the reason why there are several variants and forms for writing the same number. However it is not an arbitrary choice for symbolic and ideogrammatical principles are obeyed. The difficulty of ideographic reading increases with the existence of multiple meanings for each ideogram (homonym and homograph), a heritage observed in Vedic and Sanskrit etymologies. The maximum unit detected in this type of counting was formed by an ideographic compound representing the number 706 (copper ax 2796 = DK 7535). This does not mean that the people of the Harappā culture were unable to count large numbers nor does it mean that they had no the concept of ―infinity‖, which was probably expressed by the numbers 3 ,,, e 7 2 ― as it is seen in Sanskrit — and by the idea of ―omnipresence‖ A (viśva). It is possible to assume that these concepts were, in fact, being
55

widely used because economic (commerce, sailing) and scientific (astronomy, mathematics, land measuring) activities, which required large number counting and complex calculations, had already been developed for a long time. The origin of this type of high number counting must have been linked to astronomic phenomena such as sidereal movements (planet cycles, time between conjunctions of planets and stars, Sun and Moon, annual cycles, seasonal cycles, etc.). This type of cycle (kālachakra) is still in use, both by the classical Indian astrological system and by the application of its related calculations, adjusted throughout the year for the performance of rituals. The extraordinary capacity for Indians of the classical period to calculate large numerals and to memorize elaborate calculations and formulas cannot be underestimated. In fact, within the Indo-European family, Indian culture alone developed such concepts and practices early on. The possibility of the use of higher mathematics (associated with commerce and astronomy) and land surveying techniques during the period of Indus / Sarasvatī cannot, therefore, be put aside. The well known mathematical test ―Patal‖ to which Buddha was subject when he decided to court princess Gopā, daughter of King Dandapāni, is an excellent example of the complexity of mathematical calculations. In that test, Buddha answered to Árjuna, the court’s mathematician (astronomer and astrologer), who questioned him on the list of higher numbers:
1 kot = 107 1 ayúta = 100 kotis 1 niyúta = 1011 1 kankara = 1013 1 vivará = 1015 1 aks = 1017 1 vivāhá = 1019 1 utsam = 1021 1 hetúhila = 1031 1 karahu = 1033 1 hetvindriyá = 1035 1 samâptalambha = 1037 1 = 1039 1 mudrābala = 1043 1 sárvabala = 1045 1 visam 1 sárvasam 1 1 = 1047 = 1049 = 1051 = 1053

1 bahulá = 1023 1 nāgábala = 1025 1 tit = 1027

1 vyavasthānaprajñapti = 1029 1 niravadya = 1041

Árjuna, who was not happy with Buddha’s answer, gave him yet another test: to enumerate all divisions or atoms of a yójana (Indian mile), to which Buddha promptly answered:
56

7 atoms make the smallest particle 7 of these make 1 small particle = 72 atoms 7 particles make 1 the wind can still carry = 73 7 of these particles make one rabbit footprint = 74 7 rabbit footprint 1 of sheep = 75 7 sheep footprint make 1 of ox = 76 7 ox footprint make 1 of poppy seed = 77

7 poppy seed make 1 of mustard = 78 7 mustard seed make 1 yáva grain = 79 7 yáva grains make 1 not = 710 12 nots make 1 handfull = 12.710 2 handfull make 1 4 = 2.12.710

make 1 dhánu = 4.2.12.710

1000 dhánus make 1 króśa = 103.4.2.12.710

4 króśas make 1 yójana (mile)

From this enumeration one concludes that 1 yójana contains 4 x 103 x 4 x 2 x 12 x 710 = 384,000 x 710 atoms! Another peculiarity of Indian enumeration, very similar to the way in which the Chinese expressed this class of numbers, is the following: 5 koti 7 prauta 3 laksá 2 ayúta 6 sahásra 4 sata 3 dáśa 2 — translated in the conventional way into 57,326,432. The counting of astronomical yugás in the Indian tradition is only surpassed by the counting of Jaina tradition. Of course, this class of higher numbers does not appear in the seals studied herein, but the numerical basis is perfectly recognizable. Among the respective ideopictograms, there is dandas ;;, dhanus hh, multiple or derived of króśa, such as hásta v, etc. It is obvious that this system underwent several reforms, in the similar sense that Sanskrit evolved from the Vedic ― the same way the ideopictographic alphabet developed and originated another in the intermediate period or when the Brāhmi originated the Devanāgarī. In the classical system of weights and measures equivalences can still be found to the Vedic metric system. Weights found in Harappā and MohenjoDaro, and in other archaeological sites, substantiate contributions from at least three different sources: spherical shaped weights (like some of Mediterranean origin); barrel shaped weights (similar to those of Elam, Sumer and Egypt, and whose values are close to those of the Harappā culture); cylinder shaped weights (unusual in Harappā); cone shaped (numerous in the Nal area, Baluchistan); and cubic weights (more widespread in the Indus valley and which were most probably developed
57

there). Occasionally, all these types of weights were found with seals. This association has led some researchers to suggest a regular procedure related to the weighing, wrapping and ―stamping‖ (with seals) of merchandise which would later be carried by animals or boats, as indeed occurred in Bahrain and Sumer. Despite the numeral system presented herein being a decimal system, weighing systems seem to have been mixed (binary, octogonal and decimal), based on different sources and possibly indicating long commercial routes. The smallest weights taken from the unit 13,625 (grams), were distributed 2, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8 and 1/16, and the larger measures by 2, 4, 10, 12, 15, 20, 40, 100, 200, 400, 500 and 800. This system is in agreement with another used during the classical period and which was stipulated upon the relationships 8x8 = 64 and 10x10 = 100 (approximate numbers). It is remarkable that in the Egyptian counting system similar figures are found in the Oudjat‚, which in its turn supplies the metrological measures used in the magical rituals: 1/2, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 and 1/64. 2. Architecture. Most ideopictographic writings of the pre-classical period include architectural structures of religious nature in their ―alphabets‖. Despite this apparently obvious tendency, other housing and of merely utilitarian structures were also included, thus filling in the pictographic lexis with auxiliary secondary meanings. The Harappā ideopictographic writing is not excluded from this general principle. The architectural structures included herein do not clearly reveal an affiliation with religious buildings in the same way as does Egyptian writing ( !, I, O, R, c, i, o). Instead, the ideopictograms associated with architectural structures possess a second level meaning, related to a religious connection with cosmogonist attributes. Whatever the intention of the scribes, these structures appear to be linked to an ―indefinable‖ urban planning; this is in the sense of not
58

having existed a distinction between sacred and profane, at least not at the written level. The non-distinction between sacred and profane has been observed in many archaeological sites. Both in Harappā and in Mohenjo-Dāro cultures, temple structures or religious spaces have not yet been unequivocally identified; this fact finds echoes in the way ideopictograms represent architectural structures, and the way in which they were imagined and designed. This apparent ―indefinition‖ however, does not seem to have reached the deeper etymologic meanings of the terms or ideas they wanted to convey: each ideopictogram is unquestionably imbued with symbolic, and sometimes magical and sacred attributes. In fact, the Harappa ideopictographic system herein studied in seals and amulets was developed and adapted to be used (at the very least) within astronomical and astrological contexts, through the use of a symbolic dictionary. This dictionary is perfectly recognizable in Vedic literature. Within different contexts, the same ideopictograms would not have exactly identical meanings. The pre-classical written languages disclose a remarkable symbolic and multi-meaning character. For this reason we are inclined to believe that other tablets, larger than the seals, if found could reveal new morphologic and grammatical constructions, in which the same ideopictograms (and new ones) reveal new meanings. Thus, the ideopictogram ―boat‖ I means ―crossing‖ or ―transit‖, in the literal sense, carrying people and goods from one shore to another and, simultaneously can generically means ―transit‖ or ―star‖ within an astrological context; the same can be said of the ideopictograms for ―brick‖ Z, ―house‖ À, ―ceiling‖ N , ―gate‖ d, ―bridge‖ r, etc. Inherited them from previous periods, these multi-meaning situations for one term are very common in Sanskrit and Pāli. The same term can oftentimes present so many different meanings that it is reasonable to question if its formation might not have had its origin in different ethnic groups. If so, Sanskrit could be explained as a synthetic
59

and artificial language. To expand this linguistic enigma, in Sanskrit and Pāli, homograph, homonym and antonym words are joined; the same is true for the Harappa ideopictographic writing. Idepictograms representing architectural structures (as well as all the others), follow the same intricate multi-meaning process found in VedicSanskrit and Pāli. They are restricted to the symbolic and literal levels, as herein presented in this dictionary and grammar. However, and in spite of the double meanings, other meanings which also appear late in the classical period are supplied. It is hoped that others might try different meta-linguistic combinations. Within the scope ―indefinable‖ architecture, the central topic of all ideopictographic variants is, undoubtedly, the ―house‖ À. This idea provides the elemental meaning of ―delimitation‖ of a well known geographical space; of a space that can be measured with the help of land measuring techniques and geometry used in construction. The ―earth house‖ that shelters us À (bhāva) finds its equivalent in the ―heavenly house‖ or ―astrological house‖ ß (rāśí). The ―earth house‖ that shelters us contains subdivisions which, transposed to the ―heavenly house‖, define the canon of the ―astrological house‖. The names given to each of the 12 houses ( and vyaya), which appear profusely in the astrological Works of the classical Hindu authors are not, obviously, the same as those that appear in this ideopictographic writing. Similar to the way that ―cases‖ are indicated by their number ― a formula that persisted in Sanskrit ― the rāśis were also represented by numerals in the interior of each ―house‖, such as rooms would be: À (prathama-bhāva), Í (dvitīya-bhāva), Î ( -bhāva), Á (caturthabhāva), È ( -bhāva), Ë ( -bhāva), Ì (daśama-bhāva). The ―house‖ (bhāva) which is used as a residential home is the earthly image of his place in heavens and of his daily life. For this reason, Hindu astrological charts (north and south) have the shape of a house with
60

twelve rooms, each of them containing the most important representations and variants of a person’s life. Normally, Hindu astrology uses two distinct systems to determine the astrological house. The first is the bhāvachakra, destined to measure the houses and indicate their positions; the second is rāśíchakra (Zodiac) which considers the houses as signs. Both systems are represented in this ideopictographic writing. The astrological chart of signs is shown as lozenges, and their respective ideopictographic variants ç, ß , æ, å, ä, è, (etc.), and the places they occupy are shown as numerals, as mentioned above. Kendra, or ―quadrant‖, formed by the four cardinal houses also appears here within the ideopictographic figure of the ß rāśí, in which the respective angular corners or cardinal points have been included: æ, north, east and south in this order: (apācī).

P

(uttara),

R

(pūrva) and

Q

At the same time, the way in which ideopictograms and decorative patterns are treated at the level of written language and pottery reveals a thematic continuum identifying a cosmogony and astrology which was present in the people’s daily life. In many situations pictograms used as decorative patterns are easily recognizable; often, patterns still in use today were identified, such as yantras, or integrated in lunar and mathematical systems and mantras: Ò, Ó, Õ, ×, Ø, Ù, Ú, Û, Ü, Ý. The abacus counting system, so widespread in ancient periods, and still in use within many traditional societies, appears to be profusely represented in the seals as an icon and a decorative pattern, near the image of the ox: ö, ÷, ø, ù, ú, û, ü, ý, þ, ÿ. The ―altar of fire‖ c , ], _, `, a, b (agníkśetra) is yet another of the many examples of pictograms applied as decoration in what is very likely to be ritualistic pottery. The classical system still in use in India today, including astrology, yantras and mantras, uses the same decorative patterns of the Harappā culture seals. On the other hand, classical architecture reproduces the
61

same yantras in numerous temples ― the same which, in a wider sense, are interpreted as expressions of the divinity and its residences. In a peculiar way yantras can also be used as ―computers‖ (abacus), in the sense of ―counters‖ of sacred formulas, using the characters of the nāgarī alphabet placed in the astrologic houses with their respective degrees. It is not without reason that in Sanskrit, Vedic, Pāli and other middle -Indian languages, the terms gana (―quantity‖ or ―multitude‖), ganita (―calculation‖, ―enumeration‖ or ―counting‖) and ganaka (―astronomer‖ or ―arithmetic‖) find the same formative root in *gan (gn! ) ―count‖, ―enumerate‖ and ―calculate‖. Within this context, the reason why ancient astronomers and astrologers were considered ―arithmeticians‖ is easy to understand: they devoted themselves during the year to counting the days of stars and of planets, and their respective degrees and angle distances through different calculations. In their ―counting‖ activities, astrologers / astronomers made use of auxiliary tools for calculus and counting. Pictograms, decorative patterns and yantras thus had a decisive role in the basic formation of magic and symbolism. In the beginning of the formation of etymologies and language ― starting with the ideopictographic system ― grammar, astronomy and arithmetical functions were indistinguishable. This is why the term gánaya (―metric lines‖), as applied to the poetic construction of the hymns, has its origin in the same root *gan. What was later termed ―metric lines‖ probably had the same meaning of the ―metric lines‖ constructed as auxiliary tools for astronomical calculus. To date, this is the most likely (and only) explanation for why the nāgarī alphabet characters and the mantras are still associated with ―magic squares‖ and other geometric forms. In the by the tantric tradition ― an antroponymous also derived from *gan) and Saundaryalaharī yantras with the same designs as shown in the seals. Some of these yantras clearly reveal
62

their metric function as letter counters (bījas) of the nāgarī alphabet. Each of them (squares, rectangles, triangles, etc.) is associated to a planet which determines the number of rooms, just like a house or a temple is built. But these yantras do not represent merely the symbolic numbers of each planet which, in turn, define ―metric‖: they also represent long-term planetary cycles of activity. The ideopictograms deciphered herein represent the imaginary of the ―astrological house‖ (bhāva), with its corresponding rooms occupied by planets and stars in the shape of astronomical calculus tables. Similarly, the Vedic altar is built in a circle, imitating Agní in the shape of a bird (cf. ŚBr. 10.4.5,2 e AV.) and a triangle. This cosmic architecture thus becomes more precise and elaborate, similar to the way previous planning involving land measuring techniques is implied in urban architecture. In this sense, the classical astrology śāstras (which tradition dates back to the Vedic period), like the hatpārāśara Hora Śāstra of 16 different ―vargas‖ (rooms): or and . Some of these ―rooms‖ are recognizable among the ideopictograms explained herein. Equivalence was therefore, established between the definitions given in classical astrological texts and those identified in the ideopictograms. This allowed us to determine the corresponding transliterations and translations. Architecture implies the existence of an architect; in cosmic dimension, the meaning of ―architect of the gods‖ that Tvas has in Vedic texts is accurate and correctly associated to the ―construction‖ of cosmic structures. It should thus be assumed that these structures are the signs and planets where the gods live in the various shapes. In this way, Tvas is also the one who presides over the good birth of men; this particularity
63

clearly gives away His superior astrological nature, as in fact is stated in the RV. 10.18,6: May Tvas , he who presides over the good births, be persuaded to give you many years to live. The same attribute of ―architect‖ of Daityas is later given to Maya, an Asura, and craftsman learned in magic, astronomy and military sciences. 3. Moutain - Meru. The mountain as an axis mundi has a central and fundamental role in all traditional cultures; the more sophisticated these societies become, the more precise is its cosmic function. In Siberian shamanism, it becomes the ―pillar of the world‖, supporting the heavens and the yurta. Even in the well-known religions established today, it is the centre of faith and of mystical aspiration. In astronomy and geography, it refers to the ―pole‖ of the location or longitude, the invisible ―axis‖ taken from the Polar Star to the place of the stargazer. In a wider sense, this cosmic axis (meru) is the gnómon of astronomical reading which allows the detection of both the precession days and the degrees of star and planet transits. The term is equivalent to the aksamśa (―latitude‖ or ―rising‖ of a pole). The ideopictografic features that define the meru / dhruvá are given herein. Their ideopictographic variants are remarkably identified with concepts and corresponding terms used in Indian classical astrology and astronomy. It may, therefore, be assumed that at least one astronomical watching point existed in the Indus valley. The ideopictogram for mountain A and its variants B, C, H, G , D, E, F, I, K, M, Q stand for one of the most extraordinary etymologies found in such a writing system. In the Nirukta, and later in the astronomy and astrology compendiums (cf. Sūryas.), the cosmologic descriptions of the 7 mountain chains (Kula-girí) are found, where Meru and Párvata are used within an astronomical context. Meru takes on the meaning of centre of the world, and is the observation axis or pole. Párvata, or the Párvans, are the new and full Moon with the 8 th and 14th lunar days of each corresponding moon. And Kula-girí is the number 7,
64

representing a value of excellent category, also applied to astronomical counting. The astronomical meaning of the number 7, associated to the meaning of ―immobility‖ (ng), is directly derived from the generically used Kula-girí (kuligir) and nága (ng). This association of ideas must have come from the empirical knowledge obtained while watching the rising movement of the Sun at noon. When it reached the summit, the star was represented by the top of a gnomon. As seen before, the ideopictogram representing ―north‖ P , as well as the corresponding term in Sanskrit (%Är-uttara), means úpa (%p) to express the upper part of a gnomon. Thus, the term upanara (%pnr), which is the name for a nāga (nag), as referred by Indian lexicographers, is related to the highest point of a gnomon (nága-ng). Therefore, through homography and homophony, nāga e the serpent is synonymous with ―top of a gnomon‖; similarly, in Sanskrit, the term nára A , meaning man (nr) has both the double meaning of ―gnomon‖ and ―man‖. Hence, several types of gnomons existed for different types of reading, as expressed in the Sūryasiddhānta: yasti-yantra, dhanuścakra-yantra, chāyāyantra-yantra, toyayantra-yantra, kapāla-yantra, nara-yantra, mayūra-yantra and vānara-yantra. 4. Stars and Sidereal Movements. All planets (gráha) have the determinant morphogram of ―mountain‖ P (girí, cf. D.1.5, p. 249) in their pictographic composition, l because they are all ―venerable‖ or ―powerful‖ gods (vīrá, ibid.): Á, Â, Ã, Ä, Å, Æ, Ç. Possibly, the observation of the birth and occlusion of planets and stars in the horizon ( ) took certain mountains as reference. The mountain chain Rudrahimālaya is an example of the beginning of an astronomic cycle because its peaks coincided with the birth of stars for the first time on a given moment ― probably when significant changes in the people’s lives occurred. This chapter of the dictionary follows the sequence of 9 planets, such as it appears in the

65

classical astrology compendiums (particularly the Horāśāstra) and which is commonly accepted by Indian astrology. certain mountains take within throughout the 6 Ô seasons (

-

The Moon  and the Sun Á, together with the special positions of the geo-astrological cartography, ) and the eras, are the two great

references in the detection of specific occurrences and planet / asterism alignment, with the help of the gnomon ; ( ); simultaneously, they reference time counting (on the whole and in fractions) ß Þ (rātryahanī), as well as time breaks or ―rest‖ è (kālarātrī). These events were identified as the cause for calamities, or great gifts for people’s lives, or the rise and fall of kingdoms. This characteristic is profusely observed in the classical texts and is also quite evident in the Vedic texts. Nothing, therefore, prevents us from thinking that the same procedure was a current practice among astrologers, the upper classes and the people in general within the Harappā culture. Sacrifice, fire offerings, hymns and all sorts of amulets were undoubtedly the tools available to drive away or diminish suffering and calamities according to their beliefs. In his astrology compendium, Varāhamihira provides a list of some of such accidents, but so do a great variety of literary texts such as epics and novels. Of the entire Vedic production, its astral association cannot be excluded; similarly, the classical period must include not only the texts of Hindu tradition but also the Jainas’ and Buddhists’. This simple example is transcribed from the Meanwhile, that Brahman suddenly awoke from sleep, and seeing that the moon disk had been obscured in the sky by Venus and Jupiter, he awoke his wife; and realizing by the moon disk that the king’s life was at risk, he ordered His wife to bring him the objects appropriate to the sacrifice, so that he could make an offering to fire and thus avoid the calamity. — (AÇaNtre s ivàae=kSmaiÚÐa-¼masaÒakaze zu³gué_ya< inéÖ< cNÐm{flmvlaeKy g&ih [ImuTwPy cNÐm{flsUict< tÚ&pte> àa[s»qmvgMy haetVyÐVyai
66

[ tdupzaNtye haemawRmupFaEkiy:ye ). (Cf. Tawney 1982: p. 13) 5. Divinities / Man and Parts of the Body. Do the Gods have shape? They, who created different aspects of the universe… And under which shape(s) can they show themselves? Anthropomorphism is as satisfactory for the living heart of a religion as is the feeling of reality that moves it through and goes beyond any written language. In no passage of the Rgveda is there a description on how to build a physical support structure in order to represent divinity at the level of the human dimension. Nowhere is that procedure mentioned and yet, certain anthropomorphic shapes for each clearly expressed divinity are suggested in the whole body of hymns. The priest, and even the simple person, could easily imagine such divinities, either during rituals when hymns were recited, or when natural phenomena evoked their manifested appearance: A, D, F, G, c, b, Q, P, V, U, l, o, Z, [,I, K, L. The most important anthropomorphic description of the Rgveda is the hymn dedicated to Púrusa (Púrusa-Sūkta), the universal man. But other hymns are equally rich in anthropomorphic descriptions, referring to Indra, Agni, Varuna and Viśvakarman, or other lesser divinities. All anthropomorphic ideopictograms described herein are easily identified with the Vedic divinities because they clearly exhibit similar shapes. Thus, compound words derived from noun radicals included in the Vedic and Sanskrit lexis appear in their typical situations. The use of other compound forms (archaisms) which still appeared later can also be assumed to have been derived from an ideopictographic morphological formation. In this sense, these archaisms must have fallen out of use when ideopictograms were replaced with the phonetic system. Parts of the human body have also been represented by this ideopictographic system and, once again, they match the same descriptions and meanings of the Vedic texts with extraordinary accuracy.
67

―Aspect‖ or ―eye‖ (áksa-áksi > q), ―hand‖ or ―strength‖ (hástamuhūrta > v), ―arm‖ or ―plentiful‖ (bahú-bahú / srprákarasna > Å), as well as other terms, invariably appear in homograph and homonym situations, meaning what they really mean while also conveying a sense of both astronomical and astrological dimensions. This characteristic can be observed in the Vedic language (from Rgveda to Atharvaveda), and in Sanskrit or Pāli. In this way, the etymological origin of each known or lost term can be found in this ideopictographic system, as has been made clear. 6. Animals and Parts of the Body. All zoomorphic representations have both an astrological and astronomical connotation. Their etymologies can still be found in the astrological lexis of the classical period, emerging in numerous situations associated with planetary movements, and in Works imputed to Garga, to Jaimini, to Pārāśara, to Varāhamihira and to Prthúyaśas: A, B, D, W, H, J, L, U, \, f, l, N, e. Ideopictograms are, for the most part, related to aspects and specific movements of planets and stars. As examples, there are eight types of planetary movements: gátis (vakrā v / anuvakrā w; samá x / visama y; mandā Æ / ámandā É; cara D / aticara E), cuspid (śrmga Q) and the eclipses or occlusions (marká J and pipīlá h). This ideopictographic group also shares the same type of characteristics and meanings of ideopictograms grouped under the topic ―Religious objects, insignias and weapons‖. 7. Plants, Trees and Seasons of the Year. To this day, trees and several plants are the object of cult in Hinduism, Janaism and Buddhism. The holy fig tree a c (Ficus religiosa, L. ~ aśvatthá) is the most respected, and takes centre stage in countless rituals; several texts refer to it as a tree of cosmic dimensions. Certain trees have been considered as the permanent residence of divinities, and for this reason were believed to possess magical,
68

therapeutic and miraculous value, as referred in the RV. 10.97 and in the AV. 6.136,1. The AV. mentions a certain number of amulets prepared with plants. Trees and other kinds of plants have equally been chosen as the symbol the yearly seasons and their corresponding months. In spite of several plants being widely known due to their therapeutic features (ayurvedic) and integrated into mythology and astrology, only a few appeared to have been chosen to be included in the Harappa Culture ideopictographic writing. Even with such a limited number of plants, it was possible to identify the species represented on the seals, and whose morphological formations of ideopictographic compounds originated compound words and etyma of Vedic-Sanskrit and Pāli, such as they appear in later texts. In traditional Indian astrology plants, are classified according to a certain order and to specific planetary types. The Sun rules over vigorous trees with strong branches. Saturn rules over uninteresting trees. The Moon rules over milky sap trees, such as the rubber tree. Venus commands blossoming trees. Mars is in charge of sour trees, such as the lemon tree. And Mercury rules over fruitless but generally useful trees. This classification was considered valid when the same plants were mentioned in the Vedic and classical texts. Weeds (ósadhi/trnam), leguminous plants and cereals (śāka/śasyam ), bushes and trees (gulma/vrksá) constitute the ideopictographic group which identifies months and seasons of the year: B, C , D, E, F, H, G, t, T, L, J, I, i, j, k, Q, R, s, r, S, U, W, l.

69

TRANLITERATION AND TRANSLATION.

Of all the astronomic records translated herein, we highlight the ones which could be dated more precisely through the knowledge of planetary conjunctions and specific planetary alignments, during solstices and equinoces. These would interest the most the astrologers and priests of Harappā, Mohenjo-Dāro and all other comunities integrating this culture. But, planetary conjunctions and specific planetary alignments, during solstices and equinoces are also the ones which stand out above all because they provide precise dates within the absolute cronology spreading between 7000-600 BCE (cf. Gregory L. Possehl – 1996; Agrawal, D. P. – 1982). Since the seals studied herein are included in the time line between stage IV (Early-Mature Harappan transition 2600-2500 BCE) and the end of stage VI (Post-Urban Harappan 1700-1000 BCE), a time limit was established to detect the corresponding conjunctions between 4713 BCE (maximum limit given to the standart computer softwer used) and 1500 BCE (date chosen as a purely academic redundancy). Attention was also given to the year 2637 BCE, which was chosen by the Chinese to start their twelve year calendar, as cultural reference, and mainly the cycles Mrgaśiras (Orion c. 4500-3500 BCE) and (Pleiades c. 2990-1900 BC.), with Rohinī (Aldebaran c. 3100 BCE) as a transitional period. To date, we were unable, to make clear and inequivocal sense of the zoomorphic sequence represented in the seals. However, this sequence may obey a yearly cycle or a yearly seasonal cycle, here represented by the animals that were later seen in the Chinese twelve animal system ― the reasons linked to the loss of this tradition may have been the same cause of the disruption and end of the Harappā / Mohenjo-Dāro culture. In this way, the order of the seals presented herein attempts to reproduce (probably in an imperfect way) the manner by which astronomers and astrologuers displayed the years and the successive
70

seasons; it does not follow the order adopted in the Corpus of Hindu Seals and Inscriptions. Regarding the meaning and logic of inscription content, whenever possible, descriptions were displayed in order to depict each seal in a clarifying manner. It was our intetion to maintain the sequence of animal categories. This process however, revealed itself to be impossible at times and, taken as a whole, bacame a gigantic task. Sometimes, part of an inscription (of a broken seal) was found on another, whole seal but belonging to a different animal group. This is the reason why we took the liberty to reproduce the missing text in the shadowy area of the broken seal. Within the scope of the study herein regarding these artifacts, the fact that they are ―seals‖, and that part of them are found printed in pottery pieces (solid and liquid containers) leads to the reflection on the ritualistic manner in which they were destined to be used. If they were simple ―commercial‖ seals of pots, regardless of size, it would have made no sense at all to keep the same seal, repeating the same print over and over again, when what was printed was only associated with a specific moment in a given month of a certain year, with the rigorous accuracy that only astronomy and astrology could achieve. It would, therefore, seem senseless to have a seal recording the solstice on July 26th 3912 BCE when Mars and Saturn were in conjunction during the five preceeding days, use it commercially and reuse it again some centuries later when the same conjunction occurred again. Therefore, our inference is that these seals, by their unique nature, were destined to mark unique moments in their owners’ life, and were used in rituals after having been consecrated, in the same way an amulet is consecrated today with water or milk.

71

89.[M-953; Vr

DDI
viśva•bījat-viśva•bījam-tārá|| Trans. – the transit [from] beginning-to-beginning.

120.[M-131; Vrsan]

AvJSvI
viśva-muhūrta-táras gáti-muhūrta-tārá|| Trans. – [the] transit [of] auspicious-birth; [the] all-auspicious.

173.[M-723; Vr

è,;;ÃÇUII
vi•rāśis dvidáśa man the] Full Moon. -śani viparīta•gáti párvan-tārá|| Trans. – [the] powerful 20th (tithi) [of] Mars-Saturn; [the] transit [from] rise-to-dawn [of

243.[C-9; Vr

ÆC;;;LÄc
śukra dáśa•ghat Trans. – -nāyá|| [and] 30th (tithi) [of] Venus; [the] watcher [of the] almighty Mercury.

254.[Ad-5; Vr

UIc
viparīta•gáti párva-nāyá|| Trans. – [the] watcher [of] Párva [from] rise-to-dawn.

334.[M-214; Vr

QsYuR
cakrá-śakúni-tithi bhāgá|| Trans. – [the] cycle [of] fate [of the] Śakúni-mooning. 72

73

74

INTRODUÇÃO À GRAMÁTICA DA LÍNGUA DE HARAPPĀ
(A escrita ideopictográfica )

75

76

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

Prefácio

77

78

PREFÁCIO

Da Importância da Publicação de uma Gramática da Língua de Harappā.

O conhecimento das culturas antigas tem no conhecimento das suas línguas uma ferramenta inexcedível. Assim, se passa nos chamados Estudos Clássicos em que o latim e o grego assumem um papel fundamental na constituição do conhecimento. A língua é a marca do conhecimento e do domínio das produções de pensamento. A decifração de uma língua antiga, marcante num certo contexto cultural define o nascimento de uma certa área do saber. Assim se passou com a decifração das línguas antigas das grandes civilizações pré-clássicas (H.C. Rawlinson escrita cuneiforme 1846; J. F. Champollion escrita hieroglífica 1822; B. Hrozny escrita hitita 1915). No caso da escrita e da língua de Harappā, a impossibilidade de leitura dos textos pré-clássicos do Vale do Indo, em muito têm dificultado a correcta compreensão das relações entre o Ocidente e o Oriente, especialmente com as culturas Assírio-caldaica, Egípcia e Indo-europeias. Possivelmente mais antiga que a escrita Hitita e tão antiga como o hieroglífico egípcio, a escrita do Vale do rio Indo (c. 2.800-1500 a.C.), apresenta o mais provecto testemunho do pensamento e da cultura Indoeuropeia expressa através de ―selos‖ (contendo informações astronómicas e astrológicas), que mais tarde aparecem nos hinos védicos sob a forma escrita. Ao contrário do que aconteceu com os investigadores precedentes, a decifração da escrita ideográfica de Harappā / Mohenjo-Dāro não foi contemplada com uma pedra ―bilingue‖ ou ―trilingue‖. A decifração
79

resultou de um longo e exaustivo processo de 21 anos de investigação, recorrendo à Linguística, à História, à Arqueologia e à Antropologia. Desde o início do século XX vários investigadores tentaram quebrar este código, mas sem terem atingido os resultados desejados. O último grande orientalista que igualmente dedicou vinte anos da sua vida, mas sem ter atingido o derradeiro resultado, foi o Professor Dr. Asko Parpola da Universidade de Elsinkia que, findo este longo período abandonou a sua pesquisa. Depois dele, N.S. Rajaram e Natwar Jha tentaram igualmente ler as inscrições a partir de modelos que acabaram por não produzirem uma gramática ou um dicionário. O nosso investigador, José Carlos Calazans, após longo período de pesquisa, expõe a conclusão dos seus trabalhos de pesquisa, com a publicação da Breve Gramática da Língua de Harappā. Esta publicação vem no seguimento da sua comunicação apresentada ao XIII Congresso Internacional de Arqueologia do Sudeste Asiático (realizado Ravenna) em 2007, e após a notícia das últimas pesquisas lideradas pelo Dr. Rajesh P. N. Rao, professor associado da Universidade de Washington (Seattle) em Ciência Computacional e Engenharia. Dr. Rao anunciou em Dezembro de 2008, no artigo conjunto ―Entropic Evidence for Linguistic Structure in the Indus Scriopt‖, que esta escrita ― apesar de até à data do referido artigo não ter sido decifrada ― após ser submetida a análise computacional, verificou-se apresentar características que favorecem a hipótese linguística de pertencer a um grupo de línguas naturais da região. José Carlos Calazans, de forma humilde mas sólida, vem a este foro científico apresentar o seu trabalho. Não mais pretendemos dizer que, como a própria ciência se define, se trata de mais uma pedra na construção do conhecimento. Uma pedra que esta à vista de todos para a crítica e para que todos os restantes académicos prossigam os seus estudos, refutando-a, ultrapassando-a. Só assim se provará que o trabalho é mesmo científico.
80

Por agora, fica uma proposta de interessante trabalho que implicou mais de duas dezenas de anos de investigação e que a Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, através da sua original área de História e Ciência das Religiões e das suas Edições Universitárias Lusófonas, gostosamente, coloca à disposição de todos os interessados.

Paulo Mendes Pinto
Director da Área de Ciência das Religiões Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias

81

82

INTRODUÇÃO

A publicação do Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions (19871991), veio trazer o maior contributo para o estudo aprofundado da cultura material da Civilização do Indus, ao nível da escrita ideopictográfica. Pela primeira vez os investigadores e orientalistas passaram a ter à sua disposição a maior colecção de selos e inscrições de uma cultura sobre a qual quase tudo se conhece, menos o mais importante: o seu pensamento, sua língua e a sua escrita. Para todos os investigadores da Índia Préclássica, e principalmente para aqueles que tentaram e tentam decifrar a escrita da Civilização do Indus e do Sarasvatī, o Corpus representa o melhor instrumento de pesquisa. Mas não podemos deixar de fazer uma justa homenagem a Asko Parpola e sua equipa (P. Aalto, S. Parpola, Kimmo e Seppo Koskenniemi) assim como a outros investigadores (H. Heras, B. B. Lal, Krishna Rao, I. Mahadevan, Natwar Jha, G. L. Possehl, et all.), cujo empenho e o contributo para tentarem decifrar esta escrita, embora não tendo atingido o objectivo pretendido, conseguiram acima de tudo lançar os primeiros fundamentos metodológicos e sistemáticos de um rigor único e de uma seriedade científica assinalável. A nossa investigação teve início em 1982, quando decidimos aceitar o desafio de tentar decifrar esta escrita ideopictográfica, partindo dos pressupostos lançados por A. Parpola. Mais tarde em 1984, vimo-nos obrigados a abandonar este princípio que defendia a língua Tamil (protoTamil) como ponto de partida para a decifração; pressuposto que tinha já estado no argumento de H. Heras (1953), igualmente sem resultados satisfatórios apesar dos contributos de Y.V. Knorozov (1965). A partir de 1985 optámos então por considerar a possibilidade de tratar-se de uma língua do ramo indo-iraniano, próxima do védico ou do avesta. Foi nesta
83

altura que começámos a notar certas semelhanças entre algumas das palavras compostas que seguem igualmente o mesmo procedimento morfológico no sânscrito e noutros prácritos, como o pāli. Estas semelhanças com ideopictogramas justapostos, tomavam o mesmo sentido literal que outras palavras compostas equivalentes no védico e no sânscrito, mas por vezes apresentavam desvios lexicais a tal ponto de não se encontrar a fonte correspondente nas etimologias conhecidas ― outros investigadores assumiram o mesmo procedimento de aglutinarem consoantes, ou até mesmo palavras, que pretensamente descobriam em cada ideopictograma, para lerem palavras compostas tal como no sânscrito. Nesse momento ficámos em dúvida se o paralelismo fosse simples coincidência ou acidente, entre a morfologia própria das escritas pictográficas e a composição aglutinante das palavras compostas que surgem no indo-europeu, como igualmente na formação intrínseca do tamil. Por muito tempo experimentámos diferentes métodos, mas sempre com detalhes comuns. Um deles foi justamente a associação de consoantes ou de palavras formando grupos compostos, como sugerido pela própria morfologia pictográfica. Porém, se a decifração se podia aplicar a meia dúzia de selos, o mesmo método parecia falhar quando aplicado a todos eles; este paradoxo foi sentido por muitos investigadores. Alguns insistiram no seu método de ―meia dúzia‖, tendo a preguiça de verificar se era aplicável a toda a colecção, enquanto outros renderam-se à evidência da impossibilidade e humildemente se calaram. Tal como eles também nós avançámos e recuámos, mas nunca tivemos em mente fazer anúncio de nenhuma‖ triunfo‖, nem de arriscarmo-nos a repetir o que outros investigadores já tinham dito antes; quantos provavelmente estiveram bem perto de encontrarem a solução! Mas o nosso problema foi tentar saber qual o nível de língua em que os selos foram escritos e nunca, ―encaixar‖ à força a língua expressa pelos selos da Cultura do Indus no védico ou no sânscrito clássico ― o que neste último caso seria um verdadeiro anacronismo, mesmo assim, houve quem tivesse tentado o ―método da
84

força‖. Porém, por nosso lado, chegámos quase a tender para o grupo dos ―sanscritistas tradicionais‖, não fosse o nosso ponto de partida divergir, no sentido em que, ao usarmos das regras de composição e da gramática de -nos do sânscrito e do védico dada a peculiaridade lexical, os assuntos tratados nos textos e a própria iconografia. Poderíamos até afirmar que a distância que separa o védico do dialecto escrito dos selos, é sensivelmente a mesma que aparta o sânscrito do pāli, o que já por si é um indicador de diferenças sociorreligiosas de notável importância; os Jainas igualmente reclamaram o ardhamāgadhī dos Āgmas como sendo genuinamente a língua dos arianos e dos deuses, e não o sânscrito, muito embora tenham misturado este com os prácritos e utilizado o gujarati, o marathi, o hindi, o kanada e o tamil. É neste sentido e contexto que o conceito de mleccha tira a sua evidência, da particularidade de síntese linguística e cultural observada pelos brâmanes, que se consideravam puristas da língua e o seu dialecto como único e superior. Quanto mais a arqueologia foi revelando a cultura material da Civilização do Indus, mais o enigma se adensou, no sentido de não se encontrar paralelo com o conteúdo do , exceptuando situações ritualistas do Atharvaveda. Perante o paradoxo cultural que a Civilização do Indus e os selos apresentavam, inclinámo-nos cada vez mais para a hipótese de se tratar de um extracto linguístico diferente pertencente ao ramo indo-iraniano, mas diferente do védico e da franja cultural de influência bramânica. A própria iconografia dos selos parecia sugerir isso mesmo, mas faltava-nos ainda compreender como estariam distribuídos os diferentes dialectos e quais teriam sido os mais influentes nesse período. Se de facto se verificasse que um determinado dialecto tinha sido o gerador destes selos, então teríamos um problema de fundo: o pertenceria a uma outra tradição cultural, embora da mesma família linguística. Isto seria possível, já que o próprio faz referência a diferentes tribos e etnias que não são consideradas arianas, e muitas vezes comparadas a forças demoníacas.
85

Os estudos orientais tomaram como base importantíssima para o estudo comparado das línguas indo-europeias o e outros vedas. Partindo do pressuposto estabelecido pelo brahmanismo de que esse era o testemunho mais antigo dos Árias ― tomando os Árias como todo o povo homogéneo que ocupou os vales do Indus e do Sarasvatī, que dominavam política e religiosamente uma vasta região ― os linguistas e os historiadores de finais do séc. XIX partiram do princípio que esse tinha sido de facto o único testemunho verdadeiro do início do Hinduísmo. Todas as outras franjas da sociedade védica ficavam de fora da classificação, e sem direito a registo linguístico. Esta tese passou para o séc. XX e quanto mais a arqueologia foi trazendo à luz do dia a cultura material e os respectivos selos, mais claro se tornou que o dificilmente se enquadrava neste horizonte, principalmente quando a colecção de selos começou a crescer em número. Porque os mesmos vedas não fazem alusão à existência de um alfabeto anterior ao Brahmī; os indólogos dividiram-se entre aqueles que declararam a anterioridade (quase) pré-histórica do e os que passaram a aceitar a simultaneidade de culturas no mesmo espaço geográfico. Como resolver este enigma? A resposta parece simples de mais para ser credível: após o colapso da Civilização do Indus, o grupo social maioritariamente brahmânico assumiu o controle da sociedade, tendo tomado como textos fundadores, toda a sua tradição religiosa e ritualista que, a seu modo, tinha divergido por muito tempo da maioria da população do período anterior. A Civilização do Indus (igualmente associado ao Sarasvatī) é sem dúvida das mais antigas culturas do mundo, e a sua importância é acrescida pelo facto da área de influência ter ultrapassado em extensão a da Antiga Dinastia egípcia ou até a da Suméria. Com as mesmas características de uma civilização evoluída (arquitectura, urbanismo, saneamento básico, escrita, etc.) a Civilização do Indus fez-se ouvir em terras distantes pelas vias do comércio terrestre e marítimo. Os selos
86

produzidos por esta cultura encontram-se espalhados por uma vastíssima área entre o actual Paquistão e a Índia, mas o comércio levou esses artefactos tão longe como a Suméria, Tell Asmar, Susa, Ur, Dilmun, Magan, Failaka, Pirak, etc. Logo no inicio os arqueólogos perceberam que esta escrita era única na história da Índia e que dela não havia memória na tradição religiosas hindu nem nos textos épicos. Os resultados das escavações realizadas em Dilmun (1950), em Pirak (1968-74), em Mehrgarh, Sibri e Nausharo (1974-87), revelaram uma antiguidade que ultrapassa a ancestralidade da Suméria e do Egipto, remetendo para o sétimo milénio a.C. os sítios mais antigos da Civilização do Indus. As ligações com o Irão e a Ásia central foram igualmente evidentes nas escavações realizadas em Shahr-i Sokhta (Seistan) e em Tepe Yahya (Irão), mostrando um intercâmbio activo entre os Proto-Elamitas e as populações do planalto iraniano durante a primeira metade do terceiro milénio a.C. Com as escavações que se seguiram ficou igualmente claro que a Civilização do Indus teve uma grande troca cultural com o Irão e a Suméria e que por volta de 2000 a.C. houve um surto migratório iraniano do Nordeste para a região do Sind, Shahi-Tump e Mehri (Baluchistão). Embora o fabrico e a tradição de selos remontem à Suméria e o Irão tenha assimilado a ideia adaptando-a, a Civilização do Indus igualmente a seguiu, porém, a língua que exala desta escrita ideopictográfica nada têm de comum com o sumério ou com o acádio, mas com um dialecto (jargão) do ramo indo-iraniano, fora do círculo de influência da cultura brahmânica. Neste contexto, a antinomia entre as divindades védica e avéstica (Ásura / Ahura) parece ter representado mais do que uma simples rivalidade religiosa, mas uma verdadeira divisão social embora, dentro do mesmo ramo linguístico. Mas que terra terá sido esta que hoje designamos genericamente por ―Civilização do Indus‖? Fará algum sentido o termo sânscrito mlecchadeśa referido no como a ―terra dos não-arianos‖? Perante a possibilidade de um outro fundo linguístico dialectal, de grande extensão
87

sóciocultural, oposto ao brahmanismo e com uma escrita própria, o assunto pode começar a fazer sentido à luz desta nova análise que apresentamos. Alguns textos sumérios referem Arat como sendo uma terra situada algures nas montanhas fora da Suméria 1. Samuel Noah Kramer chegou a identificá-la com uma região próxima das montanhas Zagros, mas a geografia suméria não é tão clara ao ponto de nos dar uma resposta definitiva. Porém, desde que Kramer formulou a sua hipótese que pouco se disse e se esclareceu sobre a verdadeira localização de , ficando a questão praticamente ―resolvida‖ por si mesma. Porém, a maior parte dos historiadores discorda quanto à sua verdadeira localização e em geral, consentem que se situe entre o noroeste iraniano e o Azerbeijão, sendo as suas fronteiras estendidas desde o Cáucaso ao Zagros e do mar Cáspio ao mar Negro; por vezes aparece identificada com a estação arqueológica de Godin, a oriente de Kangavar, ao sul do Curdistão iraniano, ou então com a civilização Trypilliana-Cucuteni. Mas a questão está ainda longe de ser resolvida. Dado que aos textos sumérios descrevem esta terra como sendo rica e até certo ponto rival da Suméria, competindo com ela em riquezas naturais e em controlo do comércio terrestre e marítimo. tornou-se uma candidata natural das culturas nascentes da orla suméria, incluindo o horizonte indo-europeu (indo-iraniano). Recentemente, o país de Arat , descrito como ―a montanha cheia de cedros‖ (ETCSL: 1.8.1.5.1) ou ―a cadeia montanhosa de Ebiḫ‖ (ETCSL: 1.3.2), tem sido reclamado como o berço de culturas emergentes que pretendem justificar alguns nacionalismos de final de século XX princípios do XXI, principalmente depois da Perestroika e da queda de Saddam Hussein no Iraque. parece assim ressuscitar dos textos cuneiformes, como se ainda mantivesse a antiga disputa entre Enmerkar (―senhor de Kulaba‖) e Ensuḫ
1- Inana e Ebiḫ (ETCSL: 1.3.2), Gilgamesh e Ḫuwawa (ETCSL: 1.8.1.5.1), Lugalbanda na cavern da montanha (ETCSL: 1.8.2.1), Lugalband e o pássaro Azud (ETCSL: 1.8.2.2), Enmerkar e En-suḫgir-ana (ETCSL: 1.8.2.4). Vid. textos traduzidos pelo Instituto Oriental da Universidade de Oxford. 88

Entre os pretendentes a Arat como a sua terra de origem e o seu irredutível território, encontra-se a Ucrânia neolítica designada por ―civilização Trypilliana-Cucuteni‖ (5400-2750 a.C) perto de Kiev, descoberta e escavada pela primeira vez por Vikentiy Khvoika entre os anos 1893-1899. O conceito de origem étnica da civilização Trypilliana tem sido discutido sem ainda se encontrar um consenso. Diferentes investigadores dividiram-se entre três classificações gerais: Próto-eslavos (Vikentiy Khvoika), Traco-frígios (R. Schtern), Celtas (K. Schugardt) e Tocharianos (O. Mengin et all.). Outro candidato que reclama éa própria região do Kurdistão. Mas a atenção particular desta nossa pesquisa cai inevitavelmente sobre dois pontos fundamentais: a origem dos Kassitas e dos Mitanianos e a localização da Arat indiana. É certo que uns e outros foram considerados como invasores estrangeiros no norte da Mesopotâmia, e que traziam já uma tradição védica linguística desde os séculos XVIII-XVI a.C. (sapta > satta; Indra > Indara; Surya > Shuriash; Marut > Maruttash; Indra-Bhaga > Inda-Bugash, etc.). É provável que se tratasse da mesma migração indo-europeia, originando-se os Kassitas na indiana (Panjab oriental) tendo migrado para o Sindh, Afeganistão e região pantanosa do sul do Iraque. Este movimento migratório explicaria a existência de diferentes em diferentes regiões. Quanto ao termo em si, é notadamente um prácrito de (sem reino), cujo significado se junta àquele de mlecchadeśa (―terra dos confederados‖) ou dos ―nãoarianos‖, entendendo-se como não brahmanes. Deixamos porém e por agora ao leitor mais avisado que nós, a leitura crítica do trabalho que introduzimos, que será seguido em tempo próprio pela publicação completa do nosso trabalho de pesquisa.

89

90

I. LÍNGUA E DIALECTO

1. Dialecto ( ou ) e jargão (paiśāca). Uma tradução só é possível quando em duas línguas há palavras equivalentes para um mesmo conceito, de contrário, torna-se necessário criar novas noções. No caso dos selos da cultura Harappā, todos os investigadores partiram do pressuposto de terem sob pesquisa a versão antiga de uma língua bem conhecida, fosse ela Védico, Sânscrito ou Tamil. Assim, uma possível tradução poderia utilizar conceitos equivalentes (do Védico ou do Tamil) representados pictograficamente. O problema foi encontrar uma representação pictográfica correcta para os conceitos que, supostamente, ainda estariam em uso no período clássico. O ponto de partida de vários investigadores foi sempre usarem uma língua já bem estruturada, uma língua padrão como o Sânscrito ou o Tamil, e partirem de uma delas tentando encaixar as etimologias conhecidas no que a morfologia pictográfica sugeria, adivinhando significados tirados da exígua sintaxe que os textos pictográficos apresentam. Mas nunca se pensou, talvez, que a ―língua‖ expressa ideopictograficamente pudesse ser um dialecto ( ), uma variante afastada do Védico ou do Sânscrito ( ), ou até um jargão (paiśāca). Como refere A. Bharati:
In each religious and philosophical tradition a specific idiom is developed and constantly used by its adherents. This happened to the tantric tradition, too, and the pressure from orthodox Hinduism and Buddhism might have enhanced

langage intentionnel’. …the tantric texts are frequently couched in intentional language — a secret, obscure language with a double meaning, wherein a particular state of consciousness is expressed in erotical terminology, the mythological and -yogic and with sexual significance. (Cf. Bharati: 1983, p. 172). 91

Cada classe social criou com o decorrer do tempo um idioma específico, que historicamente se reconhece como jargão profissional, indicativo único de um determinado grupo de actividade: médicos, advogados, engenheiros, marinheiros, astrólogos, etc. Igualmente derivado da necessidade de se manter a identidade de classe, relativamente a diferentes grupos sociais e religiosos, emergiu outro desvio semântico na via normal da língua padrão. Neste sentido podemos citar vários exemplos, como o argot europeu da Idade Média e o da Índia. Porém, o nosso estudo sobre a escrita pictográfica da cultura Harappā, não nos revelou nenhuma ligada a um estrato religioso ou social, embora já pudesse estar em uso na altura. Porém, encontramos referências nos textos clássicos e védicos que apontam para a existência de vários jargões (paiśāca) e variantes ( ), alguns tidos como míticos ou imaginários, razão pela qual, provavelmente, nunca se tomou muito a sério a sua existência. Assim, podemos presumir que os ―cães‖ (śva), os ―mochos‖ (ulūka), os ―cucos‖ (koka), as ―águias‖ ( ) e os ―abutres‖ ( ), citados como demónios no (7.104.20-23) 2 , e o povo Kīkata Kilāta e Ākuli (ŚBr. 1.1.4.14-17) e o Śámman (ŚBr. 6.3.1.24) ― tiveram o seu próprio paiśāca, ou provavelmente a sua .O védico dos hinos opôs-se aos baixos dialectos das , como o Grego Antigo da Ilíada e da Odisseia à Koiné, e mais tarde o Latim erudito ao Latim bárbaro. Não raras vezes os demónios védicos assumem figuras de um antropomorfismo que a mitologia consagrou no cânon da arte indiana, mas também muitos ―feiticeiros‖ igualmente citados nos Vedas, adquirem as formas dos mesmos animais que são seus auxiliares nas práticas mágicas ― uma figura mítica e antropologicamente bem conhecida do xamanismo. Da natureza comum de uns e de outros formaram-se a mesma etimologia e a mesma raiz ― (feiticeiros) e (demónios) ―
210.87.19. 92

também elas carregadas de uma carga intencional às quais se atribuiu um dialecto específico:
– Os cães (demónios) recuam sobre o peso do engano, (eles que) alegremente gostariam de afligir Indra, que não pode ser subjugado. Śakra (Indra) afia a – Indra sempre foi o destruidor dos demónios que estragam as oferendas dos invocadores dos Deuses; que assim seja, Śakra, como um machado que racha a madeira, ataca e esmaga-os como se fossem potes de barro. – Destrói o mocho (macho) e o mocho (fêmea), destrói o cão e o cuco. Destrói – livra-nos dos infortúnios e dos problemas desta vida; da tristeza que vem do céu, preserva-nos (ó) atmosfera (divyā). -23. ____________________________ – caldeirão. Traz-nos a riqueza de Pramaganda; ó Maghavan, concede-nos o de baixa condição (servo).

Esta oposição semântica entre brâmanes, feiticeiros ( )e , poderia explicar igualmente a antinomia entre as tribos védicas dos Anus, dos Yadus e dos Druhyus por um lado, e dos Pūrus por outro. Neste sentido, devemos considerar igualmente a antinomia entre o deus persa bom (Ahura) e o deus védico mau (Ásura), diferença que Yāska explica etimologicamente dizendo:
Demons (a-suof breath; inhaled, it rests in the body, i. e. endowed with it (asuknown: he created gods (surān) from good (su), that is the characteristic of gods; he created demons (asurān) from good (a-su) that is the characteristic of demons. (Cf. Sarup 1998: Nirukt. 3.7, , p. 42).

Acaso será para perguntarmos como terão os persas explicado etimologicamente a mesma diferença? Deveríamos então aceitar como verdadeiras as descrições que o faz sobre os (feiticeiros) e (demónios), ou tomá-las como simples figuras de estilo?

-23,5

93

– Salva-nos do mal, do ardiloso. Salvanos dele que nos faz mal ou nos tenta matar, ó deus mais jovem de esplendor luminoso! -11,15 – dos sacrifícios contra as maldições. (...) – (...) Reinando de noite e ao início da aurora através de teu próprio poder, ó
1.79.1.5.27-28,6

– Ó Agni dos mil-olhos que moras entre todas as tribos, afasta os demónios
-28,12

– muito. –
4.4.3.4.23-25,1 V 5.2.3.8.14-15,9

-22,14

– (...) Ele (Ágni) afia os seus dois chifres para trespassar os demónios

Se os sacerdotes brâmanes não foram considerados todos iguais, como Kilāta e Ākuli não o foram pela ortodoxia bramânica ― eles eram os dois sacerdotes dos Ásuras ― então as suas variantes linguísticas devem ter reflectido esse mesma diferença religiosa; de facto, a estes sacerdotes brâmanes foi atribuída a linguagem dos demónios . Esta espécie de era bem conhecida dos brâmanes, de tal modo que passou para o léxico sânscrito com os nomes de (AnRwk -a;a ―dialecto sem sentido‖) ou (imït-a;a ―dialecto adulterado‖). Não deixa de ser curioso que o Nirukta faça derivar o termo da raiz * (―proteger‖, ―guardar‖), explicando que assim é porque a vida tem de ser protegida dos demónios (cf. Sarup 1998: 4.17, pp. 63-64 ), enquanto que Rudolph Roth faz derivar o mesmo termo da raiz * (―matar‖). E como diz o adágio, ―o que cura pode matar‖. Assim, existem referências a ―míticas‖ que teriam necessariamente particularidades lexicais próximas do jargão (paiśāca), e que podem ter expressado grupos sócio-religiosos considerados marginais na língua e nas opções religiosas ― neste contexto histórico e antropológico consideramos a possibilidade de estarmos perante uma situação de próto-castas. Destas ―míticas‖ emergem a (ipzac-a;a) e a (ra]is-a;a), dois termos claramente associados à classe dos demónios védicos ― segundo o próprio
94

,

ásuras e

pertencem ao grupo dos demónios piśāca.

Por outro lado, não menos mítico e talvez não menos exacto, o faz afirmar pela boca de Rāma, que Ājāneya falava uma das nove línguas eruditas existentes (navanvVyakr[p {ift). Temos assim dois níveis linguísticos que se devem ter oposto desde longo tempo, e que devem ter significado diferenças profundas no comportamento social e religioso, da mesma forma como um brâmanes se distanciou e opôs a um xamã, ou .

Nestas diferenças e subtilezas linguísticas Yāska refere uma dissemelhança dialectal no sânscrito falado, como se fosse uma espécie de provincianismo. Chega mesmo a dividir os falantes da língua entre aqueles que empregam formas primárias e outros que usam formas secundárias. De acordo com esta distinção, Yāska apresenta os Kambojas3 e os ―Orientais‖, como pertencendo ao primeiro grupo, e os ―Nortistas‖ como ao grupo das formas secundárias derivativas do sânscrito. Yāska diferencia assim os Āryas dos ―Orientais‖ como igualmente dos ―Nortistas‖. Afirma com efeito que os Kambojas, os Orientais e os Nortistas não eram Āryas ― pelo menos não eram olhados como tal por Yāska ― apesar de terem estado sob a sua ―influência‖ ao ponto de adoptarem a sua língua 4. Patañjali no seu faz a mesma distinção com quase as mesmas palavras de Yāska, mostrando-nos desta
3- Yāska chega mesmo ao pretensiosismo de afirmar que os Kambojas, que tiram o seu nome de um tipo particular de cobertores (kambala) de que tanto gostam, são os únicos a ter o verbo śavati (ir). 4- Sobre a questão da paternidade ariana ou não das etnias védicas, e quem é um verdadeiro Brāhmane, o Dhammapa esclarece que nem uma nem outra são distinção de raça, mas apanágio de educação, sinónimo de ―nobre de espírito‖: ―É bom estar com os nobres (Ariya). Viver com eles sempre traz felicidade. Não encontrar ignorantes é ser-se sempre feliz‖ (XV-206); ―Faz de ti uma ilha, esforça-te sem demora e sê sábio. Purifica-te das impurezas e, sem mácula, entrarás na morada dos Ariyas‖ (XVIII-236); ―Aquele que injuria os seres vivos não é um Ariya. Pela não-violência para com todos os seres vivos 95

forma que entre os gramáticos clássicos existia a tradição secular de distinguir o erudito do popular e do jargão. Mas quer Yāska como Patañjali, não fazem menção das línguas do sul da Índia (como o Tamil), como existindo ou sendo faladas entre os Nortistas ou entre os Orientais, o que nos leva a deduzir que a zona de grande influência do Védico e suas variantes, foi de facto o Noroeste da Índia, incluindo jargões populares e profissionais. É claro que não devemos confundir jargão (paiśāca) com variante ( ) ― uma variedade linguística pode suportar vários jargões e não o oposto. E porque o sânscrito é sempre utilizado como utensílio hábil nas traduções dos prácritos (por ser justamente uma língua artificial e sintética) optámos pela mesma convenção, fazendo uso das etimologias e dos instrumentos hábeis fornecidos pelo protocolo da gramática. O resultado do uso deste método revelou-nos a existência de uma possível variante-jargão pertencente ao grupo Indo-iraniano, certamente um jargão em uso pela classe dos astrónomos/astrólogos, que sendo piśāca poderá, talvez, encontrar ainda hoje uma sua descendente entre as línguas dárdicas (designadas igualmente por pisacha); das línguas dárdicas ou pisachas enumeram-se as seguintes: Kohistani, Dameli, Domāki, Gawari, Gojri, Kalasha, Kalkoti, Kashmiri, Chitrali, Pahari, Shina e Torwali. Mas, ter sido um jargão profissional não deveria por si só classificá lo como um ―dialecto demoníaco‖ ( ). A morfologia e a sintaxe do discurso astrológico clássico indiano, assim como as respectivas etimologias não saem fora do cânone da ortodoxia sânscrítica, mas a estrutura dos textos dos selos igualmente não diverge do corpo de conhecimentos que o registou. A denominação de ―dialecto demoníaco‖ para a língua expressa nos selos em estudo é nossa, e fundamenta-se tão simplesmente no facto de que a memória ( ) não faz menção de uma ―escrita‖ antes do advento do alfabeto brāhmī. Que a
uma pessoa torna-se num Ariya‖ (XIX-270); ―Não é por se ter o cabelo entrançado, nem por nascimento (casta) que alguém se torna num Brāhmane. Mas aquele em que mora a verdade e a rectidão, esse é puro e é um Brāhmane‖ (XXVI-393). (Cf. Calazans: 2006). 96

tradição ortodoxa védica e bramânica sempre fez questão de se distanciar dos grupos que não eram ―Āryas‖, tendo relegado para uma ignóbil existência os ―não Arianos‖ (comparados por vezes a ―demónios‖), atribuindo-lhes uma ―língua‖ estranha à sua e por isso ―demoníaca‖ (torpe). Os selos da cultura Harappā, a sua escrita pictográfica e a variante-jargão que transmitem, estiveram fora da zona de influência social bramânica, e embora os selos possam ter sido utilizados por todos os estratos da sociedade (como talismãs ou como marcas pessoais para outro fim), o simples facto de terem sido astrólogos ( ) e feiticeiros ( ) a fabricarem-nos, limita grandemente a faixa social e linguística na qual podem ser incluídos os falantes do respectivo jargão. Acrescente-se ainda e finalmente, que talismãs (kávaca ou ) são objectos destinados a afastarem os demónios e todo o género de influências malignas, sendo por essa razão que tomam o nome da mesma raiz formativa * (―proteger‖, ―guardar‖). Portanto, feiticeiro ( ), talismã ( ), demónio ( ) e ―dialecto demoníaco‖ ( ) partilham de uma mesma natureza, seja ela ―proteger‖ (segundo Yāska) ou ―matar‖ (segundo R. Roth). Como o emprega depreciativamente aqueles termos sempre que se lhes refere, qualquer jargão (paiśāca) ou variante ( ) a eles associada deve ter tido uma componente mágica, social e linguística de importância considerável, a tal ponto de ser mencionada quer na Śruti como na . Dado que esta escrita pictográfica aparece unicamente gravada em selos e em cerâmica, e porque os talismãs tomam o nome de , a escrita e o jargão neles inscritos podem assumir-se como , nome que lhes atribuímos genericamente na nossa gramática e dicionário. Reparámos igualmente que alguns étimos existentes neste jargão, são exactamente os mesmos usados na gramática Śabdānuśāsana O uso da terminologia para classificação dos casos no Sânscrito ( e āmantrita) é o mesmo para indicar os dias lunares na astronomia e na astrologia, como aparece posteriormente nos tratados clássicos. Outros termos seguem o
97

mesmo procedimento, revelando como um jargão é formado a partir de uma língua padrão, e como uma classe profissional (dos astrólogos e astrónomos) exerceu a sua actividade entre os sacerdotes mencionados no . Algumas formas lexicais caíram em desuso neste jargão profissional, pela única razão de que uma reforma linguística e ortográfica (do ideopictográfico para o fonético), quase sempre deixa de fora palavras que o fonetismo obliterou, fenómeno que envolve toda a estrutura de uma língua. Expressões e termos em desuso, tornaram-se naquilo que se passou a chamar posteriormente etimologias perdidas.

Levanta-se assim um problema que parece ser incontornável. Porque existe uma total ausência de memória sobre um antigo sistema de escrita ? A resposta pode estar na diferença socio-religiosa, entre um tipo de grupo étnico que foi responsável pela tradição védica e que esteve na origem do alfabeto brāhmī, e outro de tradição xamânica que poderia, eventualmente, ter desenvolvido um sistema de escrita ideopictográfica que desapareceu com o colapso da cultura Harappā. Do período clássico apenas são reconhecidas como (memória) as obras agrupadas em cinco colecções: , Ithiāsa (Ramāyana e Mahābhārata), , Āgama e ; mas esta ―memória‖ diz respeito a uma tradição, a uma memória transmitida oralmente tendo como valores a Ética, a Filosofia, a História e a Mitologia. A Śruti, pelo contrário, é um conjunto de textos derivados de uma clariaudiência instilada por ―inspiração divina‖, como afirma a tradição, e que formam o centro da religião hindu: , Yajurveda, Sāmaveda e Atharvaveda. É justamente na Śruti ( ) onde encontramos mais informação sobre ―os outros‖, os sacerdotes brâmanes que não eram considerados ―arianos‖, e no Yajurveda só muito timidamente se fala deles; por outro lado, é principalmente o Atharvaveda que se dedica aos encantamentos e invocações para curar doenças,
98

proteger pessoas comuns e reis, propiciar abundância em água e gado, e destruir demónios e feiticeiros. Os hinos do Atharvaveda enquadram-se no campo da magia invocatória numa versão ―software‖, enquanto que os manuais de magia prática Saundaryalaharī e Yantrachintamani de tradição tântrica, descrevem com todo o pormenor a magia na sua versão ―hardware‖; mas quer no Atharvaveda como nos dois últimos, o recurso a talismãs ( ) foi prática corrente, tal como ainda hoje é hábito em toda a Índia. Se existiu um processo evolutivo entre as várias reformas gráficas, desde o ideopictográfico ao fonético do devanāgarī, desenvolvimento que desconhecemos totalmente, então, toda a vez que uma reforma ocorreu, várias expressões (palavras compostas p.ex.) devem ter ficado fora de uso. Esta situação foi visivelmente dramática para as gerações mais antigas de escribas, que fizeram a transição entre um e outro período de escrita. Mas esta suposição parece ser somente aplicável às reformas que possam ter ocorrido durante o processo evolutivo da escrita . É sabido que o alfabeto devanāgarī apareceu depois de várias reformas gráficas, iniciadas a partir do brāhmī até o alfabeto clássico com 48 letras. As 52 letras usadas nos sons da língua Védica, foi uma forma tardia de perpetuar aqueles sons com fonemas do alfabeto nāgarī.
Twelve centuries before Christ, Tiglath Pilaser I seized Aramea and let groups of people close to the Indus, opening communication between Assyria and the Syrian territory, in the occident, and the Punjab, in east. The Aramaic became later (745 BC) the language of the trade and of the politics; and it is from an well-known Aramaic alphabet in Mesopotamia that, as it seems more probable, were derived the two alphabets, i.e., the Indian writing characters of the registrations of Aśoka. The relations between India and the Scithian territories are, certainly, very old… (cf. Wanzke: 1984, pp.71-79).

Esta foi a hipótese estabelecida pelos sânscritólogos e linguistas do século XIX, para explicarem a criação dos alfabetos brāhmī e nāgarī. Mas eles ignoravam a existência da escrita ideopictgráfica do vale do Indo, a qual não parece ter derivado directa ou indirectamente do alfabeto brāhmī,
99

ao contrário do que afirma Natwar Jha (Jha e Rajaram: 2000). Partindo do princípio por nós já exposto anteriormente, de que a escrita emergiu no seio de um grupo social diferente da ortodoxia bramânica, nunca esta iria fazer uso de um alfabeto fortemente identificado com xamãs e demónios. Esta parece-nos ser uma razão plausível para explicar porque o alfabeto aramaico foi o escolhido em vez de um que já tinha sido utilizado exactamente na mesma região do Indus uns 500 anos antes. Mas, se o ―elo perdido‖ entre o e o brāhmī não pode ser encontrado, a filiação linguística parece, inesperada e desconcertantemente mais evidente. A partir da tradução dos selos, foi-nos possível estabelecer uma ponte fonética e fonológica entre as regras do Sânscrito védico e este jargão. Desta forma, podemos dizer que o esteve em uso na mesma altura que o védico, mas separado deste, da mesma forma como o nível linguístico do Atharvaveda se distanciou daquele. Mais tarde, o aparecimento do Sânscrito trouxe uma reforma gráfica que incluiu a maior parte dos termos dos diversos jargões, ajustando muitas à nova língua sintética.

4. Arcaico (ārśam) versus e tiveram os seus respectivos nomes, mas como terá sido designado a língua dos Vedas que os linguistas ocidentais chamam sânscrito védico usadas no seu tempo: o chandas (a língua dos hinos, também designada por )ea que corresponderia à língua falada, incluindo jargões profissionais. Foi, portanto, no mesmo momento em que o védico (chandas) caiu em desuso e perdeu o aspecto de língua religiosa, que outras variantes faladas ( ) se sobrepuseram. O foi, portanto, a língua corrente da elite religiosa ortodoxa na qual o foi escrito. O surge assim como uma língua artificial, porque a forma como aparece nos textos mostra-a como arcaica, no sentido em que já não
100

era falada (cf. Abreu 1883: p. 205). Se a casta sacerdotal falou o e outras castas falaram o Indiano Médio (incluindo variantes e jargões) então, devemos presumir que muito provavelmente a língua usada nos selos é uma , como os já referidos e . Pudemos igualmente considerar existirem ligações entre estas eo Tochariano C, sugerido por D. Q. Adams. O e o zend têm ainda grandes similaridades relativamente à palatização das velares e à cacuminalização das sibilantes precedidas por i e u, como refere Grammont na sua Inde Classique (cf. Villar 1972: p. 54). Mas o apresenta algumas características próprias, algumas novidades relativamente às línguas Indo-europeias, conservando ainda um certo legado original. Entre as suas características destacamos: 7 casos flexivos; 3 géneros; 2 vozes; casos fortes e fracos; alterações vocálicas e tónicas; autonomia do provérbio e da proposição; escolha de morfemas verbais (determinada parcialmente pelo sentido da raiz – o aspecto); predominância da forma sobre o sentido; predominância do sentido esotérico sobre o literal (o que faz o seu vocabulário simbólico). Entre as novidades: rigidez e extensão dada ao ; o absolutivo; o acusativo em p; o uso do normativo do perfeito; a voz passiva. O legado original: as formas nominais; o injuntivo; temas nominais em i e u como consonânticos. O , como igualmente o sânscrito clássico, têm um procedimento cuja característica estrutural indica uma aglutinação, expressão longínqua da construção morfológica que se encontra numa escrita ideográfica e que pode ser observada no . Devido a estas similaridades, cremos que as regras comuns gramaticais do védico e do sânscrito podem ser aplicadas a este tipo de escrita ― salvaguardando as devidas distâncias entre uma escrita ideopictográfica e outra fonética, apesar do aparente anacronismo.
101

No correr do processo de decifração (transliteração e tradução) verificámos ainda não existir nenhuma discrepância na aplicação deste princípio, quer relativo às declinações de composição nominal, quer a adjectivos ou a numerais. A estrutura morfológica e sintáctica ideopictográfica, apresenta uma tal semelhança com o védico e com o sânscrito, que somos forçados a reconhecer uma continuidade linguística que se manteve quase intacta durante as duas fazes posteriores de reformas gráficas. introduzidas pelos seus predecessores e estabelecidas sob forma escrita c. 400 a.C.), devem ter formado um corpo sistemático de normas existente

Da mesma forma como observamos as diferenças entre o védico e o sânscrito, é igualmente possível encontrar regras comuns na composição morfológica ideopictográfica e na morfologia védica. Torna-se evidente a suposição de que ambos os sistemas contribuíram de um forma decisiva para dar à língua estruturas estáveis no seu processo formativo até à fixação. A relação entre o védico e o sânscrito (incluindo os jargões) não está unicamente baseado na evolução linguística, cujo estrato mais antigo pode ser encontrado nos velhos hinos do . Esta escrita ideopictográfica revela a mesma tradição védica (ortodoxa e não ortodoxa) em toda a sua vertente mítica, cosmogónica, astronómica e astrológica, mas afasta-se dela pela variante linguística e pela escolha iconográfica ― comparem-se os deuses védicos e a iconografia dos selos. A diferença deveu-se, portanto, a uma especificidade e uma intenção social e religiosa que criou certamente choques em muitas ocasiões, o que pode explicar a oposição conhecida entre Anus, Yadus e Druhyus de um lado, e Pūrus de outro, ou do povo
102

, Kukura e outros grupos étnicos de tradição xamânica, que se situavam no lado oposto da ortodoxia bramânica. Cada ideopictograma contém em si mesmo (na sua estrutura formativa) uma raiz carregada de simbolismo religioso e profano, tal como acontece no Védico e no Sânscrito. A relação linguística entre o ea , entre o védico e o sânscrito (ou entre o védico e os prácritos pisachas), é válida porque é uma mesma língua em diferentes estados de evolução, desde o período pré-clássico até ao momento clássico, sem interrupções. Os alfabetos brāhmī e devanāgarī representam as duas últimas reformas gráficas. Se inicialmente pensávamos que o período védico fora caracterizado pela tradição oral, com a inexistência de escrita, então, a descoberta dos selos da cultura Harappā e a solução que aqui se apresenta, obriga -nos a reformular a equação e a ter que recuar a datação do aparecimento da primeira forma de escrita para o período pré-clássico. Outro facto não menos surpreendente é a forma como os selos aparecem ―escritos‖, no estilo aforístico. Esta forma estilística, assim como a própria escrita, implicaram necessariamente um ensino continuado e cuidado, dando atenção particular aos significados homólogos de cada pictograma, às declinações e formação de palavras simples e compostas. A tradição escrita expressa nos selos é, provavelmente, a primeira fonte de cálculo astronómico e astrológico, que podemos tomar como originária dos śastras posteriores relacionados com a ciência astronómica. Como se trata de uma escrita ideopictográfica com uso abundante de morfogramas, a tenção não pode recair na análise do som nem na sua pronúncia, nem em vogais nem em consoantes. O pictograma representava um todo, uma ideia e um princípio religioso, divino e humano. Por esta razão era olhado como um membro fixo e estável, que por aglutinação ia aceitando outros elementos (afixos), dando origem a ideias mais complexas. O princípio de formação aglutinante e sintáctica continuou numa tradição ininterrupta até ao estabelecimento do Sânscrito.
103

II. TRANSLITERAÇÃO. Para a transliteração deste sistema ideopictográfico adoptámos três níveis de registo diacrítico: 1 – sinais indicando termos formados por composição morfogramática e sinais indicando termos formados por composição morfológica; 2 – barra simples ( ) indicando mudança de linha e barra dupla para final de período; 3 – sinalização diacrítica para equivalência fonética e indicação super-escrita em casos de terminação duvidosa. Ex.: 1.a – composição morfogramática — (…) trí•ásta. 1.b - composição morfológica — (…) kúla-tara. 2.a – mudança de linha barra simples — (...) cakrám śani-śukra guru-iśu| 2.b – fim de período barra dupla — (…) parva-cakra-ásta|| 3.a – sinalização convencional diacrítica — ā, , ī, 3.b – indicação super-escrita — s bhavana ; māsaka.

Este método de transliteração faz uso dos mesmos princípios que são observados geralmente nas transliterações aplicadas às línguas Indoeuropeias, nomeadamente no Védico e no Sânscrito. Assim, os sinais diacríticos são mantidos e do Devanāgarī a barra simples (,) e dupla (.) são igualmente usadas. Foram também feitas duas transliterações para cada fragmento ideopictográfico, sendo o primeiro sem (mantendo a fonética original de cada pictograma), e a segunda com da qual a respectiva tradução procede.

104

III. CONCEITOS E REGRAS 1. PRINCÍPIO IDEOPICTOGRÁFICO

1.1. Ideopictograma Base (IB). Cada ideopictograma básico representa uma raiz ideográfica, a qual é ao mesmo tempo um núcleo formativo potencial e permeável. Pode por si mesmo formar um termo (substantivo ou adjectivo) definido pelo contexto, mas permite também a aglutinação de outros elementos, designados por morfogramas, que podem completar a ideia básica ou que contribuem para uma nova palavra de múltiplo significado, viz.: N, d, P, A.

1.2. Composto Ideopictográfico (CI). Um composto ideopictográfico é o resultado da permeabilidade do ideopictograma básico. Pode representar por si mesmo um novo núcleo de múltiplas possibilidades significativas (homónimos e homógrafos) no processo de formação ideopictográfica, nunca excedendo o número de três ideopictogramas na sua simbiose, estando assim próximo dos compostos nominais do Védico e do Sânscrito. Os compostos ideopictográficos estão organizados numa construção morfogramática e morfológica. Os ideopictogramas básicos, quando sujeitos à constituição competente, podem formar morfogramas e nestes casos apresentam-se como infixos dentro do ideopictograma principal (cf. Macdonell 1987: cap. I, art° 8, p. 8). A formação morfológica deve-se ao processo natural sintáctico e é constituído por dois ou mais compostos ideopictográficos colocados entre eles como prefixos e sufixos. De facto eles representam as chaves mais coerentes no desenvolvimento morfológico numa frase, e precedem a formação composta como ela pode ser observada no Védico e no Sânscrito.
105

1.3. Formação Sintáctica Aglutinante (FSA). A formação Sintáctica Aglutinante é a maneira como os ideopictogramas se ligam uns aos outros numa frase. O sintagma ideopictográfico pode ser construído pelo ideopictograma básico ou pelos compostos ideopictográficos. Apesar deles já formarem por si unidades bem definidas (palavras), eles são sintagmaticamente aglutinados, não importando o grafismo que tenham.

1.4. Composição Formativa Ideopictográfica (CFI). A composição de cada ideopictograma (básico ou composto) obedece a um princípio muito simples, que é o de respeitar a raiz formativa do ideopictograma principal. A ideia é sempre representada por uma imagem, como é o caso do ideopictgrama base, em torno do qual (ou dentro dele por infixação) elementos de outros ideopictogramas base são colocados (morfogramas). Na presença desta raiz principal, estes elementos perdem a primazia e a sua função fonética. A composição formativa ideopictográfica está relacionada, portanto, com as regras de composição ideopictográfica. As regras que determinam a composição ideopictográfica estão relacionadas com morfogramas que por sua vez se ligam ao ideopictograma base e que se comportam como afixos. Essas regras designam-se por: prefixação; infixação ou sobreposição (dentro do ideopictograma básico aberto ou fechado); e sufixação. Todos os afixos sob a forma de dígitos indicam declinações, ou valores numéricos específicos. A infixação é destinada à formação de compostos ideopictográficos (morfogramáticos e morfológicos).
106

1.5. Composição Ideopictográfica Nominal (CIN). A composição nominal ideopictográfica é o resultado do fenómeno de aglutinação, que dá origem aos compostos ideográficos. Segue o mesmo modo que os compostos nominais no Védico e no Sânscrito.

2. DECLINAÇÃO 2.1. Substantivos e Adjectivos. As declinações são aplicadas a substantivos e adjectivos, tal como no Védico e noutros dialectos indo-europeus. Mas não há indicação para os géneros, deduzindo-se o f. ou o m. pelos termos equivalentes que se encontram no Védico e nos prácritos. Ideograficamente não há formações específicas para adjectivos; não são usados sinais morfográficos para determinar a adjectivação. O reconhecimento dos adjectivos é feito pela posição sintagmática que o ideopictograma ocupa no texto. Em geral, os adjectivos são ideopictogramas básicos e raramente compostos ideopictográficos. Características e qualidades básicas (atributos) são adjectivos originados quer pela natureza de um planeta (usualmente no seu aspecto positivo), ou pelo aspecto diversificado da geografia, ou ainda pelas diferentes partes do corpo humano e de animais, cujas acções sugerem certas características.

2.2. Número: singular, dual e plural. O singular é representado por um único ideopictograma e o dual pela sua duplicação (par), processo semelhante aos compostos Dvandvá, viz.: B , DD , QQ, X, II , etc. O plural é indicado pela prefixação de dígitos colocados à esquerda do ideopictograma, viz.: ,,F, ,,,x, /B, ;;;0, etc. Quando em dois ideopictogramas contínuos o primeiro apresenta dígitos indicativos para o caso (colocados à direita), e o segundo ideopictograma também têm dígitos, mas indicando o plural
107

(normalmente colocados no canto superior esquerdo), então é ao último que cabe submeter-se à predominância gráfica do primeiro, passando o número a figurar no canto inferior esquerdo, viz.: Q,,+Å, Q,,+++v, Q,,++++v, etc. Para os números superiores a três, inclusive, sendo os grafismos verticais /, 0, 1, ;, ;; (e não horizontais +++, ++++ ), subentende-se a regra aplicada nos casos anteriores, viz.: T,,1x, Q,,2, Q,,;, è,,;;. ― Parece não haver distinção entre os compostos Dvigu e a formação de plurais.

2.3. Casos. A designação dos casos no Védico e no Sânscrito assemelha-se o velho uso ideopictográfico de cômputo ( ou ) através de dígitos. Este sistema foi usado para contar tempo e objectos como igualmente, no período clássico, para a identificação dos casos: , prathamā (nom.), ,, (ac.), / ou ,,, (inst.), -- cathurtī (dat.), 0 pañcamī (abl.), 1 (gen.), 2 saptamī (loc.) e āmantrita (voc.). A formação dos casos ocorre invariavelmente colocando os respectivos dígitos no canto superior direito do ideopictograma que se quer declinar. A distinção (vibhakti) ou desinência entre os casos segue, portanto, a sequência normal da enumeração ou cômputo. Os casos que apareceram até ao momento, que podem ser observados no Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions (Parppola et all., 1989), são na sua grande maioria seis: nominativo/vocativo ( Q), acusativo (Q,), instrumental (Q,,), dativo/genitivo ( Q/), ablativo (Q;,) e locativo (Q;,,)5. Para o nom./voc. (āmantrita) o ideopictograma não apresenta nenhum dígito, está tal e qual é falado ou nomeado. Como já se referiu, esta disposição dos dígitos não deve ser confundida com valores numéricos, pois estes são invariavelmente colocados no canto superior esquerdo.
5- O conceito de ―infixo‖ usado nesta gramática não é o mesmo que o praticado na linguística clássica e moderna. Neste contexto significa o sinal colocado dentro do ideograma na formação de compostos ideográficos. 108

3. CARDINAIS O sistema numérico segue a mesma composição no Védico, no Sânscrito ou em qualquer outro prácrito e é extraordinariamente semelhante ao sistema numérico chinês antigo (pictográfico), o que faz supor uma origem comum; outros sistemas demonstram igual semelhança como o egípcio e o sumério. Porém, é ao chinês do qual mais se aproxima, provavelmente desde o tempo em que as regiões míticas de Uttara-Kuru e de Takla-Makan foram um caldeirão de culturas.

1. , 2. ,, 3. ,,, ou / 4. ,,,, 5. ,,,,, ou 0 6. 1 7. 2 ou 3 8. 8 9. 9 10. ; 40. ;;;; *70. 100. E *200.

11. > 12. ? 13. @ 14. A 15. B *16. *17. *18. *19. 20. ;; 50. ;;;;; 80. ;;;;;;;; 102. F 300. EEE ou 700. EEEEEEE ou

21. +;; 22. ++;; 23. /;; 24. --;; ou C 25. 0;; 26. 1;; 27. 2;; 28. 8;; 29. 9;; 30. ;;; 60. ;;;;;; 90. 105. J

L

M

* O outline mostra os casos hipotéticos que seguem a lógica do sistema. 109

4. VERBO O conceito de verbo (conjugação) como parte nuclear de um termo, aparece com a criação de um alfabeto consonântico. Antes deste passo, e sendo as ideias representadas por ideopictogramas, não parece ter havido distinção entre o que se intuía como verbo e o que se definia como substantivo, não havendo por isso ideopictogramas específicos para um e para outro. Só depois, com o aparecimento de um alfabeto consonântico e a função de fonemas é que o verbo começou a representar um membro independente ou uma raiz visível. Numa escrita ideopictográfica a importância da mensagem reside em si mesma e não em conjugações de morfemas; este princípio unitário é observável através de vários substantivos ideopictográficos, dos quais podemos tirar o respectivo verbo que lhe dá vida ou os anima. Numa fase posterior os morfemas começaram por representar raízes de nomes e verbos. A importância da raiz fonética apareceu unicamente com a alfabetização da língua e nunca antes. O verbo (a acção) está implícito no ideopictograma, porque é ainda o todo que se representa num ideopictograma base ou num composto ideopictográfico, o qual tem a maior importância em primazia figurativa e significante. Porém, a inexistência de um elemento morfográfico específico indicando um verbo, não serve de prova da sua ausência a nível oral, não faria sentido em nenhuma língua; neste sentido, o emprego de um sintagma ideopictográfico poderia ter tido o fim de ser usado como indicativo do tempo do verbo, porém, esta característica não é suficientemente clara neste sistema ideopictográfico para que seja aceite como regra geral. Mas podemos sim e inequivocamente construir uma derivação de um verbo ideopictográfico, fazendo simplesmente uso de um ideopictograma base, viz.: D ; Í *kac (unir); À ;Ä (atar); m ; A viśva (universo) > *viś (entrar); ï ; etc.
110

O poder criativo do verbo no período clássico, para a formação de nomes e substantivos, deriva directamente da importância dada ao significado intrínseco do sujeito, e por isso este tem de estar de acordo com o verbo que lhe corresponde. A afirmação que Yāska faz no Nirukta sobre a natureza dos verbos e dos substantivos, torna-se mais compreensível quando observamos a morfologia idepictográfica e a sua etimologia, muito embora Yāska ter acreditado que toda a tradição etimológica e gramatical tenha sido oral e nunca ter existido um sistema de escrita no período védico:
Moreover, substantives should be named according to the regular and correct grammatical form of a verb, so that their meaning may be indubitable, e.g. (man) should take the form of puri-śaya (citydweller); aśva (horse), of (runner); (grass), of tardanam (pricker). Further, people indulge in sophistry with regard to current expressions, e. g. they declare that earth ( ) is (so called) on account of being spread (√ prath derived parts of one word from different verbs, in spite of the meaning being irrelevant, and of the explanatory radical modification being non-existent, e.g. (explaning sat-ya) he derived the later syllable ya from the causal form of (the root) i (to go), and the former syllable sat from the regular form of (the root) as (to be). Further, it is said that a becoming is preceded by a being, (hence) the designation of a prior (being) from a posterior (becoming) is not tenable; consequently this (theory of the derivation of nouns from verbs) is not tenable. (Cf. Sarup 1998: chap. I, p. 14).

É possível que depois do colapso da cultura Harappā (incluindo a região de Dholavira), a memória de uma escrita ideopictgráfica tenha caído no esquecimento e com ela o conhecimento de formar compostos ideopictográficos começando a partir de ideopictogramas base (raízes pictgráficas). Todavia, a ideia de fazer originar nomes a partir de raízes, assim como a formação de palavras compostas, ficou como um dos mais importantes pólos de atenção dos gramáticos da Índia clássica. A falta de unanimidade entre estes gramáticos, em relação à origem de nomes (etimologias), formação de sufixos e verbos, parece indicar o procedimento antigo de formação partindo da composição ideopictográfica ou oral, pretendendo-se adaptar durante sucessivas gerações de gramáticos a um novo sistema, o fonético.
111

Deste anacronismo linguístico emerge o princípio proposto por Mas, como Gārgya contrapôs, este método ―forçou‖ as etimologias sujeitando-as a uma origem falaciosa, e dava como exemplo o termo aśva (cavalo). Se verdadeiramente este termo tivesse derivado da raiz *aś (viajar), então todas as viagens seriam chamadas aśva, assim como todas coisas cujos nomes começassem pelo mesmo termo, o que de facto não derivação de palavras através de sufixos? Que corrente linguística terá Espantosamente, apesar da discussão sobre a derivação a partir de aśva tenha terminado dando a origem falaciosa ao cavalo, devemos dizer, sobre a raiz *aś, que não existe um único pictograma entre todo o corpo pictográfico que possa estar relacionado com o cavalo ou com as suas partes; mas se aceitarmos a raiz proposta por Yāska ( ―corredor‖ ← *aś ―correr‖) então encontramos um pictograma que se ajusta perfeitamente ao designado termo e sentido etimológico, viz.: D jam ―perna‖ / aticāra ―rápido‖ / ―corredora‖. A ―perna‖ D de uma cabra é ―rápida‖, porque ela B ( ) é ―corredora‖ e esse movimento deriva de ―correr‖ D (*aś); assim, a perna da cabra assume o nome de ―corredora‖. Yāska e Gārgya estão de acordo quanto ao processo de formação etimológica a partir das raízes como se pode observar em toda a formação ideopictográfica. O procedimento linguístico torna-se claramente demonstrável se aplicado a um sistema ideopictográfico. A mudança de um sistema para outro (do ideopictográfico para o fonético), implicou sucessivas reformas inclusivamente ao nível das etimologias, fazendo desaparecer algumas palavras compostas e criando outras partindo de um sistema fonético. Persiste porém um problema, ligado à difusão dos selos da cultura Harappā entre o vale do rio Indo e a região de Dholavira, é que não sobreviveu memória desta escrita no período clássico, nem foram
112

encontrados textos longos que pudessem corroborar a teses de uma ―escrita‖ no seio de uma sociedade que sempre reclamou uma tradição oral. Porém, a ideia intuída de um verbo a partir do qual se pode definir um substantivo, está patente nesta ideopictografia tal como posteriormente

5. IDEOPICTOGRAMA BÁSICO 5.1. Formação Ideopictográfica (FI). A formação do ideopictograma base parte de um princípio real e simbólico. É um elemento fixo em torno do qual, por afixação de outros caracteres (ideopictogramas básicos e morfogramas), um novo termo pode ser desenvolvido originando um composto ideopictográfico. O ideopictograma básico representa sempre objectos reais que podem ser identificados a partir do imaginário Védico e Indo-europeu. O seu significado real dá lugar a outro, mas simbólico e homónimo na grande maioria dos casos.

5.2. Ideopictogramas Homólogos (IH). O fenómeno relacionado com a homologia ideopictográfica, está limitado ao nível do ideopictograma básico, e com a simbologia característica expressa nos Vedas, através de sentidos duplos e sinónimos cruzados. Os etimologistas Yāska e Durga, explicam os diferentes significados de uma palavra, quando o sentido é diferente numa frase. Esta afirmação parece ser uma forma adaptativa, de explicar as etimologias a partir de uma tradição antiga, baseada não numa evolução de raízes fonéticas, mas numa tradição ideopictográfica aplicada directamente a um sistema fonético. Esta é a razão mais plausível que podemos encontrar, para explicar o desacordo entre etimologistas e gramáticos. Compostos ideopictográficos mantêm o mesmo fenómeno na
113

presença do ideopictograma básico. As raízes originais dos ideopictogramas básicos estão ligadas pelas acções que representam como pelas ideias que veiculam. Estas raízes não estão claramente expressas, e o seu conhecimento prévio é a primeira condição para se chegar à raiz pictográfica original. Mas como se poderia alcançar esse conhecimento prévio? Este aspecto faz-nos crer na existência de uma escola que, apesar de dar grande importância ao meio gráfico, estava baseado numa tradição oral. Como o ideopictograma básico está sujeito ao fenómeno da homonímia6, da homografia e da antonímia, só através de um processo de ensino oral seria possível compreender totalmente centenas de combinações ideopictográficas. Os homónimos ideopictográficos são ideopictogramas básicos que apresentam um sentido duplo: o sentido que a figura representa tal e qual ela é, e outro que é simbólico. Quanto à pronúncia e acentuação, ela é, em regra, a mesma. Os homógrafos ideopictográficos comportam-se como sinónimos (payayī-pyyI), viz.: e em ideopictografia N tecto / céu, O chão / terra. Os antónimos ideopictográficos são ideopictogramas básicos cujos primeiros significados derivam dos respectivos sentidos homónimos e homógrafos, mas aos quais se juntou um significado oposto. A sua pronúncia, acentuação e sentido são diferentes. O fenómeno relacionado com a antonímia é unicamente aplicado aos ideopictogramas assimétricos, os únicos que permitem ―projecção em espelho‖, viz.: F G, Æ É, v z, N O, ß Þ, etc.

6- Yāska designa o conjunto de palavras homónimas por aikapadikam. (Cf. Sarup 1998: Chap. IV, p. 56). 114

5.3. Grupos Ideopictográficos (GI). Os ideopictogramas podem ser agrupados por semelhança (tema), formando ciclos ideopictográficos homogéneos, mas podem igualmente ser organizados simplesmente por semelhança simbólica, que designamos por ciclos ideopictográficos heterogéneos. Os ciclos homogéneos são facilmente identificáveis, pois apresentam uma fixidez ideopictográfica e um tema básico bastante claros, apesar da constante intervenção de morfogramas. Os ciclos heterogéneos remetem para os sentidos homónimos e homógrafos assim como para o sentido da simbologia temática.

5.4. Morfografismo. O conceito de morfografismo é extensível a uma grande variedade de pictogramas. Caracteriza-se por serem elementos que entram na composição de ideopictogramas base ao qual se juntam para completarem o sentido principal, viz.: ,, ;, =, x, U, S , f, etc.

5.4.1. Morfogramas (Mf). Uma raiz isolada nem sempre forma um ideopictograma básico. Muitas vezes é o resultado da soma de outros dois ideopictogramas por infixação ou por justaposição de elementos morfográficos. Este tipo de composição cria uma nova palavra transformando-a num novo elemento básico ― é, portanto, uma simbiose para a qual contribuem em geral todos os ideopictogramas passíveis de aglutinação. Em qualquer destes casos, a simbiose verifica-se dentro do ideopictograma (aberto ou fechado) A, x -N ou então, ligado ao elemento básico formativo, como em ÀI (bahútārá) e em IA (tareśa). Os morfogramas entram na formação de ideopictogramas básicos
115

como afixos: prefixos, infixos e sufixos. Na primeira situação, os morfogramas determinam a formação de plurais e numerais. Na segunda, indicam numerais, advérbios, adjectivos e declinações. Na terceira situação indicam unicamente declinações.

5.4.2. Compostos Nominais (CN). No Védico são geralmente constituídos por dois membros, podendo aparecer três no máximo. Na escrita ideopictográfica de Harappā é observado o mesmo procedimento. Inicialmente, os compostos nominais são formados por dois termos, cujo sentido não indica necessariamente a soma dos dois, exactamente como refere Macdonell: AV. no compounds of more than three independent members are met with, and those in which three occur are rare, such as pūrvafulfilling former wishes7. O primeiro elemento, apesar de representar o grupo de muitos, transforma-se em forma invariável ― o qual não é declinável, ou é um mero tema de uma palavra sujeito a declinação ― e aparece em geral no grau fraco. No que diz respeito ao segundo, nunca será um pronome, pois tem unicamente um valor nominal, recebendo a declinação competente. No pronome, porém, reforça a forma nominativa singular neutra, para qualquer género ou caso. Também no caso de representar uma raiz no segundo termo, a sua função continua a de ser adjectivo ou substantivo, sempre no grau fraco.

5.4.3. Compostos Ideopictográficos (CI). Os compostos ideográficos apresentam a mesma estrutura formativa de dois ou de três ideogramas básicos, mas a sua grande maioria é de dois,
7- O vocativo não é considerado um caso de acordo com as normas clássicas e não tem nenhuma equivalência neste sistema ideográfico. 116

tal como no Védico, onde surgem alguns compostos pequenos. Com o tempo, estes composto foram crescendo em extensão e frequência, incluindo o uso da flexão. A composição nominal ideopictográfica revela este ponto de partida com um mínimo de dois ideopictogramas, raramente desenvolvendo para um composto de três. Neste caso, o composto ideopictográfico está ligado a um único ideopictograma básico. Os gramáticos indianos dividem semanticamente os compostos em passaram a serem usados em outras línguas: dvandvá, karma-dhāraya e tat(que formam dois sub-grupos), dvigu e . Whitney agrupou-os em três classes com subdivisões: copulativos, determinativos (dependentes e descritivos) e secundários (possessivos e compostos, cujo membro final é rígido). Para Macdonell, a divisão tripla é mais conveniente. Só para os primeiros compostos de Whitney, Macdonell dá o nome de coordenativos e inclui os últimos sob a designação genérica de possessivos (cf. Macdonell 1987: p. 267). No caso ideopictográfico escolhemos para os três grupos de compostos: dvandvá (copulativo), karma-dhāraya e tat(descritivo e dependente) e dvigu (numeral). Em relação ao grupo , a sua composição ideopictográfica é equivalente à dos karma-dhāraya e tata, apesar de serem possessivos. A nossa classificação seguiu os princípios da formação ideopictográfica, apesar de reconhecermos claramente os grupos: coordenativo, determinativo e possessivo. Até ao momento o grupo avyaībhāva (adverbiais) não foi detectado, só se observaram comparativos de superioridade começando por substantivos, adjectivos e numerais.

117

(subst. + subst.) Rw ( ) a hora auspiciosa.

]I (agníkśetratārá) o trânsito de agníkśetra. tb ( ÎZ ( ) a jóia visível. ) o decanato de .

Karmadhāraya (adj. + subst.) ur ( aI ( ) a ascensão de nándā. ) .

ar (rucyucchala) o exaltado e luminoso. Dvigu (num. + subst.) ,,,r (tryucchala) três exaltados. ,,,,w (catúrmuhūrta) quatro muhūrtas. 0Z ( 1ÅI( ) cinco (graus) ) seis muito grandes. .

Em relação aos géneros, e porque nesta escrita ideopictográfica não existe nenhuma identificação nesse sentido, seguimos a preceito védico na transliteração. Se um composto ideopictográfico termina num substantivo, é este último que determina o género.

118

IDEOPICTOGRAMAS BÁSICOS

N
ka

d
dvāra

P
uttara

A
viśva

À
grhá

I
párvan

O
deśá

A
īśá

I
tārá

COMPOSTOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS MORFOGRAMÁTICOS

G x
upa•muhūrta

: è
náva•ka vi•rāśí

á
eka•áhar 119

L
viśva•bālava

COMPOSTOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS MORFOLÓGICOS

Þb
áhar-man viśva-tārá

ÅR
bahú-gáti párva-tārá

ßA
rāśí-īśá agni-tārá

AI II UI
FORMAÇÃO SINTÁTICA AGLUTINANTE

m;,Äc
bhū || (M-183) cakrā

Q,,;;;;F
-bālava || (M-385)

Ãc
mangala-ís || (M-185)

è,,;;ÑdI,j
vi•rāśyā dvidaśati-áyana bha-tārá eka-revátī || (M-21)

INFFIXOS

L
viśva•bālava

G
120

S
viśva•traya

PREFFIXOS


éka•candrá

:
náva•ka

;;;;v
catvārim ati-muhūrta

COMPOSIÇÃO IDEOPICTOGRÁFICA NOMINAL


-mangala (M-57) SINGULAR

Ó
párvan-áyana (M-261) DUAL

E
(M-181) PLURAL

A
viśva cakra

B
viśvā

,,,,Ã
catúr-mangala

Q QQ V
bhāgá

2F
sápta-bālava

X
121


dvādaśa-śani

FORMAÇÃO IDEOPICTOGRÁFICA

jvi

è
ßrāśi Aviśva

vi•rāśi

L
Fbālava Dmeru ; B

viśva•bālava

G F
Puttara

122

HOMÓNIMOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS telhado

N
ka

Z r
bandhá(u)

tijolo

quem?

sacrifício

cauda

ponte

F
bālava corno

captura pássaro

Q d I c

topo

U

asa

HOMÓGRAFOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS dvāra porta bha estrela

janghā coxa cara rápido pipīlá

D h ó
123

três picos párvata nó udaká águadeiro nayá observador

formiga eclípse

gabinete

subdivisão

ANTÓNIMOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS

A s
nándā

us
náva

Þ
áhar

ß G
bālava

u
nándā

F
bālava

u

s

Æ
Mandā

É
ámanda

CICLOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS HOMOGÉNEOS

ß ã è ä â ð æ ç
rāśí rāśí•áyana vi•rāśí rāśí•agníkśetra rāśí•muhūrta tri•vi•rāśí rāśí•cakra

Í Ñ Þ ß
áyana áhar meru meru•ka meru•dan

Ý á ç ã
áhar•ahar eka•áhar -áhar vi•áhar samá uttara pūrva apācī

D E G H M P R Q A c D
nayá dan

N
bhágín

P U l X
bhágan agni śakrá

124

CILCOS IDEOPICTOGRÁFICOS HETEROGÉNEOS

B

H
citrā bhāgá

T K j a m Q
hemā púnarnavā revátī aśvathá sūtā Róha

; V Z
hala

q
dhvajá

c

h
cāpa

n Q
chāyā cakra

SUFFIXOS

Q,
cakrám (acc.)

r,
ucchalám (acc.)

c,
śáktam(acc.)

a,,
aśvinyā (inst.)

r,,,
ucchalassa (dat.)

Q;,
cakrasmā (ab.)

v;,
nándāsmā (ab.)

Ñ;,
ayanāsmā(ab.)

PREFFIXOS

ã
vi•áhar

,,,v
tri-muhūrta 125

0Q 2p
páñcasápta-bha

INFFIXOS

(basic id.)

(basic id.)

(basic id.)

N
viśva•muhūrta

ß
rāśí

ç
rāśí•cakra

J
Tárám

A
Viśva

â
viśva•áhā

e
bha°

n
bha•ka

I
tara°

K
tarā

L
viśva•bālava

0

E L
Tarāya

D
viśva•bīja

c
nayá° 126

`
nayá•tara

MORPH GRAMAS = AFFIXOS PREFFIXES INFFIXES SUFFIXES

j

m

n

o

, ,, ,,, 1
etc.

j l ·······

;

, ,, ,,, ;,

, ,, ,,,
etc.

v F

127

CASOS

nom. voc.

Q
cakrás

v
nándās

b b,

a
aśvinīs

c
śáktas

ac.

Q,
cakrám

v,
nándam

a,
aśvinam

c,
śáktam

inst.

Q,,
cakrā

v,,
nándā

a,,
aśvinyā

c,,
śáktā

dat.

c,,,
śáktassa

ab. gen.

Q;,
cakrasmā

v;,
nándāsmā

b,
manismā

a;,
aśvinismā

c;,
śáktasmā

loc.

v;,,
nándāsmim

b;,,
man

a;,, c;,,
aśvinismim śáktasmim

Q
cakrás

v
nándā 128

b
man

a
aśvinī

c
śáktas

DICIONÁRIO.

Este dicionário está organizado em torno de oito temas pictográficos dos quais sete estão aqui tratados. Estes temas encerram o universo representativo da realidade mágico simbólica da cultura Harappā, e cada um deles mostra como seguem um padrão lógico, evoluindo a partir de um único pictograma desenvolvendo-se tematicamente em múltiplos aspectos. Através dos respectivos temas descobre-se igualmente o universo partilhado quer pelo védismo como por outras culturas, que tendo representado um sector da sociedade de grande importância, mantiveram a sua identidade depois do colapso de Harappā; incluímos nestes grupos o jainismo, o tantrismo e o shaktismo. Assim, nos ―dígitos‖ encontramos toda a sequência numérica conhecida de 1 a 24, das dezenas e das centenas segundo o sistema decimal; na ―arquitectura‖ o significados que a partir da casa evoluem para a compartimentação do espaço humano e sideral, no urbanismos ou na astrologia; na geografia, apenas o motivo orográfico foi considerado, onde a montanha Meru assume-se como o centro da atenção cosmológica e da observação astronómica; nos ―astros e movimentos siderais‖ é evidente toda a formulação do antecedendo o corpo do próprio śastra, assim como as estações, o ciclo anual e dos próprios planetas; nas ―divindades / homem e partes do corpo‖ são manifestas as divindades a partir da ideia e do pictograma ―senhor‖ (īśá), sobre o qual se constroem as divindades e os homens: pin , , nāyá, bhága, agní, vyādha, agástya, śakrá, , yāja, yajus, , hasta, bāhú; nos ―animais‖ as suas qualidades são emprestadas aos aspectos lunares, às constelações e aos movimentos planetários; as ―plantas‖ associam-se às estações do ano e às constelações. 1. Dígitos. Na colecção de selos fornecida pelo Corpus of Indus Seals and
129

Inscriptions (A. Parpola, 1987-1991) nem todos os dígitos aparecem na sua sequência natural, por esta razão o Dicionário Ideopictográfico de Rāks só classifica as ocorrências detectadas. Mesmo assim, através da análise deste sistema numérico de dígitos, podemos inferir a existência daqueles que estão em falta de acordo com o sistema lógico digital. Da mesma análise podemos igualmente presumir que a contagem normal fez uso não apenas dos dedos (am ) de cada mão, como também as respectivas falanges (bhogavyūhá) ― prática ainda em uso na Índia e noutras culturas tradicionais, como na Nova Guiné, China, Paquistão, Afeganistão, Iraque, Turquia, etc. Esta é a razão porque os dígitos só mostram dois tamanhos: o pequeno, feito pelo traço-médio , (vyūhá) para indicar a combinação numérica de 1 a 24, ,, -, /, --, 0, 1, 2, 8, 9, ?... C, (correspondendo à contagem de duas mãos ou dois palmos) e todas as combinações, relacionadas com dias lunares, solares e com, possivelmente, graus (bagas) astronómicos; o traço-grande, em forma de bastão ; ( ), indicando o número 10, usado como unidade básica das dezenas (daśā), assim como todas as possíveis combinações formadas por pares de bastões e dígitos cruzados: ;, ;;, ;;;, ;;;;, ;;;;;, @, A, B . Claro que todas as combinações de dígitos são possíveis, e esta é a razão porque há várias variantes e formas de escrever um mesmo número. Porém, a escolha não é arbitrária e obedece a princípios simbólicos e de natureza ideo-gramática. A dificuldade de leitura ideográfica é acrescida pelo facto de existir uma múltipla significação para cada ideograma (homónimos e homógrafas), herança observável nas etimologias do Védico e do Sânscrito. A unidade máxima detectada neste tipo de contagem é formada por um composto ideopictográfico indicando o número 706 (machado de cobre 2796 = DK 7535). Mesmo assim, não significa que o homem da cultura Harappā não conhecesse a contagem de grandes números ou até mesmo o conceito de ―infinito‖, provavelmente expressa pelos números
130

3 ,,, e 7 2 ― como aliás se observa no Sânscrito — e pela ideia de ―omnipresença‖ A (viśva). Podemos supor que os conceitos estiveram de facto em uso, por se terem desenvolvido durante muito tempo actividades económicas (comércio e navegação) e científicas (astronomia, matemática e agrimensura), que exigiam grandes contagens e cálculos elaborados. Cremos que a origem deste tipo de contagens altas deve ter estado relacionado com fenómenos astronómicos, como movimentos siderais (ciclos planetários, tempo decorrido entre conjunções de planetas e estrelas, Sol e Lua, ciclos anuais, ciclos de estações, etc.). Este tipo de ciclos (kālachakra) ainda se encontra em uso, quer no sistema clássico da astrologia indiana, quer na aplicação dos cálculos dele decorrentes e ajustados para a realização de rituais ao longo do ano. A extraordinária capacidade dos indianos dos tempos clássicos, para calcularem grandes unidades e para memorizarem cálculos e fórmulas elaboradas, não deve ser menosprezada. De facto, a cultura indiana é a única da família indo-europeia que desenvolveu desde muito cedo tais conceitos e práticas. Não deve, portanto, ser afastada a hipótese do uso de alta matemática (ligada ao comércio e à astronomia) e da agrimensura, durante o período da cultura do Indus / Sarasvatī. O conhecido teste matemático ―Patal‖ a que Budha foi submetido, quando decidiu fazer a corte à princesa Gopā, filha do rei Dan complexidade do cálculo matemático. Nesse teste Budha respondeu a Árjuna, o matemático (astrónomo e astrólogo) da dita corte, que o inquiriu sobre a lista de números altos:
1 kot = 107 1 ayúta = 100 kotis 1 niyúta = 1011 1 kankara = 1013 1 vivará = 1015 1 aks = 1017 1 vivāhá = 1019 1 utsam = 1021 1 hetúhila = 1031 1 karahu = 1033 1 hetvindriyá = 1035 1 samâptalambha = 1037 1 = 1039 1 mudrābala = 1043 1 sárvabala = 1045 1 visam 1 sárvasam 1 1 = 1047 = 1049 = 1051 = 1053

1 bahulá = 1023 1 nāgábala = 1025 1 tit = 1027

1 vyavasthānaprajñapti = 1029 1 niravadya = 1041

Não satisfeito com a resposta de Budha, Árjuna apresentou outro
131

teste, o de enumerar todas as divisões ou átomos de um yójana (milha indiana), ao qual Budha respondeu prontamente:
7 atoms make the smallest particle 7 of these make 1 small particle = 72 atoms 7 particles make 1 the wind can still carry = 73 7 of these particles make one rabbit footprint = 74 7 rabbit footprint 1 of sheep = 75 7 sheep footprint make 1 of ox = 76 7 ox footprint make 1 of poppy seed = 77 7 poppy seed make 1 of mustard = 78 7 mustard seed make 1 yáva grain = 79 7 yáva grains make 1 not = 710 12 nots make 1 handfull = 12.710 2 handfull make 1 4 = 2.12.710

make 1 dhánu = 4.2.12.710

1000 dhánus make 1 króśa = 103.4.2.12.710

4 króśas make 1 yójana (mile)

Desta enumeração podemos concluir que um yójana contém 4 x 103 x 4 x 2 x 12 x 710 = 384,000 x 710 átomos! Outra particularidade na enumeração indiana, em muitos aspectos semelhante à forma como os Chineses expressavam esta classe de números, é a seguinte: 5 kot — traduzida na forma convencional como 57,326,432. A contagem de yugás astronómicos na tradição indiana, é só ultrapassada pela contagem de tradição jaina. Claro que esta classe de números altos não aparece nos selos em estudo, mas a base numérica é perfeitamente reconhecível. Entre os respectivos ideopictogramas encontra-se ;;, dhanus hh, múltiplos ou derivados de króśa, como hásta v, etc. É evidente que este sistema sofreu várias reformas, no sentido em que o Sânscrito evoluiu a partir do nível védico ― da mesma forma como o alfabeto ideopictográfico se desenvolveu e deu origem a outro no período intermédio, ou quando o Brāhmi originou o Devanāgarī. Mas certamente que no sistema clássico de pesos e medidas, podemos ainda encontrar equivalências com o sistema métrico védico. Os pesos encontrados em Harappā e Mohenjo-Daro e noutros sítios arqueológicos, mostram subsídios de, pelo menos, três fontes diferentes: pesos de formato esférico (semelhantes a outros de origem mediterrânea); pesos em forma de barril (semelhantes aos do Elam, Suméria e conhecidos no
132

Egipto, cujos valores se aproximam dos da cultura Harappā); pesos de formato cilíndrico (não comuns em Harappā); pesos de formato cónico (numerosos na área de Nal, Balochistão); e pesos cúbicos (mais distribuídos no vale do Indus e provavelmente aí desenvolvidos. Pesos deste tipo foram encontrados ocasionalmente juntos com selos, associação que levou alguns investigadores a sugerirem a prática usual de pesar mercadorias, embalá-las e ―estampá-las‖ (com selos), para mais tarde serem carregadas em animais ou barcos, como de facto se procedia no Bahrein e na Suméria. Apesar do sistema de dígitos apresentado neste dicionário ser decimal, o sistema de pesos parece ter sido misto (binário, octogenário e decimal), originado em fontes diferentes indicando as possíveis vias de comércio de longo curso. Os pesos mais pequenos tomados a partir da unidade 13,625 (gramas), estavam distribuídos por 2, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8 e 1/16. As medidas maiores por 2, 4, 10, 12, 15, 20, 40, 100, 200, 400, 500 e 800. Este sistema está de acordo com um outro praticado no período clássico e estipulado na relação de 8x8 = 64 e de 10x10 = 100, aproximado em números redondos. É notável que no sistema egípcio de contagem, podemos encontrar cifras semelhantes no Oudjat‚, que por sua vez fornece as medidas metrológicas standard usadas nos ritos mágicos: 1/2, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 e 1/64. 2. Arquitectura. A maioria das escritas pictográficas do período pré-clássico, incluem nos seus ―alfabetos‖ estruturas arquitectónicas de origem religiosa. Mas apesar desta tendência ser aparentemente óbvia, outras estruturas habitacionais e meramente utilitárias foram igualmente incluídas, preenchendo o léxico pictográfico com significações secundárias auxiliares. A escrita ideopictográfica de Harappā não se encontra excluída deste princípio geral. Apesar das estruturas arquitectónicas aqui incluídas não revelarem claramente uma filiação com edifícios religiosos, como a
133

escrita hieroglífica egípcia o faz ( !, I, O, R, c, i, o), os ideopictogramas associados com essa ideia tem de facto, num segundo nível de leitura, uma ligação religiosa de carácter cosmogónico. Qualquer que tenha sido a intenção dos escribas, estas estruturas parece estarem ligadas a um urbanismo que podemos designar por ―indefinível‖. Assim, podemos tomar esta ―indefinição‖ no sentido de não ter existido – pelo menos ao nível da escrita – uma distinção entre o sagrado e o profano, como aliás se pode observar em muitos sítios arqueológicos. Quer em Harappā como em Mohenjo-Daro, ainda não foram reconhecidas de forma inequívoca estruturas de templos ou de espaços religiosos, e este facto encontra eco na forma como os ideopictogramas representam as estruturas arquitectónicas, como elas foram imaginadas e projectadas. Mesmo assim, esta aparente ―indefinição‖, não parece ter atingido o mais profundo sentido etimológico, dos termos ou ideias que se quiseram transmitir. É inquestionável o carácter simbólico, por vezes mágico e sagrado de cada ideopictograma. De facto, este sistema ideopictográfico usado no caso em estudo em selos / talismãs, foi desenvolvido e adaptado, pelo menos, para ser usado num contexto de astronomia e de astrologia, recorrendo um dicionário simbólico perfeitamente reconhecível na literatura védica. Isto não significa que num contexto diferente, os mesmos ideopictogramas tivessem exactamente significados idênticos. As escritas pré-clássicas revelam um notável carácter simbólico e multi-significante. É por esta razão que estamos inclinados a crer que outras tabletes, maiores que os selos, se forem encontradas, nos revelarão novas construções morfológicas e gramaticais, onde os mesmos ideopictogramas (e outros novos) revelem novos significados. Assim, o ideopictograma ―barco‖ I tanto significa ―travessia‖ ou ―trânsito‖, no sentido literal, levando pessoas e bens de uma margem para a outra, como simultânea e genericamente significa ―trânsito‖ ou ―estrela‖, num contexto astrológico; o mesmo podemos dizer em relação aos ideopictogramas para ―tijolo‖ Z, ―casa‖
134

À, ―teto‖ N, ―portão‖ d, ―ponte‖ r, etc.
Estas situações de multi-significação para um termo, são muito comuns no Sânscrito, que as herdou do período védico. Muitas vezes um mesmo termo pode apresentar significados tão diferentes, que nos leva a pensar se a sua formação não terá tido origem em diferentes grupos étnicos. Se assim fosse, o Sânscrito explicar-se-ia de facto como uma língua artificial, de síntese. Para aumentar este enigma linguístico, juntamse as palavras homógrafas, homónimas e antónimas, o mesmo aplicandose à ideopictografia. Os idepictoogramas representativos de estruturas arquitectónicas, assim como todos os outros, seguem o mesmo intrincado processo multisignificativo encontrado no Védico e no Sânscrito. Eles encontram-se limitados aos níveis simbólico e literal, tal como se apresenta neste dicionário e sua respectiva gramática. Contudo, e apesar das duplas significações, fornecemos outros significados que igualmente aparecem tardiamente no período clássico, permitindo assim que outros possam tentar outras combinações meta-linguísticas. Neste contexto de arquitectura ―indefinível‖, o tema central à volta do qual todas as variantes ideopictográficas giram é, sem dúvida alguma, a ―casa‖ À. O sentido elementar tirado da ideia, é a ―delimitação‖ de um espaço geográfico bem conhecido; de um espaço que pode ser medido com a ajuda da agrimensura e da geometria, usadas na construção de edifícios. A ―casa terrestre‖ que nos abriga À (bhāva), encontra assim a sua equivalente na ―casa celeste‖ ou ―casa astrológica‖ ß (rāśí). Desta forma, a ―casa terrestre‖ que nos abriga, contém ―divisões‖ que, transpostas para a ―morada celeste‖, definem o cânone das ―casas astrológicas‖. Os nomes atribuídos a cada uma das 12 casas (lagna, dr e vyaya), que aparecem profusamente nas obras de caracter astrológico dos autores clássicos hindús, não são, obviamente, os mesmos que aparecem nesta escrita ideopictográfica. Da mesma forma como os ―casos‖ são indicados
135

pelo seu número, fórmula que persistiu no Sânscrito, igualmente os rāśis o foram por dígitos representados no interior de cada ―casa‖, à maneira de divisões: À (prathama-bhāva), ! (dvitīya-bhāva), " ( -bhāva), Á (caturtha-bhāva), È ( -bhāva), Ë ( -bhāva), Ì (daśamabhāva). A ―casa‖ (bhāva) que serve de habitação ao homem, é a imagem terrena do seu lugar nos céus e da sua vida quotidiana. É por esta razão que as cartas astrológicas hindús (do norte e do sul), têm a forma de ―casas‖ com doze divisões, contendo cada uma delas as representações e as variantes mais importante dos momentos mais significativos na vida de uma pessoa. A astrologia hindu usa normalmente dois sistemas diferentes para determinar a casa astrológica. O primeiro, bhāvachakra, é destinado para medir as casas e dar as suas posições; o segundo, rāśíchakra (Zodíaco), considera as casas como signos. Os dois sistemas aparecem representados nesta escrita ideopictográfica, mostrando a carta astrológica dos signos como losangos e suas respectivas variantes ideopictográficas ç, ß, æ, å, ä, è , (etc.), e os lugares que ocupam por dígitos, como já foi acima referido. Kendra, ou ―quadrante‖ formado pelas quatro casas cardinais, também aqui aparece figurado pelo ideopictograma ß rāśí, no qual se incluíram os respectivos cantos angulares ou pontos cardiais æ, norte, este e sul respectivamente: P (uttara), R (pūrva) e Q (apācī). Simultaneamente, a forma como os ideopictogramas e os padrões decorativos são tratados ao nível da escrita e da cerâmica, revela um continuum temático identificador de uma cosmogonia e de uma astrologia, que acompanhavam o quotidiano das populações. Em muitas situações podemos reconhecer ideopictogramas usados como padrões decorativos, e não poucas vezes cruzamo-nos com padrões que ainda se encontram em uso como yantras, ou ainda, integrados em sistemas do cômputo lunar, matemático e em mantras: Ò, Ó, Õ, ×, Ø , Ù , Ú, Û, Ü, Ý. O
136

sistema de contagem por ábaco, tão divulgado na antiguidade e ainda em uso em muitas sociedades tradicionais, aparece profusamente representado nos selos como iconograma e padrão decorativo junto à imagem do touro: ö, ÷, ø, ù, ú, û, ü, ý, þ, ÿ. O ―altar do fogo‖ c, ], _, `, a, b (agníkśetra) é outro dos muitos exemplos que caracteriza o fenómeno de pictogramas aplicados como decoração em cerâmica, provavelmente ritual. O sistema clássico ainda em uso na Índia, incluindo a astrologia, yantras e mantras, usa os padrões decorativos que estão de acordo com os padrões que aparecem nos selos da cultura Harappā. Por outro lado, a arquitectura clássica reproduz em numerosos templos, os mesmos yantras que num sentido mais lato são interpretados como expressões da divindade e das suas residências. De uma forma peculiar podem ser usados como ―computadores‖ (ábacos), no sentido de ―contadores‖ de fórmulas sagradas, usando as letras do alfabeto nāgarī colocadas nas casas astrológicas com os seus respectivos graus. Não é sem razão que no Sânscrito, no Védico e noutras línguas do Indiano-médio, os termos gan (―quantidade‖ ou ―multidão‖), (―cálculo‖, ―enumeração‖ ou ―contagem‖) e (―astrónomo‖ ou ―aritmético‖) encontram a mesma raiz formativa em * (gn! ) ―contar‖, ―enumerar‖ e ―calcular‖. Com este sentido é fácil de entender a razão porque os antigos astrónomos e astrólogos foram considerados ―aritméticos‖, no sentido em que estavam devotados a ―contar‖ os dias das estrelas e dos planetas durante o ano, assim como os respectivos graus e distâncias angulares, realizando para isso diferentes cálculos. Nas suas actividades como ―contadores‖, os astrólogos / astrónomos fizeram uso de utensílios auxiliares para o cálculo e contagem. Foi neste contexto que os pictogramas, padrões decorativos e yantras, tiveram um papel decisivo na formação básica da magia e do simbolismo. No início da formação das etimologias e da língua, começando pelo sistema ideopictográfico, a gramática, a astronomia e as funções aritméticas, não
137

se distinguiam. Por esta razão o termo gán (―linhas métricas‖), aplicado à construção poética dos hinos védicos, encontra a sua origem na mesma raíz * . O que mais tarde foi considerado como ―linhas métricas‖, teve provavelmente o mesmo significado de ―linhas métricas‖ que construíram os utensílios auxiliares para o cálculo astronómico. Esta é provavelmente a única explicação para o facto de ainda hoje estarem associadas as letras do alfabeto nāgarī e os mantras aos ―quadrados mágicos‖ e outras formas geométricas. Nos formulários Yantracintāman (atribuído pela tradição tântrica a – um antropónimo derivado igualmente de *gan) e Saundaryalaharī encontrar vários yantras com as mesmas configurações mostradas nos selos. Alguns destes yantras mostram claramente a sua função métrica como contadores de letras (bījas) do alfabeto nāgarī. Cada um deles (quadrados, rectângulos, triângulos, etc.) está associado a um planeta que determina o número de divisões, tal como uma casa ou um templo estão construídos. Mas estes yantras não representam apenas os números simbólicos de cada planeta, que por sua vez definem a ―métrica‖, eles são também os seus longos ciclos de actividade. Os ideopictogramas decifrados neste capítulo, mostram o imaginário da ―casa astrológica‖ (bhāva), com as suas respectivas divisões ocupadas por planetas e estrelas, sob a forma de tábuas de cálculo astronómico. De forma semelhante o altar védico agníkśetra é construído: em círculo, imitando Agní sob a forma de um pássaro (cf. ŚBr. 10.4.5,2 e AV.) e na forma de um triângulo. Esta arquitectura cósmica torna-se assim bastante elaborada e precisa, tal como a arquitectura urbana pressupõe um plano prévio de agrimensura. Neste sentido, os śāstras da astrologia clássica (que a tradição faz remontar ao período védico), como o Br Śāstra
138

―vargas‖ (divisões) diferentes: ou
245 e . Algumas destas ―divisões‖ são reconhecíveis entre os ideopictogramas explicados neste capítulo do dicionário. Foi, portanto, a partir da equivalência que estabelecemos entre as definições dadas naquelas obras da astrologia clássica, e os ideopictogramas identificados, que nos foi possível determinar as respectivas transliterações e traduções.

A arquitectura pressupõe um arquitecto, e na dimensão cósmica, o sentido de ―arquitecto dos deuses‖ que Tvas tem nos textos védicos, é precisa e correctamente associada à ―construção‖ de estruturas cósmicas. Devemos presumir, portanto, que estas estruturas são os signos e os planetas onde residem os deuses, assim como as suas configurações. Desta forma, é também aquele que preside aos bons nascimentos dos homens, e esta particularidade denuncia claramente a sua natureza Que -te muitos anos de vida. O mesmo atributo de ―arquitecto‖ dos Daityas é dado mais tarde a Maya, um Asura, artesão versado em magia, astronomia e ciência militar. 3. Montanha - Meru. A montanha como axis mundi, ocupa um papel fundamental e central em todas as culturas tradicionais, e quanto mais sofisticadas estas sociedades se tornam, mais precisa é a sua função cósmica. No xamanismo siberiano torna-se o ―pilar do mundo‖, o suporte do céu e da yurta. Nas religiões estabelecidas é o centro da fé e da aspiração mística. Em astronomia e geografia significa o ―polo‖ da posição ou a longitude, o ―eixo‖ (axis) invisível tomado da Estrela Polar até ao lugar do observador. Num sentido mais lato, este axis cósmico (meru) é o gnómon da leitura astronómica que permite detectar os dias precessionais assim como os
139

graus no trânsito das estrelas e planetas. Termo equivalente ao aks (―latitude‖ ou ―elevação‖ de um polo). As características que definem ideopictograficamente o meru / dhruvá são dadas neste capítulo. As suas variantes ideopictográficas são notavelmente identificadas com conceitos e respectivos termos usados na astronomia e astrologia clássicas indiana. Podemos presumir, portanto, que pelo menos um centro de observação astronómica existiu no vale do Indo. O ideopictograma para montanha A e suas variantes B , C , H, G , D, E, F, I, K, M, Q representam uma das mais extraordinárias etimologias que podemos encontrar neste sistema de escrita. No Nirukta e mais tarde nos compêndios de astronomia e de astrologia (cf. Sūryas.), ainda podemos ler as descrições cosmológicas das 7 cadeias montanhosas (Kula-girí), o Meru e Párvata sendo usados num contexto astronómico. Meru, que assume o sentido de centro do mundo, é o axis ou o polo de observação. Párvata ou os Párvans, a Lua cheia e nova com os 8° e 14° dias lunares de cada lua respectivamente. E Kula-girí, o número 7 como valor de excelente categoria aplicado igualmente em contagem astronómica. Kula-girí (kuligir) é usado genericamente assim como nága (ng), de onde deriva directamente o sentido astronómico do número 7, associado ao sentido de ―imobilidade‖ (ng). Esta associação de ideias deve ter derivado do conhecimento empírico quando observado o movimento de ascensão do Sol ao meio do dia. O astro, ao atingir o zénite, era representado pelo topo de um gnómon. Como já observámos antes, o ideopictograma representando o ―norte‖ P, assim como o termo correspondente no Sânscrito (%Är-uttara), tem o significado de úpa (%p) para expressar a parte superior de um gnómon. Neste sentido o termo upanara (%pnr), que é o nome para um nāga (nag) referido como tal pelos lexicógrafos indianos, está relacionado com o ponto mais alto de um gnómon (nága-ng). Assim, a serpente nāga e através da sua
140

homografia e homofonia, assume o sinónimo de ―topo de um gnómon‖, da mesma forma como o termo nára A significando homem (nr), tem igualmente o sentido duplo no Sânscrito de ―gnómon‖ e de ―homem‖. Houve, portanto, vários tipos de gnómons para diferentes tipos de leitura, como vêm expresso no Sūryasiddhānta: yas -yantra, dhanuścakra-yantra, chāyāyantra-yantra, toyayantra-yantra, kapāla-yantra, nara-yantra, mayūra-yantra e vānara-yantra. 4. Astros e Movimentos Siderais. Todos os planetas (gráha) têm na sua composição ideopictográfica o morfograma determinativo ―montanha‖ P (girí, cf. D.1.5, p. 249), l porque todos eles são deuses ―veneráveis‖, ou ―poderosos‖ (vīrá, ibid.): Á, Â, Ã, Ä, Å, Æ, Ç. É possível que a observação do nascimento e oclusão de planetas e de estrelas na linha do horizonte (ks ), tenha tomado como referência determinadas montanhas. A cadeia montanhosa Rudrahimālaya é um exemplo do início de um ciclo astronómico, por os seus picos terem coincidido pela primeira vez com o nascimento das estrelas num dado momento especial, quando provavelmente ocorreram mudanças importantes na vida das populações. A sequência dos nove planetas, tal como aparece nos compêndios de astrologia clássica, dos quais destacamos o -Horāśāstra, e aceite consensualmente pela astrologia indiana, é seguido neste capítulo do dicionário. A Lua

Â

e o Sol

Á,

juntamente com as posições especiais que

certas montanhas ocupam na cartografia geo-astrológica ao longo das seis estações Ô e das eras, são as duas grandes referências na detecção de ocorrências específicas e de alinhamentos com planetas e asterismos, recorrendo-se ao auxílio do gnómon ; (śam mesmo tempo as referências para a contagem do tempo e dos tempos no seu todo e em fracções ß Þ, como para os intervalos de tempo ou ―descanço‖ è. Ocorrências estas identificadas como as causas de calamidades, de grandes dádivas para a vida das populações ou do aparecimento e queda dos reinos. Esta característica, que é observada
141

profusamente nos textos clássicos, é igualmente evidente nos textos védicos, e não há nada em contrário que nos impeça de julgar que o mesmo procedimento tenha sido prática corrente na cultura Harappā, entre astrólogos, classes superiores e população geral. Sacrifícios, oblátas ao fogo, hinos e toda a sorte de amuletos, foram sem qualquer dúvida os instrumentos possíveis segundo a crença para eliminar ou diminuir o sofrimento e as calamidades. Varāhamihira dá -nos a lista de algumas desses acidentes no seu compêndio astrológico, mas também uma enorme variedade de textos literários, como os épicos e os romances. De toda a produção védica não podemos excluir a sua associação astral, como igualmente no período clássico devemos incluir não só os textos de tradição híndu, como os jainas e os budistas. Podemos transcrever este simples exemplo tirado do Prabandhacintāman (c. 1361 Entretanto, aquele Brâmane acordou de repente do sono, e vendo que o disco da lua tinha ficado obscurecido no céu por Vénus e Júpiter, ele acordou a esposa, e percebendo pelo disco da lua que a vida do rei estava em perigo, ordenou que a esposa lhe trouxesse os objectos apropriados ao sacrifício, para que ele pudesse fazer uma obláta ao fogo e assim evitar aquela calamidade — (AÇaNtre s ivàae=kSmaiÚÐa-¼masaÒakaze zu³gué_ya< inéÖ< cNÐm{flmvlaeKy g&ih [ImuTwPy cNÐm{flsUict< tÚ&pte> àa[s»qmvgMy haetVyÐVyai [ tdupzaNtye haemawRmupFaEkiy:ye ). (Cf. Tawney 1982: p. 13) 5. Divindades / Homem e Partes do Corpo. Os Deuses, têm eles uma forma? – Eles que criaram diferentes aspectos do universo. E sob que forma podem eles manifestar-se? O antropomorfismo é tão satisfatório para o coração vivo da religião, como para o sentimento da realidade que se move, e que ultrapassa qualquer língua escrita. Em nenhum passo do R é descrito como construir um suporte físico para representar a divindade com a dimensão do homem. Em nenhuma passagem é mencionado esse procedimento, mesmo assim, em
142

todo o corpo dos hinos é sugerido um certo antropomorfismo para cada divindade, e esta é claramente expressa. O sacerdote, e até mesmo o simples observador, facilmente poderiam imaginar tais divindades, quer durante os rituais quando nos hinos eram recitados, ou quando fenómenos naturais sugeriam a manifestação dessas divindades: A, D, F, G, c, b, Q, P, V, U, l, o, Z, [,I, K, L. A mais importante descrição antropomórfica do R é o hino dedicado a ( -Sūkta) o homem universal. Mas outros hinos são igualmente ricos em descrições antropomórficas, quer referindo Indra, Agni, e Viśvakarman, ou outras divindades menores. Todos os ideopictogramas antropomórficos descritos neste capítulo, são facilmente identificados com as divindades védicas aos quais os hinos estão ligados, porque eles mostram formas claramente semelhantes. Assim, as palavras compostas derivadas dos radicais nominais que compõem o léxico Védico e Sânscrito, aparecem nas suas situações comuns. Também outras formas compostas (arcaísmos) que aparecem mais tarde num certo número, podemos presumir, o seu uso derivou de uma formação morfológica ideopictográfica. Neste sentido, esses arcaísmos devem ter caído em desuso quando o sistema ideopictográfico foi substituído por um fonético. As partes do corpo humano foram também representadas neste sistema ideopictográfico, e mais uma vez, correspondem com extraordinária precisão às mesmas descrições e significados que aparecem nos textos védicos. ―Aspecto‖ ou ―olho‖ (áks > q), ―mão‖ ou ―força‖ (hásta-muhūrta > v), ―braço‖ ou ―abundância‖ (bahúprákarasna > Å) assim como outros termos, aparecem invariavelmente em situações homógrafas e homónimas, significando o que exactamente significam e dando ao mesmo tempo um sentido de dimensão astronómica e astrológica. Estas característica podemos observar na língua védica (do ao Atharvaveda), como no Sânscrito ou no Pāli, e assim sendo a origem etimológica de cada termo conhecido como dos que se perderam, pode ser encontrado neste sistema ideopictográfico, como claramente se
143

pode observar. 6. Animais e Partes do Corpo. Todas as representações zoomórficas têm uma conotação astrológica e astronómica, cujas etimologias podem ainda ser encontradas no léxico de carácter astrológico do período clássico, emergindo em variadíssimas situações relacionadas com movimentos planetários, nos trabalhos atribuídos a Garga, a Jaimini, a Pārāśara, a Varāhamihira e a Pr A, B, D, W, H, J , L , U, \, f , l, N, e . Neste sentido os ideopictogramas estão relacionados na sua grande maioria, com aspectos e movimentos específicos de planetas e de estrelas. Temos como exemplos os oito tipos de movimentos planetários gátis (vakrā v / anuvakrā w; samá x / vis y; mandā Æ / ámandā É; cara D e aticara E) a cúspide ( Q) e os eclípses ou ocultamentos (marká J e pipīlá h). Este grupo ideopictográfico partilha ainda o mesmo tipo de características e de significados com os que se encontram agrupados sob o tema ―Objectos religiosos, emblemas e armas‖. 7. Plantas, Árvores e Estações do Ano. Árvores e várias plantas são ainda hoje objecto de culto no Hinduísmo, no Jainismo e no Budismo. A figueira sagrada a c (Ficus religiosa, L. ~ aśvatthá), é a mais reverenciada ocupando o ponto central em inúmeros rituais, e vários textos referem-na como uma árvore de dimensões cósmicas. Certas árvores foram consideradas como residências permanentes de divindades, e por esta razão consideradas como tendo valor mágico, terapêutico e milagroso, como é referido no R AV. 6.136,1. No AV. são mencionados um certo número de amuletos preparados com plantas. Árvores e outros tipos de plantas foram igualmente escolhidos como símbolos das estações do ano e respectivos meses. Apesar de várias plantas terem sido largamente conhecidas devido
144

ás suas características terapêuticas (ayurvédicas) e integradas na mitologia e na astrologia, só algumas parece terem sido escolhidas para uso nesta escrita ideopictográfica. Mesmo com este limitado número, foi possível identificar as espécies aqui representadas, cuja formação morfológica de compostos ideopictográficos estiveram na origem das palavras compostas e dos étimos no Védico e no Sânscrito, tal como aparecem em textos posteriores. Na astrologia tradicional indiana as plantas são classificadas de acordo como uma determinada ordem e tipologias planetárias específicas. O Sol governa árvores vigorosas com ramos fortes. Saturno governa árvores sem interesse. A Lua, árvores com seiva leitosa, como a seringueira. Marte, árvores azedas, como o limoeiro. Vénus governa árvores que dão flor. Júpiter, árvores que dão fruto. E Mercúrio, árvores que não dão fruto mas que são de utilidade geral. Esta classificação é considerada válida quando as mesmas plantas aparecem referidas nos textos védicos e clássicos. Ervas (ós ), plantas leguminosas e cereais ), arbustos e árvores ( ) fazem o grupo ideopictográfico que identifica meses e estações do ano: B, C, D, E, F, H, G, t, T, L , J, I, i, j, k, Q, R, s, r, S, U, W, l.

145

TRANSLITERAÇÃO E TRADUÇÃO.

De todos os registos astronómicos aqui traduzidos, destacamos aqueles que nos foi possível datar com mais segurança através de conjunções planetárias, e de alinhamentos planetários específicos durante solstícios e equinócios. Seguramente que este últimos fenómenos foram os que mais interessaram aos astrólogos e sacerdotes de Harappā, de Mohenjo-Dāro e de todas as comunidades integrantes da cultura do Vale do Indo, mas são igualmente os que nos interessam com elevada atenção por nos darem datas exactas dentro da cronologia absoluta que se estende entre 7000-600 a.C (cf. Gregory L. Possehl – 1996; Agrawal, D. P. – 1982). Como os selos aqui tratados se incluem numa faixa cronológica considerada entre as fases IV (Early-Mature Harappan transition 26002500 a.C.) e o final da VI (Post-Urban Harappan 1700-1000 a.C.), estabelecemos um limite de tempo para detecção das respectivas conjunções, situado entre 4713 a.C. (limite máximo dado pelo programa computacional por nós utilizado) e 1500 a.C. (data escolhida como redundância puramente académica). Demos igual atenção ao ano 2637 a.C., que os chineses escolheram para iniciar o seu calendário de doze anos, como mera referência cultural e principalmente os ciclos de (Orion c. 4500-3500 a.C.) e de (Pleiades c. 2990-1900 a.C.), com Rohinī (Aldebaran c. 3100 a.C.) como período de transição. Da sequência zoomórfica representada nos selos, não conseguimos tirar até hoje um sentido claro e inequívoco. Porém, estamos inclinados em crer, que esta sequência pode obedecer a um ciclo de anual ou às estações do ano, representadas por aqueles animais, como se verificou no sistema chinês de doze animais ― as razões ligadas à perca desta tradição podem ter sido a causa da ruptura e final da cultura de Harappā/MohenjoDaro. Assim, a ordem dos selos que aqui apresentamos, tenta reproduzir (provavelmente de forma imperfeita) a maneira como os astrónomos e
146

astrólogos disposeram o ano e as sucessivas estações, e por isso não segue a ordem adoptada no Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions. Quanto ao sentido e à lógica do conteúdo das inscrições tentámos, sempre que nos foi possível, dispô-lo de forma a esclarecer as descrições expostas em cada selo. Este processo revelou-se-nos em alguns casos impossível e na sua totalidade uma verdadeira empresa tântalica, dado que quizémos manter a sequência das categorias animais. Esta é a razão porque, algumas vezes, parte de uma inscrição (de um selo fracturado), se encontra noutro selo inteiro pertencente a um grupo animal diferente, que tomámos a liberdade de reproduzir na zona sombreada do selo danificado. Observando a colecção de selos aqui tratados, os seus conteúdos, o facto de serem ―selos‖, e de parte deles se encontrarem impressos em peças de cerâmica, (contentores de líquidos e de sólidos), leva -nos a reflectir sobre a forma de ritual para a qual estavam destinados. Se o seu uso fosse unicamente destinado a selar ―comercialmente‖ um pote, independentemente do seu tamanho, não teria nenhum sentido guardar o mesmo selo para repetir vezes sem conta a mesma impressão, quando o que se lá gravou marca apenas um momento específico num dado mês num determinado ano, com o rigor que só a astronomia e a astrologia podem conseguir. Não faria sentido algum, portanto, que um selo que regista um solstício a 26 de Julho de 3912 a.C., por exemplo, quando Marte e Saturno estiveram em conjunção cinco dias antes, fosse usado com fins comerciais, para voltar a ser reutilizado passados alguns séculos, quando a mesma conjunção voltasse a ocorrer. Assim, deduzimos que estes selos, pela sua natureza tão singular, destinados a assinalar momentos únicos na vida dos seus possuidores, foram usados ritualisticamente depois de consagrados, tal como um amuleto ainda hoje é com água ou com leite.

147

89.[M-953; Vr

DDI

viśva•bījat-viśva•bījam-tārá|| Trad. – o trânsito de início-a-início.

120.[M-131; Vr

AvJSvI

viśva-muhūrta-táras gáti-muhūrta-tārá|| Trad. – o trânsito do nascimento auspicioso, o trânsito todo auspicioso.

173.[M-723; Vr

è,;;ÃÇUII
vi•rāśis dvidáśa man cheia. -śani viparīta•gáti párvan-tārá|| Trad. – o poderoso 20° (tithi) de Marte-Saturno, o trânsito do nascer-a-ocaso da Lua-

243.[C-9; Vr

ÆC;;;LÄc
śukra dáśa•ghat Trad. – as 10 ghat -nāyá|| -poderoso observador de Mercúrio.

254.[Ad-5; Vr

UIc
viparīta•gáti párva-nāyá|| Trad. – o observador do nascer-a-ocaso de Párva.

334.[M-214; Vr

QsYuR

cakrá-śakúni-tithi bhāgá|| Trad. – o ciclo do destino da lunação-de-Śakúni. 148

Bibliography

ABREU, Guilherme de Vasconcellos (1883). Manual para o estudo do Sãoscrito Classicalo. Lisboa: Imprensa Nacional. ADAMS, Douglas Q. (1995, Fal/Winter). Mummies, JIES, vol. 23, nº 3-4, pp. 399-411. AALTO, Pentii (1975). Hindu Script and Dravidian. Studies in Indian Epigraphy, 2: 1631, (ib. in: SO 55 51984: 411-26). _______ (1974). Deciphering the Hindu script, methods and results. Anantapāram kila śabdaśāstram: ksiega pamitkowa kuczci Eugeniusza Słuszkiewicza: 21-7. Warsaw. _______ (1971). Marginal note on the Meluhha problem. Madras, K. A.: Nilakanta Sastri Fel, pp. 234-238. _______ (1945). ―Notes on methods of decipherment of unknown writings and languages‖, in SO II (4), I-26. ADRADOS, Francisco Rodrigues (1953). Védico y Sánscrito Clássico. Madrid: Intituto Antonio de Nebrija. ALEKSEEV, G. V. (1976). ―The characteristics of the Proto-Indian script‖, in Zide and Zvelebil, pp. 17-20. ALLCHIN, F. R. (1983). ―The interpretation of a seal from Chanhudaro and its significance for the religion of the Hindu Civilization‖, in SAA, pp. 369-84. _______ (1981). ―Archaeological and language-historical evidence for the movement of Indo-Aryan speaking peoples into South Asia‖, in Ethnic problems, pp. 33649. AMDERSON, Bernard; CORREIA-AFONSO, John (May, 1992). ―H. Heras: Indological Studies‖, in Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 51, nº 2, pp. 407-408. ASHFAQUE, Syed M. (1989). ―Primitive astronomy in the Hindu Civilization‖, in Kenoyer, pp.207-15. _______ (1977). ―Astronomy in the Hindu Valley Civilisation: a survey of the problems and possibilities of the ancient Indian astronomy and cosmology in the light of Hindu script decipherment by Finnish scholars‖, in Centaurus 21 (2), pp. 14993. BHARATI, A. (1983). The Tantric Tradition. Delhi: B. I. Publications. 149

BHATTACHARY, Tarakeshwar (1953-55). ―A forgotten chapter of the history of ancient Indian astronomy‖, in Journal of the Ganganatha Jha Research Institute, 11-12 (1-4), pp. 11-54. BRETON, Rolland J.-L. (1976). ―Atlas géographique des langues et des ethnies de l’Inde et du subcontinent: Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Népal, Bhoutan, Sikkim‖, in Travaux du Centre International de Recherche sur le Bilinguisme, A10. Quebec. CAILLA, Colette (1989). ―Dialectes dans les literatures indo-aryennes‖, in Publications de l’Institute de Civilisation Indienne, Série in-8°, 55. Paris. CALAZANS, José Carlos, trad. Pāli-Portuguese (2006). Dhammapa. As Palavras de Buddha. Lisboa: Editora Ésquilo. CHOLLOT-VARAGNAC, Marthe (1980). Les Origines du graphisme symbolique: essai d’analyse des écritures primitives en préhistoire. Paris. CLAUSON, Gerad; CHADWICK, John (1969). ―The Hindu script deciphered?‖ (Review of Parpola et al.), in Antiquity, nº 43 (171), pp. 200-7. CRYSTAL, David (1992). Dictionary of Language and Languages. London: Pinguin Books. DANI, Ahmad Hasan (1973). ―Mystery script of the Hindu Valley: one of the world’s oldest writing systems still resists the efforts of scholars‖, in Unesco Courier, nº 26 (12), pp. 28-30. FÁBRI, C. L. (1934). ―Latest attempts to read the Hindu script: a summary‖, in Indian Culture, vol. I, pp. 51-6. FAISERVIS, Walter A., Jr. (1992). The Harappan Civilization and its writing: a model for the decipherment of the Hindu script. New Delhi. _______ (1983). ―The script of the Hindu Valley Civilization‖, in Scientific American, Nº 248 (3), pp. 44-52. _______ (1981). ―Harappan Civilization according to its writing‖, in SAA, pp. 154-61. GEL, Ignace J. (1975). ―Methods of decipherment‖, in JRAS, nº 2, pp. 95-104. HORNUNG, B. W. (1964). Considérations sur le probléme de la formation de l’unité linguistique indoeuropéenne: composants ―protoindoeuropéens‖ ou absirtion substrats?. Moscou: Naouka. JHA, Natwar; RAJARAM, N. S. (2000). The Deciphered Hindu Script. Methodology, readings, interpretations. New Delhi: Aditya Prakashan. 150

JOSEPH, P. (1970). ―Harappa script decipherment: Fr. Heras and his sucesors‖, in JTS 2 (I), vol. III, p. 34. KAK, Subhash C. (1987). ―The study of the Hindu script: general considerations‖, in Cryptologia, vol. II (3), pp. 182-91. KENOYER, J. M.; MEADOW, R. H. (2006). ―The Early Hindu Script at Harappa: Origins and Development, in Intercultural Relations between South and Southwest Asia. Studies‖, in Commemoration of E.C. L. During-Caspers (19341996). BAR International Series: E. Olijdam and R. H. Spoor. _______ (2005). The Origin, Context and Function of the Hindu Script: Recent Insights from Harappa. in Ethnogenesis of South and Central Asia, Proceedings of the Pre-Symposium of RIHN and the 7th ESCA Harvard-Kyoto Roundtable, 6 - 8 June. T. Osada and Noriko Hase. Kyoto: RIHN, pp. 9-27. KOSKENNIEMI, Kimmo; PARPOLA, Asko (1970). Corpus of texts in the Hindu script, Department of Asian and African Studies. University of Helsinki, Research Reports, I. Helsinki. KOSKENNIEMI, Seppo; PARPOLA, Asko; PARPOLA, Simo (1982). Hindu script deciphered. New Delhi: Agam Kala Prakashan. _______ (1973). Materials for the study of the Hindu script, I: A concordance to the Hindu inscriptions (AASF B 185), Helsinki. _______ (1970). ―A method to classify characters of unknown ancient scripts‖, in Linguistics, nº 61, 65-91. KRISHNA RAO, M. V. N. (1969, 30 March). The Hindu script. Krishna Rao’s solution. Hindustan Times Weekly Review. SARUP, Lakshman (1998). das. . New Delhi: Motilal Banarsi-

SAWYER, John F. A. (1999). Sacred languages and sacred texts. London: Routledge. LAL, B. B. (1979). ―On the most frequently used symbol in the Hindu script‖, in EW NS 29 (I-4), pp. 27-35. _______ (1975). ―The Hindu script: some observations based on archaeology‖, in JRAS, pp. 145-9. _______ (1973). ―Has the Hindu script been deciphered? An assessment of two recent claims‖, in 29th International Congress of Orientalists. Paris. _______ (1969, 6 April). A further note on the direction of writing in the Harappan script: inconsistencies in claims of decipherment, in Hindustan Times Weekly Review, p. 14. 151

_______ (1966). ―The direction of writing in the Harappan script‖, in Antiquity, nº 40 (157), pp. 52-5. MACDONELL, Arthur A. (1987). A Vedic Grammar for Students. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. _______ (1987). A Vedic Reader for Students. Madras: Oxford University Press. _______ (1982). A Sanskrit Grammar for Students. Oxford: Oxford University Press. MAHADEVAN, Iravatham (1979). ―Study of the Hindu Script through Bi-lingual Parallels, Ancient Cities of the Hindu‖, in Gregory L. Possehl. Vikas Publishing House, pp. 261-267. MASICA, Colin P. (1991). The Indo-Aryan Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. MENNINGER, Karl (1992). Number Words and Number Symbols. A Cultural History of Numbers. New York: Dover Publications. MITCHINER, John E. (1978). Studies in The Hindu Valley Inscriptions. New Delhi: Oxford & IBH Publishing. MÜLLER, F. Max, trad. (1988). Vedic Hymns, in The Sacred Books of the East, vols. 3246. New Delhi: Motilal Banarasidas. PARPOLA, Asko (1994). Deciphering the Hindu Script. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. _______ (1990). ―Bangles, Sacred Trees and Fertility. Interpretations in Hindu script relating to the cult of Skanda-Kumarā‖, in South Asian Archaeology (1987), Part I. Rome: Instituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente. _______ (1989). Astral Proper Names in India. An analysis of the oldest sources, with argumentation for an ultimately Harappan origin, in The Adyar Library Bulletin, vol. 52. _______ (1988). ―Religion reflected in the iconic signs of the Hindu script: penetrating into long-forgotten picto+graphic messages‖, in Visible Religion, vol. VI. Leiden. _______ (1988). ―The coming of the Aryans to Iran and India and the cultural and ethnic identity of the Dāsas‖, in Studia Orientalia, vol. 64. Helsinki. _______ (1986). ―The Hindu script: a challenging puzzle‖, in World Archaeology, vol. 17, n° 3, February.

152

_______ (1970). The Hindu Script Decipherment. The Situation at the End of 1960. Madras: The Scandinavian Institute of Asian Studies. PARPOLA, A.; JOSHI, J. P.; SHAH, S. G. M., et al. (1989). ―Corpus of Hindu Seals and Inscriptions‖, vols. I-II, in Annales Academiæ Scientiarum Fennicæ. Helsinki. POSSEHL, Gregory L. (1996). Hindu Age. The Writing System. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. QUINTANA VIVES, Jorge (1946). Aportaciones a la interpretación de la escritura proto-india. Madrid-Barcelona: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas – Instituto Arias Montano. RENFREW, Colin (1990). Arqueología y Lenguaje. Barcelona: Editorial Crítica. SURYAKANTA (1981). A practical Vedic Dictionary. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. TURNER, R. L., et al. (1971). A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London, Oxford University Press. VILLAR, Francisco (1981). Dativo y locativo en el singular de la flexión nominal indoeuropea. Salamanca: Salamanca Universidad. _______ (1972). Lenguas y Pueblos Indo-Europeus. Madrid: Istmo. WANZKE, H. (1984). ―Geodetic concepts in archaeology as applied to Mohenjo-Daro‖, in G. Urban and M. Jansen, The Architecture of Mohenjo-Daro. WILLIAMS, M. A. Monier (1993). Sanskrit-English Dictionary. New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. _______ (1992). A Dictionary English and Sanskrit. New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidas Publishers. _______ (1875). Indian Wisdom or Examples of the Religious, Philosophical, and Ethical Doctrines of the Hindu. London: Wm. H. Allen & Co.

153

154

CONTENTS
Foreword. Introduction. I. - LANGUAGE AND DIALECT. 1.Dialect ( or ) and jargon (paiśāca). 2.Dialect (bhāsā) or jargon (paiśāca)? 3. Divine inspiration (śruti) and memory ( ). 4.Arcaic (ārśam) versus demonic ( ). II. - TRANSLITERATION. III. - CONCEPTS AND RULES. 1. IDEOPICTOGRAPHIC PRINCIPLE. 1.1. Basic Ideopictogram (BI). 1.2. Ideopictographic Compound (IC). 1.3.Sintactic Agglutinant Formation (SAF). 1.4. Ideopictographic Formative Composition (IFC). 1.5. Ideopictographic Noun Composition (INC). 2. DECLENSION. 2.1. Nouns and Adjectives. 2.2. Number: singular, dual and plural. 2.3. Cases. 3. CARDINALS. 4. VERB. 5. BASIC IDEOPICTOGRAM. 5.1. Ideopictographic Formation (IF). 5.2. Homologue Ideopictograms (HI). 5.3. Ideopictographic Groups (IG). 5.4. Morph graphisms. 5.4.1. Morph grams (Mf). 5.4.2. Noun Compounds (NC). 5.4.3. Ideopictografic Compounds (IC). IV. - TABLES. DICTIONARY. 1. Digits. 2. Architecture. 3. Mountain – Meru. 4. Stars and Sidereal Movements. 5. Divinities / Man and Parts of the Body. 6. Animals and Parts of the Body. 7. Plants, Trees and Seasons of the Year. TRANSLITERATION AND TRANSLATION. 5 7 13 17 20 22 26 27 28

29 30. 30 32 35 36 37 38 40 50 54 60 61 63 65 66

155

156

ÍNDICE
Prefácio. Introdução. I. - LÍNGUA E DIALECTO. 1.1.Dialecto ( ou ) e jargão (paiśāca). 1.2.Dialeto (bhāsā) ou jargão (paiśāca)? 1.3. Inspiração divina (śruti) e memória ( ). 1.4.Arcaico (ārśam) versus demoníaco ( ). II. - TRANSLITERAÇÃO III. - CONCEITOS E REGRAS. 1. PRINCÍPIO IDEOPICTOGRÁFICO. 1.1. Ideopictograma base (IB). 1.2. Composto Ideopictográfico (CI). 1.3. Formação Sintáctica Aglutinante (FSA). 1.4. Composição Formativa Ideopictográfica (CFI). 1.5. Composição Nominal Ideopictográfica (CNI). 2. DECLINAÇÃO. 2.1.Substantivos e Adjectivos. 2.2. Número: singular, dual e plural. 2.3. Casos. 3. CARDINAIS. 4. VERBO. 5. IDEOPICTOGRAMA BASE. 5.1. Formação Ideopictográfica (FI). 5.2. Ideopictogramas Homólogos (IH). 5.3. Grupos Ideopictográficos (GI). 5.4. Morfografismos. 5.4.1. Morfogramas (Mf). 5.4.2. Compostos Nominais (CN). 5.4.3. Compostos Ideopictográficos (CI). IV. - TÁBUAS. DICIONÁRIO. 1. Dígitos. 2. Arquitectura. 3. Montanha - Meru. 4. Astros e Movimentos Siderais. 5. Divindades / Homem e Partes do Corpo. 6. Animais e Partes do Corpo. 7. Plantas, Árvores e Estações do Ano. TRANLITERAÇÃO E TRADUÇÃO. BIBLIOGRAFIA 75 79 87 91 94 96 102

101 102 103 103 104 105 106 109 111 112 115 125 129 135 137 138 140 142 145

157

158

159

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer: Get 4 months of Scribd and The New York Times for just $1.87 per week!

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times